7cb735534d1055b79e7aa4536a6f895d777caf04
[kopensolaris-gnu/glibc.git] / manual / maint.texi
1 @c \input /gd/gnu/doc/texinfo
2 @c This is for making the `INSTALL' file for the distribution.
3 @c Makeinfo ignores it when processing the file from the include.
4 @setfilename INSTALL
5
6 @node Maintenance, Copying, Library Summary, Top
7 @appendix Library Maintenance
8
9 @menu
10 * Installation::          How to configure, compile and
11                              install the GNU C library.
12 * Reporting Bugs::        How to report bugs (if you want to
13                              get them fixed) and other troubles
14                              you may have with the GNU C library.
15 * Source Layout::         How to add new functions or header files
16                              to the GNU C library.
17 * Porting::               How to port the GNU C library to
18                              a new machine or operating system.
19 * Contributors::          Contributors to the GNU C Library.
20 @end menu
21
22 @node Installation
23 @appendixsec How to Install the GNU C Library
24 @cindex installing the library
25
26 Installation of the GNU C library is relatively simple, but usually
27 requires several GNU tools to be installed already.
28 @iftex
29 (@pxref{Tools for Installation}, below.)
30 @end iftex
31
32 @menu
33 * Tools for Installation::      We recommend using these tools to build.
34 * Supported Configurations::    What systems the GNU C library runs on.
35 @end menu
36
37 To configure the GNU C library for your system, run the shell script
38 @file{configure} with @code{sh}.  Use an argument which is the
39 conventional GNU name for your system configuration---for example,
40 @samp{sparc-sun-sunos4.1}, for a Sun 4 running SunOS 4.1.
41 @xref{Installation, Installation, Installing GNU CC, gcc.info, Using and
42 Porting GNU CC}, for a full description of standard GNU configuration
43 names.  If you omit the configuration name, @file{configure} will try to
44 guess one for you by inspecting the system it is running on.  It may or
45 may not be able to come up with a guess, and the its guess might be
46 wrong.  @file{configure} will tell you the canonical name of the chosen
47 configuration before proceeding.
48
49 Here are some options that you should specify (if appropriate) when
50 you run @code{configure}:
51
52 @table @samp
53 @item --with-binutils=@var{directory}
54 Use the binutils (assembler and linker) in @file{@var{directory}}, not
55 the ones the C compiler would default to.  You could use this option if
56 the default binutils on your system cannot deal with all the constructs
57 in the GNU C library.  (@code{configure} will detect the problem and
58 suppress these constructs, so the library will still be usable, but
59 functionality may be lost---for example, you can not build a shared libc
60 with old binutils.)
61
62 @c extra blank line makes it look better
63 @item --without-fp
64 @itemx --nfp
65
66 Use this option if your computer lacks hardware floating-point support
67 and your operating system does not emulate an FPU.
68
69 @item --prefix=@var{directory}
70 Install machine-independent data files in subdirectories of
71 @file{@var{directory}}.  (You can also set this in @file{configparms};
72 see below.)  The default is to install in `/usr/local'.
73
74 @item --exec-prefix=@var{directory}
75 Install the library and other machine-dependent files in subdirectories
76 of @file{@var{directory}}.  (You can also set this in
77 @file{configparms}; see below.)  The default is to use <prefix>/bin
78 and <prefix>/sbin.
79
80 @item --enable-shared
81 @itemx --disable-shared
82 Enable or disable building of an ELF shared library on systems that
83 support it.  The default is to build the shared library on systems using
84 ELF when the GNU @code{binutils} are available.
85
86 @item --enable-profile
87 @itemx --disable-profile
88 Enable or disable building of the profiled C library, @samp{-lc_p}.  The
89 default is to build the profiled library.  You may wish to disable it if
90 you don't plan to do profiling, because it doubles the build time of
91 compiling just the unprofiled static library.
92
93 @item --enable-omitfp
94 Enable building a highly-optimized but possibly undebuggable static C
95 library.  This causes the normal static and shared (if enabled) C
96 libraries to be compiled with maximal optimization, including the
97 @samp{-fomit-frame-pointer} switch that makes debugging impossible on
98 many machines, and without debugging information (which makes the
99 binaries substantially smaller).  An additional static library is
100 compiled with no optimization and full debugging information, and
101 installed as @samp{-lc_g}.
102 @end table
103
104 The simplest way to run @code{configure} is to do it in the directory
105 that contains the library sources.  This prepares to build the library
106 in that very directory.
107
108 You can prepare to build the library in some other directory by going
109 to that other directory to run @code{configure}.  In order to run
110 configure, you will have to specify a directory for it, like this:
111
112 @smallexample
113 mkdir sun4
114 cd sun4
115 ../configure sparc-sun-sunos4.1
116 @end smallexample
117
118 @noindent
119 @code{configure} looks for the sources in whatever directory you
120 specified for finding @code{configure} itself.  It does not matter where
121 in the file system the source and build directories are---as long as you
122 specify the source directory when you run @code{configure}, you will get
123 the proper results.
124
125 This feature lets you keep sources and binaries in different
126 directories, and that makes it easy to build the library for several
127 different machines from the same set of sources.  Simply create a
128 build directory for each target machine, and run @code{configure} in
129 that directory specifying the target machine's configuration name.
130
131 The library has a number of special-purpose configuration parameters.
132 These are defined in the file @file{Makeconfig}; see the comments in
133 that file for the details.
134
135 But don't edit the file @file{Makeconfig} yourself---instead, create a
136 file @file{configparms} in the directory where you are building the
137 library, and define in that file the parameters you want to specify.
138 @file{configparms} should @strong{not} be an edited copy of
139 @file{Makeconfig}; specify only the parameters that you want to
140 override.  To see how to set these parameters, find the section of
141 @file{Makeconfig} that says ``These are the configuration variables.''
142 Then for each parameter that you want to change, copy the definition
143 from @file{Makeconfig} to your new @file{configparms} file, and change
144 the value as appropriate for your system.
145
146 It is easy to configure the GNU C library for cross-compilation by
147 setting a few variables in @file{configparms}.  Set @code{CC} to the
148 cross-compiler for the target you configured the library for; it is
149 important to use this same @code{CC} value when running
150 @code{configure}, like this: @samp{CC=@var{target}-gcc configure
151 @var{target}}.  Set @code{BUILD_CC} to the compiler to use for for
152 programs run on the build system as part of compiling the library.  You
153 may need to set @code{AR} and @code{RANLIB} to cross-compiling versions
154 of @code{ar} and @code{ranlib} if the native tools are not configured to
155 work with object files for the target you configured for.
