(i[34]86sol2): New abbrev for i[34]86-unknown-solaris2.
[kopensolaris-gnu/glibc.git] / manual / job.texi
1 @node Job Control, Users and Groups, Child Processes, Top
2 @chapter Job Control
3
4 @cindex process groups
5 @cindex job control
6 @cindex job
7 @cindex session
8 @dfn{Job control} refers to the protocol for allowing a user to move
9 between multiple @dfn{process groups} (or @dfn{jobs}) within a single
10 @dfn{login session}.  The job control facilities are set up so that
11 appropriate behavior for most programs happens automatically and they
12 need not do anything special about job control.  So you can probably
13 ignore the material in this chapter unless you are writing a shell or
14 login program.
15
16 You need to be familiar with concepts relating to process creation
17 (@pxref{Process Creation Concepts}) and signal handling (@pxref{Signal
18 Handling}) in order to understand this material presented in this
19 chapter.
20
21 @menu
22 * Concepts of Job Control::     Jobs can be controlled by a shell.
23 * Job Control is Optional::     Not all POSIX systems support job control.
24 * Controlling Terminal::        How a process gets its controlling terminal.
25 * Access to the Terminal::      How processes share the controlling terminal.
26 * Orphaned Process Groups::     Jobs left after the user logs out.
27 * Implementing a Shell::        What a shell must do to implement job control.
28 * Functions for Job Control::   Functions to control process groups.
29 @end menu
30
31 @node Concepts of Job Control, Job Control is Optional,  , Job Control
32 @section Concepts of Job Control
33
34 @cindex shell
35 The fundamental purpose of an interactive shell is to read
36 commands from the user's terminal and create processes to execute the
37 programs specified by those commands.  It can do this using the
38 @code{fork} (@pxref{Creating a Process}) and @code{exec}
39 (@pxref{Executing a File}) functions.
40
41 A single command may run just one process---but often one command uses
42 several processes.  If you use the @samp{|} operator in a shell command,
43 you explicitly request several programs in their own processes.  But
44 even if you run just one program, it can use multiple processes
45 internally.  For example, a single compilation command such as @samp{cc
46 -c foo.c} typically uses four processes (though normally only two at any
47 given time).  If you run @code{make}, its job is to run other programs
48 in separate processes.
49
50 The processes belonging to a single command are called a @dfn{process
51 group} or @dfn{job}.  This is so that you can operate on all of them at
52 once.  For example, typing @kbd{C-c} sends the signal @code{SIGINT} to
53 terminate all the processes in the foreground process group.
54
55 @cindex session
56 A @dfn{session} is a larger group of processes.  Normally all the
57 proccesses that stem from a single login belong to the same session.
58
59 Every process belongs to a process group.  When a process is created, it
60 becomes a member of the same process group and session as its parent
61 process.  You can put it in another process group using the
62 @code{setpgid} function, provided the process group belongs to the same
63 session.
64
65 @cindex session leader
66 The only way to put a process in a different session is to make it the
67 initial process of a new session, or a @dfn{session leader}, using the
68 @code{setsid} function.  This also puts the session leader into a new
69 process group, and you can't move it out of that process group again.
70
71 Usually, new sessions are created by the system login program, and the
72 session leader is the process running the user's login shell.
73
74 @cindex controlling terminal
75 A shell that supports job control must arrange to control which job can
76 use the terminal at any time.  Otherwise there might be multiple jobs
77 trying to read from the terminal at once, and confusion about which
78 process should receive the input typed by the user.  To prevent this,
79 the shell must cooperate with the terminal driver using the protocol
80 described in this chapter.
81
82 @cindex foreground job
83 @cindex background job
84 The shell can give unlimited access to the controlling terminal to only
85 one process group at a time.  This is called the @dfn{foreground job} on
86 that controlling terminal.  Other process groups managed by the shell
87 that are executing without such access to the terminal are called
88 @dfn{background jobs}.
89
90 @cindex stopped job
91 If a background job needs to read from or write to its controlling
92 terminal, it is @dfn{stopped} by the terminal driver.  The user can stop
93 a foreground job by typing the SUSP character (@pxref{Special
94 Characters}) and a program can stop any job by sending it a
95 @code{SIGSTOP} signal.  It's the responsibility of the shell to notice
96 when jobs stop, to notify the user about them, and to provide mechanisms
97 for allowing the user to interactively continue stopped jobs and switch
98 jobs between foreground and background.
99
100 @xref{Access to the Terminal}, for more information about I/O to the
101 controlling terminal,
102
103 @node Job Control is Optional, Controlling Terminal, Concepts of Job Control , Job Control
104 @section Job Control is Optional
105 @cindex job control is optional
106
107 Not all operating systems support job control.  The GNU system does
108 support job control, but if you are using the GNU library on some other
109 system, that system may not support job control itself.
110
111 You can use the @code{_POSIX_JOB_CONTROL} macro to test at compile-time
112 whether the system supports job control.  @xref{System Options}.
113
114 If job control is not supported, then there can be only one process
115 group per session, which behaves as if it were always in the foreground.
116 The functions for creating additional process groups simply fail with
117 the error code @code{ENOSYS}.
118
119 The macros naming the various job control signals (@pxref{Job Control
120 Signals}) are defined even if job control is not supported.  However,
121 the system never generates these signals, and attempts to send a job
122 control signal or examine or specify their actions report errors or do
123 nothing.
124
125
126 @node Controlling Terminal, Access to the Terminal, Job Control is Optional, Job Control
127 @section Controlling Terminal of a Process
128
129 One of the attributes of a process is its controlling terminal.  Child
130 processes created with @code{fork} inherit the controlling terminal from
131 their parent process.  In this way, all the processes in a session
132 inherit the controlling terminal from the session leader.  A session
133 leader that has control of a terminal is called the @dfn{controlling
134 process} of that terminal.
