58b9ffa481563fa355ec21b335a9948f744931f2
[kopensolaris-gnu/glibc.git] / manual / socket.texi
1 @node Sockets, Low-Level Terminal Interface, Pipes and FIFOs, Top
2 @chapter Sockets
3
4 This chapter describes the GNU facilities for interprocess
5 communication using sockets.
6
7 @cindex socket
8 @cindex interprocess communication, with sockets
9 A @dfn{socket} is a generalized interprocess communication channel.
10 Like a pipe, a socket is represented as a file descriptor.  But,
11 unlike pipes, sockets support communication between unrelated
12 processes, and even between processes running on different machines
13 that communicate over a network.  Sockets are the primary means of
14 communicating with other machines; @code{telnet}, @code{rlogin},
15 @code{ftp}, @code{talk}, and the other familiar network programs use
16 sockets.
17
18 Not all operating systems support sockets.  In the GNU library, the
19 header file @file{sys/socket.h} exists regardless of the operating
20 system, and the socket functions always exist, but if the system does
21 not really support sockets, these functions always fail.
22
23 @strong{Incomplete:} We do not currently document the facilities for
24 broadcast messages or for configuring Internet interfaces.
25
26 @menu
27 * Socket Concepts::     Basic concepts you need to know about.
28 * Communication Styles::Stream communication, datagrams, and other styles.
29 * Socket Addresses::    How socket names (``addresses'') work.
30 * File Namespace::      Details about the file namespace.
31 * Internet Namespace::  Details about the Internet namespace.
32 * Misc Namespaces::     Other namespaces not documented fully here.
33 * Open/Close Sockets::  Creating sockets and destroying them.
34 * Connections::         Operations on sockets with connection state.
35 * Datagrams::           Operations on datagram sockets.
36 * Inetd::               Inetd is a daemon that starts servers on request.
37                            The most convenient way to write a server
38                            is to make it work with Inetd.
39 * Socket Options::      Miscellaneous low-level socket options.
40 * Networks Database::   Accessing the database of network names.
41 @end menu
42
43 @node Socket Concepts
44 @section Socket Concepts
45
46 @cindex communication style (of a socket)
47 @cindex style of communication (of a socket)
48 When you create a socket, you must specify the style of communication
49 you want to use and the type of protocol that should implement it.
50 The @dfn{communication style} of a socket defines the user-level
51 semantics of sending and receiving data on the socket.  Choosing a
52 communication style specifies the answers to questions such as these:
53
54 @itemize @bullet
55 @item
56 @cindex packet
57 @cindex byte stream
58 @cindex stream (sockets)
59 @strong{What are the units of data transmission?}  Some communication
60 styles regard the data as a sequence of bytes, with no larger
61 structure; others group the bytes into records (which are known in
62 this context as @dfn{packets}).
63
64 @item
65 @cindex loss of data on sockets
66 @cindex data loss on sockets
67 @strong{Can data be lost during normal operation?}  Some communication
68 styles guarantee that all the data sent arrives in the order it was
69 sent (barring system or network crashes); others styles occasionally
70 lose data as a normal part of operation, and may sometimes deliver
71 packets more than once or in the wrong order.
72
73 Designing a program to use unreliable communication styles usually
74 involves taking precautions to detect lost or misordered packets and
75 to retransmit data as needed.
76
77 @item
78 @strong{Is communication entirely with one partner?}  Some
79 communication styles are like a telephone call---you make a
80 @dfn{connection} with one remote socket, and then exchange data
81 freely.  Other styles are like mailing letters---you specify a
82 destination address for each message you send.
83 @end itemize
84
85 @cindex namespace (of socket)
86 @cindex domain (of socket)
87 @cindex socket namespace
88 @cindex socket domain
89 You must also choose a @dfn{namespace} for naming the socket.  A socket
90 name (``address'') is meaningful only in the context of a particular
91 namespace.  In fact, even the data type to use for a socket name may
92 depend on the namespace.  Namespaces are also called ``domains'', but we
93 avoid that word as it can be confused with other usage of the same
94 term.  Each namespace has a symbolic name that starts with @samp{PF_}.
95 A corresponding symbolic name starting with @samp{AF_} designates the
96 address format for that namespace.
97
98 @cindex network protocol
99 @cindex protocol (of socket)
100 @cindex socket protocol
101 @cindex protocol family
102 Finally you must next choose the @dfn{protocol} to carry out the
103 communication.  The protocol determines what low-level mechanism is used
104 to transmit and receive data.  Each protocol is valid for a particular
105 namespace and communication style; a namespace is sometimes called a
106 @dfn{protocol family} because of this, which is why the namespace names
107 start with @samp{PF_}.
108
109 The rules of a protocol apply to the data passing between two programs,
110 perhaps on different computers; most of these rules are handled by the
111 operating system, and you need not know about them.  What you do need to
112 know about protocols is this:
113
114 @itemize @bullet
115 @item
116 In order to have communication between two sockets, they must specify
117 the @emph{same} protocol.
118
119 @item
120 Each protocol is meaningful with particular style/namespace
121 combinations and cannot be used with inappropriate combinations.  For
122 example, the TCP protocol fits only the byte stream style of
123 communication and the Internet namespace.
124
125 @item
126 For each combination of style and namespace, there is a @dfn{default
127 protocol} which you can request by specifying 0 as the protocol
128 number.  And that's what you should normally do---use the default.
129 @end itemize
130
131 @node Communication Styles
132 @section Communication Styles
133
134 The GNU library includes support for several different kinds of sockets,
135 each with different characteristics.  This section describes the
136 supported socket types.  The symbolic constants listed here are
137 defined in @file{sys/socket.h}.
138 @pindex sys/socket.h
139
140 @comment sys/socket.h
141 @comment BSD
142 @deftypevr Macro int SOCK_STREAM
143 The @code{SOCK_STREAM} style is like a pipe (@pxref{Pipes and FIFOs});
144 it operates over a connection with a particular remote socket, and
145 transmits data reliably as a stream of bytes.
146
147 Use of this style is covered in detail in @ref{Connections}.
148 @end deftypevr
149
150 @comment sys/socket.h
151 @comment BSD
152 @deftypevr Macro int SOCK_DGRAM
153 The @code{SOCK_DGRAM} style is used for sending
154 individually-addressed packets, unreliably.  
155 It is the diametrical opposite of @code{SOCK_STREAM}.
156
157 Each time you write data to a socket of this kind, that data becomes
158 one packet.  Since @code{SOCK_DGRAM} sockets do not have connections,
159 you must specify the recipient address with each packet.
160
161 The only guarantee that the system makes about your requests to
162 transmit data is that it will try its best to deliver each packet you
163 send.  It may succeed with the sixth packet after failing with the
164 fourth and fifth packets; the seventh packet may arrive before the
165 sixth, and may arrive a second time after the sixth.
166
167 The typical use for @code{SOCK_DGRAM} is in situations where it is
168 acceptible to simply resend a packet if no response is seen in a
169 reasonable amount of time.
170
171 @xref{Datagrams}, for detailed information about how to use datagram
172 sockets.
173 @end deftypevr
174
175 @ignore
176 @c This appears to be only for the NS domain, which we aren't
177 @c discussing and probably won't support either.
178 @comment sys/socket.h
179 @comment BSD
180 @deftypevr Macro int SOCK_SEQPACKET
181 This style is like @code{SOCK_STREAM} except that the data is
182 structured into packets.
183
184 A program that receives data over a @code{SOCK_SEQPACKET} socket
185 should be prepared to read the entire message packet in a single call
186 to @code{read}; if it only reads part of the message, the remainder of
187 the message is simply discarded instead of being available for
188 subsequent calls to @code{read}.
189
190 Many protocols do not support this communication style.
191 @end deftypevr
192 @end ignore
193
194 @ignore
195 @comment sys/socket.h
196 @comment BSD
197 @deftypevr Macro int SOCK_RDM
198 This style is a reliable version of @code{SOCK_DGRAM}: it sends
199 individually addressed packets, but guarantees that each packet sent
200 arrives exactly once.
201
202 @strong{Warning:} It is not clear this is actually supported
203 by any operating system.
204 @end deftypevr
205 @end ignore
206
207 @comment sys/socket.h
208 @comment BSD
209 @deftypevr Macro int SOCK_RAW
210 This style provides access to low-level network protocols and
211 interfaces.  Ordinary user programs usually have no need to use this
212 style.
213 @end deftypevr
214
215 @node Socket Addresses
216 @section Socket Addresses
217
218 @cindex address of socket
219 @cindex name of socket
220 @cindex binding a socket address
221 @cindex socket address (name) binding
222 The name of a socket is normally called an @dfn{address}.  The
223 functions and symbols for dealing with socket addresses were named
224 inconsistently, sometimes using the term ``name'' and sometimes using
225 ``address''.  You can regard these terms as synonymous where sockets
226 are concerned.
227
228 A socket newly created with the @code{socket} function has no
229 address.  Other processes can find it for communication only if you
230 give it an address.  We call this @dfn{binding} the address to the
231 socket, and the way to do it is with the @code{bind} function.
232
233 You need be concerned with the address of a socket if other processes
234 are to find it and start communicating with it.  You can specify an
235 address for other sockets, but this is usually pointless; the first time
236 you send data from a socket, or use it to initiate a connection, the
237 system assigns an address automatically if you have not specified one.
238
239 Occasionally a client needs to specify an address because the server
240 discriminates based on addresses; for example, the rsh and rlogin
241 protocols look at the client's socket address and don't bypass password
242 checking unless it is less than @code{IPPORT_RESERVED} (@pxref{Ports}).
243
244 The details of socket addresses vary depending on what namespace you are
245 using.  @xref{File Namespace}, or @ref{Internet Namespace}, for specific
246 information.
247
248 Regardless of the namespace, you use the same functions @code{bind} and
249 @code{getsockname} to set and examine a socket's address.  These
250 functions use a phony data type, @code{struct sockaddr *}, to accept the
251 address.  In practice, the address lives in a structure of some other
252 data type appropriate to the address format you are using, but you cast
253 its address to @code{struct sockaddr *} when you pass it to
254 @code{bind}.
255
256 @menu
257 * Address Formats::             About @code{struct sockaddr}.
258 * Setting Address::             Binding an address to a socket.
259 * Reading Address::             Reading the address of a socket.
260 @end menu
261
262 @node Address Formats
263 @subsection Address Formats
264
265 The functions @code{bind} and @code{getsockname} use the generic data
266 type @code{struct sockaddr *} to represent a pointer to a socket
267 address.  You can't use this data type effectively to interpret an
268 address or construct one; for that, you must use the proper data type
269 for the socket's namespace.
270
271 Thus, the usual practice is to construct an address in the proper
272 namespace-specific type, then cast a pointer to @code{struct sockaddr *}
273 when you call @code{bind} or @code{getsockname}.
274
275 The one piece of information that you can get from the @code{struct
276 sockaddr} data type is the @dfn{address format} designator which tells
277 you which data type to use to understand the address fully.
278
279 @pindex sys/socket.h
280 The symbols in this section are defined in the header file
281 @file{sys/socket.h}.
282
283 @comment sys/socket.h
284 @comment BSD
285 @deftp {Date Type} {struct sockaddr}
286 The @code{struct sockaddr} type itself has the following members:
287
288 @table @code
289 @item short int sa_family
290 This is the code for the address format of this address.  It
291 identifies the format of the data which follows.
292
293 @item char sa_data[14]
294 This is the actual socket address data, which is format-dependent.  Its
295 length is also format-dependent, and may well be more than 14.  The
296 length 14 of @code{sa_data} is essentially arbitrary.
297 @end table
298 @end deftp
299
300 Each address format has a symbolic name which starts with @samp{AF_}.
301 Each of them corresponds to a @samp{PF_} symbol which designates the
302 corresponding namespace.  Here is a list of address format names:
303
304 @table @code
305 @comment sys/socket.h
306 @comment GNU
307 @item AF_FILE
308 @vindex AF_FILE
309 This designates the address format that goes with the file namespace.
310 (@code{PF_FILE} is the name of that namespace.)  @xref{File Namespace
311 Details}, for information about this address format.
312
313 @comment sys/socket.h
314 @comment BSD
315 @item AF_UNIX
316 @vindex AF_UNIX
317 This is a synonym for @code{AF_FILE}, for compatibility.
318 (@code{PF_UNIX} is likewise a synonym for @code{PF_FILE}.)
319
320 @comment sys/socket.h
321 @comment BSD
322 @item AF_INET
323 @vindex AF_INET
324 This designates the address format that goes with the Internet
325 namespace.  (@code{PF_INET} is the name of that namespace.)
326 @xref{Internet Address Format}.
327
328 @comment sys/socket.h
329 @comment BSD
330 @item AF_UNSPEC
331 @vindex AF_UNSPEC
332 This designates no particular address format.  It is used only in rare
333 cases, such as to clear out the default destination address of a
334 ``connected'' datagram socket.  @xref{Sending Datagrams}.
335
336 The corresponding namespace designator symbol @code{PF_UNSPEC} exists
337 for completeness, but there is no reason to use it in a program.
