3d60fa4d2e972f6d6ae700267562f780978d0067
[kopensolaris-gnu/glibc.git] / manual / string.texi
1 @node String and Array Utilities, Extended Characters, Character Handling, Top
2 @chapter String and Array Utilities
3
4 Operations on strings (or arrays of characters) are an important part of
5 many programs.  The GNU C library provides an extensive set of string
6 utility functions, including functions for copying, concatenating,
7 comparing, and searching strings.  Many of these functions can also
8 operate on arbitrary regions of storage; for example, the @code{memcpy}
9 function can be used to copy the contents of any kind of array.
10
11 It's fairly common for beginning C programmers to ``reinvent the wheel''
12 by duplicating this functionality in their own code, but it pays to
13 become familiar with the library functions and to make use of them,
14 since this offers benefits in maintenance, efficiency, and portability.
15
16 For instance, you could easily compare one string to another in two
17 lines of C code, but if you use the built-in @code{strcmp} function,
18 you're less likely to make a mistake.  And, since these library
19 functions are typically highly optimized, your program may run faster
20 too.
21
22 @menu
23 * Representation of Strings::   Introduction to basic concepts.
24 * String/Array Conventions::    Whether to use a string function or an
25                                  arbitrary array function.
26 * String Length::               Determining the length of a string.
27 * Copying and Concatenation::   Functions to copy the contents of strings
28                                  and arrays.
29 * String/Array Comparison::     Functions for byte-wise and character-wise
30                                  comparison.
31 * Collation Functions::         Functions for collating strings.
32 * Search Functions::            Searching for a specific element or substring.
33 * Finding Tokens in a String::  Splitting a string into tokens by looking
34                                  for delimiters.
35 * Encode Binary Data::          Encoding and Decoding of Binary Data.
36 * Argz and Envz Vectors::       Null-separated string vectors.
37 @end menu
38
39 @node Representation of Strings
40 @section Representation of Strings
41 @cindex string, representation of
42
43 This section is a quick summary of string concepts for beginning C
44 programmers.  It describes how character strings are represented in C
45 and some common pitfalls.  If you are already familiar with this
46 material, you can skip this section.
47
48 @cindex string
49 @cindex null character
50 A @dfn{string} is an array of @code{char} objects.  But string-valued
51 variables are usually declared to be pointers of type @code{char *}.
52 Such variables do not include space for the text of a string; that has
53 to be stored somewhere else---in an array variable, a string constant,
54 or dynamically allocated memory (@pxref{Memory Allocation}).  It's up to
55 you to store the address of the chosen memory space into the pointer
56 variable.  Alternatively you can store a @dfn{null pointer} in the
57 pointer variable.  The null pointer does not point anywhere, so
58 attempting to reference the string it points to gets an error.
59
60 By convention, a @dfn{null character}, @code{'\0'}, marks the end of a
61 string.  For example, in testing to see whether the @code{char *}
62 variable @var{p} points to a null character marking the end of a string,
63 you can write @code{!*@var{p}} or @code{*@var{p} == '\0'}.
64
65 A null character is quite different conceptually from a null pointer,
66 although both are represented by the integer @code{0}.
67
68 @cindex string literal
69 @dfn{String literals} appear in C program source as strings of
70 characters between double-quote characters (@samp{"}).  In @w{ISO C},
71 string literals can also be formed by @dfn{string concatenation}:
72 @code{"a" "b"} is the same as @code{"ab"}.  Modification of string
73 literals is not allowed by the GNU C compiler, because literals
74 are placed in read-only storage.
75
76 Character arrays that are declared @code{const} cannot be modified
77 either.  It's generally good style to declare non-modifiable string
78 pointers to be of type @code{const char *}, since this often allows the
79 C compiler to detect accidental modifications as well as providing some
80 amount of documentation about what your program intends to do with the
81 string.
82
83 The amount of memory allocated for the character array may extend past
84 the null character that normally marks the end of the string.  In this
85 document, the term @dfn{allocation size} is always used to refer to the
86 total amount of memory allocated for the string, while the term
87 @dfn{length} refers to the number of characters up to (but not
88 including) the terminating null character.
89 @cindex length of string
90 @cindex allocation size of string
91 @cindex size of string
92 @cindex string length
93 @cindex string allocation
94
95 A notorious source of program bugs is trying to put more characters in a
96 string than fit in its allocated size.  When writing code that extends
97 strings or moves characters into a pre-allocated array, you should be
98 very careful to keep track of the length of the text and make explicit
99 checks for overflowing the array.  Many of the library functions
100 @emph{do not} do this for you!  Remember also that you need to allocate
101 an extra byte to hold the null character that marks the end of the
102 string.
103
104 @node String/Array Conventions
105 @section String and Array Conventions
106
107 This chapter describes both functions that work on arbitrary arrays or
108 blocks of memory, and functions that are specific to null-terminated
109 arrays of characters.
110
111 Functions that operate on arbitrary blocks of memory have names
112 beginning with @samp{mem} (such as @code{memcpy}) and invariably take an
113 argument which specifies the size (in bytes) of the block of memory to
114 operate on.  The array arguments and return values for these functions
115 have type @code{void *}, and as a matter of style, the elements of these
116 arrays are referred to as ``bytes''.  You can pass any kind of pointer
117 to these functions, and the @code{sizeof} operator is useful in
118 computing the value for the size argument.
119
120 In contrast, functions that operate specifically on strings have names
121 beginning with @samp{str} (such as @code{strcpy}) and look for a null
122 character to terminate the string instead of requiring an explicit size
123 argument to be passed.  (Some of these functions accept a specified
124 maximum length, but they also check for premature termination with a
125 null character.)  The array arguments and return values for these
126 functions have type @code{char *}, and the array elements are referred
127 to as ``characters''.
128
129 In many cases, there are both @samp{mem} and @samp{str} versions of a
130 function.  The one that is more appropriate to use depends on the exact
131 situation.  When your program is manipulating arbitrary arrays or blocks of
132 storage, then you should always use the @samp{mem} functions.  On the
133 other hand, when you are manipulating null-terminated strings it is
134 usually more convenient to use the @samp{str} functions, unless you
135 already know the length of the string in advance.
136
137 @node String Length
138 @section String Length
139
140 You can get the length of a string using the @code{strlen} function.
141 This function is declared in the header file @file{string.h}.
142 @pindex string.h
143
144 @comment string.h
145 @comment ISO
146 @deftypefun size_t strlen (const char *@var{s})
147 The @code{strlen} function returns the length of the null-terminated
148 string @var{s}.  (In other words, it returns the offset of the terminating
149 null character within the array.)
150
151 For example,
152 @smallexample
153 strlen ("hello, world")
154     @result{} 12
155 @end smallexample
156
157 When applied to a character array, the @code{strlen} function returns
158 the length of the string stored there, not its allocation size.  You can
159 get the allocation size of the character array that holds a string using
160 the @code{sizeof} operator:
161
162 @smallexample
163 char string[32] = "hello, world";
164 sizeof (string)
165     @result{} 32
166 strlen (string)
167     @result{} 12
168 @end smallexample
169 @end deftypefun
170
171 @comment string.h
172 @comment GNU
173 @deftypefun size_t strnlen (const char *@var{s}, size_t @var{maxlen})
174 The @code{strnlen} function returns the length of the null-terminated
175 string @var{s} is this length is smaller than @var{maxlen}.  Otherwise
176 it returns @var{maxlen}.  Therefore this function is equivalent to
177 @code{(strlen (@var{s}) < n ? strlen (@var{s}) : @var{maxlen})} but it
178 is more efficient.
179
180 @smallexample
181 char string[32] = "hello, world";
182 strnlen (string, 32)
183     @result{} 12
184 strnlen (string, 5)
185     @result{} 5
186 @end smallexample
187
188 This function is a GNU extension.
189 @end deftypefun
190
191 @node Copying and Concatenation
192 @section Copying and Concatenation
193
194 You can use the functions described in this section to copy the contents
195 of strings and arrays, or to append the contents of one string to
196 another.  These functions are declared in the header file
197 @file{string.h}.
198 @pindex string.h
199 @cindex copying strings and arrays
200 @cindex string copy functions
201 @cindex array copy functions
202 @cindex concatenating strings
203 @cindex string concatenation functions
204
205 A helpful way to remember the ordering of the arguments to the functions
206 in this section is that it corresponds to an assignment expression, with
207 the destination array specified to the left of the source array.  All
208 of these functions return the address of the destination array.