135
136 @cindex controlling process
137 You generally do not need to worry about the exact mechanism used to
138 allocate a controlling terminal to a session, since it is done for you
139 by the system when you log in.
140 @c ??? How does GNU system let a process get a ctl terminal.
141
142 An individual process disconnects from its controlling terminal when it
143 calls @code{setsid} to become the leader of a new session.
144 @xref{Process Group Functions}.
145
146 @c !!! explain how it gets a new one (by opening any terminal)
147 @c ??? How you get a controlling terminal is system-dependent.
148 @c We should document how this will work in the GNU system when it is decided.
149 @c What Unix does is not clean and I don't think GNU should use that.
150
151 @node Access to the Terminal, Orphaned Process Groups, Controlling Terminal, Job Control
152 @section Access to the Controlling Terminal
153 @cindex controlling terminal, access to
154
155 Processes in the foreground job of a controlling terminal have
156 unrestricted access to that terminal; background proesses do not.  This
157 section describes in more detail what happens when a process in a
158 background job tries to access its controlling terminal.
159
160 @cindex @code{SIGTTIN}, from background job
161 When a process in a background job tries to read from its controlling
162 terminal, the process group is usually sent a @code{SIGTTIN} signal.
163 This normally causes all of the processes in that group to stop (unless
164 they handle the signal and don't stop themselves).  However, if the
165 reading process is ignoring or blocking this signal, then @code{read}
166 fails with an @code{EIO} error instead.
167
168 @cindex @code{SIGTTOU}, from background job
169 Similarly, when a process in a background job tries to write to its
170 controlling terminal, the default behavior is to send a @code{SIGTTOU}
171 signal to the process group.  However, the behavior is modified by the
172 @code{TOSTOP} bit of the local modes flags (@pxref{Local Modes}).  If
173 this bit is not set (which is the default), then writing to the
174 controlling terminal is always permitted without sending a signal.
175 Writing is also permitted if the @code{SIGTTOU} signal is being ignored
176 or blocked by the writing process.
177
178 Most other terminal operations that a program can do are treated as
179 reading or as writing.  (The description of each operation should say
180 which.)
181
182 For more information about the primitive @code{read} and @code{write}
183 functions, see @ref{I/O Primitives}.
184
185
186 @node Orphaned Process Groups, Implementing a Shell, Access to the Terminal, Job Control
187 @section Orphaned Process Groups
188 @cindex orphaned process group
189
190 When a controlling process terminates, its terminal becomes free and a
191 new session can be established on it.  (In fact, another user could log
192 in on the terminal.)  This could cause a problem if any processes from
193 the old session are still trying to use that terminal.
194
195 To prevent problems, process groups that continue running even after the
196 session leader has terminated are marked as @dfn{orphaned process
197 groups}.  Processes in an orphaned process group cannot read from or
198 write to the controlling terminal.  Attempts to do so will fail with an
199 @code{EIO} error.
200
201 When a process group becomes an orphan, its processes are sent a
202 @code{SIGHUP} signal.  Ordinarily, this causes the processes to
203 terminate.  However, if a program ignores this signal or establishes a
204 handler for it (@pxref{Signal Handling}), it can continue running as in
205 the orphan process group even after its controlling process terminates;
206 but it still cannot access the terminal any more.
207
208 @node Implementing a Shell, Functions for Job Control, Orphaned Process Groups, Job Control
209 @section Implementing a Job Control Shell
210
211 This section describes what a shell must do to implement job control, by
212 presenting an extensive sample program to illustrate the concepts
213 involved.
214
215 @iftex
216 @itemize @bullet
217 @item 
218 @ref{Data Structures}, introduces the example and presents
219 its primary data structures.
220
221 @item
222 @ref{Initializing the Shell}, discusses actions which the shell must
223 perform to prepare for job control.
224
225 @item
226 @ref{Launching Jobs}, includes information about how to create jobs
227 to execute commands.
228
229 @item
230 @ref{Foreground and Background}, discusses what the shell should
231 do differently when launching a job in the foreground as opposed to
232 a background job.
233
234 @item
235 @ref{Stopped and Terminated Jobs}, discusses reporting of job status
236 back to the shell.
237
238 @item
239 @ref{Continuing Stopped Jobs}, tells you how to continue jobs that
240 have been stopped.
241
242 @item
243 @ref{Missing Pieces}, discusses other parts of the shell.
244 @end itemize
245 @end iftex
246
247 @menu
248 * Data Structures::             Introduction to the sample shell.
249 * Initializing the Shell::      What the shell must do to take
250                                  responsibility for job control.
251 * Launching Jobs::              Creating jobs to execute commands.
252 * Foreground and Background::   Putting a job in foreground of background.
253 * Stopped and Terminated Jobs::  Reporting job status.
254 * Continuing Stopped Jobs::     How to continue a stopped job in
255                                  the foreground or background.
256 * Missing Pieces::              Other parts of the shell.
257 @end menu
258
259 @node Data Structures, Initializing the Shell,  , Implementing a Shell
260 @subsection Data Structures for the Shell
261
262 All of the program examples included in this chapter are part of
263 a simple shell program.  This section presents data structures
264 and utility functions which are used throughout the example.