156
157 Some of the machine-dependent code for some machines uses extensions in
158 the GNU C compiler, so you may need to compile the library with GCC.
159 (In fact, all of the existing complete ports require GCC.)
160
161
162 To build the library and related programs, type @code{make}.  This will
163 produce a lot of output, some of which may look like errors from
164 @code{make} (but isn't).  Look for error messages from @code{make}
165 containing @samp{***}.  Those indicate that something is really wrong.
166
167 To build and run some test programs which exercise some of the library
168 facilities, type @code{make check}.  This will produce several files
169 with names like @file{@var{program}.out}.
170
171 To format the @cite{GNU C Library Reference Manual} for printing, type
172 @w{@code{make dvi}}.  You need a working @TeX{} installation to do this.
173
174 To install the library and its header files, and the Info files of the
175 manual, type @code{make install}.  This will build things if necessary,
176 before installing them.  If you want to install the files in a different
177 place than the one specified at configuration time you can specify a
178 value for the Makefile variable @code{install_root} on the command line.
179 This is useful to create chroot'ed environment or to prepare binary
180 releases.@refill
181
182 @node Tools for Installation
183 @appendixsubsec Recommended Tools to Install the GNU C Library
184 @cindex installation tools
185 @cindex tools, for installing library
186
187 We recommend installing the following GNU tools before attempting to
188 build the GNU C library:
189
190 @itemize @bullet
191 @item
192 GNU @code{make} 3.75
193
194 You need the latest version of GNU @code{make}.  Modifying the GNU C
195 Library to work with other @code{make} programs would be so hard that we
196 recommend you port GNU @code{make} instead.  @strong{Really.}  We
197 recommend version GNU @code{make} version 3.75.  Versions 3.76 and
198 3.76.1 are known to have bugs which only show up in big projects like
199 GNU @code{libc}.
200
201 @item
202 GCC 2.7.2.3
203
204 On most platforms, the GNU C library can only be compiled with the GNU C
205 compiler.  We recommend GCC version 2.7.2 or later; earlier versions may
206 have problems.
207
208 On PowerPC, GCC versions dated earlier than 970904 are known not to work
209 (they crash), including 2.7.2.
210
211 @item
212 GNU @code{binutils} 2.8.1.0.17
213
214 Using the GNU @code{binutils} (assembler, linker, and related tools) is
215 preferable when possible, and they are required to build an ELF shared C
216 library.  We recommend @code{binutils} version 2.8.1 or later; earlier
217 versions are known to have problems or to not support all architectures.
218
219 @item
220 GNU @code{texinfo} 3.11
221
222 To correctly translate and install the Texinfo documentation you need
223 this version of the @code{texinfo} package.  Former versions did not
224 understand all the tags used in the document and also the installation
225 mechanisms for the info files was not present or worked differently.
226
227 On some Debian Linux based systems the used @code{install-info} program
228 works differently.  Here you have to run make like this:
229
230 @smallexample
231 make INSTALL_INFO=/path/to/GNU/install-info install
232 @end smallexample
233 @end itemize
234
235 If you change any configuration file you will need also
236
237 @itemize @bullet
238 @item
239 GNU @code{autoconf} 2.12
240 @end itemize
241
242 @noindent
243 and if you change any of the message translation files you will also need
244
245 @itemize @bullet
246 @item
247 @code{GNU gettext} 0.10 or later
248 @end itemize
249
250 If any of the manual files changed you will need this
251
252 @itemize @bullet
253 @item
254 GNU @code{awk} 3.0
255 @end itemize
256
257 @noindent
258 If you upgrade your source tree using the patches made available you probably
259 will need those package above in any case.
260
261
262 @node Supported Configurations
263 @appendixsubsec Supported Configurations
264 @cindex configurations, all supported
265
266 The GNU C Library currently supports configurations that match the
267 following patterns:
268
269 @smallexample
270 alpha-@var{anything}-linux
271 i@var{x}86-@var{anything}-gnu
272 i@var{x}86-@var{anything}-linux
273 m68k-@var{anything}-linux
274 powerpc-@var{anything}-linux
275 sparc64-@var{anything}-linux
276 @end smallexample
277
278 Former releases of this library (version 1.09.1 and perhaps earlier
279 versions) used to run on the following configurations:
280
281 @smallexample
282 alpha-dec-osf1
283 alpha-@var{anything}-linuxecoff
284 i@var{x}86-@var{anything}-bsd4.3
285 i@var{x}86-@var{anything}-isc2.2
286 i@var{x}86-@var{anything}-isc3.@var{n}
287 i@var{x}86-@var{anything}-sco3.2
288 i@var{x}86-@var{anything}-sco3.2v4
289 i@var{x}86-@var{anything}-sysv
290 i@var{x}86-@var{anything}-sysv4
291 i@var{x}86-force_cpu386-none
292 i@var{x}86-sequent-bsd
293 i960-nindy960-none
294 m68k-hp-bsd4.3
295 m68k-mvme135-none
296 m68k-mvme136-none
297 m68k-sony-newsos3
298 m68k-sony-newsos4
299 m68k-sun-sunos4.@var{n}
300 mips-dec-ultrix4.@var{n}
301 mips-sgi-irix4.@var{n}
302 sparc-sun-solaris2.@var{n}
303 sparc-sun-sunos4.@var{n}
304 @end smallexample
305
306 Since no one has volunteered to test and fix the above configurations,
307 these are not supported at the moment.  It's expected that these don't
308 work anymore.  Porting the library is not hard.  If you are interested
309 in doing a port, please contact the glibc maintainers by sending
310 electronic mail to @email{bug-glibc@@prep.ai.mit.edu}.
311
312 Each case of @samp{i@var{x}86} can be @samp{i386}, @samp{i486},
313 @samp{i586}, or @samp{i686}.  All of those configurations produce a
314 library that can run on any of these processors.  The library will be
315 optimized for the specified processor, but will not use instructions not
316 available on all of them.
317
318 While no other configurations are supported, there are handy aliases for
319 these few.  (These aliases work in other GNU software as well.)