338 @end table
339
340 @file{sys/socket.h} defines symbols starting with @samp{AF_} for many
341 different kinds of networks, all or most of which are not actually
342 implemented.  We will document those that really work, as we receive
343 information about how to use them.
344
345 @node Setting Address
346 @subsection Setting a Socket's Address
347
348 @pindex sys/socket.h
349 Use the @code{bind} function to assign an address to a socket.  The
350 prototype for @code{bind} is in the header file @file{sys/socket.h}.
351 For examples of use, see @ref{File Namespace}, or see @ref{Inet Example}.
352
353 @comment sys/socket.h
354 @comment BSD
355 @deftypefun int bind (int @var{socket}, struct sockaddr *@var{addr}, size_t @var{length})
356 The @code{bind} function assigns an address to the socket
357 @var{socket}.  The @var{addr} and @var{length} arguments specify the
358 address; the detailed format of the address depends on the namespace.
359 The first part of the address is always the format designator, which
360 specifies a namespace, and says that the address is in the format for
361 that namespace.
362
363 The return value is @code{0} on success and @code{-1} on failure.  The
364 following @code{errno} error conditions are defined for this function:
365
366 @table @code
367 @item EBADF
368 The @var{socket} argument is not a valid file descriptor.
369
370 @item ENOTSOCK
371 The descriptor @var{socket} is not a socket.
372
373 @item EADDRNOTAVAIL
374 The specified address is not available on this machine.
375
376 @item EADDRINUSE
377 Some other socket is already using the specified address.
378
379 @item EINVAL
380 The socket @var{socket} already has an address.
381
382 @item EACCESS
383 You do not have permission to access the requested address.  (In the
384 Internet domain, only the super-user is allowed to specify a port number
385 in the range 0 through @code{IPPORT_RESERVED} minus one; see
386 @ref{Ports}.)
387 @end table
388
389 Additional conditions may be possible depending on the particular namespace
390 of the socket.
391 @end deftypefun
392
393 @node Reading Address
394 @subsection Reading a Socket's Address
395
396 @pindex sys/socket.h
397 Use the function @code{getsockname} to examine the address of an
398 Internet socket.  The prototype for this function is in the header file
399 @file{sys/socket.h}.
400
401 @comment sys/socket.h
402 @comment BSD
403 @deftypefun int getsockname (int @var{socket}, struct sockaddr *@var{addr}, size_t *@var{length_ptr})
404 The @code{getsockname} function returns information about the
405 address of the socket @var{socket} in the locations specified by the
406 @var{addr} and @var{length_ptr} arguments.  Note that the
407 @var{length_ptr} is a pointer; you should initialize it to be the
408 allocation size of @var{addr}, and on return it contains the actual
409 size of the address data.
410
411 The format of the address data depends on the socket namespace.  The
412 length of the information is usually fixed for a given namespace, so
413 normally you can know exactly how much space is needed and can provide
414 that much.  The usual practice is to allocate a place for the value
415 using the proper data type for the socket's namespace, then cast its
416 address to @code{struct sockaddr *} to pass it to @code{getsockname}.
417
418 The return value is @code{0} on success and @code{-1} on error.  The
419 following @code{errno} error conditions are defined for this function:
420
421 @table @code
422 @item EBADF
423 The @var{socket} argument is not a valid file descriptor.
424
425 @item ENOTSOCK
426 The descriptor @var{socket} is not a socket.
427
428 @item ENOBUFS
429 There are not enough internal buffers available for the operation.
430 @end table
431 @end deftypefun
432
433 You can't read the address of a socket in the file namespace.  This is
434 consistent with the rest of the system; in general, there's no way to
435 find a file's name from a descriptor for that file.
436
437 @node File Namespace
438 @section The File Namespace
439 @cindex file namespace, for sockets
440
441 This section describes the details of the file namespace, whose
442 symbolic name (required when you create a socket) is @code{PF_FILE}.
443
444 @menu
445 * Concepts: File Namespace Concepts.    What you need to understand.
446 * Details: File Namespace Details.      Address format, symbolic names, etc.
447 * Example: File Socket Example.         Example of creating a socket.
448 @end menu
449
450 @node File Namespace Concepts
451 @subsection File Namespace Concepts
452
453 In the file namespace, socket addresses are file names.  You can specify
454 any file name you want as the address of the socket, but you must have
455 write permission on the directory containing it.  In order to connect to
456 a socket, you must have read permission for it.  It's common to put
457 these files in the @file{/tmp} directory.
458
459 One peculiarity of the file namespace is that the name is only used when
460 opening the connection; once that is over with, the address is not
461 meaningful and may not exist.
462
463 Another peculiarity is that you cannot connect to such a socket from
464 another machine--not even if the other machine shares the file system
465 which contains the name of the socket.  You can see the socket in a
466 directory listing, but connecting to it never succeeds.  Some programs
467 take advantage of this, such as by asking the client to send its own
468 process ID, and using the process IDs to distinguish between clients.
469 However, we recommend you not use this method in protocols you design,
470 as we might someday permit connections from other machines that mount
471 the same file systems.  Instead, send each new client an identifying
472 number if you want it to have one.
473
474 After you close a socket in the file namespace, you should delete the
475 file name from the file system.  Use @code{unlink} or @code{remove} to
476 do this; see @ref{Deleting Files}.
477
478 The file namespace supports just one protocol for any communication
479 style; it is protocol number @code{0}.
480
481 @node File Namespace Details
482 @subsection Details of File Namespace
483
484 @pindex sys/socket.h
485 To create a socket in the file namespace, use the constant
486 @code{PF_FILE} as the @var{namespace} argument to @code{socket} or
487 @code{socketpair}.  This constant is defined in @file{sys/socket.h}.
488
489 @comment sys/socket.h
490 @comment GNU
491 @deftypevr Macro int PF_FILE
492 This designates the file namespace, in which socket addresses are file
493 names, and its associated family of protocols.
494 @end deftypevr
495
496 @comment sys/socket.h
497 @comment BSD
498 @deftypevr Macro int PF_UNIX
499 This is a synonym for @code{PF_FILE}, for compatibility's sake.
500 @end deftypevr
501
502 The structure for specifying socket names in the file namespace is
503 defined in the header file @file{sys/un.h}:
504 @pindex sys/un.h
505
506 @comment sys/un.h
507 @comment BSD
508 @deftp {Data Type} {struct sockaddr_un}
509 This structure is used to specify file namespace socket addresses.  It has
510 the following members:
511
512 @table @code
513 @item short int sun_family
514 This identifies the address family or format of the socket address.
515 You should store the value @code{AF_FILE} to designate the file
516 namespace.  @xref{Socket Addresses}.
517
518 @item char sun_path[108]
519 This is the file name to use.
520
521 @strong{Incomplete:}  Why is 108 a magic number?  RMS suggests making
522 this a zero-length array and tweaking the example following to use
523 @code{alloca} to allocate an appropriate amount of storage based on
524 the length of the filename.
525 @end table
526 @end deftp
527
528 You should compute the @var{length} parameter for a socket address in
529 the file namespace as the sum of the size of the @code{sun_family}
530 component and the string length (@emph{not} the allocation size!) of
531 the file name string.
532
533 @node File Socket Example
534 @subsection Example of File-Namespace Sockets
535
536 Here is an example showing how to create and name a socket in the file
537 namespace.
538
539 @example
540 @include makefsock.c.texi
541 @end example
542
543 @node Internet Namespace
544 @section The Internet Namespace
545 @cindex Internet namespace, for sockets
546
547 This section describes the details the protocols and socket naming
548 conventions used in the Internet namespace.
549
550 To create a socket in the Internet namespace, use the symbolic name
551 @code{PF_INET} of this namespace as the @var{namespace} argument to
552 @code{socket} or @code{socketpair}.  This macro is defined in
553 @file{sys/socket.h}.
554 @pindex sys/socket.h
555
556 @comment sys/socket.h
557 @comment BSD
558 @deftypevr Macro int PF_INET
559 This designates the Internet namespace and associated family of
560 protocols.
561 @end deftypevr
562
563 A socket address for the Internet namespace includes the following components:
564
565 @itemize @bullet
566 @item
567 The address of the machine you want to connect to.  Internet addresses
568 can be specified in several ways; these are discussed in @ref{Internet
569 Address Format}, @ref{Host Addresses}, and @ref{Host Names}.
570
571 @item
572 A port number for that machine.  @xref{Ports}.
573 @end itemize
574
575 You must ensure that the address and port number are represented in a
576 canonical format called @dfn{network byte order}.  @xref{Byte Order},
577 for information about this.
578
579 @menu
580 * Internet Address Format::     How socket addresses are specified in the
581                                  Internet namespace.
582 * Host Addresses::              All about host addresses of internet host.
583 * Protocols Database::          Referring to protocols by name.
584 * Ports::                       Internet port numbers.
585 * Services Database::           Ports may have symbolic names.
586 * Byte Order::                  Different hosts may use different byte
587                                  ordering conventions; you need to
588                                  canonicalize host address and port number. 
589 * Inet Example::                Putting it all together.
590 @end menu
591
592 @node Internet Address Format
593 @subsection Internet Socket Address Format
594
595 In the Internet namespace, a socket address consists of a host address
596 and a port on that host.  In addition, the protocol you choose serves
597 effectively as a part of the address because local port numbers are
598 meaningful only within a particular protocol.
599
600 The data type for representing socket addresses in the Internet namespace
601 is defined in the header file @file{netinet/in.h}.
602 @pindex netinet/in.h
603
604 @comment netinet/in.h
605 @comment BSD
606 @deftp {Data Type} {struct sockaddr_in}
607 This is the data type used to represent socket addresses in the
608 Internet namespace.  It has the following members:
609
610 @table @code
611 @item short int sin_family
612 This identifies the address family or format of the socket address.
613 You should store the value of @code{AF_INET} in this member.
614 @xref{Socket Addresses}.
615
616 @item struct in_addr sin_addr
617 This is the Internet address of the host machine.  @xref{Host
618 Addresses}, and @ref{Host Names}, for how to get a value to store
619 here.
620
621 @item unsigned short int sin_port
622 This is the port number.  @xref{Ports}.
623 @end table
624 @end deftp
625
626 When you call @code{bind} or @code{getsockname}, you should specify
627 @code{sizeof (struct sockaddr_in)} as the @var{length} parameter if
628 you are using an Internet namespace socket address.
629
630 @node Host Addresses
631 @subsection Host Addresses
632
633 Each computer on the Internet has one or more @dfn{Internet addresses},
634 numbers which identify that computer among all those on the Internet.
635 Users typically write numeric host addresses as sequences of four
636 numbers, separated by periods, as in @samp{128.52.46.32}.
637
638 Each computer also has one or more @dfn{host names}, which are strings
639 of words separated by periods, as in @samp{churchy.gnu.ai.mit.edu}.
640
641 Programs that let the user specify a host typically accept both numeric
642 addresses and host names.  But the program needs a numeric address to
643 open a connection; to use a host name, you must convert it to the
644 numeric address it stands for.
645
646 @menu
647 * Abstract Host Addresses::     What a host number consists of.
648 * Data type: Host Address Data Type.    Data type for a host number.
649 * Functions: Host Address Functions.    Functions to operate on them.
650 * Names: Host Names.            Translating host names to host numbers.
651 @end menu
652
653 @node Abstract Host Addresses 
654 @subsubsection Internet Host Addresses
655 @cindex host address, Internet
656 @cindex Internet host address
657
658 @ifinfo
659 Each computer on the Internet has one or more Internet addresses,
660 numbers which identify that computer among all those on the Internet.
661 @end ifinfo
662
663 @cindex network number
664 @cindex local network address number
665 An Internet host address is a number containing four bytes of data.
666 These are divided into two parts, a @dfn{network number} and a
667 @dfn{local network address number} within that network.  The network
668 number consists of the first one, two or three bytes; the rest of the
669 bytes are the local address.
670
671 Network numbers are registered with the Network Information Center
672 (NIC), and are divided into three classes---A, B, and C.  The local
673 network address numbers of individual machines are registered with the
674 administrator of the particular network.
675
676 Class A networks have single-byte numbers in the range 0 to 127.  There
677 are only a small number of Class A networks, but they can each support a
678 very large number of hosts.  Medium-sized Class B networks have two-byte
679 network numbers, with the first byte in the range 128 to 191.  Class C
680 networks are the smallest; they have three-byte network numbers, with
681 the first byte in the range 192-255.  Thus, the first 1, 2, or 3 bytes
682 of an Internet address specifies a network.  The remaining bytes of the
683 Internet address specify the address within that network.
684
685 The Class A network 0 is reserved for broadcast to all networks.  In
686 addition, the host number 0 within each network is reserved for broadcast 
687 to all hosts in that network.
688
689 The Class A network 127 is reserved for loopback; you can always use
690 the Internet address @samp{127.0.0.1} to refer to the host machine.
691
692 Since a single machine can be a member of multiple networks, it can
693 have multiple Internet host addresses.  However, there is never
694 supposed to be more than one machine with the same host address.