265
266 The sample shell deals mainly with two data structures.  The
267 @code{job} type contains information about a job, which is a
268 set of subprocesses linked together with pipes.  The @code{process} type
269 holds information about a single subprocess.  Here are the relevant
270 data structure declarations:
271
272 @example
273 @group
274 /* @r{A process is a single process.}  */
275 typedef struct process
276 @{
277   struct process *next;       /* @r{next process in pipeline} */
278   char **argv;                /* @r{for exec} */
279   pid_t pid;                  /* @r{process ID} */
280   char completed;             /* @r{true if process has completed} */
281   char stopped;               /* @r{true if process has stopped} */
282   int status;                 /* @r{reported status value} */
283 @} process;
284 @end group
285
286 @group
287 /* @r{A job is a pipeline of processes.}  */
288 typedef struct job
289 @{
290   struct job *next;           /* @r{next active job} */
291   char *command;              /* @r{command line, used for messages} */
292   process *first_process;     /* @r{list of processes in this job} */
293   pid_t pgid;                 /* @r{process group ID} */
294   char notified;              /* @r{true if user told about stopped job} */
295   struct termios tmodes;      /* @r{saved terminal modes} */
296   int stdin, stdout, stderr;  /* @r{standard i/o channels} */
297 @} job;
298
299 /* @r{The active jobs are linked into a list.  This is its head.}   */
300 job *first_job = NULL;
301 @end group
302 @end example
303
304 Here are some utility functions that are used for operating on @code{job}
305 objects.
306
307 @example
308 @group
309 /* @r{Find the active job with the indicated @var{pgid}.}  */
310 job *
311 find_job (pid_t pgid)
312 @{
313   job *j;
314   
315   for (j = first_job; j; j = j->next)
316     if (j->pgid == pgid)
317       return j;
318   return NULL;
319 @}
320 @end group
321
322 @group
323 /* @r{Return true if all processes in the job have stopped or completed.}  */
324 int
325 job_is_stopped (job *j)
326 @{
327   process *p;
328   
329   for (p = j->first_process; p; p = p->next)
330     if (!p->completed && !p->stopped)
331       return 0;
332   return 1;
333 @}
334 @end group
335
336 @group
337 /* @r{Return true if all processes in the job have completed.}  */
338 int
339 job_is_completed (job *j)
340 @{
341   process *p;
342   
343   for (p = j->first_process; p; p = p->next)
344     if (!p->completed)
345       return 0;
346   return 1;
347 @}
348 @end group
349 @end example
350
351
352 @node Initializing the Shell, Launching Jobs, Data Structures, Implementing a Shell
353 @subsection Initializing the Shell
354 @cindex job control, enabling
355 @cindex subshell
356
357 When a shell program that normally performs job control is started, it
358 has to be careful in case it has been invoked from another shell that is
359 already doing its own job control.  
360
361 A subshell that runs interactively has to ensure that it has been placed
362 in the foreground by its parent shell before it can enable job control
363 itself.  It does this by getting its initial process group ID with the
364 @code{getpgrp} function, and comparing it to the process group ID of the
365 current foreground job associated with its controlling terminal (which
366 can be retrieved using the @code{tcgetpgrp} function).
367
368 If the subshell is not running as a foreground job, it must stop itself
369 by sending a @code{SIGTTIN} signal to its own process group.  It may not
370 arbitrarily put itself into the foreground; it must wait for the user to
371 tell the parent shell to do this.  If the subshell is continued again,
372 it should repeat the check and stop itself again if it is still not in
373 the foreground.
374
375 @cindex job control, enabling
376 Once the subshell has been placed into the foreground by its parent
377 shell, it can enable its own job control.  It does this by calling
378 @code{setpgid} to put itself into its own process group, and then
379 calling @code{tcsetpgrp} to place this process group into the
380 foreground.
381
382 When a shell enables job control, it should set itself to ignore all the
383 job control stop signals so that it doesn't accidentally stop itself.
384 You can do this by setting the action for all the stop signals to
385 @code{SIG_IGN}.
386
387 A subshell that runs non-interactively cannot and should not support job
388 control.  It must leave all processes it creates in the same process
389 group as the shell itself; this allows the non-interactive shell and its
390 child processes to be treated as a single job by the parent shell.  This
391 is easy to do---just don't use any of the job control primitives---but
392 you must remember to make the shell do it.
393
394
395 Here is the initialization code for the sample shell that shows how to
396 do all of this.
397
398 @example
399 /* @r{Keep track of attributes of the shell.}  */
400
401 #include <sys/types.h>
402 #include <termios.h>
403 #include <unistd.h>
404
405 pid_t shell_pgid;
406 struct termios shell_tmodes;
407 int shell_terminal;
408 int shell_is_interactive;
409
410
411 /* @r{Make sure the shell is running interactively as the foreground job}
412    @r{before proceeding.} */
413
414 void
415 init_shell ()
416 @{
417   
418   /* @r{See if we are running interactively.}  */
419   shell_terminal = STDIN_FILENO;
420   shell_is_interactive = isatty (shell_terminal);
421
422   if (shell_is_interactive)
423     @{
424       /* @r{Loop until we are in the foreground.}  */
425       while (tcgetpgrp (shell_terminal) != (shell_pgid = getpgrp ()))
426         kill (- shell_pgid, SIGTTIN);
427
428       /* @r{Ignore interactive and job-control signals.}  */
429       signal (SIGINT, SIG_IGN);
430       signal (SIGQUIT, SIG_IGN);
431       signal (SIGTSTP, SIG_IGN);
432       signal (SIGTTIN, SIG_IGN);
433       signal (SIGTTOU, SIG_IGN);
434       signal (SIGCHLD, SIG_IGN);
435
436       /* @r{Put ourselves in our own process group.}  */
437       shell_pgid = getpid ();
438       if (setpgid (shell_pgid, shell_pgid) < 0)
439         @{
440           perror ("Couldn't put the shell in its own process group");
441           exit (1);
442         @}
443
444       /* @r{Grab control of the terminal.}  */
445       tcsetpgrp (shell_terminal, shell_pgid);
446
447       /* @r{Save default terminal attributes for shell.}  */
448       tcgetattr (shell_terminal, &shell_tmodes);
449     @}
450 @}
451 @end example
452
453
454 @node Launching Jobs, Foreground and Background, Initializing the Shell, Implementing a Shell
455 @subsection Launching Jobs
456 @cindex launching jobs
457
458 Once the shell has taken responsibility for performing job control on
459 its controlling terminal, it can launch jobs in response to commands
460 typed by the user.
