b15b7110d266aa012727ef712aef70ed07e646ec
[kopensolaris-gnu/glibc.git] / PROJECTS
1 Open jobs for finishing GNU libc:
2 ---------------------------------
3 Status: February 2001
4
5 If you have time and talent to take over any of the jobs below please
6 contact <bug-glibc@gnu.org>.
7
8 ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
9 \f
10 [ 1] Port to new platforms or test current version on formerly supported
11      platforms.
12
13 **** See http://www.gnu.org/software/libc/porting.html for more details.
14
15
16 [ 2] Test compliance with standards.  If you have access to recent
17      standards (IEEE, ISO, ANSI, X/Open, ...) and/or test suites you
18      could do some checks as the goal is to be compliant with all
19      standards if they do not contradict each other.
20
21
22 [ 3] The IMHO opinion most important task is to write a more complete
23      test suite.  We cannot get too many people working on this.  It is
24      not difficult to write a test, find a definition of the function
25      which I normally can provide, if necessary, and start writing tests
26      to test for compliance.  Beside this, take a look at the sources
27      and write tests which in total test as many paths of execution as
28      possible.
29
30
31 [ 4] Write translations for the GNU libc message for the so far
32      unsupported languages.  GNU libc is fully internationalized and
33      users can immediately benefit from this.
34
35      Take a look at the matrix in
36         ftp://ftp.gnu.org/pub/gnu/ABOUT-NLS
37      for the current status (of course better use a mirror of ftp.gnu.org).
38
39
40 [ 6] Write `long double' versions of the math functions.  This should be
41      done in collaboration with the NetBSD and FreeBSD people.
42
43      The libm is in fact fdlibm (not the same as in Linux libc 5).
44
45 **** Partly done.  But we need someone with numerical experiences for
46      the rest.
47
48
49 [ 7] Several math functions have to be written:
50
51      - exp2
52
53      with long double arguments.
54
55      Beside this most of the complex math functions which are new in
56      ISO C99 should be improved.  Writing some of them in assembler is
57      useful to exploit the parallelism which often is available.
58
59
60 [ 8] If you enjoy assembler programming (as I do --drepper :-) you might
61      be interested in writing optimized versions for some functions.
62      Especially the string handling functions can be optimized a lot.
63
64      Take a look at
65
66         Faster String Functions
67         Henry Spencer, University of Toronto
68         Usenix Winter '92, pp. 419--428
69
70      or just ask.  Currently mostly i?86 and Alpha optimized versions
71      exist.  Please ask before working on this to avoid duplicate
72      work.
73
74
75 [10] Extend regex and/or rx to work with wide characters and complete
76      implementation of character class and collation class handling.
77
78      It is planned to do a complete rewrite.
79
80 ***  We have now multibyte character support.  But a rewrite is still
81      necessary.
82
83
84 [11] Write access function for netmasks, bootparams, and automount
85      databases for nss_files and nss_db module.
86      The functions should be embedded in the nss scheme.  This is not
87      hard and not all services must be supported at once.
88
89
90 [15] Cleaning up the header files.  Ideally, each header style should
91      follow the "good examples".  Each variable and function should have
92      a short description of the function and its parameters.  The prototypes
93      should always contain variable names which can help to identify their
94      meaning; better than
95
96                 int foo (int, int, int, int);
97
98      Blargh!
99
100 ***  The conformtest.pl tool helps cleaning the namespace.  As far as
101      known the prototypes all contain parameter names.  But maybe some
102      comments can be improved.
103
104
105 [16] The libio stream file functions should be extended in a way to use
106      mmap to map the file and use it as the buffer to user sees.  For
107      read-only streams this should be rather easy and it avoids all read()
108      calls.
109
110      A more sophisticated solution would use mmap also for writing.  The
111      standards do not demand that the file on the disk is always in the
112      correct form so it would be possible to enlarge it always according
113      to the page size and install the correct length only for fclose() and
114      fflush() calls.
115
116
117 [18] Based on the sprof program we need tools to analyze the output.  The
118      result should be a link map which specifies in which order the .o
119      files are placed in the shared object.  This should help to improve
120      code locality and result in a smaller foorprint (in code and data
121      memory) since less pages are only used in small parts.
122
123
124 [19] A user-level STREAMS implementation should be available if the
125      kernel does not provide the support.
126
127
128 [20] More conversion modules for iconv(3).  Existing modules should be
129      extended to do things like transliteration if this is wanted.
130      For often used conversion a direct conversion function should be
131      available.
132
133
134 [21] The nscd program and the stubs in the libc should be changed so
135      that each program uses only one socket connect.  Take a look at
136         http://www.cygnus.com/~drepper/nscd.html
137
138      An alternative approach is to use an mmap()ed file.  The idea is
139      the following:
140      - the nscd creates the hash tables and the information it stores
141        in it in a mmap()ed region.  This means no pointers must be
142        used, only offsets.
143      OR
144        if POSIX shared memory is available use a named shared memory
145        region to put the data is
146      - each program using NSS functionality tries to open the file
147        with the data.
148      - by checking some timestamp (which the nscd renew frequently)
149        the programs can test whether the file is still valid
150      - if the file is valid look through the nscd and locate the
151        appropriate hash table for the database and lookup the data.
152        If it is included we are set.
153      - if the data is not yet in the database we contact the nscd using
154        the currently implemented methods.
155
156
157 [22] It should be possible to have the information gconv-modules in
158      a simple database which is faster to access.  Using libdb is probably
159      overkill and loading it would probably be slower than reading the
160      plain text file.  But a file format with a simple hash table and
161      some data it points to should be fine.  Probably it should be
162      two tables, one for the aliases, one for the mappings.  The code
163      should start similar to this:
164
165         if (stat ("gconv-modules", &stp) == 0
166             && stat ("gconv-modules.db", &std) == 0
167             && stp.st_mtime < std.st_mtime)
168           {
169             ... use the database ...
170           {
171         else
172           {
173             ... use the plain file if it exists, otherwise the db ...
174           }
175
176
177 [23] The `strptime' function needs to be completed.  This includes among
178      other things that it must get teached about timezones.  The solution
179      envisioned is to extract the timezones from the ADO timezone
180      specifications.  Special care must be given names which are used
181      multiple times.  Here the precedence should (probably) be according
182      to the geograhical distance.  E.g., the timezone EST should be
183      treated as the `Eastern Australia Time' instead of the US `Eastern
184      Standard Time' if the current TZ variable is set to, say,
185      Australia/Canberra or if the current locale is en_AU.
186
187
188 [25] Sun's nscd version implements a feature where the nscd keeps N entries
189      for each database current.  I.e., if an entries lifespan is over and
190      it is one of the N entries to be kept the nscd updates the information
191      instead of removing the entry.
192
193      How to decide about which N entries to keep has to be examined.
194      Factors should be number of uses (of course), influenced by aging.
195      Just imagine a computer used by several people.  The IDs of the current
196      user should be preferred even if the last user spent more time.
197
198
199 [26] ...done