(Memory Allocation): Remove invalid character from section title.
[kopensolaris-gnu/glibc.git] / manual / time.texi
1 @node Date and Time, Resource Usage And Limitation, Arithmetic, Top
2 @c %MENU% Functions for getting the date and time and formatting them nicely
3 @chapter Date and Time
4
5 This chapter describes functions for manipulating dates and times,
6 including functions for determining what time it is and conversion
7 between different time representations.
8
9 @menu
10 * Time Basics::                 Concepts and definitions.
11 * Elapsed Time::                Data types to represent elapsed times
12 * Processor And CPU Time::      Time a program has spent executing.
13 * Calendar Time::               Manipulation of ``real'' dates and times.
14 * Setting an Alarm::            Sending a signal after a specified time.
15 * Sleeping::                    Waiting for a period of time.
16 @end menu
17
18
19 @node Time Basics
20 @section Time Basics
21 @cindex time
22
23 Discussing time in a technical manual can be difficult because the word
24 ``time'' in English refers to lots of different things.  In this manual,
25 we use a rigorous terminology to avoid confusion, and the only thing we
26 use the simple word ``time'' for is to talk about the abstract concept.
27
28 A @dfn{calendar time} is a point in the time continuum, for example
29 November 4, 1990 at 18:02.5 UTC.  Sometimes this is called ``absolute
30 time''.
31 @cindex calendar time
32
33 We don't speak of a ``date'', because that is inherent in a calendar
34 time.
35 @cindex date
36
37 An @dfn{interval} is a contiguous part of the time continuum between two
38 calendar times, for example the hour between 9:00 and 10:00 on July 4,
39 1980.
40 @cindex interval
41
42 An @dfn{elapsed time} is the length of an interval, for example, 35
43 minutes.  People sometimes sloppily use the word ``interval'' to refer
44 to the elapsed time of some interval.
45 @cindex elapsed time
46 @cindex time, elapsed
47
48 An @dfn{amount of time} is a sum of elapsed times, which need not be of
49 any specific intervals.  For example, the amount of time it takes to
50 read a book might be 9 hours, independently of when and in how many
51 sittings it is read.
52
53 A @dfn{period} is the elapsed time of an interval between two events,
54 especially when they are part of a sequence of regularly repeating
55 events.
56 @cindex period of time
57
58 @dfn{CPU time} is like calendar time, except that it is based on the
59 subset of the time continuum when a particular process is actively
60 using a CPU.  CPU time is, therefore, relative to a process.
61 @cindex CPU time
62
63 @dfn{Processor time} is an amount of time that a CPU is in use.  In
64 fact, it's a basic system resource, since there's a limit to how much
65 can exist in any given interval (that limit is the elapsed time of the
66 interval times the number of CPUs in the processor).  People often call
67 this CPU time, but we reserve the latter term in this manual for the
68 definition above.
69 @cindex processor time
70
71 @node Elapsed Time
72 @section Elapsed Time
73 @cindex elapsed time
74
75 One way to represent an elapsed time is with a simple arithmetic data
76 type, as with the following function to compute the elapsed time between
77 two calendar times.  This function is declared in @file{time.h}.
78
79 @comment time.h
80 @comment ISO
81 @deftypefun double difftime (time_t @var{time1}, time_t @var{time0})
82 The @code{difftime} function returns the number of seconds of elapsed
83 time between calendar time @var{time1} and calendar time @var{time0}, as
84 a value of type @code{double}.  The difference ignores leap seconds
85 unless leap second support is enabled.
86
87 In the GNU system, you can simply subtract @code{time_t} values.  But on
88 other systems, the @code{time_t} data type might use some other encoding
89 where subtraction doesn't work directly.
90 @end deftypefun
91
92 The GNU C library provides two data types specifically for representing
93 an elapsed time.  They are used by various GNU C library functions, and
94 you can use them for your own purposes too.  They're exactly the same
95 except that one has a resolution in microseconds, and the other, newer
96 one, is in nanoseconds.
97
98 @comment sys/time.h
99 @comment BSD
100 @deftp {Data Type} {struct timeval}
101 @cindex timeval
102 The @code{struct timeval} structure represents an elapsed time.  It is
103 declared in @file{sys/time.h} and has the following members:
104
105 @table @code
106 @item long int tv_sec
107 This represents the number of whole seconds of elapsed time.
108
109 @item long int tv_usec
110 This is the rest of the elapsed time (a fraction of a second),
111 represented as the number of microseconds.  It is always less than one
112 million.
113
114 @end table
115 @end deftp
116
117 @comment sys/time.h
118 @comment POSIX.1
119 @deftp {Data Type} {struct timespec}
120 @cindex timespec
121 The @code{struct timespec} structure represents an elapsed time.  It is
122 declared in @file{time.h} and has the following members:
123
124 @table @code
125 @item long int tv_sec
126 This represents the number of whole seconds of elapsed time.
127
128 @item long int tv_nsec
129 This is the rest of the elapsed time (a fraction of a second),
130 represented as the number of nanoseconds.  It is always less than one
131 billion.
