12f88cbcbd482b671905c32dae27c7404061f63a
[kopensolaris-gnu/glibc.git] / manual / libc.texinfo
1 \input texinfo                  @c -*- Texinfo -*-
2 @comment %**start of header (This is for running Texinfo on a region.)
3 @setfilename library.info
4 @settitle The GNU C Library
5 @setchapternewpage odd
6 @comment %**end of header (This is for running Texinfo on a region.)
7
8 @set EDITION 0.00
9 @set VERSION 1.06
10 @set UPDATED 18 January 1993
11
12 @ifinfo
13 This file documents the GNU C library.
14
15 This is Edition @value{EDITION}, last updated @value{UPDATED},
16 of @cite{The GNU C Library Reference Manual}, for Version @value{VERSION}.
17
18 Copyright (C) 1993 Free Software Foundation, Inc.
19
20 Permission is granted to make and distribute verbatim copies of
21 this manual provided the copyright notice and this permission notice
22 are preserved on all copies.
23
24 @ignore
25 Permission is granted to process this file through TeX and print the
26 results, provided the printed document carries copying permission
27 notice identical to this one except for the removal of this paragraph
28 (this paragraph not being relevant to the printed manual).
29
30 @end ignore
31 Permission is granted to copy and distribute modified versions of this
32 manual under the conditions for verbatim copying, provided also that the
33 section entitled ``GNU Library General Public License'' is included
34 exactly as in the original, and provided that the entire resulting
35 derived work is distributed under the terms of a permission notice
36 identical to this one.
37
38 Permission is granted to copy and distribute translations of this manual
39 into another language, under the above conditions for modified versions,
40 except that the text of the translations of the section entitled ``GNU
41 Library General Public License'' must be approved for accuracy by the
42 Foundation.
43 @end ifinfo
44
45 @setchapternewpage odd
46
47 @shorttitlepage The GNU C Library Reference Manual
48 @titlepage
49 @center @titlefont{The GNU C Library}
50 @sp 1
51 @center @titlefont{Reference Manual}
52 @sp 2
53 @center Sandra Loosemore
54 @center with
55 @center Roland McGrath, Andrew Oram, and Richard M. Stallman
56 @sp 3
57 @center last updated @value{UPDATED}
58 @sp 1
59 @center for version @value{VERSION}
60 @page
61 @vskip 0pt plus 1filll
62 Copyright @copyright{} 1993 Free Software Foundation, Inc.
63 @end titlepage
64 @page
65
66 @ifinfo
67 @node Top, Introduction, (dir), (dir)
68 @top Main Menu
69 This is the reference manual for version @value{VERSION} of the GNU C Library.
70 @end ifinfo
71
72
73 @menu
74 * Introduction::                Purpose of the GNU C Library.
75 * Error Reporting::             How the GNU Library functions report
76                                  error conditions.
77 * Memory Allocation::           Your program can allocate memory dynamically
78                                  and manipulate it via pointers.
79 * Character Handling::          Character testing and conversion functions.
80 * String and Array Utilities::  Utilities for copying and comparing
81                                  strings and arrays.
82 * Extended Characters::         Support for extended character sets.
83 * Locales::                     The country and language can affect
84                                  the behavior of library functions.
85 * Searching and Sorting::       General searching and sorting functions.
86 * Pattern Matching::            Matching wildcards and regular expressions,
87                                  and shell-style ``word expansion''.
88 * I/O Overview::                Introduction to the I/O facilities.
89 * Streams: I/O on Streams.      High-level, portable I/O facilities.
90 * Low-Level I/O::               Low-level, less portable I/O.
91 * File System Interface::       Functions for manipulating files.
92 * Pipes and FIFOs::             A simple interprocess communication mechanism.
93 * Sockets::                     A more complicated interprocess communication
94                                  mechanism, with support for networking.
95 * Low-Level Terminal Interface::How to change the characteristics
96                                  of a terminal device.
97 * Mathematics::                 Math functions (transcendental functions,
98                                  random numbers, absolute value, etc.).
99 * Arithmetic::                  Low-level arithmetic functions.
100 * Date and Time::               Functions for getting the date and time,
101                                  and for conversion between formats.
102 * Non-Local Exits::             The @code{setjmp} and @code{longjmp} facilities.
103 * Signal Handling::             All about signals; how to send them,
104                                  block them, and handle them.
105 * Process Startup::             Writing the beginning and end of your program.
106 * Child Processes::             How to create processes and run other programs.
107 * Job Control::                 All about process groups and sessions.
108 * Users and Groups::            How users are identified and classified.
109 * System Information::          Getting information about the
110                                  hardware and software configuration
111                                  of the machine a program runs on.
112 * System Configuration::        Parameters describing operating system limits.
113
114 Appendices
115
116 * Language Features::           C language features provided by the library. 
117
118 * Library Summary::             A summary showing the syntax, header file,
119                                  and derivation of each library feature.