209
210 Most of these functions do not work properly if the source and
211 destination arrays overlap.  For example, if the beginning of the
212 destination array overlaps the end of the source array, the original
213 contents of that part of the source array may get overwritten before it
214 is copied.  Even worse, in the case of the string functions, the null
215 character marking the end of the string may be lost, and the copy
216 function might get stuck in a loop trashing all the memory allocated to
217 your program.
218
219 All functions that have problems copying between overlapping arrays are
220 explicitly identified in this manual.  In addition to functions in this
221 section, there are a few others like @code{sprintf} (@pxref{Formatted
222 Output Functions}) and @code{scanf} (@pxref{Formatted Input
223 Functions}).
224
225 @comment string.h
226 @comment ISO
227 @deftypefun {void *} memcpy (void *@var{to}, const void *@var{from}, size_t @var{size})
228 The @code{memcpy} function copies @var{size} bytes from the object
229 beginning at @var{from} into the object beginning at @var{to}.  The
230 behavior of this function is undefined if the two arrays @var{to} and
231 @var{from} overlap; use @code{memmove} instead if overlapping is possible.
232
233 The value returned by @code{memcpy} is the value of @var{to}.
234
235 Here is an example of how you might use @code{memcpy} to copy the
236 contents of an array:
237
238 @smallexample
239 struct foo *oldarray, *newarray;
240 int arraysize;
241 @dots{}
242 memcpy (new, old, arraysize * sizeof (struct foo));
243 @end smallexample
244 @end deftypefun
245
246 @comment string.h
247 @comment GNU
248 @deftypefun {void *} mempcpy (void *@var{to}, const void *@var{from}, size_t @var{size})
249 The @code{mempcpy} function is nearly identical to the @code{memcpy}
250 function.  It copies @var{size} bytes from the object beginning at
251 @code{from} into the object pointed to by @var{to}.  But instead of
252 returning the value of @code{to} it returns a pointer to the byte
253 following the last written byte in the object beginning at @var{to}.
254 I.e., the value is @code{((void *) ((char *) @var{to} + @var{size}))}.
255
256 This function is useful in situations where a number of objects shall be
257 copied to consecutive memory positions.
258
259 @smallexample
260 void *
261 combine (void *o1, size_t s1, void *o2, size_t s2)
262 @{
263   void *result = malloc (s1 + s2);
264   if (result != NULL)
265     mempcpy (mempcpy (result, o1, s1), o2, s2);
266   return result;
267 @}
268 @end smallexample
269
270 This function is a GNU extension.
271 @end deftypefun
272
273 @comment string.h
274 @comment ISO
275 @deftypefun {void *} memmove (void *@var{to}, const void *@var{from}, size_t @var{size})
276 @code{memmove} copies the @var{size} bytes at @var{from} into the
277 @var{size} bytes at @var{to}, even if those two blocks of space
278 overlap.  In the case of overlap, @code{memmove} is careful to copy the
279 original values of the bytes in the block at @var{from}, including those
280 bytes which also belong to the block at @var{to}.
281 @end deftypefun
282
283 @comment string.h
284 @comment SVID
285 @deftypefun {void *} memccpy (void *@var{to}, const void *@var{from}, int @var{c}, size_t @var{size})
286 This function copies no more than @var{size} bytes from @var{from} to
287 @var{to}, stopping if a byte matching @var{c} is found.  The return
288 value is a pointer into @var{to} one byte past where @var{c} was copied,
289 or a null pointer if no byte matching @var{c} appeared in the first
290 @var{size} bytes of @var{from}.
291 @end deftypefun
292
293 @comment string.h
294 @comment ISO
295 @deftypefun {void *} memset (void *@var{block}, int @var{c}, size_t @var{size})
296 This function copies the value of @var{c} (converted to an
297 @code{unsigned char}) into each of the first @var{size} bytes of the
298 object beginning at @var{block}.  It returns the value of @var{block}.
299 @end deftypefun
300
301 @comment string.h
302 @comment ISO
303 @deftypefun {char *} strcpy (char *@var{to}, const char *@var{from})
304 This copies characters from the string @var{from} (up to and including
305 the terminating null character) into the string @var{to}.  Like
306 @code{memcpy}, this function has undefined results if the strings
307 overlap.  The return value is the value of @var{to}.
308 @end deftypefun
309
310 @comment string.h
311 @comment ISO
312 @deftypefun {char *} strncpy (char *@var{to}, const char *@var{from}, size_t @var{size})
313 This function is similar to @code{strcpy} but always copies exactly
314 @var{size} characters into @var{to}.
315
316 If the length of @var{from} is more than @var{size}, then @code{strncpy}
317 copies just the first @var{size} characters.  Note that in this case
318 there is no null terminator written into @var{to}.
319
320 If the length of @var{from} is less than @var{size}, then @code{strncpy}
321 copies all of @var{from}, followed by enough null characters to add up
322 to @var{size} characters in all.  This behavior is rarely useful, but it
323 is specified by the @w{ISO C} standard.
324
325 The behavior of @code{strncpy} is undefined if the strings overlap.
326
327 Using @code{strncpy} as opposed to @code{strcpy} is a way to avoid bugs
328 relating to writing past the end of the allocated space for @var{to}.
329 However, it can also make your program much slower in one common case:
330 copying a string which is probably small into a potentially large buffer.
331 In this case, @var{size} may be large, and when it is, @code{strncpy} will
332 waste a considerable amount of time copying null characters.
333 @end deftypefun
334
335 @comment string.h
336 @comment SVID
337 @deftypefun {char *} strdup (const char *@var{s})
338 This function copies the null-terminated string @var{s} into a newly
339 allocated string.  The string is allocated using @code{malloc}; see
340 @ref{Unconstrained Allocation}.  If @code{malloc} cannot allocate space
341 for the new string, @code{strdup} returns a null pointer.  Otherwise it
342 returns a pointer to the new string.
343 @end deftypefun
344
345 @comment string.h
346 @comment GNU
347 @deftypefun {char *} strndup (const char *@var{s}, size_t @var{size})
348 This function is similar to @code{strdup} but always copies at most
349 @var{size} characters into the newly allocated string.
350
351 If the length of @var{s} is more than @var{size}, then @code{strndup}
352 copies just the first @var{size} characters and adds a closing null
353 terminator.  Otherwise all characters are copied and the string is
354 terminated.
355
356 This function is different to @code{strncpy} in that it always
357 terminates the destination string.
358 @end deftypefun
359
360 @comment string.h
361 @comment Unknown origin
362 @deftypefun {char *} stpcpy (char *@var{to}, const char *@var{from})
363 This function is like @code{strcpy}, except that it returns a pointer to
364 the end of the string @var{to} (that is, the address of the terminating
365 null character) rather than the beginning.
366
367 For example, this program uses @code{stpcpy} to concatenate @samp{foo}
368 and @samp{bar} to produce @samp{foobar}, which it then prints.
369
370 @smallexample
371 @include stpcpy.c.texi
372 @end smallexample
373
374 This function is not part of the ISO or POSIX standards, and is not
375 customary on Unix systems, but we did not invent it either.  Perhaps it
376 comes from MS-DOG.
377
378 Its behavior is undefined if the strings overlap.
379 @end deftypefun
380
381 @comment string.h
382 @comment GNU
383 @deftypefun {char *} stpncpy (char *@var{to}, const char *@var{from}, size_t @var{size})
384 This function is similar to @code{stpcpy} but copies always exactly
385 @var{size} characters into @var{to}.
386
387 If the length of @var{from} is more then @var{size}, then @code{stpncpy}
388 copies just the first @var{size} characters and returns a pointer to the
389 character directly following the one which was copied last.  Note that in
390 this case there is no null terminator written into @var{to}.
391
392 If the length of @var{from} is less than @var{size}, then @code{stpncpy}
393 copies all of @var{from}, followed by enough null characters to add up
394 to @var{size} characters in all.  This behaviour is rarely useful, but it
395 is implemented to be useful in contexts where this behaviour of the
396 @code{strncpy} is used.  @code{stpncpy} returns a pointer to the
397 @emph{first} written null character.
398
399 This function is not part of ISO or POSIX but was found useful while
400 developing GNU C Library itself.