132
133 @end table
134 @end deftp
135
136 It is often necessary to subtract two values of type @w{@code{struct
137 timeval}} or @w{@code{struct timespec}}.  Here is the best way to do
138 this.  It works even on some peculiar operating systems where the
139 @code{tv_sec} member has an unsigned type.
140
141 @smallexample
142 /* @r{Subtract the `struct timeval' values X and Y,}
143    @r{storing the result in RESULT.}
144    @r{Return 1 if the difference is negative, otherwise 0.}  */
145
146 int
147 timeval_subtract (result, x, y)
148      struct timeval *result, *x, *y;
149 @{
150   /* @r{Perform the carry for the later subtraction by updating @var{y}.} */
151   if (x->tv_usec < y->tv_usec) @{
152     int nsec = (y->tv_usec - x->tv_usec) / 1000000 + 1;
153     y->tv_usec -= 1000000 * nsec;
154     y->tv_sec += nsec;
155   @}
156   if (x->tv_usec - y->tv_usec > 1000000) @{
157     int nsec = (x->tv_usec - y->tv_usec) / 1000000;
158     y->tv_usec += 1000000 * nsec;
159     y->tv_sec -= nsec;
160   @}
161
162   /* @r{Compute the time remaining to wait.}
163      @r{@code{tv_usec} is certainly positive.} */
164   result->tv_sec = x->tv_sec - y->tv_sec;
165   result->tv_usec = x->tv_usec - y->tv_usec;
166
167   /* @r{Return 1 if result is negative.} */
168   return x->tv_sec < y->tv_sec;
169 @}
170 @end smallexample
171
172 Common functions that use @code{struct timeval} are @code{gettimeofday} 
173 and @code{settimeofday}.
174
175
176 There are no GNU C library functions specifically oriented toward
177 dealing with elapsed times, but the calendar time, processor time, and
178 alarm and sleeping functions have a lot to do with them.
179
180
181 @node Processor And CPU Time
182 @section Processor And CPU Time
183
184 If you're trying to optimize your program or measure its efficiency,
185 it's very useful to know how much processor time it uses.  For that,
186 calendar time and elapsed times are useless because a process may spend
187 time waiting for I/O or for other processes to use the CPU.  However,
188 you can get the information with the functions in this section.
189
190 CPU time (@pxref{Time Basics}) is represented by the data type
191 @code{clock_t}, which is a number of @dfn{clock ticks}.  It gives the
192 total amount of time a process has actively used a CPU since some
193 arbitrary event.  On the GNU system, that event is the creation of the
194 process.  While arbitrary in general, the event is always the same event
195 for any particular process, so you can always measure how much time on
196 the CPU a particular computation takes by examinining the process' CPU
197 time before and after the computation.
198 @cindex CPU time
199 @cindex clock ticks
200 @cindex ticks, clock
201
202 In the GNU system, @code{clock_t} is equivalent to @code{long int} and
203 @code{CLOCKS_PER_SEC} is an integer value.  But in other systems, both
204 @code{clock_t} and the macro @code{CLOCKS_PER_SEC} can be either integer
205 or floating-point types.  Casting CPU time values to @code{double}, as
206 in the example above, makes sure that operations such as arithmetic and
207 printing work properly and consistently no matter what the underlying
208 representation is.
209
210 Note that the clock can wrap around.  On a 32bit system with
211 @code{CLOCKS_PER_SEC} set to one million this function will return the
212 same value approximately every 72 minutes.
213
214 For additional functions to examine a process' use of processor time,
215 and to control it, @xref{Resource Usage And Limitation}.
216
217
218 @menu
219 * CPU Time::                    The @code{clock} function.
220 * Processor Time::              The @code{times} function.
221 @end menu
222
223 @node CPU Time
224 @subsection CPU Time Inquiry
225
226 To get a process' CPU time, you can use the @code{clock} function.  This
227 facility is declared in the header file @file{time.h}.
228 @pindex time.h
229
230 In typical usage, you call the @code{clock} function at the beginning
231 and end of the interval you want to time, subtract the values, and then
232 divide by @code{CLOCKS_PER_SEC} (the number of clock ticks per second)
233 to get processor time, like this:
234
235 @smallexample
236 @group
237 #include <time.h>
238
239 clock_t start, end;
240 double cpu_time_used;
241
242 start = clock();
243 @dots{} /* @r{Do the work.} */
244 end = clock();
245 cpu_time_used = ((double) (end - start)) / CLOCKS_PER_SEC;
246 @end group
247 @end smallexample
248
249 Do not use a single CPU time as an amount of time; it doesn't work that
250 way.  Either do a subtraction as shown above or query processor time
251 directly.  @xref{Processor Time}.
252
253 Different computers and operating systems vary wildly in how they keep
254 track of CPU time.  It's common for the internal processor clock
255 to have a resolution somewhere between a hundredth and millionth of a
256 second.
257
258 @comment time.h
259 @comment ISO
260 @deftypevr Macro int CLOCKS_PER_SEC
261 The value of this macro is the number of clock ticks per second measured
262 by the @code{clock} function.  POSIX requires that this value be one
263 million independent of the actual resolution.