320
321 @smallexample
322 decstation
323 hp320-bsd4.3 hp300bsd
324 i486-gnu
325 i586-linux
326 i386-sco
327 i386-sco3.2v4
328 i386-sequent-dynix
329 i386-svr4
330 news
331 sun3-sunos4.@var{n} sun3
332 sun4-solaris2.@var{n} sun4-sunos5.@var{n}
333 sun4-sunos4.@var{n} sun4
334 @end smallexample
335
336 @node Reporting Bugs
337 @appendixsec Reporting Bugs
338 @cindex reporting bugs
339 @cindex bugs, reporting
340
341 There are probably bugs in the GNU C library.  There are certainly
342 errors and omissions in this manual.  If you report them, they will get
343 fixed.  If you don't, no one will ever know about them and they will
344 remain unfixed for all eternity, if not longer.
345
346 To report a bug, first you must find it.  Hopefully, this will be the
347 hard part.  Once you've found a bug, make sure it's really a bug.  A
348 good way to do this is to see if the GNU C library behaves the same way
349 some other C library does.  If so, probably you are wrong and the
350 libraries are right (but not necessarily).  If not, one of the libraries
351 is probably wrong.
352
353 Once you're sure you've found a bug, try to narrow it down to the
354 smallest test case that reproduces the problem.  In the case of a C
355 library, you really only need to narrow it down to one library
356 function call, if possible.  This should not be too difficult.
357
358 The final step when you have a simple test case is to report the bug.
359 When reporting a bug, send your test case, the results you got, the
360 results you expected, what you think the problem might be (if you've
361 thought of anything), your system type, and the version of the GNU C
362 library which you are using.  Also include the files
363 @file{config.status} and @file{config.make} which are created by running
364 @file{configure}; they will be in whatever directory was current when
365 you ran @file{configure}.
366
367 If you think you have found some way in which the GNU C library does not
368 conform to the ISO and POSIX standards (@pxref{Standards and
369 Portability}), that is definitely a bug.  Report it!@refill
370
371 Send bug reports to the Internet address
372 @email{bug-glibc@@prep.ai.mit.edu} or the UUCP path
373 @email{mit-eddie!prep.ai.mit.edu!bug-glibc}.  If you have other problems
374 with installation or use, please report those as well.@refill
375
376 If you are not sure how a function should behave, and this manual
377 doesn't tell you, that's a bug in the manual.  Report that too!  If the
378 function's behavior disagrees with the manual, then either the library
379 or the manual has a bug, so report the disagreement.  If you find any
380 errors or omissions in this manual, please report them to the Internet
381 address @email{bug-glibc-manual@@prep.ai.mit.edu} or the UUCP path
382 @email{mit-eddie!prep.ai.mit.edu!bug-glibc-manual}.
383
384 @node Source Layout
385 @appendixsec Adding New Functions
386
387 The process of building the library is driven by the makefiles, which
388 make heavy use of special features of GNU @code{make}.  The makefiles
389 are very complex, and you probably don't want to try to understand them.
390 But what they do is fairly straightforward, and only requires that you
391 define a few variables in the right places.
392
393 The library sources are divided into subdirectories, grouped by topic.
394
395 The @file{string} subdirectory has all the string-manipulation
396 functions, @file{math} has all the mathematical functions, etc.
397
398 Each subdirectory contains a simple makefile, called @file{Makefile},
399 which defines a few @code{make} variables and then includes the global
400 makefile @file{Rules} with a line like:
401
402 @smallexample
403 include ../Rules
404 @end smallexample
405
406 @noindent
407 The basic variables that a subdirectory makefile defines are:
408
409 @table @code
410 @item subdir
411 The name of the subdirectory, for example @file{stdio}.
412 This variable @strong{must} be defined.
413
414 @item headers
415 The names of the header files in this section of the library,
416 such as @file{stdio.h}.
417
418 @item routines
419 @itemx aux
420 The names of the modules (source files) in this section of the library.
421 These should be simple names, such as @samp{strlen} (rather than
422 complete file names, such as @file{strlen.c}).  Use @code{routines} for
423 modules that define functions in the library, and @code{aux} for
424 auxiliary modules containing things like data definitions.  But the
425 values of @code{routines} and @code{aux} are just concatenated, so there
426 really is no practical difference.@refill
427
428 @item tests
429 The names of test programs for this section of the library.  These
430 should be simple names, such as @samp{tester} (rather than complete file
431 names, such as @file{tester.c}).  @w{@samp{make tests}} will build and
432 run all the test programs.  If a test program needs input, put the test
433 data in a file called @file{@var{test-program}.input}; it will be given to
434 the test program on its standard input.  If a test program wants to be
435 run with arguments, put the arguments (all on a single line) in a file
436 called @file{@var{test-program}.args}.  Test programs should exit with
437 zero status when the test passes, and nonzero status when the test
438 indicates a bug in the library or error in building.
439
440 @item others
441 The names of ``other'' programs associated with this section of the
442 library.  These are programs which are not tests per se, but are other
443 small programs included with the library.  They are built by
444 @w{@samp{make others}}.@refill
445
446 @item install-lib
447 @itemx install-data
448 @itemx install
449 Files to be installed by @w{@samp{make install}}.  Files listed in
450 @samp{install-lib} are installed in the directory specified by
451 @samp{libdir} in @file{configparms} or @file{Makeconfig}
452 (@pxref{Installation}).  Files listed in @code{install-data} are
453 installed in the directory specified by @samp{datadir} in
454 @file{configparms} or @file{Makeconfig}.  Files listed in @code{install}
455 are installed in the directory specified by @samp{bindir} in
456 @file{configparms} or @file{Makeconfig}.@refill
457
458 @item distribute
459 Other files from this subdirectory which should be put into a
460 distribution tar file.  You need not list here the makefile itself or
461 the source and header files listed in the other standard variables.
462 Only define @code{distribute} if there are files used in an unusual way
463 that should go into the distribution.
464
465 @item generated
466 Files which are generated by @file{Makefile} in this subdirectory.
467 These files will be removed by @w{@samp{make clean}}, and they will
468 never go into a distribution.
469
470 @item extra-objs
471 Extra object files which are built by @file{Makefile} in this
472 subdirectory.  This should be a list of file names like @file{foo.o};
473 the files will actually be found in whatever directory object files are
474 being built in.  These files will be removed by @w{@samp{make clean}}.
475 This variable is used for secondary object files needed to build
476 @code{others} or @code{tests}.
477 @end table
478
479 @node Porting
480 @appendixsec Porting the GNU C Library
481
482 The GNU C library is written to be easily portable to a variety of
483 machines and operating systems.  Machine- and operating system-dependent
484 functions are well separated to make it easy to add implementations for
485 new machines or operating systems.  This section describes the layout of
486 the library source tree and explains the mechanisms used to select
487 machine-dependent code to use.