401
402 Its behaviour is undefined if the strings overlap.
403 @end deftypefun
404
405 @comment string.h
406 @comment GNU
407 @deftypefn {Macro} {char *} strdupa (const char *@var{s})
408 This function is similar to @code{strdup} but allocates the new string
409 using @code{alloca} instead of @code{malloc}
410 @pxref{Variable Size Automatic}.  This means of course the returned
411 string has the same limitations as any block of memory allocated using
412 @code{alloca}.
413
414 For obvious reasons @code{strdupa} is implemented only as a macro.  I.e.,
415 you cannot get the address of this function.  Despite this limitation
416 it is a useful function.  The following code shows a situation where
417 using @code{malloc} would be a lot more expensive.
418
419 @smallexample
420 @include strdupa.c.texi
421 @end smallexample
422
423 Please note that calling @code{strtok} using @var{path} directly is
424 invalid.
425
426 This function is only available if GNU CC is used.
427 @end deftypefn
428
429 @comment string.h
430 @comment GNU
431 @deftypefn {Macro} {char *} strndupa (const char *@var{s}, size_t @var{size})
432 This function is similar to @code{strndup} but like @code{strdupa} it
433 allocates the new string using @code{alloca}
434 @pxref{Variable Size Automatic}.  The same advantages and limitations
435 of @code{strdupa} are valid for @code{strndupa}, too.
436
437 This function is implemented only as a macro which means one cannot
438 get the address of it.
439
440 @code{strndupa} is only available if GNU CC is used.
441 @end deftypefn
442
443 @comment string.h
444 @comment ISO
445 @deftypefun {char *} strcat (char *@var{to}, const char *@var{from})
446 The @code{strcat} function is similar to @code{strcpy}, except that the
447 characters from @var{from} are concatenated or appended to the end of
448 @var{to}, instead of overwriting it.  That is, the first character from
449 @var{from} overwrites the null character marking the end of @var{to}.
450
451 An equivalent definition for @code{strcat} would be:
452
453 @smallexample
454 char *
455 strcat (char *to, const char *from)
456 @{
457   strcpy (to + strlen (to), from);
458   return to;
459 @}
460 @end smallexample
461
462 This function has undefined results if the strings overlap.
463 @end deftypefun
464
465 @comment string.h
466 @comment ISO
467 @deftypefun {char *} strncat (char *@var{to}, const char *@var{from}, size_t @var{size})
468 This function is like @code{strcat} except that not more than @var{size}
469 characters from @var{from} are appended to the end of @var{to}.  A
470 single null character is also always appended to @var{to}, so the total
471 allocated size of @var{to} must be at least @code{@var{size} + 1} bytes
472 longer than its initial length.
473
474 The @code{strncat} function could be implemented like this:
475
476 @smallexample
477 @group
478 char *
479 strncat (char *to, const char *from, size_t size)
480 @{
481   strncpy (to + strlen (to), from, size);
482   return to;
483 @}
484 @end group
485 @end smallexample
486
487 The behavior of @code{strncat} is undefined if the strings overlap.
488 @end deftypefun
489
490 Here is an example showing the use of @code{strncpy} and @code{strncat}.
491 Notice how, in the call to @code{strncat}, the @var{size} parameter
492 is computed to avoid overflowing the character array @code{buffer}.
493
494 @smallexample
495 @include strncat.c.texi
496 @end smallexample
497
498 @noindent
499 The output produced by this program looks like:
500
501 @smallexample
502 hello
503 hello, wo
504 @end smallexample
505
506 @comment string.h
507 @comment BSD
508 @deftypefun void bcopy (const void *@var{from}, void *@var{to}, size_t @var{size})
509 This is a partially obsolete alternative for @code{memmove}, derived from
510 BSD.  Note that it is not quite equivalent to @code{memmove}, because the
511 arguments are not in the same order and there is no return value.
512 @end deftypefun
513
514 @comment string.h
515 @comment BSD
516 @deftypefun void bzero (void *@var{block}, size_t @var{size})
517 This is a partially obsolete alternative for @code{memset}, derived from
518 BSD.  Note that it is not as general as @code{memset}, because the only
519 value it can store is zero.
520 @end deftypefun
521
522 @node String/Array Comparison
523 @section String/Array Comparison
524 @cindex comparing strings and arrays
525 @cindex string comparison functions
526 @cindex array comparison functions
527 @cindex predicates on strings
528 @cindex predicates on arrays
529
530 You can use the functions in this section to perform comparisons on the
531 contents of strings and arrays.  As well as checking for equality, these
532 functions can also be used as the ordering functions for sorting
533 operations.  @xref{Searching and Sorting}, for an example of this.
534
535 Unlike most comparison operations in C, the string comparison functions
536 return a nonzero value if the strings are @emph{not} equivalent rather
537 than if they are.  The sign of the value indicates the relative ordering
538 of the first characters in the strings that are not equivalent:  a
539 negative value indicates that the first string is ``less'' than the
540 second, while a positive value indicates that the first string is
541 ``greater''.
542
543 The most common use of these functions is to check only for equality.
544 This is canonically done with an expression like @w{@samp{! strcmp (s1, s2)}}.
545
546 All of these functions are declared in the header file @file{string.h}.
547 @pindex string.h
548
549 @comment string.h
550 @comment ISO
551 @deftypefun int memcmp (const void *@var{a1}, const void *@var{a2}, size_t @var{size})
552 The function @code{memcmp} compares the @var{size} bytes of memory
553 beginning at @var{a1} against the @var{size} bytes of memory beginning
554 at @var{a2}.  The value returned has the same sign as the difference
555 between the first differing pair of bytes (interpreted as @code{unsigned
556 char} objects, then promoted to @code{int}).
557
558 If the contents of the two blocks are equal, @code{memcmp} returns
559 @code{0}.
560 @end deftypefun
561
562 On arbitrary arrays, the @code{memcmp} function is mostly useful for
563 testing equality.  It usually isn't meaningful to do byte-wise ordering
564 comparisons on arrays of things other than bytes.  For example, a
565 byte-wise comparison on the bytes that make up floating-point numbers
566 isn't likely to tell you anything about the relationship between the
567 values of the floating-point numbers.
568
569 You should also be careful about using @code{memcmp} to compare objects
570 that can contain ``holes'', such as the padding inserted into structure
571 objects to enforce alignment requirements, extra space at the end of
572 unions, and extra characters at the ends of strings whose length is less
573 than their allocated size.  The contents of these ``holes'' are
574 indeterminate and may cause strange behavior when performing byte-wise
575 comparisons.  For more predictable results, perform an explicit
576 component-wise comparison.
577
578 For example, given a structure type definition like:
579
580 @smallexample
581 struct foo
582   @{
583     unsigned char tag;
584     union
585       @{
586         double f;
587         long i;
588         char *p;
589       @} value;
590   @};
591 @end smallexample
592
593 @noindent
594 you are better off writing a specialized comparison function to compare
595 @code{struct foo} objects instead of comparing them with @code{memcmp}.
596
597 @comment string.h
598 @comment ISO
599 @deftypefun int strcmp (const char *@var{s1}, const char *@var{s2})
600 The @code{strcmp} function compares the string @var{s1} against
601 @var{s2}, returning a value that has the same sign as the difference
602 between the first differing pair of characters (interpreted as
603 @code{unsigned char} objects, then promoted to @code{int}).
604
605 If the two strings are equal, @code{strcmp} returns @code{0}.
606
607 A consequence of the ordering used by @code{strcmp} is that if @var{s1}
608 is an initial substring of @var{s2}, then @var{s1} is considered to be
609 ``less than'' @var{s2}.
610 @end deftypefun
611
612 @comment string.h
613 @comment BSD
614 @deftypefun int strcasecmp (const char *@var{s1}, const char *@var{s2})
615 This function is like @code{strcmp}, except that differences in case are
616 ignored.  How uppercase and lowercase character are related is
617 determined by the currently selected locale.  In the standard @code{"C"}
618 locale the characters @"A and @"a do not match but in a locale which
619 regards this characters as parts of the alphabet they do match.
620
621 @code{strcasecmp} is derived from BSD.
622 @end deftypefun
623
624 @comment string.h
625 @comment BSD
626 @deftypefun int strncasecmp (const char *@var{s1}, const char *@var{s2}, size_t @var{n})
627 This function is like @code{strncmp}, except that differences in case
628 are ignored.  Like for @code{strcasecmp} it is locale dependent how
629 uppercase and lowercase character are related.
630
631 @code{strncasecmp} is a GNU extension.