264 @end deftypevr
265
266 @comment time.h
267 @comment POSIX.1
268 @deftypevr Macro int CLK_TCK
269 This is an obsolete name for @code{CLOCKS_PER_SEC}.
270 @end deftypevr
271
272 @comment time.h
273 @comment ISO
274 @deftp {Data Type} clock_t
275 This is the type of the value returned by the @code{clock} function.
276 Values of type @code{clock_t} are numbers of clock ticks.
277 @end deftp
278
279 @comment time.h
280 @comment ISO
281 @deftypefun clock_t clock (void)
282 This function returns the calling process' current CPU time.  If the CPU
283 time is not available or cannot be represented, @code{clock} returns the
284 value @code{(clock_t)(-1)}.
285 @end deftypefun
286
287
288 @node Processor Time
289 @subsection Processor Time Inquiry
290
291 The @code{times} function returns information about a process'
292 consumption of processor time in a @w{@code{struct tms}} object, in
293 addition to the process' CPU time.  @xref{Time Basics}.  You should
294 include the header file @file{sys/times.h} to use this facility.
295 @cindex processor time
296 @cindex CPU time
297 @pindex sys/times.h
298
299 @comment sys/times.h
300 @comment POSIX.1
301 @deftp {Data Type} {struct tms}
302 The @code{tms} structure is used to return information about process
303 times.  It contains at least the following members:
304
305 @table @code
306 @item clock_t tms_utime
307 This is the total processor time the calling process has used in
308 executing the instructions of its program.
309
310 @item clock_t tms_stime
311 This is the processor time the system has used on behalf of the calling
312 process.
313
314 @item clock_t tms_cutime
315 This is the sum of the @code{tms_utime} values and the @code{tms_cutime}
316 values of all terminated child processes of the calling process, whose
317 status has been reported to the parent process by @code{wait} or
318 @code{waitpid}; see @ref{Process Completion}.  In other words, it
319 represents the total processor time used in executing the instructions
320 of all the terminated child processes of the calling process, excluding
321 child processes which have not yet been reported by @code{wait} or
322 @code{waitpid}.
323 @cindex child process
324
325 @item clock_t tms_cstime
326 This is similar to @code{tms_cutime}, but represents the total processor
327 time system has used on behalf of all the terminated child processes
328 of the calling process.
329 @end table
330
331 All of the times are given in numbers of clock ticks.  Unlike CPU time,
332 these are the actual amounts of time; not relative to any event.
333 @xref{Creating a Process}.
334 @end deftp
335
336 @comment sys/times.h
337 @comment POSIX.1
338 @deftypefun clock_t times (struct tms *@var{buffer})
339 The @code{times} function stores the processor time information for
340 the calling process in @var{buffer}.
341
342 The return value is the calling process' CPU time (the same value you
343 get from @code{clock()}.  @code{times} returns @code{(clock_t)(-1)} to
344 indicate failure.
345 @end deftypefun
346
347 @strong{Portability Note:} The @code{clock} function described in
348 @ref{CPU Time} is specified by the @w{ISO C} standard.  The
349 @code{times} function is a feature of POSIX.1.  In the GNU system, the
350 CPU time is defined to be equivalent to the sum of the @code{tms_utime}
351 and @code{tms_stime} fields returned by @code{times}.
352
353 @node Calendar Time
354 @section Calendar Time
355
356 This section describes facilities for keeping track of calendar time.
357 @xref{Time Basics}.
358
359 The GNU C library represents calendar time three ways:
360
361 @itemize @bullet
362 @item
363 @dfn{Simple time} (the @code{time_t} data type) is a compact
364 representation, typically giving the number of seconds of elapsed time
365 since some implementation-specific base time.
366 @cindex simple time
367
368 @item
369 There is also a "high-resolution time" representation.  Like simple
370 time, this represents a calendar time as an elapsed time since a base
371 time, but instead of measuring in whole seconds, it uses a @code{struct
372 timeval} data type, which includes fractions of a second.  Use this time
373 representation instead of simple time when you need greater precision.
374 @cindex high-resolution time
375
376 @item
377 @dfn{Local time} or @dfn{broken-down time} (the @code{struct tm} data
378 type) represents a calendar time as a set of components specifying the
379 year, month, and so on in the Gregorian calendar, for a specific time
380 zone.  This calendar time representation is usually used only to
381 communicate with people.
382 @cindex local time
383 @cindex broken-down time
384 @cindex Gregorian calendar
385 @cindex calendar, Gregorian
386 @end itemize
387
388 @menu
389 * Simple Calendar Time::        Facilities for manipulating calendar time.
390 * High-Resolution Calendar::    A time representation with greater precision.
391 * Broken-down Time::            Facilities for manipulating local time.
392 * High Accuracy Clock::         Maintaining a high accuracy system clock.
393 * Formatting Calendar Time::    Converting times to strings.
394 * Parsing Date and Time::       Convert textual time and date information back
395                                  into broken-down time values.