695
696 @c !!! this section could document the IN_CLASS* macros in <netinet/in.h>.
697
698 @cindex standard dot notation, for Internet addresses
699 @cindex dot notation, for Internet addresses
700 There are four forms of the @dfn{standard numbers-and-dots notation}
701 for Internet addresses:
702
703 @table @code
704 @item @var{a}.@var{b}.@var{c}.@var{d}
705 This specifies all four bytes of the address individually.
706
707 @item @var{a}.@var{b}.@var{c}
708 The last part of the address, @var{c}, is interpreted as a 2-byte quantity.
709 This is useful for specifying host addresses in a Class B network with
710 network address number @code{@var{a}.@var{b}}.
711
712 @item @var{a}.@var{b}
713 The last part of the address, @var{c}, is interpreted as a 3-byte quantity.
714 This is useful for specifying host addresses in a Class A network with
715 network address number @var{a}.
716
717 @item @var{a}
718 If only one part is given, this corresponds directly to the host address
719 number.
720 @end table
721
722 Within each part of the address, the usual C conventions for specifying
723 the radix apply.  In other words, a leading @samp{0x} or @samp{0X} implies
724 hexadecimal radix; a leading @samp{0} implies octal; and otherwise decimal
725 radix is assumed.
726
727 @node Host Address Data Type
728 @subsubsection Host Address Data Type
729
730 Internet host addresses are represented in some contexts as integers
731 (type @code{unsigned long int}).  In other contexts, the integer is
732 packaged inside a structure of type @code{struct in_addr}.  It would
733 be better if the usage were made consistent, but it is not hard to extract
734 the integer from the structure or put the integer into a structure.
735
736 The following basic definitions for Internet addresses appear in the
737 header file @file{netinet/in.h}:
738 @pindex netinet/in.h
739
740 @comment netinet/in.h
741 @comment BSD
742 @deftp {Data Type} {struct in_addr}
743 This data type is used in certain contexts to contain an Internet host
744 address.  It has just one field, named @code{s_addr}, which records the
745 host address number as an @code{unsigned long int}.
746 @end deftp
747
748 @comment netinet/in.h
749 @comment BSD
750 @deftypevr Macro {unsigned long int} INADDR_ANY
751 You can use this constant to stand for ``the address of this machine,''
752 instead of finding its actual address.  This special constant saves you
753 the trouble of looking up the address of your own machine.  Also, if
754 your machine has multiple network addresses on different networks (which
755 is not unusual), using @code{INADDR_ANY} permits the system to choose
756 whichever address makes communication most efficient.
757 @end deftypevr
758
759 @c !!! list also INADDR_LOOPBACK, INADDR_NONE, INADDR_BROADCAST
760
761 @node Host Address Functions
762 @subsubsection Host Address Functions
763
764 @pindex arpa/inet.h
765 These additional functions for manipulating Internet addresses are
766 declared in @file{arpa/inet.h}.  They represent Internet addresses in
767 network byte order; they represent network numbers and
768 local-address-within-network numbers in host byte order.
769 @xref{Byte Order}, for an explanation of network and host byte order.
770
771 @comment arpa/inet.h
772 @comment BSD
773 @deftypefun {unsigned long int} inet_addr (const char *@var{name})
774 This function converts the Internet host address @var{name}
775 from the standard numbers-and-dots notation into binary data.
776 If the input is not valid, @code{inet_addr} returns @code{-1}.
777 @end deftypefun
778
779 @comment arpa/inet.h
780 @comment BSD
781 @deftypefun {unsigned long int} inet_network (const char *@var{name})
782 This function extracts the network number from the address @var{name},
783 given in the standard numbers-and-dots notation.
784 If the input is not valid, @code{inet_network} returns @code{-1}.
785 @end deftypefun
786
787 @comment arpa/inet.h
788 @comment BSD
789 @deftypefun {char *} inet_ntoa (struct in_addr @var{addr})
790 This function converts the Internet host address @var{addr} to a
791 string in the standard numbers-and-dots notation.  The return value is
792 a pointer into a statically-allocated buffer.  Subsequent calls will
793 overwrite the same buffer, so you should copy the string if you need
794 to save it.
795 @end deftypefun
796
797 @comment arpa/inet.h
798 @comment BSD
799 @deftypefun {struct in_addr} inet_makeaddr (int @var{net}, int @var{local})
800 This function makes an Internet host address by combining the network
801 number @var{net} with the local-address-within-network number
802 @var{local}.
803 @end deftypefun
804
805 @comment arpa/inet.h
806 @comment BSD
807 @deftypefun int inet_lnaof (struct in_addr @var{addr})
808 This function returns the local-address-within-network part of the
809 Internet host address @var{addr}.
810 @end deftypefun
811
812 @comment arpa/inet.h
813 @comment BSD
814 @deftypefun int inet_netof (struct in_addr @var{addr})
815 This function returns the network number part of the Internet host
816 address @var{addr}.
817 @end deftypefun
818
819 @node Host Names
820 @subsubsection Host Names
821 @cindex hosts database
822 @cindex converting host name to address
823 @cindex converting host address to name
824
825 Besides the standard numbers-and-dots notation for Internet addresses,
826 you can also refer to a host by a symbolic name.  The advantage of a
827 symbolic name is that it is usually easier to remember.  For example,
828 the machine with Internet address @samp{128.52.46.32} is also known as
829 @samp{churchy.gnu.ai.mit.edu}; and other machines in the @samp{gnu.ai.mit.edu}
830 domain can refer to it simply as @samp{churchy}.
831
832 @pindex /etc/hosts
833 @pindex netdb.h
834 Internally, the system uses a database to keep track of the mapping
835 between host names and host numbers.  This database is usually either
836 the file @file{/etc/hosts} or an equivalent provided by a name server.
837 The functions and other symbols for accessing this database are declared
838 in @file{netdb.h}.  They are BSD features, defined unconditionally if
839 you include @file{netdb.h}.
840
841 @comment netdb.h
842 @comment BSD
843 @deftp {Data Type} {struct hostent}
844 This data type is used to represent an entry in the hosts database.  It
845 has the following members:
846
847 @table @code
848 @item char *h_name
849 This is the ``official'' name of the host.
850
851 @item char **h_aliases
852 These are alternative names for the host, represented as a null-terminated
853 vector of strings.
854
855 @item int h_addrtype
856 This is the host address type; in practice, its value is always
857 @code{AF_INET}.  In principle other kinds of addresses could be
858 represented in the data base as well as Internet addresses; if this were
859 done, you might find a value in this field other than @code{AF_INET}.
860 @xref{Socket Addresses}.
861
862 @item int h_length
863 This is the length, in bytes, of each address.
864
865 @item char **h_addr_list
866 This is the vector of addresses for the host.  (Recall that the host
867 might be connected to multiple networks and have different addresses on
868 each one.)  The vector is terminated by a null pointer.
869
870 @item char *h_addr
871 This is a synonym for @code{h_addr_list[0]}; in other words, it is the
872 first host address.
873 @end table
874 @end deftp
875
876 As far as the host database is concerned, each address is just a block
877 of memory @code{h_length} bytes long.  But in other contexts there is an
878 implicit assumption that you can convert this to a @code{struct in_addr} or
879 an @code{unsigned long int}.  Host addresses in a @code{struct hostent}
880 structure are always given in network byte order; see @ref{Byte Order}.
881
882 You can use @code{gethostbyname} or @code{gethostbyaddr} to search the
883 hosts database for information about a particular host.  The information
884 is returned in a statically-allocated structure; you must copy the
885 information if you need to save it across calls.
886
887 @comment netdb.h
888 @comment BSD
889 @deftypefun {struct hostent *} gethostbyname (const char *@var{name})
890 The @code{gethostbyname} function returns information about the host
891 named @var{name}.  If the lookup fails, it returns a null pointer.
892 @end deftypefun
893
894 @comment netdb.h
895 @comment BSD
896 @deftypefun {struct hostent *} gethostbyaddr (const char *@var{addr}, int @var{length}, int @var{format})
897 The @code{gethostbyaddr} function returns information about the host
898 with Internet address @var{addr}.  The @var{length} argument is the
899 size (in bytes) of the address at @var{addr}.  @var{format} specifies
900 the address format; for an Internet address, specify a value of
901 @code{AF_INET}.
902
903 If the lookup fails, @code{gethostbyaddr} returns a null pointer.
904 @end deftypefun
905
906 @vindex h_errno
907 If the name lookup by @code{gethostbyname} or @code{gethostbyaddr}
908 fails, you can find out the reason by looking at the value of the
909 variable @code{h_errno}.  (It would be cleaner design for these
910 functions to set @code{errno}, but use of @code{h_errno} is compatible
911 with other systems.)  Before using @code{h_errno}, you must declare it
912 like this:
913
914 @example
915 extern int h_errno;
916 @end example
917
918 Here are the error codes that you may find in @code{h_errno}:
919
920 @table @code
921 @comment netdb.h
922 @comment BSD
923 @item HOST_NOT_FOUND
924 @vindex HOST_NOT_FOUND
925 No such host is known in the data base.
926
927 @comment netdb.h
928 @comment BSD
929 @item TRY_AGAIN
930 @vindex TRY_AGAIN
931 This condition happens when the name server could not be contacted.  If
932 you try again later, you may succeed then.
933
934 @comment netdb.h
935 @comment BSD 
936 @item NO_RECOVERY 
937 @vindex NO_RECOVERY 
938 A non-recoverable error occurred.
939
940 @comment netdb.h
941 @comment BSD
942 @item NO_ADDRESS
943 @vindex NO_ADDRESS
944 The host database contains an entry for the name, but it doesn't have an
945 associated Internet address.
946 @end table
947
948 You can also scan the entire hosts database one entry at a time using
949 @code{sethostent}, @code{gethostent}, and @code{endhostent}.  Be careful
950 in using these functions, because they are not reentrant.
951
952 @comment netdb.h
953 @comment BSD
954 @deftypefun void sethostent (int @var{stayopen})
955 This function opens the hosts database to begin scanning it.  You can
956 then call @code{gethostent} to read the entries.
957
958 @c There was a rumor that this flag has different meaning if using the DNS,
959 @c but it appears this description is accurate in that case also.
960 If the @var{stayopen} argument is nonzero, this sets a flag so that
961 subsequent calls to @code{gethostbyname} or @code{gethostbyaddr} will
962 not close the database (as they usually would).  This makes for more
963 efficiency if you call those functions several times, by avoiding
964 reopening the database for each call.
965 @end deftypefun
966
967 @comment netdb.h
968 @comment BSD
969 @deftypefun {struct hostent *} gethostent ()
970 This function returns the next entry in the hosts database.  It
971 returns a null pointer if there are no more entries.
972 @end deftypefun
973
974 @comment netdb.h
975 @comment BSD
976 @deftypefun void endhostent ()
977 This function closes the hosts database.
978 @end deftypefun
979
980 @node Ports
981 @subsection Internet Ports
982 @cindex port number
983
984 A socket address in the Internet namespace consists of a machine's
985 Internet address plus a @dfn{port number} which distinguishes the
986 sockets on a given machine (for a given protocol).  Port numbers range
987 from 0 to 65,535.
988
989 Port numbers less than @code{IPPORT_RESERVED} are reserved for standard
990 servers, such as @code{finger} and @code{telnet}.  There is a database
991 that keeps track of these, and you can use the @code{getservbyname}
992 function to map a service name onto a port number; see @ref{Services
993 Database}.
994
995 If you write a server that is not one of the standard ones defined in
996 the database, you must choose a port number for it.  Use a number
997 greater than @code{IPPORT_USERRESERVED}; such numbers are reserved for
998 servers and won't ever be generated automatically by the system.
999 Avoiding conflicts with servers being run by other users is up to you.
1000
1001 When you use a socket without specifying its address, the system
1002 generates a port number for it.  This number is between
1003 @code{IPPORT_RESERVED} and @code{IPPORT_USERRESERVED}.
1004
1005 On the Internet, it is actually legitimate to have two different
1006 sockets with the same port number, as long as they never both try to
1007 communicate with the same socket address (host address plus port
1008 number).  You shouldn't duplicate a port number except in special
1009 circumstances where a higher-level protocol requires it.  Normally,
1010 the system won't let you do it; @code{bind} normally insists on
1011 distinct port numbers.  To reuse a port number, you must set the
1012 socket option @code{SO_REUSEADDR}.  @xref{Socket-Level Options}.
1013
1014 @pindex netinet/in.h
1015 These macros are defined in the header file @file{netinet/in.h}.
1016
1017 @comment netinet/in.h
1018 @comment BSD
1019 @deftypevr Macro int IPPORT_RESERVED
1020 Port numbers less than @code{IPPORT_RESERVED} are reserved for
1021 superuser use.
1022 @end deftypevr
1023
1024 @comment netinet/in.h
1025 @comment BSD
1026 @deftypevr Macro int IPPORT_USERRESERVED
1027 Port numbers greater than or equal to @code{IPPORT_USERRESERVED} are
1028 reserved for explicit use; they will never be allocated automatically.