461
462 To create the processes in a process group, you use the same @code{fork}
463 and @code{exec} functions described in @ref{Process Creation Concepts}.
464 Since there are multiple child processes involved, though, things are a
465 little more complicated and you must be careful to do things in the
466 right order.  Otherwise, nasty race conditions can result.
467
468 You have two choices for how to structure the tree of parent-child
469 relationships among the processes.  You can either make all the
470 processes in the process group be children of the shell process, or you
471 can make one process in group be the ancestor of all the other processes
472 in that group.  The sample shell program presented in this chapter uses
473 the first approach because it makes bookkeeping somewhat simpler.
474
475 @cindex process group leader
476 @cindex process group ID
477 As each process is forked, it should put itself in the new process group
478 by calling @code{setpgid}; see @ref{Process Group Functions}.  The first
479 process in the new group becomes its @dfn{process group leader}, and its
480 process ID becomes the @dfn{process group ID} for the group.
481
482 @cindex race conditions, relating to job control
483 The shell should also call @code{setpgid} to put each of its child
484 processes into the new process group.  This is because there is a
485 potential timing problem: each child process must be put in the process
486 group before it begins executing a new program, and the shell depends on
487 having all the child processes in the group before it continues
488 executing.  If both the child processes and the shell call
489 @code{setpgid}, this ensures that the right things happen no matter which
490 process gets to it first.
491
492 If the job is being launched as a foreground job, the new process group
493 also needs to be put into the foreground on the controlling terminal
494 using @code{tcsetpgrp}.  Again, this should be done by the shell as well
495 as by each of its child processes, to avoid race conditions.
496
497 The next thing each child process should do is to reset its signal
498 actions.
499
500 During initialization, the shell process set itself to ignore job
501 control signals; see @ref{Initializing the Shell}.  As a result, any child
502 processes it creates also ignore these signals by inheritance.  This is
503 definitely undesirable, so each child process should explicitly set the
504 actions for these signals back to @code{SIG_DFL} just after it is forked.
505
506 Since shells follow this convention, applications can assume that they
507 inherit the correct handling of these signals from the parent process.
508 But every application has a responsibility not to mess up the handling
509 of stop signals.  Applications that disable the normal interpretation of
510 the SUSP character should provide some other mechanism for the user to
511 stop the job.  When the user invokes this mechanism, the program should
512 send a @code{SIGTSTP} signal to the process group of the process, not
513 just to the process itself.  @xref{Signaling Another Process}.
514
515 Finally, each child process should call @code{exec} in the normal way.
516 This is also the point at which redirection of the standard input and 
517 output channels should be handled.  @xref{Duplicating Descriptors},
518 for an explanation of how to do this.
519
520 Here is the function from the sample shell program that is responsible
521 for launching a program.  The function is executed by each child process
522 immediately after it has been forked by the shell, and never returns.
523
524 @example
525 void
526 launch_process (process *p, pid_t pgid,
527                 int infile, int outfile, int errfile,
528                 int foreground)
529 @{
530   pid_t pid;
531
532   if (shell_is_interactive)
533     @{
534       /* @r{Put the process into the process group and give the process group}
535          @r{the terminal, if appropriate.}
536          @r{This has to be done both by the shell and in the individual}
537          @r{child processes because of potential race conditions.}  */
538       pid = getpid ();
539       if (pgid == 0) pgid = pid;
540       setpgid (pid, pgid);
541       if (foreground)
542         tcsetpgrp (shell_terminal, pgid);
543
544       /* @r{Set the handling for job control signals back to the default.}  */
545       signal (SIGINT, SIG_DFL);
546       signal (SIGQUIT, SIG_DFL);
547       signal (SIGTSTP, SIG_DFL);
548       signal (SIGTTIN, SIG_DFL);
549       signal (SIGTTOU, SIG_DFL);
550       signal (SIGCHLD, SIG_DFL);
551     @}
552
553   /* @r{Set the standard input/output channels of the new process.}  */
554   if (infile != STDIN_FILENO)
555     @{
556       dup2 (infile, STDIN_FILENO);
557       close (infile);
558     @}
559   if (outfile != STDOUT_FILENO)
560     @{
561       dup2 (outfile, STDOUT_FILENO);
562       close (outfile);
563     @}
564   if (errfile != STDERR_FILENO)
565     @{
566       dup2 (errfile, STDERR_FILENO);
567       close (errfile);
568     @}    
569   
570   /* @r{Exec the new process.  Make sure we exit.}  */ 
571   execvp (p->argv[0], p->argv);
572   perror ("execvp");
573   exit (1);
574 @}
575 @end example
576
577 If the shell is not running interactively, this function does not do
578 anything with process groups or signals.  Remember that a shell not
579 performing job control must keep all of its subprocesses in the same
580 process group as the shell itself.
581
582 Next, here is the function that actually launches a complete job.
583 After creating the child processes, this function calls some other
584 functions to put the newly created job into the foreground or background;
585 these are discussed in @ref{Foreground and Background}.