632 @end deftypefun
633
634 @comment string.h
635 @comment ISO
636 @deftypefun int strncmp (const char *@var{s1}, const char *@var{s2}, size_t @var{size})
637 This function is the similar to @code{strcmp}, except that no more than
638 @var{size} characters are compared.  In other words, if the two strings are
639 the same in their first @var{size} characters, the return value is zero.
640 @end deftypefun
641
642 Here are some examples showing the use of @code{strcmp} and @code{strncmp}.
643 These examples assume the use of the ASCII character set.  (If some
644 other character set---say, EBCDIC---is used instead, then the glyphs
645 are associated with different numeric codes, and the return values
646 and ordering may differ.)
647
648 @smallexample
649 strcmp ("hello", "hello")
650     @result{} 0    /* @r{These two strings are the same.} */
651 strcmp ("hello", "Hello")
652     @result{} 32   /* @r{Comparisons are case-sensitive.} */
653 strcmp ("hello", "world")
654     @result{} -15  /* @r{The character @code{'h'} comes before @code{'w'}.} */
655 strcmp ("hello", "hello, world")
656     @result{} -44  /* @r{Comparing a null character against a comma.} */
657 strncmp ("hello", "hello, world", 5)
658     @result{} 0    /* @r{The initial 5 characters are the same.} */
659 strncmp ("hello, world", "hello, stupid world!!!", 5)
660     @result{} 0    /* @r{The initial 5 characters are the same.} */
661 @end smallexample
662
663 @comment string.h
664 @comment GNU
665 @deftypefun int strverscmp (const char *@var{s1}, const char *@var{s2})
666 The @code{strverscmp} function compares the string @var{s1} against
667 @var{s2}, considering them as holding indices/version numbers.  Return
668 value follows the same conventions as found in the @code{strverscmp}
669 function.  In fact, if @var{s1} and @var{s2} contain no digits,
670 @code{strverscmp} behaves like @code{strcmp}.
671
672 Basically, we compare strings normally (character by character), until
673 we find a digit in each string - then we enter a special comparison
674 mode, where each sequence of digit is taken as a whole.  If we reach the
675 end of these two parts without noticing a difference, we return to the
676 standard comparison mode.  There are two types of numeric parts:
677 "integral" and "fractional" (those  begin with a '0'). The types
678 of the numeric parts affect the way we sort them:
679
680 @itemize @bullet
681 @item
682 integral/integral: we compare values as you would expect.
683
684 @item
685 fractional/integral: the fractional part is less than the integral one.
686 Again, no surprise.
687
688 @item
689 fractional/fractional: the things become a bit more complex.
690 If the common prefix contains only leading zeroes, the longest part is less
691 than the other one; else the comparison behaves normally.
692 @end itemize
693
694 @smallexample
695 strverscmp ("no digit", "no digit")
696     @result{} 0    /* @r{same behaviour as strverscmp.} */
697 strverscmp ("item#99", "item#100")
698     @result{} <0   /* @r{same prefix, but 99 < 100.} */
699 strverscmp ("alpha1", "alpha001")
700     @result{} >0   /* @r{fractional part inferior to integral one.} */
701 strverscmp ("part1_f012", "part1_f01")
702     @result{} >0   /* @r{two fractional parts.} */
703 strverscmp ("foo.009", "foo.0")
704     @result{} <0   /* @r{idem, but with leading zeroes only.} */
705 @end smallexample
706
707 This function is especially useful when dealing with filename sorting,
708 because filenames frequently hold indices/version numbers.
709
710 @code{strverscmp} is a GNU extension.
711 @end deftypefun
712
713 @comment string.h
714 @comment BSD
715 @deftypefun int bcmp (const void *@var{a1}, const void *@var{a2}, size_t @var{size})
716 This is an obsolete alias for @code{memcmp}, derived from BSD.
717 @end deftypefun
718
719 @node Collation Functions
720 @section Collation Functions
721
722 @cindex collating strings
723 @cindex string collation functions
724
725 In some locales, the conventions for lexicographic ordering differ from
726 the strict numeric ordering of character codes.  For example, in Spanish
727 most glyphs with diacritical marks such as accents are not considered
728 distinct letters for the purposes of collation.  On the other hand, the
729 two-character sequence @samp{ll} is treated as a single letter that is
730 collated immediately after @samp{l}.
731
732 You can use the functions @code{strcoll} and @code{strxfrm} (declared in
733 the header file @file{string.h}) to compare strings using a collation
734 ordering appropriate for the current locale.  The locale used by these
735 functions in particular can be specified by setting the locale for the
736 @code{LC_COLLATE} category; see @ref{Locales}.
737 @pindex string.h
738
739 In the standard C locale, the collation sequence for @code{strcoll} is
740 the same as that for @code{strcmp}.
741
742 Effectively, the way these functions work is by applying a mapping to
743 transform the characters in a string to a byte sequence that represents
744 the string's position in the collating sequence of the current locale.
745 Comparing two such byte sequences in a simple fashion is equivalent to
746 comparing the strings with the locale's collating sequence.
747
748 The function @code{strcoll} performs this translation implicitly, in
749 order to do one comparison.  By contrast, @code{strxfrm} performs the
750 mapping explicitly.  If you are making multiple comparisons using the
751 same string or set of strings, it is likely to be more efficient to use
752 @code{strxfrm} to transform all the strings just once, and subsequently
753 compare the transformed strings with @code{strcmp}.
754
755 @comment string.h
756 @comment ISO
757 @deftypefun int strcoll (const char *@var{s1}, const char *@var{s2})
758 The @code{strcoll} function is similar to @code{strcmp} but uses the
759 collating sequence of the current locale for collation (the
760 @code{LC_COLLATE} locale).
761 @end deftypefun
762
763 Here is an example of sorting an array of strings, using @code{strcoll}
764 to compare them.  The actual sort algorithm is not written here; it
765 comes from @code{qsort} (@pxref{Array Sort Function}).  The job of the
766 code shown here is to say how to compare the strings while sorting them.
767 (Later on in this section, we will show a way to do this more
768 efficiently using @code{strxfrm}.)
769
770 @smallexample
771 /* @r{This is the comparison function used with @code{qsort}.} */
772
773 int
774 compare_elements (char **p1, char **p2)
775 @{
776   return strcoll (*p1, *p2);
777 @}
778
779 /* @r{This is the entry point---the function to sort}
780    @r{strings using the locale's collating sequence.} */
781
782 void
783 sort_strings (char **array, int nstrings)
784 @{
785   /* @r{Sort @code{temp_array} by comparing the strings.} */
786   qsort (array, sizeof (char *),
787          nstrings, compare_elements);
788 @}
789 @end smallexample
790
791 @cindex converting string to collation order
792 @comment string.h
793 @comment ISO
794 @deftypefun size_t strxfrm (char *@var{to}, const char *@var{from}, size_t @var{size})
795 The function @code{strxfrm} transforms @var{string} using the collation
796 transformation determined by the locale currently selected for
797 collation, and stores the transformed string in the array @var{to}.  Up
798 to @var{size} characters (including a terminating null character) are
799 stored.
800
801 The behavior is undefined if the strings @var{to} and @var{from}
802 overlap; see @ref{Copying and Concatenation}.
803
804 The return value is the length of the entire transformed string.  This
805 value is not affected by the value of @var{size}, but if it is greater
806 or equal than @var{size}, it means that the transformed string did not
807 entirely fit in the array @var{to}.  In this case, only as much of the
808 string as actually fits was stored.  To get the whole transformed
809 string, call @code{strxfrm} again with a bigger output array.
810
811 The transformed string may be longer than the original string, and it
812 may also be shorter.
813
814 If @var{size} is zero, no characters are stored in @var{to}.  In this
815 case, @code{strxfrm} simply returns the number of characters that would
816 be the length of the transformed string.  This is useful for determining
817 what size string to allocate.  It does not matter what @var{to} is if
818 @var{size} is zero; @var{to} may even be a null pointer.
819 @end deftypefun
820
821 Here is an example of how you can use @code{strxfrm} when
822 you plan to do many comparisons.  It does the same thing as the previous
823 example, but much faster, because it has to transform each string only
824 once, no matter how many times it is compared with other strings.  Even
825 the time needed to allocate and free storage is much less than the time
826 we save, when there are many strings.