488
489 All the machine-dependent and operating system-dependent files in the
490 library are in the subdirectory @file{sysdeps} under the top-level
491 library source directory.  This directory contains a hierarchy of
492 subdirectories (@pxref{Hierarchy Conventions}).
493
494 Each subdirectory of @file{sysdeps} contains source files for a
495 particular machine or operating system, or for a class of machine or
496 operating system (for example, systems by a particular vendor, or all
497 machines that use IEEE 754 floating-point format).  A configuration
498 specifies an ordered list of these subdirectories.  Each subdirectory
499 implicitly appends its parent directory to the list.  For example,
500 specifying the list @file{unix/bsd/vax} is equivalent to specifying the
501 list @file{unix/bsd/vax unix/bsd unix}.  A subdirectory can also specify
502 that it implies other subdirectories which are not directly above it in
503 the directory hierarchy.  If the file @file{Implies} exists in a
504 subdirectory, it lists other subdirectories of @file{sysdeps} which are
505 appended to the list, appearing after the subdirectory containing the
506 @file{Implies} file.  Lines in an @file{Implies} file that begin with a
507 @samp{#} character are ignored as comments.  For example,
508 @file{unix/bsd/Implies} contains:@refill
509 @smallexample
510 # BSD has Internet-related things.
511 unix/inet
512 @end smallexample
513 @noindent
514 and @file{unix/Implies} contains:
515 @need 300
516 @smallexample
517 posix
518 @end smallexample
519
520 @noindent
521 So the final list is @file{unix/bsd/vax unix/bsd unix/inet unix posix}.
522
523 @file{sysdeps} has a ``special'' subdirectory called @file{generic}.  It
524 is always implicitly appended to the list of subdirectories, so you
525 needn't put it in an @file{Implies} file, and you should not create any
526 subdirectories under it intended to be new specific categories.
527 @file{generic} serves two purposes.  First, the makefiles do not bother
528 to look for a system-dependent version of a file that's not in
529 @file{generic}.  This means that any system-dependent source file must
530 have an analogue in @file{generic}, even if the routines defined by that
531 file are not implemented on other platforms.  Second. the @file{generic}
532 version of a system-dependent file is used if the makefiles do not find
533 a version specific to the system you're compiling for.
534
535 If it is possible to implement the routines in a @file{generic} file in
536 machine-independent C, using only other machine-independent functions in
537 the C library, then you should do so.  Otherwise, make them stubs.  A
538 @dfn{stub} function is a function which cannot be implemented on a
539 particular machine or operating system.  Stub functions always return an
540 error, and set @code{errno} to @code{ENOSYS} (Function not implemented).
541 @xref{Error Reporting}.  If you define a stub function, you must place
542 the statement @code{stub_warning(@var{function})}, where @var{function}
543 is the name of your function, after its definition; also, you must
544 include the file @code{<stub-tag.h>} into your file.  This causes the
545 function to be listed in the installed @code{<gnu/stubs.h>}, and
546 makes GNU ld warn when the function is used.
547
548 Some rare functions are only useful on specific systems and aren't
549 defined at all on others; these do not appear anywhere in the
550 system-independent source code or makefiles (including the
551 @file{generic} directory), only in the system-dependent @file{Makefile}
552 in the specific system's subdirectory.
553
554 If you come across a file that is in one of the main source directories
555 (@file{string}, @file{stdio}, etc.), and you want to write a machine- or
556 operating system-dependent version of it, move the file into
557 @file{sysdeps/generic} and write your new implementation in the
558 appropriate system-specific subdirectory.  Note that if a file is to be
559 system-dependent, it @strong{must not} appear in one of the main source
560 directories.@refill
561
562 There are a few special files that may exist in each subdirectory of
563 @file{sysdeps}:
564
565 @comment Blank lines after items make the table look better.
566 @table @file
567 @item Makefile
568
569 A makefile for this machine or operating system, or class of machine or
570 operating system.  This file is included by the library makefile
571 @file{Makerules}, which is used by the top-level makefile and the
572 subdirectory makefiles.  It can change the variables set in the
573 including makefile or add new rules.  It can use GNU @code{make}
574 conditional directives based on the variable @samp{subdir} (see above) to
575 select different sets of variables and rules for different sections of
576 the library.  It can also set the @code{make} variable
577 @samp{sysdep-routines}, to specify extra modules to be included in the
578 library.  You should use @samp{sysdep-routines} rather than adding
579 modules to @samp{routines} because the latter is used in determining
580 what to distribute for each subdirectory of the main source tree.@refill
581
582 Each makefile in a subdirectory in the ordered list of subdirectories to
583 be searched is included in order.  Since several system-dependent
584 makefiles may be included, each should append to @samp{sysdep-routines}
585 rather than simply setting it:
586
587 @smallexample
588 sysdep-routines := $(sysdep-routines) foo bar
589 @end smallexample
590
591 @need 1000
592 @item Subdirs
593
594 This file contains the names of new whole subdirectories under the
595 top-level library source tree that should be included for this system.
596 These subdirectories are treated just like the system-independent
597 subdirectories in the library source tree, such as @file{stdio} and
598 @file{math}.
599
600 Use this when there are completely new sets of functions and header
601 files that should go into the library for the system this subdirectory
602 of @file{sysdeps} implements.  For example,
603 @file{sysdeps/unix/inet/Subdirs} contains @file{inet}; the @file{inet}
604 directory contains various network-oriented operations which only make
605 sense to put in the library on systems that support the Internet.@refill
606
607 @item Dist
608
609 This file contains the names of files (relative to the subdirectory of
610 @file{sysdeps} in which it appears) which should be included in the
611 distribution.  List any new files used by rules in the @file{Makefile}
612 in the same directory, or header files used by the source files in that
613 directory.  You don't need to list files that are implementations
614 (either C or assembly source) of routines whose names are given in the
615 machine-independent makefiles in the main source tree.
616
617 @item configure
618
619 This file is a shell script fragment to be run at configuration time.
620 The top-level @file{configure} script uses the shell @code{.} command to
621 read the @file{configure} file in each system-dependent directory
622 chosen, in order.  The @file{configure} files are often generated from
623 @file{configure.in} files using Autoconf.