586
587 @example
588 void
589 launch_job (job *j, int foreground)
590 @{
591   process *p;
592   pid_t pid;
593   int mypipe[2], infile, outfile;
594   
595   infile = j->stdin;
596   for (p = j->first_process; p; p = p->next)
597     @{
598       /* @r{Set up pipes, if necessary.}  */
599       if (p->next)
600         @{
601           if (pipe (mypipe) < 0)
602             @{
603               perror ("pipe");
604               exit (1);
605             @}
606           outfile = mypipe[1];
607         @}
608       else
609         outfile = j->stdout;
610
611       /* @r{Fork the child processes.}  */
612       pid = fork ();
613       if (pid == 0)
614         /* @r{This is the child process.}  */
615         launch_process (p, j->pgid, infile, outfile, j->stderr, foreground);
616       else if (pid < 0)
617         @{
618           /* @r{The fork failed.}  */
619           perror ("fork");
620           exit (1);
621         @}
622       else
623         @{
624           /* @r{This is the parent process.}  */
625           p->pid = pid;
626           if (shell_is_interactive)
627             @{
628               if (!j->pgid)
629                 j->pgid = pid;
630               setpgid (pid, j->pgid);
631             @}
632         @}
633
634       /* @r{Clean up after pipes.}  */
635       if (infile != j->stdin)
636         close (infile);
637       if (outfile != j->stdout)
638         close (outfile);
639       infile = mypipe[0];
640     @}
641   
642   format_job_info (j, "launched");
643
644   if (!shell_is_interactive)
645     wait_for_job (j);
646   else if (foreground)
647     put_job_in_foreground (j, 0);
648   else
649     put_job_in_background (j, 0);
650 @}
651 @end example
652
653
654 @node Foreground and Background, Stopped and Terminated Jobs, Launching Jobs, Implementing a Shell
655 @subsection Foreground and Background
656
657 Now let's consider what actions must be taken by the shell when it
658 launches a job into the foreground, and how this differs from what
659 must be done when a background job is launched.
660
661 @cindex foreground job, launching
662 When a foreground job is launched, the shell must first give it access
663 to the controlling terminal by calling @code{tcsetpgrp}.  Then, the
664 shell should wait for processes in that process group to terminate or
665 stop.  This is discussed in more detail in @ref{Stopped and Terminated
666 Jobs}.
667
668 When all of the processes in the group have either completed or stopped,
669 the shell should regain control of the terminal for its own process
670 group by calling @code{tcsetpgrp} again.  Since stop signals caused by
671 I/O from a background process or a SUSP character typed by the user
672 are sent to the process group, normally all the processes in the job
673 stop together.
674
675 The foreground job may have left the terminal in a strange state, so the
676 shell should restore its own saved terminal modes before continuing.  In
677 case the job is merely been stopped, the shell should first save the
678 current terminal modes so that it can restore them later if the job is
679 continued.  The functions for dealing with terminal modes are
680 @code{tcgetattr} and @code{tcsetattr}; these are described in
681 @ref{Terminal Modes}.
682
683 Here is the sample shell's function for doing all of this.
684
685 @example
686 @group
687 /* @r{Put job J in the foreground.  If CONT is nonzero,}
688    @r{restore the saved terminal modes and send the process group a}
689    @r{@code{SIGCONT} signal to wake it up before we block.}  */
690
691 void
692 put_job_in_foreground (job *j, int cont)
693 @{
694   /* @r{Put the job into the foreground.}  */
695   tcsetpgrp (shell_terminal, j->pgid);
696 @end group
697
698 @group
699   /* @r{Send the job a continue signal, if necessary.}  */
700   if (cont)
701     @{
702       tcsetattr (shell_terminal, TCSADRAIN, &j->tmodes);
703       if (kill (- j->pgid, SIGCONT) < 0)
704         perror ("kill (SIGCONT)");
705     @}
706 @end group
707   
708   /* @r{Wait for it to report.}  */
709   wait_for_job (j);
710     
711   /* @r{Put the shell back in the foreground.}  */
712   tcsetpgrp (shell_terminal, shell_pgid);
713     
714 @group
715   /* @r{Restore the shell's terminal modes.}  */
716   tcgetattr (shell_terminal, &j->tmodes);
717   tcsetattr (shell_terminal, TCSADRAIN, &shell_tmodes);
718 @}
719 @end group
720 @end example
721
722 @cindex background job, launching
723 If the process group is launched as a background job, the shell should
724 remain in the foreground itself and continue to read commands from
725 the terminal.  
726
727 In the sample shell, there is not much that needs to be done to put
728 a job into the background.  Here is the function it uses:
729
730 @example
731 /* @r{Put a job in the background.  If the cont argument is true, send}
732    @r{the process group a @code{SIGCONT} signal to wake it up.}  */
733
734 void
735 put_job_in_background (job *j, int cont)
736 @{
737   /* @r{Send the job a continue signal, if necessary.}  */
738   if (cont)
739     if (kill (-j->pgid, SIGCONT) < 0)
740       perror ("kill (SIGCONT)");
741 @}
742 @end example
743
744
745 @node Stopped and Terminated Jobs, Continuing Stopped Jobs, Foreground and Background, Implementing a Shell
746 @subsection Stopped and Terminated Jobs
747
748 @cindex stopped jobs, detecting
749 @cindex terminated jobs, detecting
750 When a foreground process is launched, the shell must block until all of
751 the processes in that job have either terminated or stopped.  It can do
752 this by calling the @code{waitpid} function; see @ref{Process
753 Completion}.  Use the @code{WUNTRACED} option so that status is reported
754 for processes that stop as well as processes that terminate.
755
756 The shell must also check on the status of background jobs so that it
757 can report terminated and stopped jobs to the user; this can be done by
758 calling @code{waitpid} with the @code{WNOHANG} option.  A good place to
759 put a such a check for terminated and stopped jobs is just before
760 prompting for a new command.
761
762 @cindex @code{SIGCHLD}, handling of
763 The shell can also receive asynchronous notification that there is
764 status information available for a child process by establishing a
765 handler for @code{SIGCHLD} signals.  @xref{Signal Handling}.