120 * Maintenance::                 How to install and maintain the GNU C Library.
121 * Copying::                     The GNU Library General Public License says
122                                  how you can copy and share the GNU C Library.
123
124 Indices
125
126 * Concept Index::               Index of concepts and names.
127 * Type Index::                  Index of types and type qualifiers.
128 * Function Index::              Index of functions and function-like macros.
129 * Variable Index::              Index of variables and variable-like macros.
130 * File Index::                  Index of programs and files.
131
132  --- The Detailed Node Listing ---
133
134 Introduction
135
136 * Getting Started::             Getting Started
137 * Standards and Portability::   Standards and Portability
138 * Using the Library::           Using the Library
139 * Roadmap to the Manual::       Roadmap to the Manual
140
141 Standards and Portability
142
143 * ANSI C::                      The American National Standard for the
144                                  C programming language.  
145 * POSIX::                       The IEEE 1003 standards for operating systems.
146 * Berkeley Unix::               BSD and SunOS.
147 * SVID::                        The System V Interface Description.  
148
149 Using the Library
150
151 * Header Files::                How to use the header files in your programs.
152 * Macro Definitions::           Some functions in the library may really
153                                  be implemented as macros.
154 * Reserved Names::              The C standard reserves some names for
155                                  the library, and some for users.
156 * Feature Test Macros::         How to control what names are defined.
157
158 Error Reporting
159
160 * Checking for Errors::         How errors are reported by library functions.
161 * Error Codes::                 What all the error codes are.
162 * Error Messages::              Mapping error codes onto error messages.
163
164 Memory Allocation
165
166 * Memory Concepts::             An introduction to concepts and terminology.
167 * Dynamic Allocation and C::    How to get different kinds of allocation in C.
168 * Unconstrained Allocation::    The @code{malloc} facility allows fully general
169                                  dynamic allocation.
170 * Obstacks::                    Obstacks are less general than malloc
171                                  but more efficient and convenient.
172 * Variable Size Automatic::     Allocation of variable-sized blocks
173                                  of automatic storage that are freed when the
174                                  calling function returns.
175 * Relocating Allocator::        Waste less memory, if you can tolerate
176                                  automatic relocation of the blocks you get.
177 * Memory Warnings::             Getting warnings when memory is nearly full.
178
179 Unconstrained Allocation
180
181 * Basic Allocation::            Simple use of @code{malloc}.
182 * Malloc Examples::             Examples of @code{malloc}.  @code{xmalloc}.
183 * Freeing after Malloc::        Use @code{free} to free a block you
184                                  got with @code{malloc}.
185 * Changing Block Size::         Use @code{realloc} to make a block
186                                  bigger or smaller.
187 * Allocating Cleared Space::    Use @code{calloc} to allocate a
188                                  block and clear it.
189 * Efficiency and Malloc::       Efficiency considerations in use of
190                                  these functions.
191 * Aligned Memory Blocks::       Allocating specially aligned memory:
192                                  @code{memalign} and @code{valloc}.
193 * Heap Consistency Checking::   Automatic checking for errors.
194 * Hooks for Malloc::            You can use these hooks for debugging
195                                  programs that use @code{malloc}.
196 * Statistics of Malloc::        Getting information about how much
197                                  memory your program is using.
198 * Summary of Malloc::           Summary of @code{malloc} and related functions.
199
200 Obstacks
201
202 * Creating Obstacks::           How to declare an obstack in your program.
203 * Preparing for Obstacks::      Preparations needed before you can
204                                  use obstacks.
205 * Allocation in an Obstack::    Allocating objects in an obstack.
206 * Freeing Obstack Objects::     Freeing objects in an obstack.
207 * Obstack Functions::           The obstack functions are both
208                                  functions and macros.
209 * Growing Objects::             Making an object bigger by stages.
210 * Extra Fast Growing::          Extra-high-efficiency (though more
211                                  complicated) growing objects.
212 * Status of an Obstack::        Inquiries about the status of an obstack.
213 * Obstacks Data Alignment::     Controlling alignment of objects in obstacks.
214 * Obstack Chunks::              How obstacks obtain and release chunks. 
215                                 Efficiency considerations.
216 * Summary of Obstacks::         
217
218 Automatic Storage with Variable Size
219
220 * Alloca Example::              Example of using @code{alloca}.
221 * Advantages of Alloca::        Reasons to use @code{alloca}.
222 * Disadvantages of Alloca::     Reasons to avoid @code{alloca}.
223 * GNU C Variable-Size Arrays::  Only in GNU C, here is an alternative
224                                  method of allocating dynamically and
225                                  freeing automatically.
226 Relocating Allocator
227
228 * Relocator Concepts::          How to understand relocating allocation.
229 * Using Relocator::             Functions for relocating allocation.
230
231 Character Handling
232
233 * Classification of Characters::Testing whether characters are
234                                  letters, digits, punctuation, etc.