624
625 A system-dependent @file{configure} script will usually add things to
626 the shell variables @samp{DEFS} and @samp{config_vars}; see the
627 top-level @file{configure} script for details.  The script can check for
628 @w{@samp{--with-@var{package}}} options that were passed to the
629 top-level @file{configure}.  For an option
630 @w{@samp{--with-@var{package}=@var{value}}} @file{configure} sets the
631 shell variable @w{@samp{with_@var{package}}} (with any dashes in
632 @var{package} converted to underscores) to @var{value}; if the option is
633 just @w{@samp{--with-@var{package}}} (no argument), then it sets
634 @w{@samp{with_@var{package}}} to @samp{yes}.
635
636 @item configure.in
637
638 This file is an Autoconf input fragment to be processed into the file
639 @file{configure} in this subdirectory.  @xref{Introduction,,,
640 autoconf.info, Autoconf: Generating Automatic Configuration Scripts},
641 for a description of Autoconf.  You should write either @file{configure}
642 or @file{configure.in}, but not both.  The first line of
643 @file{configure.in} should invoke the @code{m4} macro
644 @samp{GLIBC_PROVIDES}.  This macro does several @code{AC_PROVIDE} calls
645 for Autoconf macros which are used by the top-level @file{configure}
646 script; without this, those macros might be invoked again unnecessarily
647 by Autoconf.
648 @end table
649
650 That is the general system for how system-dependencies are isolated.
651 @iftex
652 The next section explains how to decide what directories in
653 @file{sysdeps} to use.  @ref{Porting to Unix}, has some tips on porting
654 the library to Unix variants.
655 @end iftex
656
657 @menu
658 * Hierarchy Conventions::       The layout of the @file{sysdeps} hierarchy.
659 * Porting to Unix::             Porting the library to an average
660                                    Unix-like system.
661 @end menu
662
663 @node Hierarchy Conventions
664 @appendixsubsec Layout of the @file{sysdeps} Directory Hierarchy
665
666 A GNU configuration name has three parts: the CPU type, the
667 manufacturer's name, and the operating system.  @file{configure} uses
668 these to pick the list of system-dependent directories to look for.  If
669 the @samp{--nfp} option is @emph{not} passed to @file{configure}, the
670 directory @file{@var{machine}/fpu} is also used.  The operating system
671 often has a @dfn{base operating system}; for example, if the operating
672 system is @samp{sunos4.1}, the base operating system is @samp{unix/bsd}.
673 The algorithm used to pick the list of directories is simple:
674 @file{configure} makes a list of the base operating system,
675 manufacturer, CPU type, and operating system, in that order.  It then
676 concatenates all these together with slashes in between, to produce a
677 directory name; for example, the configuration @w{@samp{sparc-sun-sunos4.1}}
678 results in @file{unix/bsd/sun/sparc/sunos4.1}.  @file{configure} then
679 tries removing each element of the list in turn, so
680 @file{unix/bsd/sparc} and @file{sun/sparc} are also tried, among others.
681 Since the precise version number of the operating system is often not
682 important, and it would be very inconvenient, for example, to have
683 identical @file{sunos4.1.1} and @file{sunos4.1.2} directories,
684 @file{configure} tries successively less specific operating system names
685 by removing trailing suffixes starting with a period.
686
687 As an example, here is the complete list of directories that would be
688 tried for the configuration @w{@samp{sparc-sun-sunos4.1}} (without the
689 @w{@samp{--nfp}} option):
690
691 @smallexample
692 sparc/fpu
693 unix/bsd/sun/sunos4.1/sparc
694 unix/bsd/sun/sunos4.1
695 unix/bsd/sun/sunos4/sparc
696 unix/bsd/sun/sunos4
697 unix/bsd/sun/sunos/sparc
698 unix/bsd/sun/sunos
699 unix/bsd/sun/sparc
700 unix/bsd/sun
701 unix/bsd/sunos4.1/sparc
702 unix/bsd/sunos4.1
703 unix/bsd/sunos4/sparc
704 unix/bsd/sunos4
705 unix/bsd/sunos/sparc
706 unix/bsd/sunos
707 unix/bsd/sparc
708 unix/bsd
709 unix/sun/sunos4.1/sparc
710 unix/sun/sunos4.1
711 unix/sun/sunos4/sparc
712 unix/sun/sunos4
713 unix/sun/sunos/sparc
714 unix/sun/sunos
715 unix/sun/sparc
716 unix/sun
717 unix/sunos4.1/sparc
718 unix/sunos4.1
719 unix/sunos4/sparc
720 unix/sunos4
721 unix/sunos/sparc
722 unix/sunos
723 unix/sparc
724 unix
725 sun/sunos4.1/sparc
726 sun/sunos4.1
727 sun/sunos4/sparc
728 sun/sunos4
729 sun/sunos/sparc
730 sun/sunos
731 sun/sparc
732 sun
733 sunos4.1/sparc
734 sunos4.1
735 sunos4/sparc
736 sunos4
737 sunos/sparc
738 sunos
739 sparc
740 @end smallexample
741
742 Different machine architectures are conventionally subdirectories at the
743 top level of the @file{sysdeps} directory tree.  For example,
744 @w{@file{sysdeps/sparc}} and @w{@file{sysdeps/m68k}}.  These contain
745 files specific to those machine architectures, but not specific to any
746 particular operating system.  There might be subdirectories for
747 specializations of those architectures, such as
748 @w{@file{sysdeps/m68k/68020}}. Code which is specific to the
749 floating-point coprocessor used with a particular machine should go in
750 @w{@file{sysdeps/@var{machine}/fpu}}.
751
752 There are a few directories at the top level of the @file{sysdeps}
753 hierarchy that are not for particular machine architectures.
754
755 @table @file
756 @item generic
757 As described above (@pxref{Porting}), this is the subdirectory
758 that every configuration implicitly uses after all others.
759
760 @item ieee754
761 This directory is for code using the IEEE 754 floating-point format,
762 where the C type @code{float} is IEEE 754 single-precision format, and
763 @code{double} is IEEE 754 double-precision format.  Usually this
764 directory is referred to in the @file{Implies} file in a machine
765 architecture-specific directory, such as @file{m68k/Implies}.
766
767 @item posix
768 This directory contains implementations of things in the library in
769 terms of @sc{POSIX.1} functions.  This includes some of the @sc{POSIX.1}
770 functions themselves.  Of course, @sc{POSIX.1} cannot be completely
771 implemented in terms of itself, so a configuration using just
772 @file{posix} cannot be complete.