766
767 In the sample shell program, the @code{SIGCHLD} signal is normally
768 ignored.  This is to avoid reentrancy problems involving the global data
769 structures the shell manipulates.  But at specific times when the shell
770 is not using these data structures---such as when it is waiting for
771 input on the terminal---it makes sense to enable a handler for
772 @code{SIGCHLD}.  The same function that is used to do the synchronous
773 status checks (@code{do_job_notification}, in this case) can also be
774 called from within this handler.
775
776 Here are the parts of the sample shell program that deal with checking
777 the status of jobs and reporting the information to the user.
778
779 @example
780 @group
781 /* @r{Store the status of the process PID that was returned by waitpid.}
782    @r{Return 0 if all went well, nonzero otherwise.}  */
783
784 int
785 mark_process_status (pid_t pid, int status)
786 @{
787   job *j;
788   process *p;
789 @end group
790
791 @group
792   if (pid > 0)
793     @{
794       /* @r{Update the record for the process.}  */
795       for (j = first_job; j; j = j->next)
796         for (p = j->first_process; p; p = p->next)
797           if (p->pid == pid)
798             @{
799               p->status = status;
800               if (WIFSTOPPED (status))
801                 p->stopped = 1;
802               else
803                 @{
804                   p->completed = 1;
805                   if (WIFSIGNALED (status))
806                     fprintf (stderr, "%d: Terminated by signal %d.\n",
807                              (int) pid, WTERMSIG (p->status));
808                 @}
809               return 0;
810              @}
811       fprintf (stderr, "No child process %d.\n", pid);
812       return -1;
813     @}
814 @end group
815 @group
816   else if (pid == 0 || errno == ECHILD)
817     /* @r{No processes ready to report.}  */
818     return -1;
819   else @{
820     /* @r{Other weird errors.}  */
821     perror ("waitpid");
822     return -1;
823   @}
824 @}
825 @end group
826
827 @group
828 /* @r{Check for processes that have status information available,}
829    @r{without blocking.}  */
830
831 void
832 update_status (void)
833 @{
834   int status;
835   pid_t pid;
836   
837   do
838     pid = waitpid (WAIT_ANY, &status, WUNTRACED|WNOHANG);
839   while (!mark_process_status (pid, status));
840 @}
841 @end group
842
843 @group
844 /* @r{Check for processes that have status information available,}
845    @r{blocking until all processes in the given job have reported.}  */
846
847 void
848 wait_for_job (job *j)
849 @{
850   int status;
851   pid_t pid;
852   
853   do
854     pid = waitpid (WAIT_ANY, &status, WUNTRACED);
855   while (!mark_process_status (pid, status) 
856          && !job_is_stopped (j) 
857          && !job_is_completed (j));
858 @}
859 @end group
860
861 @group
862 /* @r{Format information about job status for the user to look at.}  */
863
864 void
865 format_job_info (job *j, const char *status)
866 @{
867   fprintf (stderr, "%ld (%s): %s\n", (long)j->pgid, status, j->command);
868 @}
869 @end group
870
871 @group
872 /* @r{Notify the user about stopped or terminated jobs.}
873    @r{Delete terminated jobs from the active job list.}  */
874
875 void
876 do_job_notification (void)
877 @{
878   job *j, *jlast, *jnext;
879   process *p;
880
881   /* @r{Update status information for child processes.}  */
882   update_status ();
883   
884   jlast = NULL;
885   for (j = first_job; j; j = jnext)
886     @{
887       jnext = j->next;
888
889       /* @r{If all processes have completed, tell the user the job has}
890          @r{completed and delete it from the list of active jobs.}  */
891       if (job_is_completed (j)) @{
892         format_job_info (j, "completed");
893         if (jlast)
894           jlast->next = jnext;
895         else
896           first_job = jnext;
897         free_job (j);
898       @}
899
900       /* @r{Notify the user about stopped jobs,}
901          @r{marking them so that we won't do this more than once.}  */
902       else if (job_is_stopped (j) && !j->notified) @{
903         format_job_info (j, "stopped");
904         j->notified = 1;
905         jlast = j;
906       @}
907
908       /* @r{Don't say anything about jobs that are still running.}  */
909       else
910         jlast = j;
911     @}
912 @}
913 @end group
914 @end example
915
916 @node Continuing Stopped Jobs, Missing Pieces, Stopped and Terminated Jobs, Implementing a Shell
917 @subsection Continuing Stopped Jobs
918
919 @cindex stopped jobs, continuing
920 The shell can continue a stopped job by sending a @code{SIGCONT} signal
921 to its process group.  If the job is being continued in the foreground,
922 the shell should first invoke @code{tcsetpgrp} to give the job access to
923 the terminal, and restore the saved terminal settings.  After continuing
924 a job in the foreground, the shell should wait for the job to stop or
925 complete, as if the job had just been launched in the foreground.
926
927 The sample shell program uses the same set of
928 functions---@w{@code{put_job_in_foreground}} and
929 @w{@code{put_job_in_background}}---to handle both newly created and
930 continued jobs.  The definitions of these functions were given in
931 @ref{Foreground and Background}.  When continuing a stopped job, a
932 nonzero value is passed as the @var{cont} argument to ensure that the
933 @code{SIGCONT} signal is sent and the terminal modes reset, as
934 appropriate.
935
936 This leaves only a function for updating the shell's internal bookkeeping
937 about the job being continued:
938
939 @example
940 @group
941 /* @r{Mark a stopped job J as being running again.}  */
942
943 void
944 mark_job_as_running (job *j)
945 @{
946   Process *p;
947
948   for (p = j->first_process; p; p = p->next)
949     p->stopped = 0;
950   j->notified = 0;
951 @}
952 @end group
953
954 @group
955 /* @r{Continue the job J.}  */
956
957 void
958 continue_job (job *j, int foreground)
959 @{
960   mark_job_as_running (j);
961   if (foreground)
962     put_job_in_foreground (j, 1);
963   else
964     put_job_in_background (j, 1);
965 @}
966 @end group
967 @end example
968
969 @node Missing Pieces,  , Continuing Stopped Jobs, Implementing a Shell
970 @subsection The Missing Pieces
971
972 The code extracts for the sample shell included in this chapter are only
973 a part of the entire shell program.  In particular, nothing at all has
974 been said about how @code{job} and @code{program} data structures are
975 allocated and initialized.