1029 @end deftypevr
1030
1031 @node Services Database
1032 @subsection The Services Database
1033 @cindex services database
1034 @cindex converting service name to port number
1035 @cindex converting port number to service name
1036
1037 @pindex /etc/services
1038 The database that keeps track of ``well-known'' services is usually
1039 either the file @file{/etc/services} or an equivalent from a name server.
1040 You can use these utilities, declared in @file{netdb.h}, to access
1041 the services database.
1042 @pindex netdb.h
1043
1044 @comment netdb.h
1045 @comment BSD
1046 @deftp {Data Type} {struct servent}
1047 This data type holds information about entries from the services database.
1048 It has the following members:
1049
1050 @table @code
1051 @item char *s_name
1052 This is the ``official'' name of the service.
1053
1054 @item char **s_aliases
1055 These are alternate names for the service, represented as an array of
1056 strings.  A null pointer terminates the array.
1057
1058 @item int s_port
1059 This is the port number for the service.  Port numbers are given in
1060 network byte order; see @ref{Byte Order}.
1061
1062 @item char *s_proto
1063 This is the name of the protocol to use with this service.
1064 @xref{Protocols Database}.
1065 @end table
1066 @end deftp
1067
1068 To get information about a particular service, use the
1069 @code{getservbyname} or @code{getservbyport} functions.  The information
1070 is returned in a statically-allocated structure; you must copy the
1071 information if you need to save it across calls.
1072
1073 @comment netdb.h
1074 @comment BSD
1075 @deftypefun {struct servent *} getservbyname (const char *@var{name}, const char *@var{proto})
1076 The @code{getservbyname} function returns information about the
1077 service named @var{name} using protocol @var{proto}.  If it can't find
1078 such a service, it returns a null pointer.
1079
1080 This function is useful for servers as well as for clients; servers
1081 use it to determine which port they should listen on (@pxref{Listening}).
1082 @end deftypefun
1083
1084 @comment netdb.h
1085 @comment BSD
1086 @deftypefun {struct servent *} getservbyport (int @var{port}, const char *@var{proto})
1087 The @code{getservbyport} function returns information about the
1088 service at port @var{port} using protocol @var{proto}.  If it can't
1089 find such a service, it returns a null pointer.
1090 @end deftypefun
1091
1092 You can also scan the services database using @code{setservent},
1093 @code{getservent}, and @code{endservent}.  Be careful in using these
1094 functions, because they are not reentrant.
1095
1096 @comment netdb.h
1097 @comment BSD
1098 @deftypefun void setservent (int @var{stayopen})
1099 This function opens the services database to begin scanning it.
1100
1101 If the @var{stayopen} argument is nonzero, this sets a flag so that
1102 subsequent calls to @code{getservbyname} or @code{getservbyport} will
1103 not close the database (as they usually would).  This makes for more
1104 efficiency if you call those functions several times, by avoiding
1105 reopening the database for each call.
1106 @end deftypefun
1107
1108 @comment netdb.h
1109 @comment BSD
1110 @deftypefun {struct servent *} getservent (void)
1111 This function returns the next entry in the services database.  If
1112 there are no more entries, it returns a null pointer.
1113 @end deftypefun
1114
1115 @comment netdb.h
1116 @comment BSD
1117 @deftypefun void endservent (void)
1118 This function closes the services database.
1119 @end deftypefun
1120
1121 @node Byte Order
1122 @subsection Byte Order Conversion
1123 @cindex byte order conversion, for socket
1124 @cindex converting byte order
1125
1126 @cindex big-endian
1127 @cindex little-endian
1128 Different kinds of computers use different conventions for the
1129 ordering of bytes within a word.  Some computers put the most
1130 significant byte within a word first (this is called ``big-endian''
1131 order), and others put it last (``little-endian'' order).
1132
1133 @cindex network byte order
1134 So that machines with different byte order conventions can
1135 communicate, the Internet protocols specify a canonical byte order
1136 convention for data transmitted over the network.  This is known
1137 as the @dfn{network byte order}.
1138
1139 When establishing an Internet socket connection, you must make sure that
1140 the data in the @code{sin_port} and @code{sin_addr} members of the
1141 @code{sockaddr_in} structure are represented in the network byte order.
1142 If you are encoding integer data in the messages sent through the
1143 socket, you should convert this to network byte order too.  If you don't
1144 do this, your program may fail when running on or talking to other kinds
1145 of machines.
1146
1147 If you use @code{getservbyname} and @code{gethostbyname} or
1148 @code{inet_addr} to get the port number and host address, the values are
1149 already in the network byte order, and you can copy them directly into
1150 the @code{sockaddr_in} structure.
1151
1152 Otherwise, you have to convert the values explicitly.  Use
1153 @code{htons} and @code{ntohs} to convert values for the @code{sin_port}
1154 member.  Use @code{htonl} and @code{ntohl} to convert values for the
1155 @code{sin_addr} member.  (Remember, @code{struct in_addr} is equivalent
1156 to @code{unsigned long int}.)  These functions are declared in
1157 @file{netinet/in.h}.
1158 @pindex netinet/in.h
1159
1160 @comment netinet/in.h
1161 @comment BSD
1162 @deftypefun {unsigned short int} htons (unsigned short int @var{hostshort})
1163 This function converts the @code{short} integer @var{hostshort} from
1164 host byte order to network byte order.
1165 @end deftypefun
1166
1167 @comment netinet/in.h
1168 @comment BSD
1169 @deftypefun {unsigned short int} ntohs (unsigned short int @var{netshort})
1170 This function converts the @code{short} integer @var{netshort} from
1171 network byte order to host byte order.
1172 @end deftypefun
1173
1174 @comment netinet/in.h
1175 @comment BSD
1176 @deftypefun {unsigned long int} htonl (unsigned long int @var{hostlong})
1177 This function converts the @code{long} integer @var{hostlong} from
1178 host byte order to network byte order.
1179 @end deftypefun
1180
1181 @comment netinet/in.h
1182 @comment BSD
1183 @deftypefun {unsigned long int} ntohl (unsigned long int @var{netlong})
1184 This function converts the @code{long} integer @var{netlong} from
1185 network byte order to host byte order.
1186 @end deftypefun
1187
1188 @node Protocols Database
1189 @subsection Protocols Database
1190 @cindex protocols database
1191
1192 The communications protocol used with a socket controls low-level
1193 details of how data is exchanged.  For example, the protocol implements
1194 things like checksums to detect errors in transmissions, and routing
1195 instructions for messages.  Normal user programs have little reason to
1196 mess with these details directly.
1197
1198 @cindex TCP (Internet protocol)
1199 The default communications protocol for the Internet namespace depends on
1200 the communication style.  For stream communication, the default is TCP
1201 (``transmission control protocol'').  For datagram communication, the
1202 default is UDP (``user datagram protocol'').  For reliable datagram
1203 communication, the default is RDP (``reliable datagram protocol'').
1204 You should nearly always use the default.
1205
1206 @pindex /etc/protocols
1207 Internet protocols are generally specified by a name instead of a
1208 number.  The network protocols that a host knows about are stored in a
1209 database.  This is usually either derived from the file
1210 @file{/etc/protocols}, or it may be an equivalent provided by a name
1211 server.  You look up the protocol number associated with a named
1212 protocol in the database using the @code{getprotobyname} function.
1213
1214 Here are detailed descriptions of the utilities for accessing the
1215 protocols database.  These are declared in @file{netdb.h}.
1216 @pindex netdb.h
1217
1218 @comment netdb.h
1219 @comment BSD
1220 @deftp {Data Type} {struct protoent}
1221 This data type is used to represent entries in the network protocols
1222 database.  It has the following members:
1223
1224 @table @code
1225 @item char *p_name
1226 This is the official name of the protocol.
1227
1228 @item char **p_aliases
1229 These are alternate names for the protocol, specified as an array of
1230 strings.  The last element of the array is a null pointer.
1231
1232 @item int p_proto
1233 This is the protocol number (in host byte order); use this member as the
1234 @var{protocol} argument to @code{socket}.
1235 @end table
1236 @end deftp
1237
1238 You can use @code{getprotobyname} and @code{getprotobynumber} to search
1239 the protocols database for a specific protocol.  The information is
1240 returned in a statically-allocated structure; you must copy the
1241 information if you need to save it across calls.
1242
1243 @comment netdb.h
1244 @comment BSD
1245 @deftypefun {struct protoent *} getprotobyname (const char *@var{name})
1246 The @code{getprotobyname} function returns information about the
1247 network protocol named @var{name}.  If there is no such protocol, it
1248 returns a null pointer.
1249 @end deftypefun
1250
1251 @comment netdb.h
1252 @comment BSD
1253 @deftypefun {struct protoent *} getprotobynumber (int @var{protocol})
1254 The @code{getprotobynumber} function returns information about the
1255 network protocol with number @var{protocol}.  If there is no such
1256 protocol, it returns a null pointer.
1257 @end deftypefun
1258
1259 You can also scan the whole protocols database one protocol at a time by
1260 using @code{setprotoent}, @code{getprotoent}, and @code{endprotoent}.
1261 Be careful in using these functions, because they are not reentrant.
1262
1263 @comment netdb.h
1264 @comment BSD
1265 @deftypefun void setprotoent (int @var{stayopen})
1266 This function opens the protocols database to begin scanning it.
1267
1268 If the @var{stayopen} argument is nonzero, this sets a flag so that
1269 subsequent calls to @code{getprotobyname} or @code{getprotobynumber} will
1270 not close the database (as they usually would).  This makes for more
1271 efficiency if you call those functions several times, by avoiding
1272 reopening the database for each call.
1273 @end deftypefun
1274
1275 @comment netdb.h
1276 @comment BSD
1277 @deftypefun {struct protoent *} getprotoent (void)
1278 This function returns the next entry in the protocols database.  It
1279 returns a null pointer if there are no more entries.
1280 @end deftypefun
1281
1282 @comment netdb.h
1283 @comment BSD
1284 @deftypefun void endprotoent (void)
1285 This function closes the protocols database.
1286 @end deftypefun
1287
1288 @node Inet Example
1289 @subsection Internet Socket Example
1290
1291 Here is an example showing how to create and name a socket in the
1292 Internet namespace.  The newly created socket exists on the machine that
1293 the program is running on.  Rather than finding and using the machine's
1294 Internet address, this example specifies @code{INADDR_ANY} as the host
1295 address; the system replaces that with the machine's actual address.
1296
1297 @example
1298 @include makeisock.c.texi
1299 @end example
1300
1301 Here is another example, showing how you can fill in a @code{sockaddr_in}
1302 structure, given a host name string and a port number:
1303
1304 @example
1305 @include isockaddr.c.texi
1306 @end example
1307
1308 @node Misc Namespaces
1309 @section Other Namespaces
1310
1311 @vindex PF_NS
1312 @vindex PF_ISO
1313 @vindex PF_CCITT
1314 @vindex PF_IMPLINK
1315 @vindex PF_ROUTE
1316 Certain other namespaces and associated protocol families are supported
1317 but not documented yet because they are not often used.  @code{PF_NS}
1318 refers to the Xerox Network Software protocols.  @code{PF_ISO} stands
1319 for Open Systems Interconnect.  @code{PF_CCITT} refers to protocols from
1320 CCITT.  @file{socket.h} defines these symbols and others naming protocols
1321 not actually implemented.
1322
1323 @code{PF_IMPLINK} is used for communicating between hosts and Internet
1324 Message Processors.  For information on this, and on @code{PF_ROUTE}, an
1325 occasionally-used local area routing protocol, see the GNU Hurd Manual
1326 (to appear in the future).
1327
1328 @node Open/Close Sockets
1329 @section Opening and Closing Sockets
1330
1331 This section describes the actual library functions for opening and
1332 closing sockets.  The same functions work for all namespaces and
1333 connection styles.
1334
1335 @menu
1336 * Creating a Socket::           How to open a socket.
1337 * Closing a Socket::            How to close a socket.
1338 * Socket Pairs::                These are created like pipes.
1339 @end menu
1340
1341 @node Creating a Socket
1342 @subsection Creating a Socket
1343 @cindex creating a socket
1344 @cindex socket, creating
1345 @cindex opening a socket
1346
1347 The primitive for creating a socket is the @code{socket} function,
1348 declared in @file{sys/socket.h}.
1349 @pindex sys/socket.h
1350
1351 @comment sys/socket.h
1352 @comment BSD
1353 @deftypefun int socket (int @var{namespace}, int @var{style}, int @var{protocol})
1354 This function creates a socket and specifies communication style
1355 @var{style}, which should be one of the socket styles listed in
1356 @ref{Communication Styles}.  The @var{namespace} argument specifies
1357 the namespace; it must be @code{PF_FILE} (@pxref{File Namespace}) or
1358 @code{PF_INET} (@pxref{Internet Namespace}).  @var{protocol}
1359 designates the specific protocol (@pxref{Socket Concepts}); zero is
1360 usually right for @var{protocol}.