827
828 @smallexample
829 struct sorter @{ char *input; char *transformed; @};
830
831 /* @r{This is the comparison function used with @code{qsort}}
832    @r{to sort an array of @code{struct sorter}.} */
833
834 int
835 compare_elements (struct sorter *p1, struct sorter *p2)
836 @{
837   return strcmp (p1->transformed, p2->transformed);
838 @}
839
840 /* @r{This is the entry point---the function to sort}
841    @r{strings using the locale's collating sequence.} */
842
843 void
844 sort_strings_fast (char **array, int nstrings)
845 @{
846   struct sorter temp_array[nstrings];
847   int i;
848
849   /* @r{Set up @code{temp_array}.  Each element contains}
850      @r{one input string and its transformed string.} */
851   for (i = 0; i < nstrings; i++)
852     @{
853       size_t length = strlen (array[i]) * 2;
854       char *transformed;
855       size_t transformed_length;
856
857       temp_array[i].input = array[i];
858
859       /* @r{First try a buffer perhaps big enough.}  */
860       transformed = (char *) xmalloc (length);
861
862       /* @r{Transform @code{array[i]}.}  */
863       transformed_length = strxfrm (transformed, array[i], length);
864
865       /* @r{If the buffer was not large enough, resize it}
866          @r{and try again.}  */
867       if (transformed_length >= length)
868         @{
869           /* @r{Allocate the needed space. +1 for terminating}
870              @r{@code{NUL} character.}  */
871           transformed = (char *) xrealloc (transformed,
872                                            transformed_length + 1);
873
874           /* @r{The return value is not interesting because we know}
875              @r{how long the transformed string is.}  */
876           (void) strxfrm (transformed, array[i], transformed_length + 1);
877         @}
878
879       temp_array[i].transformed = transformed;
880     @}
881
882   /* @r{Sort @code{temp_array} by comparing transformed strings.} */
883   qsort (temp_array, sizeof (struct sorter),
884          nstrings, compare_elements);
885
886   /* @r{Put the elements back in the permanent array}
887      @r{in their sorted order.} */
888   for (i = 0; i < nstrings; i++)
889     array[i] = temp_array[i].input;
890
891   /* @r{Free the strings we allocated.} */
892   for (i = 0; i < nstrings; i++)
893     free (temp_array[i].transformed);
894 @}
895 @end smallexample
896
897 @strong{Compatibility Note:}  The string collation functions are a new
898 feature of @w{ISO C 89}.  Older C dialects have no equivalent feature.
899
900 @node Search Functions
901 @section Search Functions
902
903 This section describes library functions which perform various kinds
904 of searching operations on strings and arrays.  These functions are
905 declared in the header file @file{string.h}.
906 @pindex string.h
907 @cindex search functions (for strings)
908 @cindex string search functions
909
910 @comment string.h
911 @comment ISO
912 @deftypefun {void *} memchr (const void *@var{block}, int @var{c}, size_t @var{size})
913 This function finds the first occurrence of the byte @var{c} (converted
914 to an @code{unsigned char}) in the initial @var{size} bytes of the
915 object beginning at @var{block}.  The return value is a pointer to the
916 located byte, or a null pointer if no match was found.
917 @end deftypefun
918
919 @comment string.h
920 @comment ISO
921 @deftypefun {char *} strchr (const char *@var{string}, int @var{c})
922 The @code{strchr} function finds the first occurrence of the character
923 @var{c} (converted to a @code{char}) in the null-terminated string
924 beginning at @var{string}.  The return value is a pointer to the located
925 character, or a null pointer if no match was found.
926
927 For example,
928 @smallexample
929 strchr ("hello, world", 'l')
930     @result{} "llo, world"
931 strchr ("hello, world", '?')
932     @result{} NULL
933 @end smallexample
934
935 The terminating null character is considered to be part of the string,
936 so you can use this function get a pointer to the end of a string by
937 specifying a null character as the value of the @var{c} argument.
938 @end deftypefun
939
940 @comment string.h
941 @comment BSD
942 @deftypefun {char *} index (const char *@var{string}, int @var{c})
943 @code{index} is another name for @code{strchr}; they are exactly the same.
944 New code should always use @code{strchr} since this name is defined in
945 @w{ISO C} while @code{index} is a BSD invention which never was available
946 on @w{System V} derived systems.
947 @end deftypefun
948
949 @comment string.h
950 @comment ISO
951 @deftypefun {char *} strrchr (const char *@var{string}, int @var{c})
952 The function @code{strrchr} is like @code{strchr}, except that it searches
953 backwards from the end of the string @var{string} (instead of forwards
954 from the front).
955
956 For example,
957 @smallexample
958 strrchr ("hello, world", 'l')
959     @result{} "ld"
960 @end smallexample
961 @end deftypefun
962
963 @comment string.h
964 @comment BSD
965 @deftypefun {char *} rindex (const char *@var{string}, int @var{c})
966 @code{rindex} is another name for @code{strrchr}; they are exactly the same.
967 New code should always use @code{strrchr} since this name is defined in
968 @w{ISO C} while @code{rindex} is a BSD invention which never was available
969 on @w{System V} derived systems.
970 @end deftypefun
971
972 @comment string.h
973 @comment ISO
974 @deftypefun {char *} strstr (const char *@var{haystack}, const char *@var{needle})
975 This is like @code{strchr}, except that it searches @var{haystack} for a
976 substring @var{needle} rather than just a single character.  It
977 returns a pointer into the string @var{haystack} that is the first
978 character of the substring, or a null pointer if no match was found.  If
979 @var{needle} is an empty string, the function returns @var{haystack}.
980
981 For example,
982 @smallexample
983 strstr ("hello, world", "l")
984     @result{} "llo, world"
985 strstr ("hello, world", "wo")
986     @result{} "world"
987 @end smallexample
988 @end deftypefun
989
990
991 @comment string.h
992 @comment GNU
993 @deftypefun {void *} memmem (const void *@var{haystack}, size_t @var{haystack-len},@*const void *@var{needle}, size_t @var{needle-len})
994 This is like @code{strstr}, but @var{needle} and @var{haystack} are byte
995 arrays rather than null-terminated strings.  @var{needle-len} is the
996 length of @var{needle} and @var{haystack-len} is the length of
997 @var{haystack}.@refill
998
999 This function is a GNU extension.
1000 @end deftypefun
1001
1002 @comment string.h
1003 @comment ISO
1004 @deftypefun size_t strspn (const char *@var{string}, const char *@var{skipset})
1005 The @code{strspn} (``string span'') function returns the length of the
1006 initial substring of @var{string} that consists entirely of characters that
1007 are members of the set specified by the string @var{skipset}.  The order
1008 of the characters in @var{skipset} is not important.
1009
1010 For example,
1011 @smallexample
1012 strspn ("hello, world", "abcdefghijklmnopqrstuvwxyz")
1013     @result{} 5
1014 @end smallexample
1015 @end deftypefun
1016
1017 @comment string.h
1018 @comment ISO
1019 @deftypefun size_t strcspn (const char *@var{string}, const char *@var{stopset})
1020 The @code{strcspn} (``string complement span'') function returns the length
1021 of the initial substring of @var{string} that consists entirely of characters
1022 that are @emph{not} members of the set specified by the string @var{stopset}.
1023 (In other words, it returns the offset of the first character in @var{string}
1024 that is a member of the set @var{stopset}.)
1025
1026 For example,
1027 @smallexample
1028 strcspn ("hello, world", " \t\n,.;!?")
1029     @result{} 5
1030 @end smallexample
1031 @end deftypefun
1032
1033 @comment string.h
1034 @comment ISO
1035 @deftypefun {char *} strpbrk (const char *@var{string}, const char *@var{stopset})
1036 The @code{strpbrk} (``string pointer break'') function is related to
1037 @code{strcspn}, except that it returns a pointer to the first character
1038 in @var{string} that is a member of the set @var{stopset} instead of the
1039 length of the initial substring.  It returns a null pointer if no such
1040 character from @var{stopset} is found.
1041
1042 @c @group  Invalid outside the example.
1043 For example,
1044
1045 @smallexample
1046 strpbrk ("hello, world", " \t\n,.;!?")
1047     @result{} ", world"
1048 @end smallexample
1049 @c @end group
1050 @end deftypefun
1051
1052 @node Finding Tokens in a String
1053 @section Finding Tokens in a String
1054
1055 @cindex tokenizing strings
1056 @cindex breaking a string into tokens
1057 @cindex parsing tokens from a string
1058 It's fairly common for programs to have a need to do some simple kinds
1059 of lexical analysis and parsing, such as splitting a command string up
1060 into tokens.  You can do this with the @code{strtok} function, declared
1061 in the header file @file{string.h}.