976
977 Most real shells provide a complex user interface that has support for
978 a command language; variables; abbreviations, substitutions, and pattern
979 matching on file names; and the like.  All of this is far too complicated
980 to explain here!  Instead, we have concentrated on showing how to 
981 implement the core process creation and job control functions that can
982 be called from such a shell.
983
984 Here is a table summarizing the major entry points we have presented:
985
986 @table @code
987 @item void init_shell (void)
988 Initialize the shell's internal state.  @xref{Initializing the
989 Shell}.
990
991 @item void launch_job (job *@var{j}, int @var{foreground})
992 Launch the job @var{j} as either a foreground or background job.
993 @xref{Launching Jobs}.
994
995 @item void do_job_notification (void)
996 Check for and report any jobs that have terminated or stopped.  Can be
997 called synchronously or within a handler for @code{SIGCHLD} signals.
998 @xref{Stopped and Terminated Jobs}.
999
1000 @item void continue_job (job *@var{j}, int @var{foreground})
1001 Continue the job @var{j}.  @xref{Continuing Stopped Jobs}.
1002 @end table
1003
1004 Of course, a real shell would also want to provide other functions for
1005 managing jobs.  For example, it would be useful to have commands to list
1006 all active jobs or to send a signal (such as @code{SIGKILL}) to a job.
1007
1008
1009 @node Functions for Job Control,  , Implementing a Shell, Job Control
1010 @section Functions for Job Control
1011 @cindex process group functions
1012 @cindex job control functions
1013
1014 This section contains detailed descriptions of the functions relating
1015 to job control.
1016
1017 @menu
1018 * Identifying the Terminal::    Determining the controlling terminal's name.
1019 * Process Group Functions::     Functions for manipulating process groups.
1020 * Terminal Access Functions::   Functions for controlling terminal access.
1021 @end menu
1022
1023
1024 @node Identifying the Terminal, Process Group Functions,  , Functions for Job Control
1025 @subsection Identifying the Controlling Terminal
1026 @cindex controlling terminal, determining
1027
1028 You can use the @code{ctermid} function to get a file name that you can
1029 use to open the controlling terminal.  In the GNU library, it returns
1030 the same string all the time: @code{"/dev/tty"}.  That is a special
1031 ``magic'' file name that refers to the controlling terminal of the
1032 current process (if it has one).  The function @code{ctermid} is
1033 declared in the header file @file{stdio.h}.
1034 @pindex stdio.h
1035
1036 @comment stdio.h
1037 @comment POSIX.1
1038 @deftypefun {char *} ctermid (char *@var{string})
1039 The @code{ctermid} function returns a string containing the file name of
1040 the controlling terminal for the current process.  If @var{string} is
1041 not a null pointer, it should be an array that can hold at least
1042 @code{L_ctermid} characters; the string is returned in this array.
1043 Otherwise, a pointer to a string in a static area is returned, which
1044 might get overwritten on subsequent calls to this function.
1045
1046 An empty string is returned if the file name cannot be determined for
1047 any reason.  Even if a file name is returned, access to the file it
1048 represents is not guaranteed.
1049 @end deftypefun
1050
1051 @comment stdio.h
1052 @comment POSIX.1
1053 @deftypevr Macro int L_ctermid
1054 The value of this macro is an integer constant expression that
1055 represents the size of a string large enough to hold the file name
1056 returned by @code{ctermid}.
1057 @end deftypevr
1058
1059 See also the @code{isatty} and @code{ttyname} functions, in 
1060 @ref{Is It a Terminal}.
1061
1062
1063 @node Process Group Functions, Terminal Access Functions, Identifying the Terminal, Functions for Job Control
1064 @subsection Process Group Functions
1065
1066 Here are descriptions of the functions for manipulating process groups.
1067 Your program should include the header files @file{sys/types.h} and
1068 @file{unistd.h} to use these functions.
1069 @pindex unistd.h
1070 @pindex sys/types.h
1071
1072 @comment unistd.h
1073 @comment POSIX.1
1074 @deftypefun pid_t setsid (void)
1075 The @code{setsid} function creates a new session.  The calling process
1076 becomes the session leader, and is put in a new process group whose
1077 process group ID is the same as the process ID of that process.  There
1078 are initially no other processes in the new process group, and no other
1079 process groups in the new session.
1080
1081 This function also makes the calling process have no controlling terminal.
1082
1083 The @code{setsid} function returns the new process group ID of the
1084 calling process if successful.  A return value of @code{-1} indicates an
1085 error.  The following @code{errno} error conditions are defined for this
1086 function:
1087
1088 @table @code
1089 @item EPERM
1090 The calling process is already a process group leader, or there is
1091 already another process group around that has the same process group ID.
1092 @end table
1093 @end deftypefun
1094
1095 The @code{getpgrp} function has two definitions: one derived from BSD
1096 Unix, and one from the POSIX.1 standard.  The feature test macros you
1097 have selected (@pxref{Feature Test Macros}) determine which definition
1098 you get.  Specifically, you get the BSD version if you define
1099 @code{_BSD_SOURCE}; otherwise, you get the POSIX version if you define
1100 @code{_POSIX_SOURCE} or @code{_GNU_SOURCE}.  Programs written for old
1101 BSD systems will not include @file{unistd.h}, which defines
1102 @code{getpgrp} specially under @code{_BSD_SOURCE}.  You must link such
1103 programs with the @code{-lbsd-compat} option to get the BSD definition.@refill
1104 @findex -lbsd-compat
1105 @findex bsd-compat
1106 @cindex BSD compatibility library
1107
1108 @comment unistd.h
1109 @comment POSIX.1
1110 @deftypefn {POSIX.1 Function} pid_t getpgrp (void)
1111 The POSIX.1 definition of @code{getpgrp} returns the process group ID of
1112 the calling process.