1361
1362 The return value from @code{socket} is the file descriptor for the new
1363 socket, or @code{-1} in case of error.  The following @code{errno} error
1364 conditions are defined for this function:
1365
1366 @table @code
1367 @item EPROTONOSUPPORT
1368 The @var{protocol} or @var{style} is not supported by the
1369 @var{namespace} specified.
1370
1371 @item EMFILE
1372 The process already has too many file descriptors open.
1373
1374 @item ENFILE
1375 The system already has too many file descriptors open.
1376
1377 @item EACCESS
1378 The process does not have privilege to create a socket of the specified
1379 @var{style} or @var{protocol}.
1380
1381 @item ENOBUFS
1382 The system ran out of internal buffer space.
1383 @end table
1384
1385 The file descriptor returned by the @code{socket} function supports both
1386 read and write operations.  But, like pipes, sockets do not support file
1387 positioning operations.
1388 @end deftypefun
1389
1390 For examples of how to call the @code{socket} function, 
1391 see @ref{File Namespace}, or @ref{Inet Example}.
1392
1393
1394 @node Closing a Socket
1395 @subsection Closing a Socket
1396 @cindex socket, closing
1397 @cindex closing a socket
1398 @cindex shutting down a socket
1399 @cindex socket shutdown
1400
1401 When you are finished using a socket, you can simply close its
1402 file descriptor with @code{close}; see @ref{Opening and Closing Files}.
1403 If there is still data waiting to be transmitted over the connection,
1404 normally @code{close} tries to complete this transmission.  You
1405 can control this behavior using the @code{SO_LINGER} socket option to
1406 specify a timeout period; see @ref{Socket Options}.
1407
1408 @pindex sys/socket.h
1409 You can also shut down only reception or only transmission on a
1410 connection by calling @code{shutdown}, which is declared in
1411 @file{sys/socket.h}.
1412
1413 @comment sys/socket.h
1414 @comment BSD
1415 @deftypefun int shutdown (int @var{socket}, int @var{how})
1416 The @code{shutdown} function shuts down the connection of socket
1417 @var{socket}.  The argument @var{how} specifies what action to
1418 perform:
1419
1420 @table @code
1421 @item 0
1422 Stop receiving data for this socket.  If further data arrives,
1423 reject it.
1424
1425 @item 1
1426 Stop trying to transmit data from this socket.  Discard any data
1427 waiting to be sent.  Stop looking for acknowledgement of data already
1428 sent; don't retransmit it if it is lost.
1429
1430 @item 2
1431 Stop both reception and transmission.
1432 @end table
1433
1434 The return value is @code{0} on success and @code{-1} on failure.  The
1435 following @code{errno} error conditions are defined for this function:
1436
1437 @table @code
1438 @item EBADF
1439 @var{socket} is not a valid file descriptor.
1440
1441 @item ENOTSOCK
1442 @var{socket} is not a socket.
1443
1444 @item ENOTCONN
1445 @var{socket} is not connected.
1446 @end table
1447 @end deftypefun
1448
1449 @node Socket Pairs
1450 @subsection Socket Pairs
1451 @cindex creating a socket pair
1452 @cindex socket pair
1453 @cindex opening a socket pair
1454
1455 @pindex sys/socket.h
1456 A @dfn{socket pair} consists of a pair of connected (but unnamed)
1457 sockets.  It is very similar to a pipe and is used in much the same
1458 way.  Socket pairs are created with the @code{socketpair} function,
1459 declared in @file{sys/socket.h}.  A socket pair is much like a pipe; the
1460 main difference is that the socket pair is bidirectional, whereas the
1461 pipe has one input-only end and one output-only end (@pxref{Pipes and
1462 FIFOs}).
1463
1464 @comment sys/socket.h
1465 @comment BSD
1466 @deftypefun int socketpair (int @var{namespace}, int @var{style}, int @var{protocol}, int @var{filedes}@t{[2]})
1467 This function creates a socket pair, returning the file descriptors in
1468 @code{@var{filedes}[0]} and @code{@var{filedes}[1]}.  The socket pair
1469 is a full-duplex communications channel, so that both reading and writing
1470 may be performed at either end.
1471
1472 The @var{namespace}, @var{style}, and @var{protocol} arguments are
1473 interpreted as for the @code{socket} function.  @var{style} should be
1474 one of the communication styles listed in @ref{Communication Styles}.
1475 The @var{namespace} argument specifies the namespace, which must be
1476 @code{AF_FILE} (@pxref{File Namespace}); @var{protocol} specifies the
1477 communications protocol, but zero is the only meaningful value.
1478
1479 If @var{style} specifies a connectionless communication style, then
1480 the two sockets you get are not @emph{connected}, strictly speaking,
1481 but each of them knows the other as the default destination address,
1482 so they can send packets to each other.
1483
1484 The @code{socketpair} function returns @code{0} on success and @code{-1}
1485 on failure.  The following @code{errno} error conditions are defined
1486 for this function:
1487
1488 @table @code
1489 @item EMFILE
1490 The process has too many file descriptors open.
1491
1492 @item EAFNOSUPPORT
1493 The specified namespace is not supported.
1494
1495 @item EPROTONOSUPPORT
1496 The specified protocol is not supported.
1497
1498 @item EOPNOTSUPP
1499 The specified protocol does not support the creation of socket pairs.
1500 @end table
1501 @end deftypefun
1502
1503 @node Connections
1504 @section Using Sockets with Connections
1505
1506 @cindex connection
1507 @cindex client
1508 @cindex server
1509 The most common communication styles involve making a connection to a
1510 particular other socket, and then exchanging data with that socket
1511 over and over.  Making a connection is asymmetric; one side (the
1512 @dfn{client}) acts to request a connection, while the other side (the
1513 @dfn{server}) makes a socket and waits for the connection request.
1514
1515 @iftex
1516 @itemize @bullet
1517 @item
1518 @ref{Connecting}, describes what the client program must do to
1519 initiate a connection with a server.
1520
1521 @item
1522 @ref{Listening}, and @ref{Accepting Connections}, describe what the
1523 server program must do to wait for and act upon connection requests
1524 from clients.
1525
1526 @item
1527 @ref{Transferring Data}, describes how data is transferred through the
1528 connected socket.
1529 @end itemize
1530 @end iftex
1531
1532 @menu
1533 * Connecting::               What the client program must do.
1534 * Listening::                How a server program waits for requests.
1535 * Accepting Connections::    What the server does when it gets a request.
1536 * Who is Connected::         Getting the address of the
1537                                 other side of a connection.
1538 * Transferring Data::        How to send and receive data.
1539 * Byte Stream Example::      An example program: a client for communicating
1540                               over a byte stream socket in the Internet namespace.
1541 * Server Example::           A corresponding server program.
1542 * Out-of-Band Data::         This is an advanced feature.
1543 @end menu
1544
1545 @node Connecting
1546 @subsection Making a Connection
1547 @cindex connecting a socket
1548 @cindex socket, connecting
1549 @cindex socket, initiating a connection
1550 @cindex socket, client actions
1551
1552 In making a connection, the client makes a connection while the server
1553 waits for and accepts the connection.  Here we discuss what the client
1554 program must do, using the @code{connect} function.
1555
1556 @comment sys/socket.h
1557 @comment BSD
1558 @deftypefun int connect (int @var{socket}, struct sockaddr *@var{addr}, size_t @var{length})
1559 The @code{connect} function initiates a connection from the socket
1560 with file descriptor @var{socket} to the socket whose address is
1561 specified by the @var{addr} and @var{length} arguments.  (This socket
1562 is typically on another machine, and it must be already set up as a
1563 server.)  @xref{Socket Addresses}, for information about how these
1564 arguments are interpreted.
1565
1566 Normally, @code{connect} waits until the server responds to the request
1567 before it returns.  You can set nonblocking mode on the socket
1568 @var{socket} to make @code{connect} return immediately without waiting
1569 for the response.  @xref{File Status Flags}, for information about
1570 nonblocking mode.
1571 @c !!! how do you tell when it has finished connecting?  I suspect the
1572 @c way you do it is select for writing.
1573
1574 The normal return value from @code{connect} is @code{0}.  If an error
1575 occurs, @code{connect} returns @code{-1}.  The following @code{errno}
1576 error conditions are defined for this function:
1577
1578 @table @code
1579 @item EBADF
1580 The socket @var{socket} is not a valid file descriptor.
1581
1582 @item ENOTSOCK
1583 The socket @var{socket} is not a socket.
1584
1585 @item EADDRNOTAVAIL
1586 The specified address is not available on the remote machine.
1587
1588 @item EAFNOSUPPORT
1589 The namespace of the @var{addr} is not supported by this socket.
1590
1591 @item EISCONN
1592 The socket @var{socket} is already connected.
1593
1594 @item ETIMEDOUT
1595 The attempt to establish the connection timed out.
1596
1597 @item ECONNREFUSED
1598 The server has actively refused to establish the connection.
1599
1600 @item ENETUNREACH
1601 The network of the given @var{addr} isn't reachable from this host.
1602
1603 @item EADDRINUSE
1604 The socket address of the given @var{addr} is already in use.
1605
1606 @item EINPROGRESS
1607 The socket @var{socket} is non-blocking and the connection could not be
1608 established immediately.
1609
1610 @item EALREADY
1611 The socket @var{socket} is non-blocking and already has a pending
1612 connection in progress.
1613 @end table
1614 @end deftypefun
1615
1616 @node Listening
1617 @subsection Listening for Connections
1618 @cindex listening (sockets)
1619 @cindex sockets, server actions
1620 @cindex sockets, listening
1621
1622 Now let us consider what the server process must do to accept
1623 connections on a socket.  This involves the use of the @code{listen}
1624 function to enable connection requests on the socket, and later using
1625 the @code{accept} function (@pxref{Accepting Connections}) to act on a
1626 request.  The @code{listen} function is not allowed for sockets using
1627 connectionless communication styles.
1628
1629 You can write a network server that does not even start running until a
1630 connection to it is requested.  @xref{Inetd Servers}.
1631
1632 In the Internet namespace, there are no special protection mechanisms
1633 for controlling access to connect to a port; any process on any machine
1634 can make a connection to your server.  If you want to restrict access to
1635 your server, make it examine the addresses associated with connection
1636 requests or implement some other handshaking or identification
1637 protocol.
1638
1639 In the File namespace, the ordinary file protection bits control who has
1640 access to connect to the socket.
1641
1642 @comment sys/socket.h
1643 @comment BSD
1644 @deftypefun int listen (int @var{socket}, unsigned int @var{n})
1645 The @code{listen} function enables the socket @var{socket} to
1646 accept connections, thus making it a server socket.
1647
1648 The argument @var{n} specifies the length of the queue for pending
1649 connections.
1650
1651 The @code{listen} function returns @code{0} on success and @code{-1}
1652 on failure.  The following @code{errno} error conditions are defined
1653 for this function:
1654
1655 @table @code
1656 @item EBADF
1657 The argument @var{socket} is not a valid file descriptor.
1658
1659 @item ENOTSOCK
1660 The argument @var{socket} is not a socket.
1661
1662 @item EOPNOTSUPP
1663 The socket @var{socket} does not support this operation.
1664 @end table
1665 @end deftypefun
1666
1667 @node Accepting Connections
1668 @subsection Accepting Connections
1669 @cindex sockets, accepting connections
1670 @cindex accepting connections
1671
1672 When a server receives a connection request, it can complete the
1673 connection by accepting the request.  Use the function @code{accept}
1674 to do this.
1675
1676 A socket that has been established as a server can accept connection
1677 requests from multiple clients.  The server's original socket
1678 @emph{does not become part} of the connection; instead, @code{accept}
1679 makes a new socket which participates in the connection.
1680 @code{accept} returns the descriptor for this socket.  The server's
1681 original socket remains available for listening for further connection
1682 requests.
1683
1684 The number of pending connection requests on a server socket is finite.
1685 If connection requests arrive from clients faster than the server can
1686 act upon them, the queue can fill up and additional requests are refused
1687 with a @code{ECONNREFUSED} error.  You can specify the maximum length of
1688 this queue as an argument to the @code{listen} function, although the
1689 system may also impose its own internal limit on the length of this
1690 queue.
1691
1692 @comment sys/socket.h
1693 @comment BSD
1694 @deftypefun int accept (int @var{socket}, struct sockaddr *@var{addr}, size_t *@var{length_ptr})
1695 This function is used to accept a connection request on the server
1696 socket @var{socket}.
1697
1698 The @code{accept} function waits if there are no connections pending,
1699 unless the socket @var{socket} has nonblocking mode set.  (You can use
1700 @code{select} to wait for a pending connection, with a nonblocking
1701 socket.)  @xref{File Status Flags}, for information about nonblocking
1702 mode.
1703
1704 The @var{addr} and @var{length_ptr} arguments are used to return
1705 information about the name of the client socket that initiated the
1706 connection.  @xref{Socket Addresses}, for information about the format
1707 of the information.
1708
1709 Accepting a connection does not make @var{socket} part of the
1710 connection.  Instead, it creates a new socket which becomes
1711 connected.  The normal return value of @code{accept} is the file
1712 descriptor for the new socket.