773
774 @item unix
775 This is the directory for Unix-like things.  @xref{Porting to Unix}.
776 @file{unix} implies @file{posix}.  There are some special-purpose
777 subdirectories of @file{unix}:
778
779 @table @file
780 @item unix/common
781 This directory is for things common to both BSD and System V release 4.
782 Both @file{unix/bsd} and @file{unix/sysv/sysv4} imply @file{unix/common}.
783
784 @item unix/inet
785 This directory is for @code{socket} and related functions on Unix systems.
786 The @file{inet} top-level subdirectory is enabled by @file{unix/inet/Subdirs}.
787 @file{unix/common} implies @file{unix/inet}.
788 @end table
789
790 @item mach
791 This is the directory for things based on the Mach microkernel from CMU
792 (including the GNU operating system).  Other basic operating systems
793 (VMS, for example) would have their own directories at the top level of
794 the @file{sysdeps} hierarchy, parallel to @file{unix} and @file{mach}.
795 @end table
796
797 @node Porting to Unix
798 @appendixsubsec Porting the GNU C Library to Unix Systems
799
800 Most Unix systems are fundamentally very similar.  There are variations
801 between different machines, and variations in what facilities are
802 provided by the kernel.  But the interface to the operating system
803 facilities is, for the most part, pretty uniform and simple.
804
805 The code for Unix systems is in the directory @file{unix}, at the top
806 level of the @file{sysdeps} hierarchy.  This directory contains
807 subdirectories (and subdirectory trees) for various Unix variants.
808
809 The functions which are system calls in most Unix systems are
810 implemented in assembly code, which is generated automatically from
811 specifications in the file @file{sysdeps/unix/syscalls.list}.  Some
812 special system calls are implemented in files that are named with a
813 suffix of @samp{.S}; for example, @file{_exit.S}.  Files ending in
814 @samp{.S} are run through the C preprocessor before being fed to the
815 assembler.
816
817 These files all use a set of macros that should be defined in
818 @file{sysdep.h}.  The @file{sysdep.h} file in @file{sysdeps/unix}
819 partially defines them; a @file{sysdep.h} file in another directory must
820 finish defining them for the particular machine and operating system
821 variant.  See @file{sysdeps/unix/sysdep.h} and the machine-specific
822 @file{sysdep.h} implementations to see what these macros are and what
823 they should do.@refill
824
825 The system-specific makefile for the @file{unix} directory (that is, the
826 file @file{sysdeps/unix/Makefile}) gives rules to generate several files
827 from the Unix system you are building the library on (which is assumed
828 to be the target system you are building the library @emph{for}).  All
829 the generated files are put in the directory where the object files are
830 kept; they should not affect the source tree itself.  The files
831 generated are @file{ioctls.h}, @file{errnos.h}, @file{sys/param.h}, and
832 @file{errlist.c} (for the @file{stdio} section of the library).
833
834 @ignore
835 @c This section might be a good idea if it is finished,
836 @c but there's no point including it as it stands. --rms
837 @c @appendixsec Compatibility with Traditional C
838
839 @c ??? This section is really short now.  Want to keep it? --roland
840
841 Although the GNU C library implements the @w{ISO C} library facilities, you
842 @emph{can} use the GNU C library with traditional, ``pre-ISO'' C
843 compilers.  However, you need to be careful because the content and
844 organization of the GNU C library header files differs from that of
845 traditional C implementations.  This means you may need to make changes
846 to your program in order to get it to compile.
847 @end ignore
848
849 @node Contributors
850 @appendixsec Contributors to the GNU C Library
851
852 The GNU C library was written originally by Roland McGrath.  Some parts
853 of the library were contributed or worked on by other people.
854
855 @itemize @bullet
856 @item
857 The @code{getopt} function and related code were written by
858 Richard Stallman, @w{David J. MacKenzie}, and @w{Roland McGrath}.
859
860 @item
861 The merge sort function @code{qsort} was written by Michael J. Haertel.
862
863 @item
864 The quick sort function used as a fallback by @code{qsort} was written
865 by Douglas C. Schmidt.
866
867 @item
868 The memory allocation functions @code{malloc}, @code{realloc} and
869 @code{free} and related code were written by Michael J. Haertel.
870
871 @item
872 Fast implementations of many of the string functions (@code{memcpy},
873 @code{strlen}, etc.) were written by Torbj@"orn Granlund.
874
875 @item
876 The @file{tar.h} header file was written by David J. MacKenzie.
877
878 @item
879 The port to the MIPS DECStation running Ultrix 4
880 (@code{mips-dec-ultrix4})
881 was contributed by Brendan Kehoe and Ian Lance Taylor.
882
883 @item
884 The DES encryption function @code{crypt} and related functions were
885 contributed by Michael Glad.
886
887 @item
888 The @code{ftw} and @code{nftw} function was contributed by Ulrich Drepper.
889
890 @item
891 The startup code to support SunOS shared libraries was contributed by
892 Tom Quinn.
893
894 @item
895 The @code{mktime} function was contributed by Paul Eggert.
896
897 @item
898 The port to the Sequent Symmetry running Dynix version 3
899 (@code{i386-sequent-bsd}) was contributed by Jason Merrill.
900
901 @item
902 The timezone support code is derived from the public-domain timezone
903 package by Arthur David Olson and his many contributors.
904
905 @item
906 The port to the DEC Alpha running OSF/1 (@code{alpha-dec-osf1}) was
907 contributed by Brendan Kehoe, using some code written by Roland McGrath.
908
909 @item
910 The port to SGI machines running Irix 4 (@code{mips-sgi-irix4}) was
911 contributed by Tom Quinn.
912
913 @item
914 The port of the Mach and Hurd code to the MIPS architecture
915 (@code{mips-@var{anything}-gnu}) was contributed by Kazumoto Kojima.
916
917 @item
918 The floating-point printing function used by @code{printf} and friends
919 and the floating-point reading function used by @code{scanf},
920 @code{strtod} and friends were written by Ulrich Drepper.  The
921 multi-precision integer functions used in those functions are taken from
922 GNU MP, which was contributed by Torbj@"orn Granlund.
923
924 @item
925 The internationalization support in the library, and the support
926 programs @code{locale} and @code{localedef}, were written by Ulrich
927 Drepper.  Ulrich Drepper adapted the support code for message catalogs
928 (@file{libintl.h}, etc.) from the GNU @code{gettext} package, which he
929 also wrote.  He also contributed the @code{catgets} support and the
930 entire suite of multi-byte and wide-character support functions
931 (@file{wctype.h}, @file{wchar.h}, etc.).