396 * TZ Variable::                 How users specify the time zone.
397 * Time Zone Functions::         Functions to examine or specify the time zone.
398 * Time Functions Example::      An example program showing use of some of
399                                  the time functions.
400 @end menu
401
402 @node Simple Calendar Time
403 @subsection Simple Calendar Time
404
405 This section describes the @code{time_t} data type for representing calendar
406 time as simple time, and the functions which operate on simple time objects.
407 These facilities are declared in the header file @file{time.h}.
408 @pindex time.h
409
410 @cindex epoch
411 @comment time.h
412 @comment ISO
413 @deftp {Data Type} time_t
414 This is the data type used to represent simple time.  Sometimes, it also
415 represents an elapsed time.  When interpreted as a calendar time value,
416 it represents the number of seconds elapsed since 00:00:00 on January 1,
417 1970, Coordinated Universal Time.  (This calendar time is sometimes
418 referred to as the @dfn{epoch}.)  POSIX requires that this count not
419 include leap seconds, but on some systems this count includes leap seconds
420 if you set @code{TZ} to certain values (@pxref{TZ Variable}).
421
422 Note that a simple time has no concept of local time zone.  Calendar
423 Time @var{T} is the same instant in time regardless of where on the
424 globe the computer is.
425
426 In the GNU C library, @code{time_t} is equivalent to @code{long int}.
427 In other systems, @code{time_t} might be either an integer or
428 floating-point type.
429 @end deftp
430
431 The function @code{difftime} tells you the elapsed time between two
432 simple calendar times, which is not always as easy to compute as just
433 subtracting.  @xref{Elapsed Time}.
434
435 @comment time.h
436 @comment ISO
437 @deftypefun time_t time (time_t *@var{result})
438 The @code{time} function returns the current calendar time as a value of
439 type @code{time_t}.  If the argument @var{result} is not a null pointer,
440 the calendar time value is also stored in @code{*@var{result}}.  If the
441 current calendar time is not available, the value
442 @w{@code{(time_t)(-1)}} is returned.
443 @end deftypefun
444
445 @c The GNU C library implements stime() with a call to settimeofday() on
446 @c Linux.
447 @comment time.h
448 @comment SVID, XPG
449 @deftypefun int stime (time_t *@var{newtime})
450 @code{stime} sets the system clock, i.e.  it tells the system that the
451 current calendar time is @var{newtime}, where @code{newtime} is
452 interpreted as described in the above definition of @code{time_t}.
453
454 @code{settimeofday} is a newer function which sets the system clock to
455 better than one second precision.  @code{settimeofday} is generally a
456 better choice than @code{stime}.  @xref{High-Resolution Calendar}.
457
458 Only the superuser can set the system clock.
459
460 If the function succeeds, the return value is zero.  Otherwise, it is
461 @code{-1} and @code{errno} is set accordingly:
462
463 @table @code
464 @item EPERM
465 The process is not superuser.
466 @end table
467 @end deftypefun
468
469
470
471 @node High-Resolution Calendar
472 @subsection High-Resolution Calendar
473
474 The @code{time_t} data type used to represent simple times has a
475 resolution of only one second.  Some applications need more precision.
476
477 So, the GNU C library also contains functions which are capable of
478 representing calendar times to a higher resolution than one second.  The
479 functions and the associated data types described in this section are
480 declared in @file{sys/time.h}.
481 @pindex sys/time.h
482
483 @comment sys/time.h
484 @comment BSD
485 @deftp {Data Type} {struct timezone}
486 The @code{struct timezone} structure is used to hold minimal information
487 about the local time zone.  It has the following members:
488
489 @table @code
490 @item int tz_minuteswest
491 This is the number of minutes west of UTC.
492
493 @item int tz_dsttime
494 If nonzero, Daylight Saving Time applies during some part of the year.
495 @end table
496
497 The @code{struct timezone} type is obsolete and should never be used.
498 Instead, use the facilities described in @ref{Time Zone Functions}.
499 @end deftp
500
501 @comment sys/time.h
502 @comment BSD
503 @deftypefun int gettimeofday (struct timeval *@var{tp}, struct timezone *@var{tzp})
504 The @code{gettimeofday} function returns the current calendar time as
505 the elapsed time since the epoch in the @code{struct timeval} structure
506 indicated by @var{tp}.  (@pxref{Elapsed Time} for a description of
507 @code{struct timespec}).  Information about the time zone is returned in
508 the structure pointed at @var{tzp}.  If the @var{tzp} argument is a null
509 pointer, time zone information is ignored.
510
511 The return value is @code{0} on success and @code{-1} on failure.  The
512 following @code{errno} error condition is defined for this function:
513
514 @table @code
515 @item ENOSYS
516 The operating system does not support getting time zone information, and
517 @var{tzp} is not a null pointer.  The GNU operating system does not
518 support using @w{@code{struct timezone}} to represent time zone
519 information; that is an obsolete feature of 4.3 BSD.