1713
1714 After @code{accept}, the original socket @var{socket} remains open and
1715 unconnected, and continues listening until you close it.  You can
1716 accept further connections with @var{socket} by calling @code{accept}
1717 again.
1718
1719 If an error occurs, @code{accept} returns @code{-1}.  The following
1720 @code{errno} error conditions are defined for this function:
1721
1722 @table @code
1723 @item EBADF
1724 The @var{socket} argument is not a valid file descriptor.
1725
1726 @item ENOTSOCK
1727 The descriptor @var{socket} argument is not a socket.
1728
1729 @item EOPNOTSUPP
1730 The descriptor @var{socket} does not support this operation.
1731
1732 @item EWOULDBLOCK
1733 @var{socket} has nonblocking mode set, and there are no pending
1734 connections immediately available.
1735 @end table
1736 @end deftypefun
1737
1738 The @code{accept} function is not allowed for sockets using
1739 connectionless communication styles.
1740
1741 @node Who is Connected
1742 @subsection Who is Connected to Me?
1743
1744 @comment sys/socket.h
1745 @comment BSD
1746 @deftypefun int getpeername (int @var{socket}, struct sockaddr *@var{addr}, size_t *@var{length_ptr})
1747 The @code{getpeername} function returns the address of the socket that
1748 @var{socket} is connected to; it stores the address in the memory space
1749 specified by @var{addr} and @var{length_ptr}.  It stores the length of
1750 the address in @code{*@var{length_ptr}}.
1751
1752 @xref{Socket Addresses}, for information about the format of the
1753 address.  In some operating systems, @code{getpeername} works only for
1754 sockets in the Internet domain.
1755
1756 The return value is @code{0} on success and @code{-1} on error.  The
1757 following @code{errno} error conditions are defined for this function:
1758
1759 @table @code
1760 @item EBADF
1761 The argument @var{socket} is not a valid file descriptor.
1762
1763 @item ENOTSOCK
1764 The descriptor @var{socket} is not a socket.
1765
1766 @item ENOTCONN
1767 The socket @var{socket} is not connected.
1768
1769 @item ENOBUFS
1770 There are not enough internal buffers available.
1771 @end table
1772 @end deftypefun
1773
1774
1775 @node Transferring Data
1776 @subsection Transferring Data
1777 @cindex reading from a socket
1778 @cindex writing to a socket
1779
1780 Once a socket has been connected to a peer, you can use the ordinary
1781 @code{read} and @code{write} operations (@pxref{I/O Primitives}) to
1782 transfer data.  A socket is a two-way communications channel, so read
1783 and write operations can be performed at either end.
1784
1785 There are also some I/O modes that are specific to socket operations.
1786 In order to specify these modes, you must use the @code{recv} and
1787 @code{send} functions instead of the more generic @code{read} and
1788 @code{write} functions.  The @code{recv} and @code{send} functions take
1789 an additional argument which you can use to specify various flags to
1790 control the special I/O modes.  For example, you can specify the
1791 @code{MSG_OOB} flag to read or write out-of-band data, the
1792 @code{MSG_PEEK} flag to peek at input, or the @code{MSG_DONTROUTE} flag
1793 to control inclusion of routing information on output.
1794
1795 @menu
1796 * Sending Data::                Sending data with @code{write}.
1797 * Receiving Data::              Reading data with @code{read}.
1798 * Socket Data Options::         Using @code{send} and @code{recv}.
1799 @end menu
1800
1801 @node Sending Data
1802 @subsubsection Sending Data
1803
1804 @pindex sys/socket.h
1805 The @code{send} function is declared in the header file
1806 @file{sys/socket.h}.  If your @var{flags} argument is zero, you can just
1807 as well use @code{write} instead of @code{send}; see @ref{I/O
1808 Primitives}.  If the socket was connected but the connection has broken,
1809 you get a @code{SIGPIPE} signal for any use of @code{send} or
1810 @code{write} (@pxref{Miscellaneous Signals}).
1811
1812 @comment sys/socket.h
1813 @comment BSD
1814 @deftypefun int send (int @var{socket}, void *@var{buffer}, size_t @var{size}, int @var{flags})
1815 The @code{send} function is like @code{write}, but with the additional
1816 flags @var{flags}.  The possible values of @var{flags} are described
1817 in @ref{Socket Data Options}.
1818
1819 This function returns the number of bytes transmitted, or @code{-1} on
1820 failure.  If the socket is nonblocking, then @code{send} (like
1821 @code{write}) can return after sending just part of the data.
1822 @xref{File Status Flags}, for information about nonblocking mode.
1823
1824 Note, however, that a successful return value merely indicates that
1825 the message has been sent without error, not necessarily that it has
1826 been received without error.
1827
1828 The following @code{errno} error conditions are defined for this function:
1829
1830 @table @code
1831 @item EBADF
1832 The @var{socket} argument is not a valid file descriptor.
1833
1834 @item EINTR
1835 The operation was interrupted by a signal before any data was sent.
1836 @xref{Interrupted Primitives}.
1837
1838 @item ENOTSOCK
1839 The descriptor @var{socket} is not a socket.
1840
1841 @item EMSGSIZE
1842 The socket type requires that the message be sent atomically, but the
1843 message is too large for this to be possible.
1844
1845 @item EWOULDBLOCK
1846 Nonblocking mode has been set on the socket, and the write operation
1847 would block.  (Normally @code{send} blocks until the operation can be
1848 completed.)
1849
1850 @item ENOBUFS
1851 There is not enough internal buffer space available.
1852
1853 @item ENOTCONN
1854 You never connected this socket.
1855
1856 @item EPIPE
1857 This socket was connected but the connection is now broken.  In this
1858 case, @code{send} generates a @code{SIGPIPE} signal first; if that
1859 signal is ignored or blocked, or if its handler returns, then
1860 @code{send} fails with @code{EPIPE}.
1861 @end table
1862 @end deftypefun
1863
1864 @node Receiving Data
1865 @subsubsection Receiving Data
1866
1867 @pindex sys/socket.h
1868 The @code{recv} function is declared in the header file
1869 @file{sys/socket.h}.  If your @var{flags} argument is zero, you can
1870 just as well use @code{read} instead of @code{recv}; see @ref{I/O
1871 Primitives}.
1872
1873 @comment sys/socket.h
1874 @comment BSD
1875 @deftypefun int recv (int @var{socket}, void *@var{buffer}, size_t @var{size}, int @var{flags})
1876 The @code{recv} function is like @code{read}, but with the additional
1877 flags @var{flags}.  The possible values of @var{flags} are described
1878 In @ref{Socket Data Options}.
1879
1880 If nonblocking mode is set for @var{socket}, and no data is available to
1881 be read, @code{recv} fails immediately rather than waiting.  @xref{File
1882 Status Flags}, for information about nonblocking mode.
1883
1884 This function returns the number of bytes received, or @code{-1} on failure.
1885 The following @code{errno} error conditions are defined for this function:
1886
1887 @table @code
1888 @item EBADF
1889 The @var{socket} argument is not a valid file descriptor.
1890
1891 @item ENOTSOCK
1892 The descriptor @var{socket} is not a socket.
1893
1894 @item EWOULDBLOCK
1895 Nonblocking mode has been set on the socket, and the read operation
1896 would block.  (Normally, @code{recv} blocks until there is input
1897 available to be read.)
1898
1899 @item EINTR
1900 The operation was interrupted by a signal before any data was read.
1901 @xref{Interrupted Primitives}.
1902
1903 @item ENOTCONN
1904 You never connected this socket.
1905 @end table
1906 @end deftypefun
1907
1908 @node Socket Data Options
1909 @subsubsection Socket Data Options
1910
1911 @pindex sys/socket.h
1912 The @var{flags} argument to @code{send} and @code{recv} is a bit
1913 mask.  You can bitwise-OR the values of the following macros together
1914 to obtain a value for this argument.  All are defined in the header
1915 file @file{sys/socket.h}.
1916
1917 @comment sys/socket.h
1918 @comment BSD
1919 @deftypevr Macro int MSG_OOB
1920 Send or receive out-of-band data.  @xref{Out-of-Band Data}.
1921 @end deftypevr
1922
1923 @comment sys/socket.h
1924 @comment BSD
1925 @deftypevr Macro int MSG_PEEK
1926 Look at the data but don't remove it from the input queue.  This is
1927 only meaningful with input functions such as @code{recv}, not with
1928 @code{send}.
1929 @end deftypevr
1930
1931 @comment sys/socket.h
1932 @comment BSD
1933 @deftypevr Macro int MSG_DONTROUTE
1934 Don't include routing information in the message.  This is only
1935 meaningful with output operations, and is usually only of interest for
1936 diagnostic or routing programs.  We don't try to explain it here.
1937 @end deftypevr
1938
1939 @node Byte Stream Example
1940 @subsection Byte Stream Socket Example
1941
1942 Here is an example client program that makes a connection for a byte
1943 stream socket in the Internet namespace.  It doesn't do anything
1944 particularly interesting once it has connected to the server; it just
1945 sends a text string to the server and exits.
1946
1947 @example
1948 @include inetclient.c.texi
1949 @end example
1950
1951 @node Server Example
1952 @subsection Byte Stream Connection Server Example
1953
1954 The server end is much more complicated.  Since we want to allow
1955 multiple clients to be connected to the server at the same time, it
1956 would be incorrect to wait for input from a single client by simply
1957 calling @code{read} or @code{recv}.  Instead, the right thing to do is
1958 to use @code{select} (@pxref{Waiting for I/O}) to wait for input on
1959 all of the open sockets.  This also allows the server to deal with
1960 additional connection requests.
1961
1962 This particular server doesn't do anything interesting once it has
1963 gotten a message from a client.  It does close the socket for that
1964 client when it detects an end-of-file condition (resulting from the
1965 client shutting down its end of the connection).
1966
1967 This program uses @code{make_socket} and @code{init_sockaddr} to set
1968 up the socket address; see @ref{Inet Example}.
1969
1970 @example
1971 @include inetserver.c.texi
1972 @end example
1973
1974 @node Out-of-Band Data
1975 @subsection Out-of-Band Data
1976
1977 @cindex out-of-band data
1978 @cindex high-priority data
1979 Streams with connections permit @dfn{out-of-band} data that is
1980 delivered with higher priority than ordinary data.  Typically the
1981 reason for sending out-of-band data is to send notice of an
1982 exceptional condition.  The way to send out-of-band data is using
1983 @code{send}, specifying the flag @code{MSG_OOB} (@pxref{Sending
1984 Data}).
1985
1986 Out-of-band data is received with higher priority because the
1987 receiving process need not read it in sequence; to read the next
1988 available out-of-band data, use @code{recv} with the @code{MSG_OOB}
1989 flag (@pxref{Receiving Data}).  Ordinary read operations do not read
1990 out-of-band data; they read only the ordinary data.
1991
1992 @cindex urgent socket condition
1993 When a socket finds that out-of-band data is on its way, it sends a
1994 @code{SIGURG} signal to the owner process or process group of the
1995 socket.  You can specify the owner using the @code{F_SETOWN} command
1996 to the @code{fcntl} function; see @ref{Interrupt Input}.  You must
1997 also establish a handler for this signal, as described in @ref{Signal
1998 Handling}, in order to take appropriate action such as reading the
1999 out-of-band data.
2000
2001 Alternatively, you can test for pending out-of-band data, or wait
2002 until there is out-of-band data, using the @code{select} function; it
2003 can wait for an exceptional condition on the socket.  @xref{Waiting
2004 for I/O}, for more information about @code{select}.
2005
2006 Notification of out-of-band data (whether with @code{SIGURG} or with
2007 @code{select}) indicates that out-of-band data is on the way; the data
2008 may not actually arrive until later.  If you try to read the
2009 out-of-band data before it arrives, @code{recv} fails with an
2010 @code{EWOULDBLOCK} error.