235 * Case Conversion::             Case mapping, and the like.
236
237 String and Array Utilities
238
239 * Representation of Strings::   Introduction to basic concepts.
240 * String/Array Conventions::    Whether to use a string function or an
241                                  arbitrary array function.
242 * String Length::               Determining the length of a string.
243 * Copying and Concatenation::   Functions to copy the contents of strings
244                                  and arrays.
245 * String/Array Comparison::     Functions for byte-wise and character-wise
246                                  comparison.
247 * Collation Functions::         Functions for collating strings.
248 * Search Functions::            Searching for a specific element or substring.
249 * Finding Tokens in a String::  Splitting a string into tokens by looking
250                                  for delimiters.
251
252 Extended Characters
253
254 * Extended Char Intro::         Multibyte codes versus wide characters.
255 * Locales and Extended Chars::  The locale selects the character codes.
256 * Multibyte Char Intro::        How multibyte codes are represented.
257 * Wide Char Intro::             How wide characters are represented.
258 * Wide String Conversion::      Converting wide strings to multibyte code
259                                    and vice versa.
260 * Length of Char::              how many bytes make up one multibyte char.
261 * Converting One Char::         Converting a string character by character.
262 * Example of Conversion::       Example showing why converting 
263                                    one character at a time may be useful.
264 * Shift State::                 Multibyte codes with "shift characters".
265
266 Locales and Internationalization
267
268 * Effects of Locale::           Actions affected by the choice of locale.
269 * Choosing Locale::             How the user specifies a locale.
270 * Locale Categories::           Different purposes for which
271                                  you can select a locale.
272 * Setting the Locale::          How a program specifies the locale.
273 * Standard Locales::            Locale names available on all systems.
274 * Numeric Formatting::          How to format numbers for the chosen locale.
275
276 Searching and Sorting 
277
278 * Comparison Functions::        Defining how to compare two objects.
279                                 Since the sort and search facilities are
280                                 general, you have to specify the ordering.
281 * Array Search Function::       The @code{bsearch} function.
282 * Array Sort Function::         The @code{qsort} function.
283 * Search/Sort Example::         An example program.
284
285 Pattern Matching
286
287 * Wildcard Matching::    Matching a wildcard pattern against a single string.
288 * Globbing::             Finding the files that match a wildcard pattern.
289 * Regular Expressions::  Matching regular expressions against strings.
290 * Word Expansion::       Expanding shell variables, nested commands,
291                           arithmetic, and wildcards.
292                           This is what the shell does with shell commands.
293
294 I/O Overview
295
296 * I/O Concepts::                Some basic information and terminology.
297 * File Names::                  How to refer to a file.
298
299 I/O Concepts
300
301 * Streams and File Descriptors:: The GNU Library provides two ways
302                                   to access the contents of files.
303 * File Position::               The number of bytes from the
304                                  beginning of the file.
305
306 File Names
307
308 * Directories::                 Directories contain entries for files.
309 * File Name Resolution::        A file name specifies how to look up a file.
310 * File Name Errors::            Error conditions relating to file names.
311 * File Name Portability::       File name portability and syntax issues.
312
313 I/O on Streams
314
315 * Streams::                     About the data type representing a stream.
316 * Standard Streams::            Streams to the standard input and output 
317                                  devices are created for you.
318 * Opening Streams::             How to create a stream to talk to a file.
319 * Closing Streams::             Close a stream when you are finished with it.
320 * Simple Output::               Unformatted output by characters and lines.
321 * Character Input::             Unformatted input by characters and words.
322 * Line Input::                  Reading a line or a record from a stream.
323 * Unreading::                   Peeking ahead/pushing back input just read.
324 * Formatted Output::            @code{printf} and related functions.
325 * Customizing Printf::          You can define new conversion specifiers for
326                                  @code{printf} and friends.
327 * Formatted Input::             @code{scanf} and related functions.
328 * Block Input/Output::          Input and output operations on blocks of data.
329 * EOF and Errors::              How you can tell if an I/O error happens.
330 * Binary Streams::              Some systems distinguish between text files
331                                  and binary files.
332 * File Positioning::            About random-access streams.
333 * Portable Positioning::        Random access on peculiar ANSI C systems.
334 * Stream Buffering::            How to control buffering of streams.
335 * Temporary Files::             How to open a temporary file.
336 * Other Kinds of Streams::      Other Kinds of Streams
337
338 Unreading
339
340 * Unreading Idea::              An explanation of unreading with pictures.
341 * How Unread::                  How to call @code{ungetc} to do unreading.
342
343 Formatted Output
344
345 * Formatted Output Basics::     Some examples to get you started.
346 * Output Conversion Syntax::    General syntax of conversion specifications.
347 * Table of Output Conversions:: Summary of output conversions, what they do.
348 * Integer Conversions::         Details of formatting integers.