520 Instead, use the facilities described in @ref{Time Zone Functions}.
521 @end table
522 @end deftypefun
523
524 @comment sys/time.h
525 @comment BSD
526 @deftypefun int settimeofday (const struct timeval *@var{tp}, const struct timezone *@var{tzp})
527 The @code{settimeofday} function sets the current calendar time in the
528 system clock according to the arguments.  As for @code{gettimeofday},
529 the calendar time is represented as the elapsed time since the epoch.
530 As for @code{gettimeofday}, time zone information is ignored if
531 @var{tzp} is a null pointer.
532
533 You must be a privileged user in order to use @code{settimeofday}.
534
535 Some kernels automatically set the system clock from some source such as
536 a hardware clock when they start up.  Others, including Linux, place the
537 system clock in an ``invalid'' state (in which attempts to read the clock
538 fail).  A call of @code{stime} removes the system clock from an invalid
539 state, and system startup scripts typically run a program that calls
540 @code{stime}.
541
542 @code{settimeofday} causes a sudden jump forwards or backwards, which
543 can cause a variety of problems in a system.  Use @code{adjtime} (below)
544 to make a smooth transition from one time to another by temporarily
545 speeding up or slowing down the clock.
546
547 With a Linux kernel, @code{adjtimex} does the same thing and can also
548 make permanent changes to the speed of the system clock so it doesn't
549 need to be corrected as often.
550
551 The return value is @code{0} on success and @code{-1} on failure.  The
552 following @code{errno} error conditions are defined for this function:
553
554 @table @code
555 @item EPERM
556 This process cannot set the clock because it is not privileged.
557
558 @item ENOSYS
559 The operating system does not support setting time zone information, and
560 @var{tzp} is not a null pointer.
561 @end table
562 @end deftypefun
563
564 @c On Linux, GNU libc implements adjtime() as a call to adjtimex().
565 @comment sys/time.h
566 @comment BSD
567 @deftypefun int adjtime (const struct timeval *@var{delta}, struct timeval *@var{olddelta})
568 This function speeds up or slows down the system clock in order to make
569 a gradual adjustment.  This ensures that the calendar time reported by
570 the system clock is always monotonically increasing, which might not
571 happen if you simply set the clock.
572
573 The @var{delta} argument specifies a relative adjustment to be made to
574 the clock time.  If negative, the system clock is slowed down for a
575 while until it has lost this much elapsed time.  If positive, the system
576 clock is speeded up for a while.
577
578 If the @var{olddelta} argument is not a null pointer, the @code{adjtime}
579 function returns information about any previous time adjustment that
580 has not yet completed.
581
582 This function is typically used to synchronize the clocks of computers
583 in a local network.  You must be a privileged user to use it.
584
585 With a Linux kernel, you can use the @code{adjtimex} function to
586 permanently change the clock speed.
587
588 The return value is @code{0} on success and @code{-1} on failure.  The
589 following @code{errno} error condition is defined for this function:
590
591 @table @code
592 @item EPERM
593 You do not have privilege to set the time.
594 @end table
595 @end deftypefun
596
597 @strong{Portability Note:}  The @code{gettimeofday}, @code{settimeofday},
598 and @code{adjtime} functions are derived from BSD.
599
600
601 Symbols for the following function are declared in @file{sys/timex.h}.
602
603 @comment sys/timex.h
604 @comment GNU
605 @deftypefun int adjtimex (struct timex *@var{timex})
606
607 @code{adjtimex} is functionally identical to @code{ntp_adjtime}.
608 @xref{High Accuracy Clock}.
609
610 This function is present only with a Linux kernel.
611
612 @end deftypefun
613
614 @node Broken-down Time
615 @subsection Broken-down Time
616 @cindex broken-down time
617 @cindex calendar time and broken-down time
618
619 Calendar time is represented by the usual GNU C library functions as an
620 elapsed time since a fixed base calendar time.  This is convenient for
621 computation, but has no relation to the way people normally think of
622 calendar time.  By contrast, @dfn{broken-down time} is a binary
623 representation of calendar time separated into year, month, day, and so
624 on.  Broken-down time values are not useful for calculations, but they
625 are useful for printing human readable time information.
626
627 A broken-down time value is always relative to a choice of time
628 zone, and it also indicates which time zone that is.
629
630 The symbols in this section are declared in the header file @file{time.h}.
631
632 @comment time.h
633 @comment ISO
634 @deftp {Data Type} {struct tm}
635 This is the data type used to represent a broken-down time.  The structure
636 contains at least the following members, which can appear in any order.
637
638 @table @code
639 @item int tm_sec
640 This is the number of full seconds since the top of the minute (normally
641 in the range @code{0} through @code{59}, but the actual upper limit is
642 @code{60}, to allow for leap seconds if leap second support is
643 available).
644 @cindex leap second
645
646 @item int tm_min
647 This is the number of full minutes since the top of the hour (in the
648 range @code{0} through @code{59}).
649
650 @item int tm_hour
651 This is the number of full hours past midnight (in the range @code{0} through
652 @code{23}).
653
654 @item int tm_mday
655 This is the ordinal day of the month (in the range @code{1} through @code{31}).
656 Watch out for this one!  As the only ordinal number in the structure, it is
657 inconsistent with the rest of the structure.