2011
2012 Sending out-of-band data automatically places a ``mark'' in the stream
2013 of ordinary data, showing where in the sequence the out-of-band data
2014 ``would have been''.  This is useful when the meaning of out-of-band
2015 data is ``cancel everything sent so far''.  Here is how you can test,
2016 in the receiving process, whether any ordinary data was sent before
2017 the mark:
2018
2019 @example
2020 success = ioctl (socket, SIOCATMARK, &result);
2021 @end example
2022
2023 Here's a function to discard any ordinary data preceding the
2024 out-of-band mark:
2025
2026 @example
2027 int
2028 discard_until_mark (int socket)
2029 @{
2030   while (1)
2031     @{
2032       /* @r{This is not an arbitrary limit; any size will do.}  */
2033       char buffer[1024];
2034       int result, success;
2035
2036       /* @r{If we have reached the mark, return.}  */
2037       success = ioctl (socket, SIOCATMARK, &result);
2038       if (success < 0)
2039         perror ("ioctl");
2040       if (result)
2041         return;
2042
2043       /* @r{Otherwise, read a bunch of ordinary data and discard it.}
2044          @r{This is guaranteed not to read past the mark}
2045          @r{if it starts before the mark.}  */
2046       success = read (socket, buffer, sizeof buffer);
2047       if (success < 0)
2048         perror ("read");
2049     @}
2050 @}
2051 @end example
2052
2053 If you don't want to discard the ordinary data preceding the mark, you
2054 may need to read some of it anyway, to make room in internal system
2055 buffers for the out-of-band data.  If you try to read out-of-band data
2056 and get an @code{EWOULDBLOCK} error, try reading some ordinary data
2057 (saving it so that you can use it when you want it) and see if that
2058 makes room.  Here is an example:
2059
2060 @example
2061 struct buffer
2062 @{
2063   char *buffer;
2064   int size;
2065   struct buffer *next;
2066 @};
2067
2068 /* @r{Read the out-of-band data from SOCKET and return it}
2069    @r{as a `struct buffer', which records the address of the data}
2070    @r{and its size.}
2071
2072    @r{It may be necessary to read some ordinary data}
2073    @r{in order to make room for the out-of-band data.}
2074    @r{If so, the ordinary data is saved as a chain of buffers}
2075    @r{found in the `next' field of the value.}  */
2076
2077 struct buffer *
2078 read_oob (int socket)
2079 @{
2080   struct buffer *tail = 0;
2081   struct buffer *list = 0;
2082
2083   while (1)
2084     @{
2085       /* @r{This is an arbitrary limit.}
2086          @r{Does anyone know how to do this without a limit?}  */
2087       char *buffer = (char *) xmalloc (1024);
2088       struct buffer *link;
2089       int success;
2090       int result;
2091
2092       /* @r{Try again to read the out-of-band data.}  */
2093       success = recv (socket, buffer, sizeof buffer, MSG_OOB);
2094       if (success >= 0)
2095         @{
2096           /* @r{We got it, so return it.}  */
2097           struct buffer *link
2098             = (struct buffer *) xmalloc (sizeof (struct buffer));
2099           link->buffer = buffer;
2100           link->size = success;
2101           link->next = list;
2102           return link;
2103         @}
2104
2105       /* @r{If we fail, see if we are at the mark.}  */
2106       success = ioctl (socket, SIOCATMARK, &result);
2107       if (success < 0)
2108         perror ("ioctl");
2109       if (result)
2110         @{
2111           /* @r{At the mark; skipping past more ordinary data cannot help.}
2112              @r{So just wait a while.}  */
2113           sleep (1);
2114           continue;
2115         @}
2116
2117       /* @r{Otherwise, read a bunch of ordinary data and save it.}
2118          @r{This is guaranteed not to read past the mark}
2119          @r{if it starts before the mark.}  */
2120       success = read (socket, buffer, sizeof buffer);
2121       if (success < 0)
2122         perror ("read");
2123
2124       /* @r{Save this data in the buffer list.}  */
2125       @{
2126         struct buffer *link
2127           = (struct buffer *) xmalloc (sizeof (struct buffer));
2128         link->buffer = buffer;
2129         link->size = success;
2130
2131         /* @r{Add the new link to the end of the list.}  */
2132         if (tail)
2133           tail->next = link;
2134         else
2135           list = link;
2136         tail = link;
2137       @}
2138     @}
2139 @}
2140 @end example
2141
2142 @node Datagrams
2143 @section Datagram Socket Operations
2144
2145 @cindex datagram socket
2146 This section describes how to use communication styles that don't use
2147 connections (styles @code{SOCK_DGRAM} and @code{SOCK_RDM}).  Using
2148 these styles, you group data into packets and each packet is an
2149 independent communication.  You specify the destination for each
2150 packet individually.
2151
2152 Datagram packets are like letters: you send each one independently,
2153 with its own destination address, and they may arrive in the wrong
2154 order or not at all.
2155
2156 The @code{listen} and @code{accept} functions are not allowed for
2157 sockets using connectionless communication styles.
2158
2159 @menu
2160 * Sending Datagrams::    Sending packets on a datagram socket.
2161 * Receiving Datagrams::  Receiving packets on a datagram socket.
2162 * Datagram Example::     An example program: packets sent over a
2163                            datagram socket in the file namespace.
2164 * Example Receiver::     Another program, that receives those packets.
2165 @end menu
2166
2167 @node Sending Datagrams
2168 @subsection Sending Datagrams
2169 @cindex sending a datagram
2170 @cindex transmitting datagrams
2171 @cindex datagrams, transmitting
2172
2173 @pindex sys/socket.h
2174 The normal way of sending data on a datagram socket is by using the
2175 @code{sendto} function, declared in @file{sys/socket.h}.
2176
2177 You can call @code{connect} on a datagram socket, but this only
2178 specifies a default destination for further data transmission on the
2179 socket.  When a socket has a default destination, then you can use
2180 @code{send} (@pxref{Sending Data}) or even @code{write} (@pxref{I/O
2181 Primitives}) to send a packet there.  You can cancel the default
2182 destination by calling @code{connect} using an address format of
2183 @code{AF_UNSPEC} in the @var{addr} argument.  @xref{Connecting}, for
2184 more information about the @code{connect} function.
2185
2186 @comment sys/socket.h
2187 @comment BSD
2188 @deftypefun int sendto (int @var{socket}, void *@var{buffer}. size_t @var{size}, int @var{flags}, struct sockaddr *@var{addr}, size_t @var{length})
2189 The @code{sendto} function transmits the data in the @var{buffer}
2190 through the socket @var{socket} to the destination address specified
2191 by the @var{addr} and @var{length} arguments.  The @var{size} argument
2192 specifies the number of bytes to be transmitted.
2193
2194 The @var{flags} are interpreted the same way as for @code{send}; see
2195 @ref{Socket Data Options}.
2196
2197 The return value and error conditions are also the same as for
2198 @code{send}, but you cannot rely on the system to detect errors and
2199 report them; the most common error is that the packet is lost or there
2200 is no one at the specified address to receive it, and the operating
2201 system on your machine usually does not know this.
2202
2203 It is also possible for one call to @code{sendto} to report an error
2204 due to a problem related to a previous call.
2205 @end deftypefun
2206
2207 @node Receiving Datagrams
2208 @subsection Receiving Datagrams
2209 @cindex receiving datagrams
2210
2211 The @code{recvfrom} function reads a packet from a datagram socket and
2212 also tells you where it was sent from.  This function is declared in
2213 @file{sys/socket.h}.
2214
2215 @comment sys/socket.h
2216 @comment BSD
2217 @deftypefun int recvfrom (int @var{socket}, void *@var{buffer}, size_t @var{size}, int @var{flags}, struct sockaddr *@var{addr}, size_t *@var{length_ptr})
2218 The @code{recvfrom} function reads one packet from the socket
2219 @var{socket} into the buffer @var{buffer}.  The @var{size} argument
2220 specifies the maximum number of bytes to be read.
2221
2222 If the packet is longer than @var{size} bytes, then you get the first
2223 @var{size} bytes of the packet, and the rest of the packet is lost.
2224 There's no way to read the rest of the packet.  Thus, when you use a
2225 packet protocol, you must always know how long a packet to expect.
2226
2227 The @var{addr} and @var{length_ptr} arguments are used to return the
2228 address where the packet came from.  @xref{Socket Addresses}.  For a
2229 socket in the file domain, the address information won't be meaningful,
2230 since you can't read the address of such a socket (@pxref{File
2231 Namespace}).  You can specify a null pointer as the @var{addr} argument
2232 if you are not interested in this information.
2233
2234 The @var{flags} are interpreted the same way as for @code{recv}
2235 (@pxref{Socket Data Options}).  The return value and error conditions
2236 are also the same as for @code{recv}.
2237 @end deftypefun
2238
2239 You can use plain @code{recv} (@pxref{Receiving Data}) instead of
2240 @code{recvfrom} if you know don't need to find out who sent the packet
2241 (either because you know where it should come from or because you
2242 treat all possible senders alike).  Even @code{read} can be used if
2243 you don't want to specify @var{flags} (@pxref{I/O Primitives}).
2244
2245 @ignore
2246 @c sendmsg and recvmsg are like readv and writev in that they
2247 @c use a series of buffers.  It's not clear this is worth
2248 @c supporting or that we support them.
2249 @c !!! they can do more; it is hairy
2250
2251 @comment sys/socket.h
2252 @comment BSD
2253 @deftp {Data Type} {struct msghdr}
2254 @end deftp
2255
2256 @comment sys/socket.h
2257 @comment BSD
2258 @deftypefun int sendmsg (int @var{socket}, const struct msghdr *@var{message}, int @var{flags})
2259 @end deftypefun
2260
2261 @comment sys/socket.h
2262 @comment BSD
2263 @deftypefun int recvmsg (int @var{socket}, struct msghdr *@var{message}, int @var{flags})
2264 @end deftypefun
2265 @end ignore
2266
2267 @node Datagram Example
2268 @subsection Datagram Socket Example
2269
2270 Here is a set of example programs that send messages over a datagram
2271 stream in the file namespace.  Both the client and server programs use the
2272 @code{make_named_socket} function that was presented in @ref{File
2273 Namespace}, to create and name their sockets.
2274
2275 First, here is the server program.  It sits in a loop waiting for
2276 messages to arrive, bouncing each message back to the sender.
2277 Obviously, this isn't a particularly useful program, but it does show
2278 the general ideas involved.
2279
2280 @example
2281 @include fileserver.c.texi
2282 @end example
2283
2284 @node Example Receiver
2285 @subsection Example of Reading Datagrams
2286
2287 Here is the client program corresponding to the server above.
2288
2289 It sends a datagram to the server and then waits for a reply.  Notice
2290 that the socket for the client (as well as for the server) in this
2291 example has to be given a name.  This is so that the server can direct
2292 a message back to the client.  Since the socket has no associated
2293 connection state, the only way the server can do this is by
2294 referencing the name of the client.
2295
2296 @example
2297 @include fileclient.c.texi
2298 @end example
2299
2300 Keep in mind that datagram socket communications are unreliable.  In
2301 this example, the client program waits indefinitely if the message
2302 never reaches the server or if the server's response never comes
2303 back.  It's up to the user running the program to kill it and restart
2304 it, if desired.  A more automatic solution could be to use
2305 @code{select} (@pxref{Waiting for I/O}) to establish a timeout period
2306 for the reply, and in case of timeout either resend the message or
2307 shut down the socket and exit.
2308
2309 @node Inetd
2310 @section The @code{inetd} Daemon
2311
2312 We've explained above how to write a server program that does its own
2313 listening.  Such a server must already be running in order for anyone
2314 to connect to it.
2315
2316 Another way to provide service for an Internet port is to let the daemon
2317 program @code{inetd} do the listening.  @code{inetd} is a program that
2318 runs all the time and waits (using @code{select}) for messages on a
2319 specified set of ports.  When it receives a message, it accepts the
2320 connection (if the socket style calls for connections) and then forks a
2321 child process to run the corresponding server program.  You specify the
2322 ports and their programs in the file @file{/etc/inetd.conf}.
2323
2324 @menu
2325 * Inetd Servers::
2326 * Configuring Inetd::
2327 @end menu
2328
2329 @node Inetd Servers
2330 @subsection @code{inetd} Servers
2331
2332 Writing a server program to be run by @code{inetd} is very simple.  Each time
2333 someone requests a connection to the appropriate port, a new server
2334 process starts.  The connection already exists at this time; the
2335 socket is available as the standard input descriptor and as the
2336 standard output descriptor (descriptors 0 and 1) in the server
2337 process.  So the server program can begin reading and writing data
2338 right away.  Often the program needs only the ordinary I/O facilities;
2339 in fact, a general-purpose filter program that knows nothing about
2340 sockets can work as a byte stream server run by @code{inetd}.
2341
2342 You can also use @code{inetd} for servers that use connectionless
2343 communication styles.  For these servers, @code{inetd} does not try to accept
2344 a connection, since no connection is possible.  It just starts the
2345 server program, which can read the incoming datagram packet from
2346 descriptor 0.  The server program can handle one request and then
2347 exit, or you can choose to write it to keep reading more requests
2348 until no more arrive, and then exit.  You must specify which of these
2349 two techniques the server uses, when you configure @code{inetd}.
2350
2351 @node Configuring Inetd
2352 @subsection Configuring @code{inetd}
2353
2354 The file @file{/etc/inetd.conf} tells @code{inetd} which ports to listen to
2355 and what server programs to run for them.  Normally each entry in the
2356 file is one line, but you can split it onto multiple lines provided
2357 all but the first line of the entry start with whitespace.  Lines that
2358 start with @samp{#} are comments.
2359
2360 Here are two standard entries in @file{/etc/inetd.conf}:
2361
2362 @smallexample
2363 ftp     stream  tcp     nowait  root    /libexec/ftpd   ftpd
2364 talk    dgram   udp     wait    root    /libexec/talkd  talkd
2365 @end smallexample
2366
2367 An entry has this format:
2368
2369 @example
2370 @var{service} @var{style} @var{protocol} @var{wait} @var{username} @var{program} @var{arguments}
2371 @end example
2372
2373 The @var{service} field says which service this program provides.  It
2374 should be the name of a service defined in @file{/etc/services}.