349 * Floating-Point Conversions::  Details of formatting floating-point numbers.
350 * Other Output Conversions::    Details about formatting of strings,
351                                  characters, pointers, and the like.
352 * Formatted Output Functions::  Descriptions of the actual functions.
353 * Variable Arguments Output::   @code{vprintf} and friends.
354 * Parsing a Template String::   What kinds of arguments does
355                                  a given template call for?
356
357 Customizing Printf
358
359 * Registering New Conversions::  
360 * Conversion Specifier Options::  
361 * Defining the Output Handler::  
362 * Printf Extension Example::    
363
364 Formatted Input
365
366 * Formatted Input Basics::      Some basics to get you started.
367 * Input Conversion Syntax::     Syntax of conversion specifications.
368 * Table of Input Conversions::  Summary of input conversions and what they do.
369 * Numeric Input Conversions::   Details of conversions for reading numbers.
370 * String Input Conversions::    Details of conversions for reading strings.
371 * Other Input Conversions::     Details of miscellaneous other conversions.
372 * Formatted Input Functions::   Descriptions of the actual functions.
373 * Variable Arguments Input::    @code{vscanf} and friends.
374
375 Stream Buffering
376
377 * Buffering Concepts::          Terminology is defined here.
378 * Flushing Buffers::            How to ensure that output buffers are flushed.
379 * Controlling Buffering::       How to specify what kind of buffering to use.
380
381 Other Kinds of Streams
382
383 * String Streams::              
384 * Custom Streams::              
385
386 Programming Your Own Custom Streams
387
388 * Streams and Cookies::         
389 * Hook Functions::              
390
391 Low-Level I/O
392
393 * Opening and Closing Files::   How to open and close file descriptors.
394 * I/O Primitives::              Reading and writing data.
395 * File Position Primitive::     Setting a descriptor's file position.
396 * Descriptors and Streams::     Converting descriptor to stream or vice-versa.
397 * Stream/Descriptor Precautions::  Precautions needed if you use both
398                                     descriptors and streams.
399 * Waiting for I/O::             How to check for input or output
400                                  on multiple file descriptors.
401 * Control Operations::          Various other operations on file descriptors.
402 * Duplicating Descriptors::     Fcntl commands for duplicating descriptors.
403 * Descriptor Flags::            Fcntl commands for manipulating flags
404                                  associated with file descriptors.
405 * File Status Flags::           Fcntl commands for manipulating flags
406                                  associated with open files.
407 * File Locks::                  Fcntl commands for implementing file locking.
408 * Interrupt Input::             Getting a signal when input arrives.
409
410 File System Interface
411
412 * Working Directory::           This is used to resolve relative file names.
413 * Accessing Directories::       Finding out what files a directory contains.
414 * Hard Links::                  Adding alternate names to a file.
415 * Symbolic Links::              A file that ``points to'' a file name.
416 * Deleting Files::              How to delete a file, and what that means.
417 * Renaming Files::              Changing a file's name.
418 * Creating Directories::        A system call just for creating a directory.
419 * File Attributes::             Attributes of individual files.
420 * Making Special Files::        How to create special files.
421
422 Accessing Directories
423
424 * Directory Entries::           Format of one directory entry.
425 * Opening a Directory::         How to open a directory stream.
426 * Reading/Closing Directory::   How to read directory entries from the stream.
427 * Simple Directory Lister::     A very simple directory listing program.
428 * Random Access Directory::     Rereading part of the directory
429                                   already read with the same stream.
430
431 File Attributes
432
433 * Attribute Meanings::          The names of the file attributes,
434                                  and what their values mean.
435 * Reading Attributes::          How to read the attributes of a file.
436 * Testing File Type::           Distinguishing ordinary files,
437                                  directories, links...
438 * File Owner::                  How ownership for new files is determined,
439                                  and how to change it.
440 * Permission Bits::             How information about a file's access mode
441                                  is stored.
442 * Access Permission::           How the system decides who can access a file.
443 * Setting Permissions::         How permissions for new files are assigned,
444                                  and how to change them.
445 * Testing File Access::         How to find out if your process can
446                                  access a file.
447 * File Times::                  About the time attributes of a file.
448
449 Pipes and FIFOs
450
451 * Creating a Pipe::             Making a pipe with the @code{pipe} function.
452 * Pipe to a Subprocess::        Using a pipe to communicate with a child.
453 * FIFO Special Files::          Making a FIFO special file.
454
455 Sockets
456
457 * Socket Concepts::             Basic concepts you need to know about.
458 * Communication Styles::        Stream communication, datagrams, and others.
459 * Socket Addresses::            How socket names (``addresses'') work.
460 * File Namespace::              Details about the file namespace.
461 * Internet Namespace::          Details about the Internet namespace.
462 * Open/Close Sockets::          Creating sockets and destroying them.
463 * Connections::                 Operations on sockets with connection state.