1113 @end deftypefn
1114
1115 @comment unistd.h
1116 @comment BSD
1117 @deftypefn {BSD Function} pid_t getpgrp (pid_t @var{pid})
1118 The BSD definition of @code{getpgrp} returns the process group ID of the
1119 process @var{pid}.  You can supply a value of @code{0} for the @var{pid}
1120 argument to get information about the calling process.
1121 @end deftypefn
1122
1123 @comment unistd.h
1124 @comment POSIX.1
1125 @deftypefun int setpgid (pid_t @var{pid}, pid_t @var{pgid})
1126 The @code{setpgid} function puts the process @var{pid} into the process
1127 group @var{pgid}.  As a special case, either @var{pid} or @var{pgid} can
1128 be zero to indicate the process ID of the calling process.
1129
1130 This function fails on a system that does not support job control.
1131 @xref{Job Control is Optional}, for more information.
1132
1133 If the operation is successful, @code{setpgid} returns zero.  Otherwise
1134 it returns @code{-1}.  The following @code{errno} error conditions are
1135 defined for this function:
1136
1137 @table @code
1138 @item EACCES
1139 The child process named by @var{pid} has executed an @code{exec}
1140 function since it was forked.
1141
1142 @item EINVAL
1143 The value of the @var{pgid} is not valid.
1144
1145 @item ENOSYS
1146 The system doesn't support job control.
1147
1148 @item EPERM
1149 The process indicated by the @var{pid} argument is a session leader,
1150 or is not in the same session as the calling process, or the value of
1151 the @var{pgid} argument doesn't match a process group ID in the same
1152 session as the calling process.
1153
1154 @item ESRCH
1155 The process indicated by the @var{pid} argument is not the calling
1156 process or a child of the calling process.
1157 @end table
1158 @end deftypefun
1159
1160 @comment unistd.h
1161 @comment BSD
1162 @deftypefun int setpgrp (pid_t @var{pid}, pid_t @var{pgid})
1163 This is the BSD Unix name for @code{setpgid}.  Both functions do exactly
1164 the same thing.
1165 @end deftypefun
1166
1167
1168 @node Terminal Access Functions,  , Process Group Functions, Functions for Job Control
1169 @subsection Functions for Controlling Terminal Access
1170
1171 These are the functions for reading or setting the foreground
1172 process group of a terminal.  You should include the header files
1173 @file{sys/types.h} and @file{unistd.h} in your application to use
1174 these functions.
1175 @pindex unistd.h
1176 @pindex sys/types.h
1177
1178 Although these functions take a file descriptor argument to specify
1179 the terminal device, the foreground job is associated with the terminal
1180 file itself and not a particular open file descriptor.
1181
1182 @comment unistd.h
1183 @comment POSIX.1
1184 @deftypefun pid_t tcgetpgrp (int @var{filedes})
1185 This function returns the process group ID of the foreground process
1186 group associated with the terminal open on descriptor @var{filedes}.
1187
1188 If there is no foreground process group, the return value is a number
1189 greater than @code{1} that does not match the process group ID of any
1190 existing process group.  This can happen if all of the processes in the
1191 job that was formerly the foreground job have terminated, and no other
1192 job has yet been moved into the foreground.
1193
1194 In case of an error, a value of @code{-1} is returned.  The
1195 following @code{errno} error conditions are defined for this function:
1196
1197 @table @code
1198 @item EBADF
1199 The @var{filedes} argument is not a valid file descriptor.
1200
1201 @item ENOSYS
1202 The system doesn't support job control.
1203
1204 @item ENOTTY
1205 The terminal file associated with the @var{filedes} argument isn't the
1206 controlling terminal of the calling process.
1207 @end table
1208 @end deftypefun
1209
1210 @comment unistd.h
1211 @comment POSIX.1
1212 @deftypefun int tcsetpgrp (int @var{filedes}, pid_t @var{pgid})
1213 This function is used to set a terminal's foreground process group ID.
1214 The argument @var{filedes} is a descriptor which specifies the terminal;
1215 @var{pgid} specifies the process group.  The calling process must be a
1216 member of the same session as @var{pgid} and must have the same
1217 controlling terminal.
1218
1219 For terminal access purposes, this function is treated as output.  If it
1220 is called from a background process on its controlling terminal,
1221 normally all processes in the process group are sent a @code{SIGTTOU}
1222 signal.  The exception is if the calling process itself is ignoring or
1223 blocking @code{SIGTTOU} signals, in which case the operation is
1224 performed and no signal is sent.
1225
1226 If successful, @code{tcsetpgrp} returns @code{0}.  A return value of
1227 @code{-1} indicates an error.  The following @code{errno} error
1228 conditions are defined for this function:
1229
1230 @table @code
1231 @item EBADF
1232 The @var{filedes} argument is not a valid file descriptor.
1233
1234 @item EINVAL
1235 The @var{pgid} argument is not valid.
1236
1237 @item ENOSYS
1238 The system doesn't support job control.
1239
1240 @item ENOTTY
1241 The @var{filedes} isn't the controlling terminal of the calling process.
1242
1243 @item EPERM
1244 The @var{pgid} isn't a process group in the same session as the calling
1245 process.
1246 @end table
1247 @end deftypefun