932
933 @item
934 The implementations of the @file{nsswitch.conf} mechanism and the files
935 and DNS backends for it were designed and written by Ulrich Drepper and
936 Roland McGrath, based on a backend interface defined by Peter Eriksson.
937
938 @item
939 The port to Linux i386/ELF (@code{i386-@var{anything}-linux}) was
940 contributed by Ulrich Drepper, based in large part on work done in
941 Hongjiu Lu's Linux version of the GNU C Library.
942
943 @item
944 The port to Linux/m68k (@code{m68k-@var{anything}-linux}) was
945 contributed by Andreas Schwab.
946
947 @item
948 The ports to Linux/ARM (@code{arm-@var{ANYTHING}-linuxaout}) and ARM
949 standalone (@code{arm-@var{ANYTHING}-none}), as well as parts of the
950 IPv6 support code, were contributed by Philip Blundell.
951
952 @item
953 Richard Henderson contributed the ELF dynamic linking code and other
954 support for the Alpha processor.
955
956 @item
957 David Mosberger-Tang contributed the port to Linux/Alpha
958 (@code{alpha-@var{anything}-linux}).
959
960 @item
961 The port to Linux on PowerPC (@code{powerpc-@var{anything}-linux})
962 was contributed by Geoffrey Keating.
963
964 @item
965 Miles Bader wrote the argp argument-parsing package, and the argz/envz
966 interfaces.
967
968 @item
969 Stephen R. van den Berg contributed a highly-optimized @code{strstr} function.
970
971 @item
972 Ulrich Drepper contributed the @code{hsearch} and @code{drand48}
973 families of functions; reentrant @samp{@dots{}@code{_r}} versions of the
974 @code{random} family; System V shared memory and IPC support code; and
975 several highly-optimized string functions for i@var{x}86 processors.
976
977 @item
978 The math functions are taken from @code{fdlibm-5.1} by Sun
979 Microsystems, as modified by J.T. Conklin, Ian Lance Taylor,
980 Ulrich Drepper, Andreas Schwab, and Roland McGrath.
981
982 @item
983 The @code{libio} library used to implement @code{stdio} functions on
984 some platforms was written by Per Bothner and modified by Ulrich Drepper.
985
986 @item
987 The Internet-related code (most of the @file{inet} subdirectory) and
988 several other miscellaneous functions and header files have been
989 included from 4.4 BSD with little or no modification.
990
991 All code incorporated from 4.4 BSD is under the following copyright:
992
993 @quotation
994 @display
995 Copyright @copyright{} 1991 Regents of the University of California.
996 All rights reserved.
997 @end display
998
999 Redistribution and use in source and binary forms, with or without
1000 modification, are permitted provided that the following conditions
1001 are met:
1002
1003 @enumerate
1004 @item
1005 Redistributions of source code must retain the above copyright
1006 notice, this list of conditions and the following disclaimer.
1007 @item
1008 Redistributions in binary form must reproduce the above copyright
1009 notice, this list of conditions and the following disclaimer in the
1010 documentation and/or other materials provided with the distribution.
1011 @item
1012 All advertising materials mentioning features or use of this software
1013 must display the following acknowledgement:
1014 @quotation
1015 This product includes software developed by the University of
1016 California, Berkeley and its contributors.
1017 @end quotation
1018 @item
1019 Neither the name of the University nor the names of its contributors
1020 may be used to endorse or promote products derived from this software
1021 without specific prior written permission.
1022 @end enumerate
1023
1024 @sc{this software is provided by the regents and contributors ``as is'' and
1025 any express or implied warranties, including, but not limited to, the
1026 implied warranties of merchantability and fitness for a particular purpose
1027 are disclaimed.  in no event shall the regents or contributors be liable
1028 for any direct, indirect, incidental, special, exemplary, or consequential
1029 damages (including, but not limited to, procurement of substitute goods
1030 or services; loss of use, data, or profits; or business interruption)
1031 however caused and on any theory of liability, whether in contract, strict
1032 liability, or tort (including negligence or otherwise) arising in any way
1033 out of the use of this software, even if advised of the possibility of
1034 such damage.}
1035 @end quotation
1036
1037 @item
1038 The random number generation functions @code{random}, @code{srandom},
1039 @code{setstate} and @code{initstate}, which are also the basis for the
1040 @code{rand} and @code{srand} functions, were written by Earl T. Cohen
1041 for the University of California at Berkeley and are copyrighted by the
1042 Regents of the University of California.  They have undergone minor
1043 changes to fit into the GNU C library and to fit the @w{ISO C} standard,
1044 but the functional code is Berkeley's.@refill
1045
1046 @item
1047 The Internet resolver code is taken directly from BIND 4.9.5, which is
1048 under both the Berkeley copyright above and also:
1049
1050 @quotation
1051 Portions Copyright @copyright{} 1993 by Digital Equipment Corporation.
1052
1053 Permission to use, copy, modify, and distribute this software for any
1054 purpose with or without fee is hereby granted, provided that the above
1055 copyright notice and this permission notice appear in all copies, and
1056 that the name of Digital Equipment Corporation not be used in
1057 advertising or publicity pertaining to distribution of the document or
1058 software without specific, written prior permission.
1059
1060 @sc{the software is provided ``as is'' and digital equipment corp.
1061 disclaims all warranties with regard to this software, including all
1062 implied warranties of merchantability and fitness.  in no event shall
1063 digital equipment corporation be liable for any special, direct,
1064 indirect, or consequential damages or any damages whatsoever resulting
1065 from loss of use, data or profits, whether in an action of contract,
1066 negligence or other tortious action, arising out of or in connection
1067 with the use or performance of this software.}
1068 @end quotation
1069
1070 @item
1071 The code to support Sun RPC is taken verbatim from Sun's
1072 @w{@sc{rpcsrc-4.0}} distribution, and is covered by this copyright:
1073
1074 @quotation
1075 @display
1076 Copyright @copyright{} 1984, Sun Microsystems, Inc.
1077 @end display
1078
1079 Sun RPC is a product of Sun Microsystems, Inc. and is provided for
1080 unrestricted use provided that this legend is included on all tape media
1081 and as a part of the software program in whole or part.  Users may copy
1082 or modify Sun RPC without charge, but are not authorized to license or
1083 distribute it to anyone else except as part of a product or program
1084 developed by the user.