464 * Datagrams::                   Operations on datagram sockets.
465 * Socket Options::              Miscellaneous low-level socket options.
466 * Networks Database::           Accessing the database of network names.
467
468 Socket Addresses
469
470 * Address Formats::             About @code{struct sockaddr}.
471 * Setting Address::             Binding an address to a socket.
472 * Reading Address::             Reading the address of a socket.
473
474 Internet Domain
475
476 * Internet Address Format::     How socket addresses are specified in the
477                                  Internet namespace.
478 * Host Addresses::              All about host addresses of Internet hosts.
479 * Protocols Database::          Referring to protocols by name.
480 * Services Database::           Ports may have symbolic names.
481 * Byte Order::                  Different hosts may use different byte
482                                  ordering conventions; you need to
483                                  canonicalize host address and port number. 
484 * Inet Example::                Putting it all together.
485
486 Host Addresses
487
488 * Abstract Host Addresses::             What a host number consists of.
489 * Data type: Host Address Data Type.    Data type for a host number.
490 * Functions: Host Address Functions.    Functions to operate on them.
491 * Names: Host Names.                    Translating host names to host numbers.
492
493 Open/Close Sockets
494
495 * Creating a Socket::           How to open a socket.
496 * Closing a Socket::            How to close a socket.
497 * Socket Pairs::                These are created like pipes.
498
499 Connections
500
501 * Connecting::                  What the client program must do.
502 * Listening::                   How a server program waits for requests.
503 * Accepting Connections::       What the server does when it gets a request.
504 * Who is Connected::            Getting the address of the
505                                  other side of a connection.
506 * Transferring Data::           How to send and receive data.
507 * Byte Stream Example::         An example client for communicating over a
508                                  byte stream socket in the Internet namespace.
509 * Server Example::              A corresponding server program.
510 * Out-of-Band Data::            This is an advanced feature.
511
512 Transferring Data
513
514 * Sending Data::                Sending data with @code{write}.
515 * Receiving Data::              Reading data with @code{read}.
516 * Socket Data Options::         Using @code{send} and @code{recv}.
517
518 Datagrams
519
520 * Sending Datagrams::           Sending packets on a datagram socket.
521 * Receiving Datagrams::         Receiving packets on a datagram socket.
522 * Datagram Example::            An example program: packets sent over a
523                                  datagram stream in the file namespace.
524 * Example Receiver::            Another program, that receives those packets.
525
526 Socket Options
527
528 * Socket Option Functions::     The basic functions for setting and getting
529                                  socket options.
530 * Socket-Level Options::        Details of the options at the socket level.
531
532 Low-Level Terminal Interface
533
534 * Is It a Terminal::            How to determine if a file is a terminal
535                                  device, and what its name is.
536 * I/O Queues::                  About flow control and typeahead.
537 * Canonical or Not::            Two basic styles of input processing.
538 * Terminal Modes::              How to examine and modify flags controlling
539                                  terminal I/O: echoing, signals, editing.
540 * Line Control::                Sending break sequences, clearing  buffers...
541 * Noncanon Example::            How to read single characters without echo.
542
543 Terminal Modes
544
545 * Mode Data Types::             The data type @code{struct termios} and related types.
546 * Mode Functions::              Functions to read and set terminal attributes.
547 * Setting Modes::               The right way to set attributes reliably.
548 * Input Modes::                 Flags controlling low-level input handling.
549 * Output Modes::                Flags controlling low-level output handling.
550 * Control Modes::               Flags controlling serial port behavior.
551 * Local Modes::                 Flags controlling high-level input handling.
552 * Line Speed::                  How to read and set the terminal line speed.
553 * Special Characters::          Characters that have special effects,
554                                  and how to change them.
555 * Noncanonical Input::          Controlling how long to wait for input.
556
557 Special Characters
558
559 * Editing Characters::          
560 * Signal Characters::           
561 * Start/Stop Characters::       
562
563 Mathematics
564
565 * Domain and Range Errors::     How overflow conditions and the
566                                  like are reported.
567 * Not a Number::                Making NANs and testing for NANs.
568 * Trig Functions::              Sine, cosine, and tangent.
569 * Inverse Trig Functions::      Arc sine, arc cosine, and arc tangent.
570 * Exponents and Logarithms::    Also includes square root.
571 * Hyperbolic Functions::        Hyperbolic sine and friends.
572 * Pseudo-Random Numbers::       Functions for generating pseudo-random numbers.
573 * Absolute Value::              Absolute value functions.
574
575 Pseudo-Random Numbers
576
577 * ANSI Random::                 @code{rand} and friends.
578 * BSD Random::                  @code{random} and friends.
579
580 Low-Level Arithmetic Functions
581
582 * Normalization Functions::     Hacks for radix-2 representations.
583 * Rounding and Remainders::     Determinining the integer and
584                                  fractional parts of a float.