658
659 @item int tm_mon
660 This is the number of full calendar months since the beginning of the
661 year (in the range @code{0} through @code{11}).  Watch out for this one!
662 People usually use ordinal numbers for month-of-year (where January = 1).
663
664 @item int tm_year
665 This is the number of full calendar years since 1900.
666
667 @item int tm_wday
668 This is the number of full days since Sunday (in the range @code{0} through
669 @code{6}).
670
671 @item int tm_yday
672 This is the number of full days since the beginning of the year (in the
673 range @code{0} through @code{365}).
674
675 @item int tm_isdst
676 @cindex Daylight Saving Time
677 @cindex summer time
678 This is a flag that indicates whether Daylight Saving Time is (or was, or
679 will be) in effect at the time described.  The value is positive if
680 Daylight Saving Time is in effect, zero if it is not, and negative if the
681 information is not available.
682
683 @item long int tm_gmtoff
684 This field describes the time zone that was used to compute this
685 broken-down time value, including any adjustment for daylight saving; it
686 is the number of seconds that you must add to UTC to get local time.
687 You can also think of this as the number of seconds east of UTC.  For
688 example, for U.S. Eastern Standard Time, the value is @code{-5*60*60}.
689 The @code{tm_gmtoff} field is derived from BSD and is a GNU library
690 extension; it is not visible in a strict @w{ISO C} environment.
691
692 @item const char *tm_zone
693 This field is the name for the time zone that was used to compute this
694 broken-down time value.  Like @code{tm_gmtoff}, this field is a BSD and
695 GNU extension, and is not visible in a strict @w{ISO C} environment.
696 @end table
697 @end deftp
698
699
700 @comment time.h
701 @comment ISO
702 @deftypefun {struct tm *} localtime (const time_t *@var{time})
703 The @code{localtime} function converts the simple time pointed to by
704 @var{time} to broken-down time representation, expressed relative to the
705 user's specified time zone.
706
707 The return value is a pointer to a static broken-down time structure, which
708 might be overwritten by subsequent calls to @code{ctime}, @code{gmtime},
709 or @code{localtime}.  (But no other library function overwrites the contents
710 of this object.)
711
712 The return value is the null pointer if @var{time} cannot be represented
713 as a broken-down time; typically this is because the year cannot fit into
714 an @code{int}.
715
716 Calling @code{localtime} has one other effect: it sets the variable
717 @code{tzname} with information about the current time zone.  @xref{Time
718 Zone Functions}.
719 @end deftypefun
720
721 Using the @code{localtime} function is a big problem in multi-threaded
722 programs.  The result is returned in a static buffer and this is used in
723 all threads.  POSIX.1c introduced a variant of this function.
724
725 @comment time.h
726 @comment POSIX.1c
727 @deftypefun {struct tm *} localtime_r (const time_t *@var{time}, struct tm *@var{resultp})
728 The @code{localtime_r} function works just like the @code{localtime}
729 function.  It takes a pointer to a variable containing a simple time
730 and converts it to the broken-down time format.
731
732 But the result is not placed in a static buffer.  Instead it is placed
733 in the object of type @code{struct tm} to which the parameter
734 @var{resultp} points.
735
736 If the conversion is successful the function returns a pointer to the
737 object the result was written into, i.e., it returns @var{resultp}.
738 @end deftypefun
739
740
741 @comment time.h
742 @comment ISO
743 @deftypefun {struct tm *} gmtime (const time_t *@var{time})
744 This function is similar to @code{localtime}, except that the broken-down
745 time is expressed as Coordinated Universal Time (UTC) (formerly called
746 Greenwich Mean Time (GMT)) rather than relative to a local time zone.
747
748 @end deftypefun
749
750 As for the @code{localtime} function we have the problem that the result
751 is placed in a static variable.  POSIX.1c also provides a replacement for
752 @code{gmtime}.
753
754 @comment time.h
755 @comment POSIX.1c
756 @deftypefun {struct tm *} gmtime_r (const time_t *@var{time}, struct tm *@var{resultp})
757 This function is similar to @code{localtime_r}, except that it converts
758 just like @code{gmtime} the given time as Coordinated Universal Time.
759
760 If the conversion is successful the function returns a pointer to the
761 object the result was written into, i.e., it returns @var{resultp}.
762 @end deftypefun
763
764
765 @comment time.h
766 @comment ISO
767 @deftypefun time_t mktime (struct tm *@var{brokentime})
768 The @code{mktime} function is used to convert a broken-down time structure
769 to a simple time representation.  It also ``normalizes'' the contents of
770 the broken-down time structure, by filling in the day of week and day of
771 year based on the other date and time components.
772
773 The @code{mktime} function ignores the specified contents of the
774 @code{tm_wday} and @code{tm_yday} members of the broken-down time
775 structure.  It uses the values of the other components to determine the
776 calendar time; it's permissible for these components to have
777 unnormalized values outside their normal ranges.  The last thing that
778 @code{mktime} does is adjust the components of the @var{brokentime}
779 structure (including the @code{tm_wday} and @code{tm_yday}).