1062 @pindex string.h
1063
1064 @comment string.h
1065 @comment ISO
1066 @deftypefun {char *} strtok (char *@var{newstring}, const char *@var{delimiters})
1067 A string can be split into tokens by making a series of calls to the
1068 function @code{strtok}.
1069
1070 The string to be split up is passed as the @var{newstring} argument on
1071 the first call only.  The @code{strtok} function uses this to set up
1072 some internal state information.  Subsequent calls to get additional
1073 tokens from the same string are indicated by passing a null pointer as
1074 the @var{newstring} argument.  Calling @code{strtok} with another
1075 non-null @var{newstring} argument reinitializes the state information.
1076 It is guaranteed that no other library function ever calls @code{strtok}
1077 behind your back (which would mess up this internal state information).
1078
1079 The @var{delimiters} argument is a string that specifies a set of delimiters
1080 that may surround the token being extracted.  All the initial characters
1081 that are members of this set are discarded.  The first character that is
1082 @emph{not} a member of this set of delimiters marks the beginning of the
1083 next token.  The end of the token is found by looking for the next
1084 character that is a member of the delimiter set.  This character in the
1085 original string @var{newstring} is overwritten by a null character, and the
1086 pointer to the beginning of the token in @var{newstring} is returned.
1087
1088 On the next call to @code{strtok}, the searching begins at the next
1089 character beyond the one that marked the end of the previous token.
1090 Note that the set of delimiters @var{delimiters} do not have to be the
1091 same on every call in a series of calls to @code{strtok}.
1092
1093 If the end of the string @var{newstring} is reached, or if the remainder of
1094 string consists only of delimiter characters, @code{strtok} returns
1095 a null pointer.
1096 @end deftypefun
1097
1098 @strong{Warning:} Since @code{strtok} alters the string it is parsing,
1099 you always copy the string to a temporary buffer before parsing it with
1100 @code{strtok}.  If you allow @code{strtok} to modify a string that came
1101 from another part of your program, you are asking for trouble; that
1102 string may be part of a data structure that could be used for other
1103 purposes during the parsing, when alteration by @code{strtok} makes the
1104 data structure temporarily inaccurate.
1105
1106 The string that you are operating on might even be a constant.  Then
1107 when @code{strtok} tries to modify it, your program will get a fatal
1108 signal for writing in read-only memory.  @xref{Program Error Signals}.
1109
1110 This is a special case of a general principle: if a part of a program
1111 does not have as its purpose the modification of a certain data
1112 structure, then it is error-prone to modify the data structure
1113 temporarily.
1114
1115 The function @code{strtok} is not reentrant.  @xref{Nonreentrancy}, for
1116 a discussion of where and why reentrancy is important.
1117
1118 Here is a simple example showing the use of @code{strtok}.
1119
1120 @comment Yes, this example has been tested.
1121 @smallexample
1122 #include <string.h>
1123 #include <stddef.h>
1124
1125 @dots{}
1126
1127 const char string[] = "words separated by spaces -- and, punctuation!";
1128 const char delimiters[] = " .,;:!-";
1129 char *token, *cp;
1130
1131 @dots{}
1132
1133 cp = strdupa (string);                /* Make writable copy.  */
1134 token = strtok (cp, delimiters);      /* token => "words" */
1135 token = strtok (NULL, delimiters);    /* token => "separated" */
1136 token = strtok (NULL, delimiters);    /* token => "by" */
1137 token = strtok (NULL, delimiters);    /* token => "spaces" */
1138 token = strtok (NULL, delimiters);    /* token => "and" */
1139 token = strtok (NULL, delimiters);    /* token => "punctuation" */
1140 token = strtok (NULL, delimiters);    /* token => NULL */
1141 @end smallexample
1142
1143 The GNU C library contains two more functions for tokenizing a string
1144 which overcome the limitation of non-reentrancy.
1145
1146 @comment string.h
1147 @comment POSIX
1148 @deftypefun {char *} strtok_r (char *@var{newstring}, const char *@var{delimiters}, char **@var{save_ptr})
1149 Just like @code{strtok} this function splits the string into several
1150 tokens which can be accessed be successive calls to @code{strtok_r}.
1151 The difference is that the information about the next token is not set
1152 up in some internal state information.  Instead the caller has to
1153 provide another argument @var{save_ptr} which is a pointer to a string
1154 pointer.  Calling @code{strtok_r} with a null pointer for
1155 @var{newstring} and leaving @var{save_ptr} between the calls unchanged
1156 does the job without limiting reentrancy.
1157
1158 This function is defined in POSIX-1 and can be found on many systems
1159 which support multi-threading.
1160 @end deftypefun
1161
1162 @comment string.h
1163 @comment BSD
1164 @deftypefun {char *} strsep (char **@var{string_ptr}, const char *@var{delimiter})
1165 A second reentrant approach is to avoid the additional first argument.
1166 The initialization of the moving pointer has to be done by the user.
1167 Successive calls of @code{strsep} move the pointer along the tokens
1168 separated by @var{delimiter}, returning the address of the next token
1169 and updating @var{string_ptr} to point to the beginning of the next
1170 token.
1171
1172 This function was introduced in 4.3BSD and therefore is widely available.
1173 @end deftypefun
1174
1175 Here is how the above example looks like when @code{strsep} is used.
1176
1177 @comment Yes, this example has been tested.
1178 @smallexample
1179 #include <string.h>
1180 #include <stddef.h>
1181
1182 @dots{}
1183
1184 const char string[] = "words separated by spaces -- and, punctuation!";
1185 const char delimiters[] = " .,;:!-";
1186 char *running;
1187 char *token;
1188
1189 @dots{}
1190
1191 running = strdupa (string);
1192 token = strsep (&running, delimiters);    /* token => "words" */
1193 token = strsep (&running, delimiters);    /* token => "separated" */
1194 token = strsep (&running, delimiters);    /* token => "by" */
1195 token = strsep (&running, delimiters);    /* token => "spaces" */
1196 token = strsep (&running, delimiters);    /* token => "and" */
1197 token = strsep (&running, delimiters);    /* token => "punctuation" */
1198 token = strsep (&running, delimiters);    /* token => NULL */
1199 @end smallexample
1200
1201 @node Encode Binary Data
1202 @section Encode Binary Data
1203
1204 To store or transfer binary data in environments which only support text
1205 one has to encode the binary data by mapping the input bytes to
1206 characters in the range allowed for storing or transfering.  SVID
1207 systems (and nowadays XPG compliant systems) have such a function in the
1208 C library.
1209
1210 @comment stdlib.h
1211 @comment XPG
1212 @deftypefun {char *} l64a (long int @var{n})
1213 This function encodes an input value with 32 bits using characters from
1214 the basic character set.  Groups of 6 bits are encoded using the
1215 following table:
1216
1217 @multitable {xxxxx} {xxx} {xxx} {xxx} {xxx} {xxx} {xxx} {xxx} {xxx}
1218 @item              @tab 0 @tab 1 @tab 2 @tab 3 @tab 4 @tab 5 @tab 6 @tab 7
1219 @item       0      @tab @code{.} @tab @code{/} @tab @code{0} @tab @code{1}
1220                    @tab @code{2} @tab @code{3} @tab @code{4} @tab @code{5}
1221 @item       8      @tab @code{6} @tab @code{7} @tab @code{8} @tab @code{9}
1222                    @tab @code{A} @tab @code{B} @tab @code{C} @tab @code{D}
1223 @item       16     @tab @code{E} @tab @code{F} @tab @code{G} @tab @code{H}
1224                    @tab @code{I} @tab @code{J} @tab @code{K} @tab @code{L}
1225 @item       24     @tab @code{M} @tab @code{N} @tab @code{O} @tab @code{P}
1226                    @tab @code{Q} @tab @code{R} @tab @code{S} @tab @code{T}
1227 @item       32     @tab @code{U} @tab @code{V} @tab @code{W} @tab @code{X}
1228                    @tab @code{Y} @tab @code{Z} @tab @code{a} @tab @code{b}
1229 @item       40     @tab @code{c} @tab @code{d} @tab @code{e} @tab @code{f}
1230                    @tab @code{g} @tab @code{h} @tab @code{i} @tab @code{j}
1231 @item       48     @tab @code{k} @tab @code{l} @tab @code{m} @tab @code{n}
1232                    @tab @code{o} @tab @code{p} @tab @code{q} @tab @code{r}
1233 @item       56     @tab @code{s} @tab @code{t} @tab @code{u} @tab @code{v}
1234                    @tab @code{w} @tab @code{x} @tab @code{y} @tab @code{z}
1235 @end multitable
1236
1237 The function returns a pointer to a static buffer which contains the
1238 string representing of the encoding of @var{n}.  To encoded a series of
1239 bytes the use should append the new string to the destination buffer.