585 * Integer Division::            Functions for performing integer division.
586 * Parsing of Numbers::          Functions for ``reading'' numbers from strings.
587 * Predicates on Floats::        Some miscellaneous test functions.
588
589 Parsing of Numbers
590
591 * Parsing of Integers::         Functions for conversion of integer values.
592 * Parsing of Floats::           Functions for conversion of floating-point.
593
594 Date and Time
595
596 * Processor Time::              Measures processor time used by a program.
597 * Calendar Time::               Manipulation of ``real'' dates and times.
598 * Setting an Alarm::            Sending a signal after a specified time.
599 * Sleeping::                    Waiting for a period of time.
600
601 Processor Time
602
603 * Basic CPU Time::              The @code{clock} function.
604 * Detailed CPU Time::           The @code{times} function.
605
606 Calendar Time
607
608 * Simple Calendar Time::        Facilities for manipulating calendar time.
609 * High-Resolution Calendar::    A time representation with greater precision.
610 * Broken-down Time::            Facilities for manipulating local time.
611 * Formatting Date and Time::    Converting times to strings.
612 * TZ Variable::                 How users specify the time zone.
613 * Time Zone Functions::         Functions to examine or specify the time zone.
614 * Time Functions Example::      An example program showing use of some of
615                                  the time functions.
616
617 Signal Handling
618
619 * Concepts of Signals::         Introduction to the signal facilities.
620 * Standard Signals::            Particular kinds of signals with standard
621                                  names and meanings.
622 * Signal Actions::              Specifying what happens when a particular
623                                  signal is delivered.
624 * Defining Handlers::           How to write a signal handler function.
625 * Generating Signals::          How to send a signal to a process.
626 * Blocking Signals::            Making the system hold signals temporarily.
627 * Waiting for a Signal::        Suspending your program until a signal arrives.
628 * BSD Signal Handling::         Additional functions for backward
629                                  compatibility with BSD.
630 * BSD Handler::                 BSD Function to Establish a Handler
631
632 Basic Concepts of Signals
633
634 * Kinds of Signals::            Some examples of what can cause a signal.
635 * Signal Generation::           Concepts of why and how signals occur.
636 * Delivery of Signal::          Concepts of what a signal does to the process.
637
638 Standard Signals
639
640 * Program Error Signals::       Used to report serious program errors.
641 * Termination Signals::         Used to interrupt and/or terminate the program.
642 * Alarm Signals::               Used to indicate expiration of timers.
643 * Asynchronous I/O Signals::    Used to indicate input is available.
644 * Job Control Signals::         Signals used to support job control.
645 * Miscellaneous Signals::       Miscellaneous Signals
646 * Nonstandard Signals::         Implementations can support other signals.
647 * Signal Messages::             Printing a message describing a signal.
648
649 Specifying Signal Actions
650
651 * Basic Signal Handling::       The simple @code{signal} function.
652 * Advanced Signal Handling::    The more powerful @code{sigaction} function.
653 * Signal and Sigaction::        How those two functions interact.
654 * Sigaction Function Example::  An example of using the sigaction function.
655 * Flags for Sigaction::         Specifying options for signal handling.
656 * Initial Signal Actions::      How programs inherit signal actions.
657
658 Defining Signal Handlers
659
660 * Handler Returns::             
661 * Termination in Handler::      
662 * Longjmp in Handler::          
663 * Signals in Handler::       
664 * Nonreentrancy::               
665 * Atomic Data Access::          
666
667 Generating Signals
668
669 * Signaling Yourself::          Signaling Yourself
670 * Signaling Another Process::   Send a signal to another process.
671 * Permission for kill::         Permission for using @code{kill}
672 * Kill Example::                Using @code{kill} for Communication
673
674 Blocking Signals
675
676 * Why Block::                   The purpose of blocking signals.
677 * Signal Sets::                 How to specify which signals to block.
678 * Process Signal Mask::         Blocking delivery of signals to your
679                                  process during normal execution.
680 * Testing for Delivery::        Blocking to Test for Delivery of a Signal
681 * Blocking for Handler::        Blocking additional signals while a
682                                  handler is being run.
683 * Checking for Pending Signals::Checking for Pending Signals
684 * Remembering a Signal::        How you can get almost the same effect
685                                  as blocking a signal, by handling it
686                                  and setting a flag to be tested later.
687
688 Waiting for a Signal
689
690 * Using Pause::                 The simple way, using @code{pause}.
691 * Pause Problems::              Why the simple way is often not very good.
692 * Sigsuspend::                  Reliably waiting for a specific signal.
693
694 BSD Signal Handling
695
696 * POSIX vs BSD::                Comparison of BSD and POSIX signal functions.
697
698 BSD Function to Establish a Handler
699
700 * Blocking in BSD::             BSD Functions for Blocking Signals 
701 * Signal Stack::                Using a Separate Signal Stack
702
703 Process Startup and Termination
704
705 * Program Arguments::           Parsing your program's command-line arguments.