1085
1086 @sc{sun rpc is provided as is with no warranties of any kind including the
1087 warranties of design, merchantibility and fitness for a particular
1088 purpose, or arising from a course of dealing, usage or trade practice.}
1089
1090 Sun RPC is provided with no support and without any obligation on the
1091 part of Sun Microsystems, Inc. to assist in its use, correction,
1092 modification or enhancement.
1093
1094 @sc{sun microsystems, inc. shall have no liability with respect to the
1095 infringement of copyrights, trade secrets or any patents by sun rpc
1096 or any part thereof.}
1097
1098 In no event will Sun Microsystems, Inc. be liable for any lost revenue
1099 or profits or other special, indirect and consequential damages, even if
1100 Sun has been advised of the possibility of such damages.
1101
1102 @display
1103 Sun Microsystems, Inc.
1104 2550 Garcia Avenue
1105 Mountain View, California  94043
1106 @end display
1107 @end quotation
1108
1109 @item
1110 Some of the support code for Mach is taken from Mach 3.0 by CMU,
1111 and is under the following copyright terms:
1112
1113 @quotation
1114 @display
1115 Mach Operating System
1116 Copyright @copyright{} 1991,1990,1989 Carnegie Mellon University
1117 All Rights Reserved.
1118 @end display
1119
1120 Permission to use, copy, modify and distribute this software and its
1121 documentation is hereby granted, provided that both the copyright
1122 notice and this permission notice appear in all copies of the
1123 software, derivative works or modified versions, and any portions
1124 thereof, and that both notices appear in supporting documentation.
1125
1126 @sc{carnegie mellon allows free use of this software in its ``as is''
1127 condition.  carnegie mellon disclaims any liability of any kind for
1128 any damages whatsoever resulting from the use of this software.}
1129
1130 Carnegie Mellon requests users of this software to return to
1131
1132 @display
1133  Software Distribution Coordinator
1134  School of Computer Science
1135  Carnegie Mellon University
1136  Pittsburgh PA 15213-3890
1137 @end display
1138
1139 @noindent
1140 or @email{Software.Distribution@@CS.CMU.EDU} any improvements or
1141 extensions that they make and grant Carnegie Mellon the rights to
1142 redistribute these changes.
1143 @end quotation
1144
1145 @item
1146 The code for the database library @file{libdb} comes from the 2.3
1147 release of Berkeley DB. That code is under the same copyright as 4.4 BSD
1148 and also:
1149
1150 @quotation
1151 @display
1152 Copyright @copyright{} 1990, 1993, 1994, 1995, 1996, 1997
1153 Sleepycat Software.  All rights reserved.
1154 @end display
1155
1156 Redistribution and use in source and binary forms, with or without
1157 modification, are permitted provided that the following conditions
1158 are met:
1159
1160 @enumerate
1161 @item
1162 Redistributions of source code must retain the above copyright
1163 notice, this list of conditions and the following disclaimer.
1164 @item
1165 Redistributions in binary form must reproduce the above copyright
1166 notice, this list of conditions and the following disclaimer in the
1167 documentation and/or other materials provided with the distribution.
1168 @item
1169 Redistributions in any form must be accompanied by information on
1170 how to obtain complete source code for the DB software and any
1171 accompanying software that uses the DB software.  The source code
1172 must either be included in the distribution or be available for no
1173 more than the cost of distribution plus a nominal fee, and must be
1174 freely redistributable under reasonable conditions.  For an
1175 executable file, complete source code means the source code for all
1176 modules it contains.  It does not mean source code for modules or
1177 files that typically accompany the operating system on which the
1178 executable file runs, e.g., standard library modules or system
1179 header files.
1180 @end enumerate
1181
1182 @sc{this software is provided by sleepycat software ``as is'' and
1183 any express or implied warranties, including, but not limited to, the
1184 implied warranties of merchantability and fitness for a particular purpose
1185 are disclaimed.  in no event shall sleepycat software be liable
1186 for any direct, indirect, incidental, special, exemplary, or consequential
1187 damages (including, but not limited to, procurement of substitute goods
1188 or services; loss of use, data, or profits; or business interruption)
1189 however caused and on any theory of liability, whether in contract, strict
1190 liability, or tort (including negligence or otherwise) arising in any way
1191 out of the use of this software, even if advised of the possibility of
1192 such damage.}
1193
1194 @display
1195 Portions copyright @copyright{} 1995, 1996
1196 The President and Fellows of Harvard University.
1197 All rights reserved.
1198 @end display
1199
1200 Redistribution and use in source and binary forms, with or without
1201 modification, are permitted provided that the following conditions
1202 are met:
1203 @enumerate
1204 @item
1205 Redistributions of source code must retain the above copyright
1206 notice, this list of conditions and the following disclaimer.
1207 @item
1208 Redistributions in binary form must reproduce the above copyright
1209 notice, this list of conditions and the following disclaimer in the
1210 documentation and/or other materials provided with the distribution.
1211 @item
1212 All advertising materials mentioning features or use of this software
1213 must display the following acknowledgement:
1214 @quotation
1215  This product includes software developed by Harvard University
1216  and its contributors.
1217 @end quotation
1218 @item
1219 Neither the name of the University nor the names of its contributors
1220 may be used to endorse or promote products derived from this software
1221 without specific prior written permission.
1222 @end enumerate
1223
1224 @sc{this software is provided by harvard and its contributors ``as is'' and
1225 any express or implied warranties, including, but not limited to, the
1226 implied warranties of merchantability and fitness for a particular purpose
1227 are disclaimed.  in no event shall harvard or its contributors be liable
1228 for any direct, indirect, incidental, special, exemplary, or consequential
1229 damages (including, but not limited to, procurement of substitute goods
1230 or services; loss of use, data, or profits; or business interruption)
1231 however caused and on any theory of liability, whether in contract, strict
1232 liability, or tort (including negligence or otherwise) arising in any way
1233 out of the use of this software, even if advised of the possibility of
1234 such damage.}
1235
1236 @noindent
1237 For a license to use, redistribute or sell DB software under conditions
1238 other than those described above, or to purchase support for this
1239 software, please contact Sleepycat Software at
1240
1241 @display
1242  Sleepycat Software
1243  394 E. Riding Dr.
1244  Carlisle, MA 01741
1245  USA
1246  +1-508-287-4781
1247 @end display
1248
1249 or @email{db@@sleepycat.com}.
1250
1251 @end quotation
1252
1253 @end itemize
1254
1255 @c @bye