1240 @emph{Warning:} Since a static buffer is used this function should not
1241 be used in multi-threaded programs.  There is no thread-safe alternative
1242 to this function in the C library.
1243 @end deftypefun
1244
1245 Alone the @code{l64a} function is not usable.  To encode arbitrary
1246 sequences of bytes one needs some more code and this could look like
1247 this:
1248
1249 @smallexample
1250 char *
1251 encode (const void *buf, size_t len)
1252 @{
1253   /* @r{We know in advance how long the buffer has to be.} */
1254   unsigned char *in = (unsigned char *) buf;
1255   char *out = malloc (6 + ((len + 3) / 4) * 6 + 1);
1256   char *cp = out;
1257
1258   /* @r{Encode the length.} */
1259   memcpy (cp, l64a (len), 6);
1260   cp += 6;
1261
1262   while (len > 3)
1263     @{
1264       unsigned long int n = *in++;
1265       n = (n << 8) | *in++;
1266       n = (n << 8) | *in++;
1267       n = (n << 8) | *in++;
1268       len -= 4;
1269       /* @r{Using `htonl' is necessary so that the data can be}
1270          @r{decoded even on machines with different byte order.} */
1271       memcpy (cp, l64a (htonl (n)), 6);
1272       cp += 6;
1273     @}
1274   if (len > 0)
1275     @{
1276       unsigned long int n = *in++;
1277       if (--len > 0)
1278         @{
1279           n = (n << 8) | *in++;
1280           if (--len > 0)
1281             n = (n << 8) | *in;
1282         @}
1283       memcpy (cp, l64a (htonl (n)), 6);
1284       cp += 6;
1285     @}
1286   *cp = '\0';
1287   return out;
1288 @}
1289 @end smallexample
1290
1291 It is strange that the library does not provide the complete
1292 functionality needed but so be it.  There are some other encoding
1293 methods which are much more widely used (UU encoding, Base64 encoding).
1294 Generally, it is better to use one of these encodings.
1295
1296 To decode data produced with @code{l64a} the following function should be
1297 used.
1298
1299 @comment stdlib.h
1300 @comment XPG
1301 @deftypefun {long int} a64l (const char *@var{string})
1302 The parameter @var{string} should contain a string which was produced by
1303 a call to @code{l64a}.  The function processes the next 6 characters and
1304 decodes the characters it finds according to the table above.
1305 Characters not in the conversion table are simply ignored.  This is
1306 useful for breaking the information in lines in which case the end of
1307 line characters are simply ignored.
1308
1309 The decoded number is returned at the end as a @code{long int} value.
1310 Consecutive calls to this function are possible but the caller must make
1311 sure the buffer pointer is update after each call to @code{a64l} since
1312 this function does not modify the buffer pointer.  Every call consumes 6
1313 characters.
1314 @end deftypefun
1315
1316 @node Argz and Envz Vectors
1317 @section Argz and Envz Vectors
1318
1319 @cindex argz vectors (string vectors)
1320 @cindex string vectors, null-character separated
1321 @cindex argument vectors, null-character separated
1322 @dfn{argz vectors} are vectors of strings in a contiguous block of
1323 memory, each element separated from its neighbors by null-characters
1324 (@code{'\0'}).
1325
1326 @cindex envz vectors (environment vectors)
1327 @cindex environment vectors, null-character separated
1328 @dfn{Envz vectors} are an extension of argz vectors where each element is a
1329 name-value pair, separated by a @code{'='} character (as in a Unix
1330 environment).
1331
1332 @menu
1333 * Argz Functions::              Operations on argz vectors.
1334 * Envz Functions::              Additional operations on environment vectors.
1335 @end menu
1336
1337 @node Argz Functions, Envz Functions, , Argz and Envz Vectors
1338 @subsection Argz Functions
1339
1340 Each argz vector is represented by a pointer to the first element, of
1341 type @code{char *}, and a size, of type @code{size_t}, both of which can
1342 be initialized to @code{0} to represent an empty argz vector.  All argz
1343 functions accept either a pointer and a size argument, or pointers to
1344 them, if they will be modified.
1345
1346 The argz functions use @code{malloc}/@code{realloc} to allocate/grow
1347 argz vectors, and so any argz vector creating using these functions may
1348 be freed by using @code{free}; conversely, any argz function that may
1349 grow a string expects that string to have been allocated using
1350 @code{malloc} (those argz functions that only examine their arguments or
1351 modify them in place will work on any sort of memory).
1352 @xref{Unconstrained Allocation}.
1353
1354 All argz functions that do memory allocation have a return type of
1355 @code{error_t}, and return @code{0} for success, and @code{ENOMEM} if an
1356 allocation error occurs.
1357
1358 @pindex argz.h
1359 These functions are declared in the standard include file @file{argz.h}.
1360
1361 @comment argz.h
1362 @comment GNU
1363 @deftypefun {error_t} argz_create (char *const @var{argv}[], char **@var{argz}, size_t *@var{argz_len})
1364 The @code{argz_create} function converts the Unix-style argument vector
1365 @var{argv} (a vector of pointers to normal C strings, terminated by
1366 @code{(char *)0}; @pxref{Program Arguments}) into an argz vector with
1367 the same elements, which is returned in @var{argz} and @var{argz_len}.
1368 @end deftypefun
1369
1370 @comment argz.h
1371 @comment GNU
1372 @deftypefun {error_t} argz_create_sep (const char *@var{string}, int @var{sep}, char **@var{argz}, size_t *@var{argz_len})
1373 The @code{argz_create_sep} function converts the null-terminated string
1374 @var{string} into an argz vector (returned in @var{argz} and
1375 @var{argz_len}) by splitting it into elements at every occurance of the
1376 character @var{sep}.
1377 @end deftypefun
1378
1379 @comment argz.h
1380 @comment GNU
1381 @deftypefun {size_t} argz_count (const char *@var{argz}, size_t @var{arg_len})
1382 Returns the number of elements in the argz vector @var{argz} and
1383 @var{argz_len}.
1384 @end deftypefun
1385
1386 @comment argz.h
1387 @comment GNU
1388 @deftypefun {void} argz_extract (char *@var{argz}, size_t @var{argz_len}, char **@var{argv})
1389 The @code{argz_extract} function converts the argz vector @var{argz} and
1390 @var{argz_len} into a Unix-style argument vector stored in @var{argv},
1391 by putting pointers to every element in @var{argz} into successive
1392 positions in @var{argv}, followed by a terminator of @code{0}.
1393 @var{Argv} must be pre-allocated with enough space to hold all the
1394 elements in @var{argz} plus the terminating @code{(char *)0}
1395 (@code{(argz_count (@var{argz}, @var{argz_len}) + 1) * sizeof (char *)}
1396 bytes should be enough).  Note that the string pointers stored into
1397 @var{argv} point into @var{argz}---they are not copies---and so
1398 @var{argz} must be copied if it will be changed while @var{argv} is
1399 still active.  This function is useful for passing the elements in
1400 @var{argz} to an exec function (@pxref{Executing a File}).
1401 @end deftypefun
1402
1403 @comment argz.h
1404 @comment GNU
1405 @deftypefun {void} argz_stringify (char *@var{argz}, size_t @var{len}, int @var{sep})
1406 The @code{argz_stringify} converts @var{argz} into a normal string with
1407 the elements separated by the character @var{sep}, by replacing each
1408 @code{'\0'} inside @var{argz} (except the last one, which terminates the
1409 string) with @var{sep}.  This is handy for printing @var{argz} in a
1410 readable manner.
1411 @end deftypefun
1412
1413 @comment argz.h
1414 @comment GNU
1415 @deftypefun {error_t} argz_add (char **@var{argz}, size_t *@var{argz_len}, const char *@var{str})
1416 The @code{argz_add} function adds the string @var{str} to the end of the
1417 argz vector @code{*@var{argz}}, and updates @code{*@var{argz}} and
1418 @code{*@var{argz_len}} accordingly.