780
781 If the specified broken-down time cannot be represented as a simple time,
782 @code{mktime} returns a value of @code{(time_t)(-1)} and does not modify
783 the contents of @var{brokentime}.
784
785 Calling @code{mktime} also sets the variable @code{tzname} with
786 information about the current time zone.  @xref{Time Zone Functions}.
787 @end deftypefun
788
789 @comment time.h
790 @comment ???
791 @deftypefun time_t timelocal (struct tm *@var{brokentime})
792
793 @code{timelocal} is functionally identical to @code{mktime}, but more
794 mnemonically named.  Note that it is the inverse of the @code{localtime}
795 function.
796
797 @strong{Portability note:}  @code{mktime} is essentially universally
798 available.  @code{timelocal} is rather rare.
799
800 @end deftypefun
801
802 @comment time.h
803 @comment ???
804 @deftypefun time_t timegm (struct tm *@var{brokentime})
805
806 @code{timegm} is functionally identical to @code{mktime} except it
807 always takes the input values to be Coordinated Universal Time (UTC)
808 regardless of any local time zone setting.
809
810 Note that @code{timegm} is the inverse of @code{gmtime}.
811
812 @strong{Portability note:}  @code{mktime} is essentially universally
813 available.  @code{timegm} is rather rare.  For the most portable
814 conversion from a UTC broken-down time to a simple time, set
815 the @code{TZ} environment variable to UTC, call @code{mktime}, then set
816 @code{TZ} back.
817
818 @end deftypefun
819
820
821
822 @node High Accuracy Clock
823 @subsection High Accuracy Clock
824
825 @cindex time, high precision
826 @cindex clock, high accuracy
827 @pindex sys/timex.h
828 @c On Linux, GNU libc implements ntp_gettime() and npt_adjtime() as calls
829 @c to adjtimex().
830 The @code{ntp_gettime} and @code{ntp_adjtime} functions provide an
831 interface to monitor and manipulate the system clock to maintain high
832 accuracy time.  For example, you can fine tune the speed of the clock
833 or synchronize it with another time source.
834
835 A typical use of these functions is by a server implementing the Network
836 Time Protocol to synchronize the clocks of multiple systems and high
837 precision clocks.
838
839 These functions are declared in @file{sys/timex.h}.
840
841 @tindex struct ntptimeval
842 @deftp {Data Type} {struct ntptimeval}
843 This structure is used for information about the system clock.  It
844 contains the following members:
845 @table @code
846 @item struct timeval time
847 This is the current calendar time, expressed as the elapsed time since
848 the epoch.  The @code{struct timeval} data type is described in
849 @ref{Elapsed Time}.
850
851 @item long int maxerror
852 This is the maximum error, measured in microseconds.  Unless updated
853 via @code{ntp_adjtime} periodically, this value will reach some
854 platform-specific maximum value.
855
856 @item long int esterror
857 This is the estimated error, measured in microseconds.  This value can
858 be set by @code{ntp_adjtime} to indicate the estimated offset of the
859 system clock from the true calendar time.
860 @end table
861 @end deftp
862
863 @comment sys/timex.h
864 @comment GNU
865 @deftypefun int ntp_gettime (struct ntptimeval *@var{tptr})
866 The @code{ntp_gettime} function sets the structure pointed to by
867 @var{tptr} to current values.  The elements of the structure afterwards
868 contain the values the timer implementation in the kernel assumes.  They
869 might or might not be correct.  If they are not a @code{ntp_adjtime}
870 call is necessary.
871
872 The return value is @code{0} on success and other values on failure.  The
873 following @code{errno} error conditions are defined for this function:
874
875 @table @code
876 @item TIME_ERROR
877 The precision clock model is not properly set up at the moment, thus the
878 clock must be considered unsynchronized, and the values should be
879 treated with care.
880 @end table
881 @end deftypefun
882
883 @tindex struct timex
884 @deftp {Data Type} {struct timex}
885 This structure is used to control and monitor the system clock.  It
886 contains the following members:
887 @table @code
888 @item unsigned int modes
889 This variable controls whether and which values are set.  Several
890 symbolic constants have to be combined with @emph{binary or} to specify
891 the effective mode.  These constants start with @code{MOD_}.
892
893 @item long int offset
894 This value indicates the current offset of the system clock from the true
895 calendar time.  The value is given in microseconds.  If bit
896 @code{MOD_OFFSET} is set in @code{modes}, the offset (and possibly other
897 dependent values) can be set.  The offset's absolute value must not
898 exceed @code{MAXPHASE}.
899
900
901 @item long int frequency
902 This value indicates the difference in frequency between the true
903 calendar time and the system clock.  The value is expressed as scaled
904 PPM (parts per million, 0.0001%).  The scaling is @code{1 <<
905 SHIFT_USEC}.  The value can be set with bit @code{MOD_FREQUENCY}, but
906 the absolute value must not exceed @code{MAXFREQ}.