2375 @code{inetd} uses @var{service} to decide which port to listen on for
2376 this entry.
2377
2378 The fields @var{style} and @var{protocol} specify the communication
2379 style and the protocol to use for the listening socket.  The style
2380 should be the name of a communication style, converted to lower case
2381 and with @samp{SOCK_} deleted---for example, @samp{stream} or
2382 @samp{dgram}.  @var{protocol} should be one of the protocols listed in
2383 @file{/etc/protocols}.  The typical protocol names are @samp{tcp} for
2384 byte stream connections and @samp{udp} for unreliable datagrams.
2385
2386 The @var{wait} field should be either @samp{wait} or @samp{nowait}.
2387 Use @samp{wait} if @var{style} is a connectionless style and the
2388 server, once started, handles multiple requests, as many as come in.
2389 Use @samp{nowait} if @code{inetd} should start a new process for each message
2390 or request that comes in.  If @var{style} uses connections, then
2391 @var{wait} @strong{must} be @samp{nowait}.
2392
2393 @var{user} is the user name that the server should run as.  @code{inetd} runs
2394 as root, so it can set the user ID of its children arbitrarily.  It's
2395 best to avoid using @samp{root} for @var{user} if you can; but some
2396 servers, such as Telnet and FTP, read a username and password
2397 themselves.  These servers need to be root initially so they can log
2398 in as commanded by the data coming over the network.
2399
2400 @var{program} together with @var{arguments} specifies the command to
2401 run to start the server.  @var{program} should be an absolute file
2402 name specifying the executable file to run.  @var{arguments} consists
2403 of any number of whitespace-separated words, which become the
2404 command-line arguments of @var{program}.  The first word in
2405 @var{arguments} is argument zero, which should by convention be the
2406 program name itself (sans directories).
2407
2408 If you edit @file{/etc/inetd.conf}, you can tell @code{inetd} to reread the
2409 file and obey its new contents by sending the @code{inetd} process the
2410 @code{SIGHUP} signal.  You'll have to use @code{ps} to determine the
2411 process ID of the @code{inetd} process, as it is not fixed.
2412
2413 @c !!! could document /etc/inetd.sec
2414
2415 @node Socket Options
2416 @section Socket Options
2417 @cindex socket options
2418
2419 This section describes how to read or set various options that modify
2420 the behavior of sockets and their underlying communications protocols.
2421
2422 @cindex level, for socket options
2423 @cindex socket option level
2424 When you are manipulating a socket option, you must specify which
2425 @dfn{level} the option pertains to.  This describes whether the option
2426 applies to the socket interface, or to a lower-level communications
2427 protocol interface.
2428
2429 @menu
2430 * Socket Option Functions::     The basic functions for setting and getting
2431                                  socket options.
2432 * Socket-Level Options::        Details of the options at the socket level.
2433 @end menu
2434
2435 @node Socket Option Functions
2436 @subsection Socket Option Functions
2437
2438 @pindex sys/socket.h
2439 Here are the functions for examining and modifying socket options.
2440 They are declared in @file{sys/socket.h}.
2441
2442 @comment sys/socket.h
2443 @comment BSD
2444 @deftypefun int getsockopt (int @var{socket}, int @var{level}, int @var{optname}, void *@var{optval}, size_t *@var{optlen_ptr})
2445 The @code{getsockopt} function gets information about the value of
2446 option @var{optname} at level @var{level} for socket @var{socket}.
2447
2448 The option value is stored in a buffer that @var{optval} points to.
2449 Before the call, you should supply in @code{*@var{optlen_ptr}} the
2450 size of this buffer; on return, it contains the number of bytes of
2451 information actually stored in the buffer.
2452
2453 Most options interpret the @var{optval} buffer as a single @code{int}
2454 value.
2455
2456 The actual return value of @code{getsockopt} is @code{0} on success
2457 and @code{-1} on failure.  The following @code{errno} error conditions
2458 are defined:
2459
2460 @table @code
2461 @item EBADF
2462 The @var{socket} argument is not a valid file descriptor.
2463
2464 @item ENOTSOCK
2465 The descriptor @var{socket} is not a socket.
2466
2467 @item ENOPROTOOPT
2468 The @var{optname} doesn't make sense for the given @var{level}.
2469 @end table
2470 @end deftypefun
2471
2472 @comment sys/socket.h
2473 @comment BSD
2474 @deftypefun int setsockopt (int @var{socket}, int @var{level}, int @var{optname}, void *@var{optval}, size_t @var{optlen})
2475 This function is used to set the socket option @var{optname} at level
2476 @var{level} for socket @var{socket}.  The value of the option is passed
2477 in the buffer @var{optval}, which has size @var{optlen}.
2478
2479 The return value and error codes are the same as for @code{getsockopt}.
2480 @end deftypefun
2481
2482 @node Socket-Level Options
2483 @subsection Socket-Level Options
2484
2485 @comment sys/socket.h
2486 @comment BSD
2487 @deftypevr Constant int SOL_SOCKET
2488 Use this constant as the @var{level} argument to @code{getsockopt} or
2489 @code{setsockopt} to manipulate the socket-level options described in
2490 this section.
2491 @end deftypevr
2492
2493 @pindex sys/socket.h
2494 Here is a table of socket-level option names; all are defined in the
2495 header file @file{sys/socket.h}.
2496
2497 @table @code
2498 @comment sys/socket.h
2499 @comment BSD
2500 @item SO_DEBUG
2501 @c Extra blank line here makes the table look better.
2502
2503 This option toggles recording of debugging information in the underlying
2504 protocol modules.  The value has type @code{int}; a nonzero value means
2505 ``yes''.
2506 @c !!! should say how this is used
2507 @c Ok, anyone who knows, please explain.
2508
2509 @comment sys/socket.h
2510 @comment BSD
2511 @item SO_REUSEADDR
2512 This option controls whether @code{bind} (@pxref{Setting Address})
2513 should permit reuse of local addresses for this socket.  If you enable
2514 this option, you can actually have two sockets with the same Internet
2515 port number; but the system won't allow you to use the two
2516 identically-named sockets in a way that would confuse the Internet.  The
2517 reason for this option is that some higher-level Internet protocols,
2518 including FTP, require you to keep reusing the same socket number.
2519
2520 The value has type @code{int}; a nonzero value means ``yes''.
2521
2522 @comment sys/socket.h
2523 @comment BSD
2524 @item SO_KEEPALIVE
2525 This option controls whether the underlying protocol should
2526 periodically transmit messages on a connected socket.  If the peer
2527 fails to respond to these messages, the connection is considered
2528 broken.  The value has type @code{int}; a nonzero value means
2529 ``yes''.
2530
2531 @comment sys/socket.h
2532 @comment BSD
2533 @item SO_DONTROUTE
2534 This option controls whether outgoing messages bypass the normal
2535 message routing facilities.  If set, messages are sent directly to the
2536 network interface instead.  The value has type @code{int}; a nonzero
2537 value means ``yes''.
2538
2539 @comment sys/socket.h
2540 @comment BSD
2541 @item SO_LINGER
2542 This option specifies what should happen when the socket of a type
2543 that promises reliable delivery still has untransmitted messages when
2544 it is closed; see @ref{Closing a Socket}.  The value has type
2545 @code{struct linger}.
2546
2547 @comment sys/socket.h
2548 @comment BSD
2549 @deftp {Data Type} {struct linger}
2550 This structure type has the following members:
2551
2552 @table @code
2553 @item int l_onoff
2554 This field is interpreted as a boolean.  If nonzero, @code{close}
2555 blocks until the data is transmitted or the timeout period has expired.
2556
2557 @item int l_linger
2558 This specifies the timeout period, in seconds.
2559 @end table
2560 @end deftp
2561
2562 @comment sys/socket.h
2563 @comment BSD
2564 @item SO_BROADCAST
2565 This option controls whether datagrams may be broadcast from the socket.
2566 The value has type @code{int}; a nonzero value means ``yes''.
2567
2568 @comment sys/socket.h
2569 @comment BSD
2570 @item SO_OOBINLINE
2571 If this option is set, out-of-band data received on the socket is
2572 placed in the normal input queue.  This permits it to be read using
2573 @code{read} or @code{recv} without specifying the @code{MSG_OOB}
2574 flag.  @xref{Out-of-Band Data}.  The value has type @code{int}; a
2575 nonzero value means ``yes''.
2576
2577 @comment sys/socket.h
2578 @comment BSD
2579 @item SO_SNDBUF
2580 This option gets or sets the size of the output buffer.  The value is an
2581 @code{size_t}, which is the size in bytes.
2582
2583 @comment sys/socket.h
2584 @comment BSD
2585 @item SO_RCVBUF
2586 This option gets or sets the size of the input buffer.  The value is an
2587 @code{size_t}, which is the size in bytes.
2588
2589 @comment sys/socket.h
2590 @comment GNU
2591 @item SO_STYLE
2592 @comment sys/socket.h
2593 @comment BSD 
2594 @itemx SO_TYPE
2595 This option can be used with @code{getsockopt} only.  It is used to
2596 get the socket's communication style.  @code{SO_TYPE} is the
2597 historical name, and @code{SO_STYLE} is the preferred name in GNU.
2598 The value has type @code{int} and its value designates a communication
2599 style; see @ref{Communication Styles}.
2600
2601 @comment sys/socket.h
2602 @comment BSD 
2603 @item SO_ERROR
2604 @c Extra blank line here makes the table look better.
2605
2606 This option can be used with @code{getsockopt} only.  It is used to reset
2607 the error status of the socket.  The value is an @code{int}, which represents
2608 the previous error status.
2609 @c !!! what is "socket error status"?  this is never defined.
2610 @end table
2611
2612 @node Networks Database
2613 @section Networks Database
2614 @cindex networks database
2615 @cindex converting network number to network name
2616 @cindex converting network name to network number
2617
2618 @pindex /etc/networks
2619 @pindex netdb.h
2620 Many systems come with a database that records a list of networks known
2621 to the system developer.  This is usually kept either in the file
2622 @file{/etc/networks} or in an equivalent from a name server.  This data
2623 base is useful for routing programs such as @code{route}, but it is not
2624 useful for programs that simply communicate over the network.  We
2625 provide functions to access this data base, which are declared in
2626 @file{netdb.h}.
2627
2628 @comment netdb.h
2629 @comment BSD
2630 @deftp {Data Type} {struct netent}
2631 This data type is used to represent information about entries in the
2632 networks database.  It has the following members:
2633
2634 @table @code
2635 @item char *n_name
2636 This is the ``official'' name of the network.
2637
2638 @item char **n_aliases
2639 These are alternative names for the network, represented as a vector
2640 of strings.  A null pointer terminates the array.
2641
2642 @item int n_addrtype
2643 This is the type of the network number; this is always equal to
2644 @code{AF_INET} for Internet networks.
2645
2646 @item unsigned long int n_net
2647 This is the network number.  Network numbers are returned in host
2648 byte order; see @ref{Byte Order}.
2649 @end table
2650 @end deftp
2651
2652 Use the @code{getnetbyname} or @code{getnetbyaddr} functions to search
2653 the networks database for information about a specific network.  The
2654 information is returned in a statically-allocated structure; you must
2655 copy the information if you need to save it.
2656
2657 @comment netdb.h
2658 @comment BSD
2659 @deftypefun {struct netent *} getnetbyname (const char *@var{name})
2660 The @code{getnetbyname} function returns information about the network
2661 named @var{name}.  It returns a null pointer if there is no such
2662 network.
2663 @end deftypefun
2664
2665 @comment netdb.h
2666 @comment BSD
2667 @deftypefun {struct netent *} getnetbyaddr (long @var{net}, int @var{type})
2668 The @code{getnetbyaddr} function returns information about the network
2669 of type @var{type} with number @var{net}.  You should specify a value of
2670 @code{AF_INET} for the @var{type} argument for Internet networks.  
2671
2672 @code{getnetbyaddr} returns a null pointer if there is no such
2673 network.
2674 @end deftypefun
2675
2676 You can also scan the networks database using @code{setnetent},
2677 @code{getnetent}, and @code{endnetent}.  Be careful in using these
2678 functions, because they are not reentrant.
2679
2680 @comment netdb.h
2681 @comment BSD
2682 @deftypefun void setnetent (int @var{stayopen})
2683 This function opens and rewinds the networks database.
2684
2685 If the @var{stayopen} argument is nonzero, this sets a flag so that
2686 subsequent calls to @code{getnetbyname} or @code{getnetbyaddr} will
2687 not close the database (as they usually would).  This makes for more
2688 efficiency if you call those functions several times, by avoiding
2689 reopening the database for each call.
2690 @end deftypefun
2691
2692 @comment netdb.h
2693 @comment BSD
2694 @deftypefun {struct netent *} getnetent (void)
2695 This function returns the next entry in the networks database.  It
2696 returns a null pointer if there are no more entries.
2697 @end deftypefun
2698
2699 @comment netdb.h
2700 @comment BSD
2701 @deftypefun void endnetent (void)
2702 This function closes the networks database.
2703 @end deftypefun