1419 @end deftypefun
1420
1421 @comment argz.h
1422 @comment GNU
1423 @deftypefun {error_t} argz_add_sep (char **@var{argz}, size_t *@var{argz_len}, const char *@var{str}, int @var{delim})
1424 The @code{argz_add_sep} function is similar to @code{argz_add}, but
1425 @var{str} is split into separate elements in the result at occurances of
1426 the character @var{delim}.  This is useful, for instance, for
1427 adding the components of a Unix search path to an argz vector, by using
1428 a value of @code{':'} for @var{delim}.
1429 @end deftypefun
1430
1431 @comment argz.h
1432 @comment GNU
1433 @deftypefun {error_t} argz_append (char **@var{argz}, size_t *@var{argz_len}, const char *@var{buf}, size_t @var{buf_len})
1434 The @code{argz_append} function appends @var{buf_len} bytes starting at
1435 @var{buf} to the argz vector @code{*@var{argz}}, reallocating
1436 @code{*@var{argz}} to accommodate it, and adding @var{buf_len} to
1437 @code{*@var{argz_len}}.
1438 @end deftypefun
1439
1440 @comment argz.h
1441 @comment GNU
1442 @deftypefun {error_t} argz_delete (char **@var{argz}, size_t *@var{argz_len}, char *@var{entry})
1443 If @var{entry} points to the beginning of one of the elements in the
1444 argz vector @code{*@var{argz}}, the @code{argz_delete} function will
1445 remove this entry and reallocate @code{*@var{argz}}, modifying
1446 @code{*@var{argz}} and @code{*@var{argz_len}} accordingly.  Note that as
1447 destructive argz functions usually reallocate their argz argument,
1448 pointers into argz vectors such as @var{entry} will then become invalid.
1449 @end deftypefun
1450
1451 @comment argz.h
1452 @comment GNU
1453 @deftypefun {error_t} argz_insert (char **@var{argz}, size_t *@var{argz_len}, char *@var{before}, const char *@var{entry})
1454 The @code{argz_insert} function inserts the string @var{entry} into the
1455 argz vector @code{*@var{argz}} at a point just before the existing
1456 element pointed to by @var{before}, reallocating @code{*@var{argz}} and
1457 updating @code{*@var{argz}} and @code{*@var{argz_len}}.  If @var{before}
1458 is @code{0}, @var{entry} is added to the end instead (as if by
1459 @code{argz_add}).  Since the first element is in fact the same as
1460 @code{*@var{argz}}, passing in @code{*@var{argz}} as the value of
1461 @var{before} will result in @var{entry} being inserted at the beginning.
1462 @end deftypefun
1463
1464 @comment argz.h
1465 @comment GNU
1466 @deftypefun {char *} argz_next (char *@var{argz}, size_t @var{argz_len}, const char *@var{entry})
1467 The @code{argz_next} function provides a convenient way of iterating
1468 over the elements in the argz vector @var{argz}.  It returns a pointer
1469 to the next element in @var{argz} after the element @var{entry}, or
1470 @code{0} if there are no elements following @var{entry}.  If @var{entry}
1471 is @code{0}, the first element of @var{argz} is returned.
1472
1473 This behavior suggests two styles of iteration:
1474
1475 @smallexample
1476     char *entry = 0;
1477     while ((entry = argz_next (@var{argz}, @var{argz_len}, entry)))
1478       @var{action};
1479 @end smallexample
1480
1481 (the double parentheses are necessary to make some C compilers shut up
1482 about what they consider a questionable @code{while}-test) and:
1483
1484 @smallexample
1485     char *entry;
1486     for (entry = @var{argz};
1487          entry;
1488          entry = argz_next (@var{argz}, @var{argz_len}, entry))
1489       @var{action};
1490 @end smallexample
1491
1492 Note that the latter depends on @var{argz} having a value of @code{0} if
1493 it is empty (rather than a pointer to an empty block of memory); this
1494 invariant is maintained for argz vectors created by the functions here.
1495 @end deftypefun
1496
1497 @comment argz.h
1498 @comment GNU
1499 @deftypefun error_t argz_replace (@w{char **@var{argz}, size_t *@var{argz_len}}, @w{const char *@var{str}, const char *@var{with}}, @w{unsigned *@var{replace_count}})
1500 Replace any occurances of the string @var{str} in @var{argz} with
1501 @var{with}, reallocating @var{argz} as necessary.  If
1502 @var{replace_count} is non-zero, @code{*@var{replace_count}} will be
1503 incremented by number of replacements performed.
1504 @end deftypefun
1505
1506 @node Envz Functions, , Argz Functions, Argz and Envz Vectors
1507 @subsection Envz Functions
1508
1509 Envz vectors are just argz vectors with additional constraints on the form
1510 of each element; as such, argz functions can also be used on them, where it
1511 makes sense.
1512
1513 Each element in an envz vector is a name-value pair, separated by a @code{'='}
1514 character; if multiple @code{'='} characters are present in an element, those
1515 after the first are considered part of the value, and treated like all other
1516 non-@code{'\0'} characters.
1517
1518 If @emph{no} @code{'='} characters are present in an element, that element is
1519 considered the name of a ``null'' entry, as distinct from an entry with an
1520 empty value: @code{envz_get} will return @code{0} if given the name of null
1521 entry, whereas an entry with an empty value would result in a value of
1522 @code{""}; @code{envz_entry} will still find such entries, however.  Null
1523 entries can be removed with @code{envz_strip} function.
1524
1525 As with argz functions, envz functions that may allocate memory (and thus
1526 fail) have a return type of @code{error_t}, and return either @code{0} or
1527 @code{ENOMEM}.
1528
1529 @pindex envz.h
1530 These functions are declared in the standard include file @file{envz.h}.
1531
1532 @comment envz.h
1533 @comment GNU
1534 @deftypefun {char *} envz_entry (const char *@var{envz}, size_t @var{envz_len}, const char *@var{name})
1535 The @code{envz_entry} function finds the entry in @var{envz} with the name
1536 @var{name}, and returns a pointer to the whole entry---that is, the argz
1537 element which begins with @var{name} followed by a @code{'='} character.  If
1538 there is no entry with that name, @code{0} is returned.
1539 @end deftypefun
1540
1541 @comment envz.h
1542 @comment GNU
1543 @deftypefun {char *} envz_get (const char *@var{envz}, size_t @var{envz_len}, const char *@var{name})
1544 The @code{envz_get} function finds the entry in @var{envz} with the name
1545 @var{name} (like @code{envz_entry}), and returns a pointer to the value
1546 portion of that entry (following the @code{'='}).  If there is no entry with
1547 that name (or only a null entry), @code{0} is returned.
1548 @end deftypefun
1549
1550 @comment envz.h
1551 @comment GNU
1552 @deftypefun {error_t} envz_add (char **@var{envz}, size_t *@var{envz_len}, const char *@var{name}, const char *@var{value})
1553 The @code{envz_add} function adds an entry to @code{*@var{envz}}
1554 (updating @code{*@var{envz}} and @code{*@var{envz_len}}) with the name
1555 @var{name}, and value @var{value}.  If an entry with the same name
1556 already exists in @var{envz}, it is removed first.  If @var{value} is
1557 @code{0}, then the new entry will the special null type of entry
1558 (mentioned above).
1559 @end deftypefun
1560
1561 @comment envz.h
1562 @comment GNU
1563 @deftypefun {error_t} envz_merge (char **@var{envz}, size_t *@var{envz_len}, const char *@var{envz2}, size_t @var{envz2_len}, int @var{override})
1564 The @code{envz_merge} function adds each entry in @var{envz2} to @var{envz},
1565 as if with @code{envz_add}, updating @code{*@var{envz}} and
1566 @code{*@var{envz_len}}.  If @var{override} is true, then values in @var{envz2}
1567 will supersede those with the same name in @var{envz}, otherwise not.
1568
1569 Null entries are treated just like other entries in this respect, so a null
1570 entry in @var{envz} can prevent an entry of the same name in @var{envz2} from
1571 being added to @var{envz}, if @var{override} is false.
1572 @end deftypefun
1573
1574 @comment envz.h
1575 @comment GNU
1576 @deftypefun {void} envz_strip (char **@var{envz}, size_t *@var{envz_len})
1577 The @code{envz_strip} function removes any null entries from @var{envz},
1578 updating @code{*@var{envz}} and @code{*@var{envz_len}}.
1579 @end deftypefun