706 * Environment Variables::       How to access parameters inherited from
707                                  a parent process.
708 * Program Termination::         How to cause a process to terminate and
709                                  return status information to its parent.
710
711 Program Arguments
712
713 * Argument Syntax::             By convention, options start with a hyphen.
714 * Parsing Options::             The @code{getopt} function.
715 * Example of Getopt::           An example of parsing options with @code{getopt}.
716 * Long Options::                GNU utilities should accept long-named options.
717                                  Here is how to do that.
718 * Long Option Example::         An example of using @code{getopt_long}.
719
720 Environment Variables
721
722 * Environment Access::          How to get and set the values of
723                                  environment variables.
724 * Standard Environment::        These environment variables have
725                                  standard interpretations.
726
727 Program Termination
728
729 * Normal Termination::          If a program calls @code{exit}, a
730                                  process terminates normally.
731 * Exit Status::                 The @code{exit status} provides information 
732                                  about why the process terminated. 
733 * Cleanups on Exit::            A process can run its own cleanup
734                                  functions upon normal termination. 
735 * Aborting a Program::          The @code{abort} function causes
736                                  abnormal program termination. 
737 * Termination Internals::       What happens when a process terminates.
738
739
740 Child Processes
741
742 * Running a Command::           The easy way to run another program.
743 * Process Creation Concepts::   An overview of the hard way to do it.
744 * Process Identification::      How to get the process ID of a process.
745 * Creating a Process::          How to fork a child process.
746 * Executing a File::            How to make a child execute another program.
747 * Process Completion::          How to tell when a child process has completed.
748 * Process Completion Status::   How to interpret the status value 
749                                  returned from a child process.
750 * BSD Wait Functions::          More functions, for backward compatibility.
751 * Process Creation Example::    A complete example program.
752
753 Job Control
754
755 * Concepts of Job Control ::    Concepts of Job Control
756 * Job Control is Optional::     Not all POSIX systems support job control.
757 * Controlling Terminal::        How a process gets its controlling terminal.
758 * Access to the Terminal::      How processes share the controlling terminal.
759 * Orphaned Process Groups::     Jobs left after the user logs out.
760 * Implementing a Shell::        What a shell must do to implement job control.
761 * Functions for Job Control::   Functions to control process groups.
762
763 Implementing a Job Control Shell
764
765 * Data Structures::             Introduction to the sample shell.
766 * Initializing the Shell::      What the shell must do to take
767                                  responsibility for job control.
768 * Launching Jobs::              Creating jobs to execute commands.
769 * Foreground and Background::   Putting a job in foreground of background.
770 * Stopped and Terminated Jobs:: Reporting job status.
771 * Continuing Stopped Jobs::     How to continue a stopped job in
772                                  the foreground or background.
773 * Missing Pieces::              Other parts of the shell.
774
775 Functions for Job Control
776
777 * Identifying the Terminal::    Determining the controlling terminal's name.
778 * Process Group Functions::     Functions for manipulating process groups.
779 * Terminal Access Functions::   Functions for controlling terminal access.
780
781 Users and Groups
782
783 * User and Group IDs::          Each user and group has a unique numeric ID.
784 * Process Persona::             The user IDs and group IDs of a process.
785 * Why Change Persona::          Why a program might need to change
786                                  its user and/or group IDs.
787 * How Change Persona::          Restrictions on changing user and group IDs.
788 * Reading Persona::             Examining the process's user and group IDs.
789 * Setting User ID::             
790 * Setting Groups::              
791 * Enable/Disable Setuid::       
792 * Setuid Program Example::      Setuid Program Example
793 * Tips for Setuid::             
794 * Who Logged In::               Getting the name of the user who logged in,
795                                  or of the real user ID of the current process.
796
797 * User Database::               Functions and data structures for
798                                  accessing the user database.
799 * Group Database::              Functions and data structures for
800                                  accessing the group database.
801 * Database Example::            Example program showing use of database
802                                  inquiry functions.
803
804 User Database
805
806 * User Data Structure::         
807 * Lookup User::                 
808 * Scanning All Users::          Scanning the List of All Users
809 * Writing a User Entry::        
810
811 Group Database
812
813 * Group Data Structure::        
814 * Lookup Group::                
815 * Scanning All Groups::         Scanning the List of All Groups
816
817 System Information
818
819 * Host Identification::         Determining the name of the machine.
820 * Hardware/Software Type ID::   Determining the hardware type and
821                                  operating system type.
822
823 System Configuration Limits
824
825 * General Limits::              Constants and functions that describe
826                                  various process-related limits that have
827                                  one uniform value for any given machine.
828 * System Options::              Optional POSIX features.
829 * Version Supported::           Version numbers of POSIX.1 and POSIX.2.
