Use _CALL_DL_FCT to call function from dynamically loaded object.
[kopensolaris-gnu/glibc.git] / login / README.utmpd
1 With the introduction of version 2 of the GNU C Library the format of
2 the UTMP and WTMP files changed for some configurations (see Q&A `Why
3 does getlogin() always return NULL on my Linux box?' of the FAQ).
4 This version of the GNU C Library contains a solution for the problems
5 this may cause, by providing an UTMP daemon `utmpd'.
6
7 Do I need it?
8 =============
9
10 If your configuration is one of the following:
11
12                 i[3456]86-*-linux-gnu    Linux-2.0 on Intel
13                 m68k-*-linux-gnu         Linux-2.0 on Motorola 680x0
14
15 you might need it, so please read on.  If it is not, please read the
16 section titled `Programming' at the end of this text.
17
18 In principle, you only need the daemon if you want to keep using old
19 programs linked against the previous version of the Linux C Library
20 (libc5).  In addition you will need the daemon if you are running
21 Linux on Intel, and you are planning to use iBCS (Intel Binary
22 Compatibility Standard).  If you have no libc5 programs left on your
23 system and you are not using iBCS, it is probably better not to
24 install the daemon since it uses (a small amount of) memory and CPU
25 time.  But apart from that it shouldn't hurt to install `utmpd', so
26 when in doubt install it anyway.
27
28
29 Installation
30 ============
31
32 The installation process (`make install') already places the `utmpd'
33 binary in $(sbindir).  The only thing you have to do is modifying your
34 startup scripts to start the daemon.  Unfortunately this is a bit of a
35 hassle, since the layout of these scripts is not standardized.  You
36 should try to find the command that creates the file `/var/run/utmp'.
37 This is usually done in a script named `/etc/rc', `/etc/init.d/boot'
38 (Debian) or `/etc/rc.d/rc.S' (Slackware).  You could try:
39
40      grep utmp /etc/* /etc/init.d/* /etc/rc.d/*
41
42 to find the right script.  The creation of `/var/run/utmp' is usually
43 done with a command like:
44
45      : > /var/run/utmp
46
47 or
48
49      cat /dev/null > /var/run/utmp
50
51 Now add a line before this command to create the file `/var/run/utmpx'
52 e.g.
53
54      : > /var/run/utmpx
55
56 or
57
58      cat /dev/null > /var/run/utmpx
59
60 whatever you prefer, and after this command, add a line to start the
61 daemon
62
63      utmpd
64
65 The entire fragment could look something like
66
67      # Clean up /var/run and create /var/run/utmp so that we can login.
68      ( cd /var/run && find . ! -type d -exec rm -f -- {} \; )
69      : > /var/run/utmpx
70      : > /var/run/utmp
71      utmpd
72
73 If the file `/var/log/wtmp' exists on your system, you will probably
74 want to create the file `/var/log/wtmpx'.  Programs linked against the
75 GNU C Library will now write to `/var/log/wtmpx', while programs
76 linked against the old library will continue to write to
77 `/var/log/wtmp'.  Of course this means that the information gets
78 spread over two files.  We hope to provide a better solution in the
79 future.
80
81 After a reboot, user accounting should be working again.  If not,
82 please refer to the section titled `Troubleshooting' below before
83 submitting a bug report.
84
85
86 What is `utmpd' doing?
87 ======================
88
89 After installation there will be two files that store the user
90 accounting information: `/var/run/utmp' and `/var/run/utmpx'.  The
91 file `/var/run/utmp' will be in the old format so libc5 programs will
92 continue to work (even if they are broken and do not use the library
93 functions to access the user accounting database).  And on Intel, you
94 can safely link `/var/run/utmp' to `/etc/utmp' for iBCS programs.
95 Programs linked against the new GNU C Library (glibc2) will contact
96 the daemon for all user accounting database access.  The daemon will
97 store its information in `/var/run/utmpx' and keeps this file in sync
98 with `/var/run/utmp'.  Entries added to `/var/run/utmpx' will be
99 converted to the old format and will be added to `/var/run/utmp' and
100 vice versa.  This way both libc5 and glibc2 see the same information
101 in the same fields of `struct utmp'. Of course libc5 programs see only
102 part of the information that glibc2 programs see because not all
103 members of the glibc2 `struct utmp' are present in the libc5 `struct
104 utmp'.  For the same reason libc5 will see a truncated version of
105 those fields where the length of the glibc2 field is larger than the
106 corresponding libc5 field (ut_user, ut_line, ut_host).
107
108
109 Troubleshooting
110 ===============
111
112 If user accounting is not working on your system, e.g. programs like
113 `who' or `logname' return rubbish, or you cannot login, make
114 sure that:
115
116 *  The file `/var/run/utmpx' exists.
117
118 *  The file `/var/log/wtmpx' exists.
119
120 *  No program linked against the GNU C Library (libc6) is accessing
121    `/var/run/utmp' directly (see the section on `Programming' below).
122
123 If that does not solve your problems, please use the `glibcbug' script
124 to report the problem to <bugs@gnu.org>.
125
126 The `utmpd' daemon uses `syslogd' to report problems.  It uses the
127 `daemon' facility and `warning' and `error' levels.  Alternatively you
128 could use the following option to ease debugging:
129
130 `--debug'
131     Use this option if you want the daemon to output its warnings and
132     error messages to the terminal instead of sending them to the
133     system logger (`syslogd').  When using this option the daemon does
134     not auto-background itself.
135
136 To use this option you should first kill the daemon that is already
137 running, and start a fresh one with the desired option:
138
139     kill `cat /var/run/utmpd.pid`
140     utmpd --debug
141
142 Please include any warnings or error messages from `utmpd' in your
143 bug reports.
144
145
146 Programming
147 ===========
148
149 In order for the `utmpd' approach to work it is essential that NO
150 program EVER accesses the UTMP and WTMP files directly.  Instead, a
151 program should use ONLY the available library functions:
152
153      * utmpname()       Select the database used (UTMP, WTMP, ...).
154      * setutent()       Open the database.
155      * getutent()       Read the next entry from the database.
156      * getutid()        Search for the next entry with a specific ID.
157      * getutline()      Search for the next entry for a specific line.
158      * pututline()      Write an entry to the database.
159      * endutent()       Close the database.
160      * updwtmp()        Add an entry to a database (WTMP, ...).
161
162 For details, please refer to `The GNU C Library Reference Manual',
163 which also contains information about some additional functions
164 derived from BSD and XPG that may be of interest.  The command
165
166     info libc "User Accounting Database"
167
168 should point you at the right location.
169
170 If you encounter a program that reads from or, even worse, writes to
171 the UTMP and WTMP files directly, please report this as a bug to the
172 author of that program.  Note that the files referred to by the macros
173 `_PATH_UTMP' and `_PATH_WTMP' might even disappear in the future, so
174 please do not use these, except in a call to `utmpname()' or
175 `updwtmp()', not even to check their existence.