830 * Sysconf::                     Getting specific configuration values
831                                  of general limits and system options.
832 * Minimums::                    Minimum values for general limits.
833    
834 * Limits for Files::            Size limitations on individual files.
835                                  These can vary between file systems
836                                   or even from file to file.
837 * Options for Files::           Optional features that some files may support.
838 * File Minimums::               Minimum values for file limits.
839 * Pathconf::                    Getting the limit values for a particular file.
840    
841 * Utility Limits::              Capacity limits of POSIX.2 utility programs.
842 * Utility Minimums::            Minimum allowable values of those limits.
843    
844 * String Parameters::           Getting the default search path.
845
846 Library Facilities that are Part of the C Language
847
848 * Consistency Checking::        Using @code{assert} to abort
849                                  if something ``impossible'' happens.
850 * Variadic Functions::          Defining functions with varying
851                                  numbers of arguments.
852 * Null Pointer Constant::       The macro @code{NULL}.
853 * Important Data Types::        Data types for object sizes.
854 * Data Type Measurements::      Parameters of data type representations.
855
856 Variadic Functions
857
858 * Why Variadic::                Reasons for making functions take
859                                  variable arguments.
860 * How Variadic::                How to define and call variadic functions.
861 * Argument Macros::             Detailed specification of the macros
862                                  for accessing variable arguments.
863 * Variadic Example::            A complete example.
864
865 How Variadic Functions are Defined and Used
866
867 * Variadic Prototypes::         How to make a prototype for a function
868                                  with variable arguments.
869 * Receiving Arguments::         Steps you must follow to access the
870                                  optional argument values.
871 * How Many Arguments::          How to decide whether there are more arguments.
872 * Calling Variadics::           Things you need to know about calling
873                                  variable arguments functions.
874
875 Data Type Measurements
876
877 * Width of Type::               How many bits does an integer type hold?
878 * Range of Type::               What are the largest and smallest values
879                                  that an integer type can hold?
880 * Floating Type Macros::        Parameters that measure floating-point types.
881 * Structure Measurement::       Getting measurements on structure types.
882
883 Floating Type Macros
884
885 * Floating Point Concepts::     Definitions of terminology.
886 * Floating Point Parameters::   Dimensions, limits of floating point types.
887 * IEEE Floating Point::         How one common representation is described.
888
889 Library Maintenance
890
891 * Installation::                How to configure, compile and install
892                                  the GNU C library.
893 * Reporting Bugs::              How to report bugs (if you want to
894                                  get them fixed) and other troubles
895                                  you may have with the GNU C library.
896 * Porting::                     How to port the GNU C library to
897                                  a new machine or operating system.
898 @c * Traditional C Compatibility::  Using the GNU C library with non-ANSI
899 @c                                          C compilers.
900 * Contributors::                Who wrote what parts of the GNU C Library.
901
902 Porting the GNU C Library
903
904 * Hierarchy Conventions::       How the @file{sysdeps} hierarchy is
905                                  layed out.
906 * Porting to Unix::             Porting the library to an average
907                                  Unix-like system.
908 @end menu
909
910
911 @comment Includes of all the individual chapters.
912 @include intro.texinfo
913 @include errno.texinfo
914 @include memory.texinfo
915 @include ctype.texinfo
916 @include string.texinfo
917 @include mbyte.texinfo
918 @include locale.texinfo
919 @include search.texinfo
920 @include pattern.texi
921 @include io.texinfo
922 @include stdio.texinfo
923 @include llio.texinfo
924 @include filesys.texinfo
925 @include pipe.texinfo
926 @include socket.texinfo
927 @include terminal.texinfo
928 @include math.texinfo
929 @include arith.texinfo
930 @include time.texinfo
931 @include setjmp.texinfo
932 @include signal.texinfo
933 @include startup.texinfo
934 @include child.texinfo
935 @include job.texinfo
936 @include users.texinfo
937 @include sysinfo.texinfo
938 @include conf.texinfo
939 @include lang.texinfo
940
941 @comment Includes of the appendices.
942 @include header.texinfo
943 @include maint.texinfo
944
945
946 @set lgpl-appendix
947 @node Copying, Concept Index, Maintenance, Top
948 @include lgpl.texinfo
949
950
951 @node Concept Index, Type Index, Copying, Top
952 @unnumbered Concept Index
953
954 @printindex cp
955
956 @node Type Index, Function Index, Concept Index, Top
957 @unnumbered Type Index
958
959 @printindex tp
960
961 @node Function Index, Variable Index, Type Index, Top
962 @unnumbered Function and Macro Index
963
964 @printindex fn
965
966 @node Variable Index, File Index, Function Index, Top
967 @unnumbered Variable and Constant Macro Index
968
969 @printindex vr
970
971 @node File Index, , Variable Index, Top
972 @unnumbered Program and File Index
973
974 @printindex pg
975
976
977 @shortcontents
978 @contents
979 @bye