907
908 @item long int maxerror
909 This is the maximum error, measured in microseconds.  A new value can be
910 set using bit @code{MOD_MAXERROR}.  Unless updated via
911 @code{ntp_adjtime} periodically, this value will increase steadily
912 and reach some platform-specific maximum value.
913
914 @item long int esterror
915 This is the estimated error, measured in microseconds.  This value can
916 be set using bit @code{MOD_ESTERROR}.
917
918 @item int status
919 This variable reflects the various states of the clock machinery.  There
920 are symbolic constants for the significant bits, starting with
921 @code{STA_}.  Some of these flags can be updated using the
922 @code{MOD_STATUS} bit.
923
924 @item long int constant
925 This value represents the bandwidth or stiffness of the PLL (phase
926 locked loop) implemented in the kernel.  The value can be changed using
927 bit @code{MOD_TIMECONST}.
928
929 @item long int precision
930 This value represents the accuracy or the maximum error when reading the
931 system clock.  The value is expressed in microseconds.
932
933 @item long int tolerance
934 This value represents the maximum frequency error of the system clock in
935 scaled PPM.  This value is used to increase the @code{maxerror} every
936 second.
937
938 @item struct timeval time
939 The current calendar time.
940
941 @item long int tick
942 The elapsed time between clock ticks in microseconds.  A clock tick is a
943 periodic timer interrupt on which the system clock is based.
944
945 @item long int ppsfreq
946 This is the first of a few optional variables that are present only if
947 the system clock can use a PPS (pulse per second) signal to discipline
948 the system clock.  The value is expressed in scaled PPM and it denotes
949 the difference in frequency between the system clock and the PPS signal.
950
951 @item long int jitter
952 This value expresses a median filtered average of the PPS signal's
953 dispersion in microseconds.
954
955 @item int shift
956 This value is a binary exponent for the duration of the PPS calibration
957 interval, ranging from @code{PPS_SHIFT} to @code{PPS_SHIFTMAX}.
958
959 @item long int stabil
960 This value represents the median filtered dispersion of the PPS
961 frequency in scaled PPM.
962
963 @item long int jitcnt
964 This counter represents the number of pulses where the jitter exceeded
965 the allowed maximum @code{MAXTIME}.
966
967 @item long int calcnt
968 This counter reflects the number of successful calibration intervals.
969
970 @item long int errcnt
971 This counter represents the number of calibration errors (caused by
972 large offsets or jitter).
973
974 @item long int stbcnt
975 This counter denotes the number of of calibrations where the stability
976 exceeded the threshold.
977 @end table
978 @end deftp
979
980 @comment sys/timex.h
981 @comment GNU
982 @deftypefun int ntp_adjtime (struct timex *@var{tptr})
983 The @code{ntp_adjtime} function sets the structure specified by
984 @var{tptr} to current values.
985
986 In addition, @code{ntp_adjtime} updates some settings to match what you
987 pass to it in *@var{tptr}.  Use the @code{modes} element of *@var{tptr}
988 to select what settings to update.  You can set @code{offset},
989 @code{freq}, @code{maxerror}, @code{esterror}, @code{status},
990 @code{constant}, and @code{tick}.
991
992 @code{modes} = zero means set nothing.
993
994 Only the superuser can update settings.
995
996 @c On Linux, ntp_adjtime() also does the adjtime() function if you set
997 @c modes = ADJ_OFFSET_SINGLESHOT (in fact, that is how GNU libc implements
998 @c adjtime()).  But this should be considered an internal function because
999 @c it's so inconsistent with the rest of what ntp_adjtime() does and is
1000 @c forced in an ugly way into the struct timex.  So we don't document it
1001 @c and instead document adjtime() as the way to achieve the function.
1002
1003 The return value is @code{0} on success and other values on failure.  The
1004 following @code{errno} error conditions are defined for this function:
1005
1006 @table @code
1007 @item TIME_ERROR
1008 The high accuracy clock model is not properly set up at the moment, thus the
1009 clock must be considered unsynchronized, and the values should be
1010 treated with care.  Another reason could be that the specified new values
1011 are not allowed.
1012
1013 @item EPERM
1014 The process specified a settings update, but is not superuser.
1015
1016 @end table
1017
1018 For more details see RFC1305 (Network Time Protocol, Version 3) and
1019 related documents.
1020
1021 @strong{Portability note:} Early versions of the GNU C library did not
1022 have this function but did have the synonymous @code{adjtimex}.
1023
1024 @end deftypefun
1025
1026
1027 @node Formatting Calendar Time
1028 @subsection Formatting Calendar Time
1029
1030 The functions described in this section format calendar time values as
1031 strings.  These functions are declared in the header file @file{time.h}.
1032 @pindex time.h
1033
1034 @comment time.h
1035 @comment ISO
1036 @deftypefun {char *} asctime (const struct tm *@var{brokentime})
1037 The @code{asctime} function converts the broken-down time value that
1038 @var{brokentime} points to into a string in a standard format:
1039
1040 @smallexample
1041 "Tue May 21 13:46:22 1991\n"
1042 @end smallexample
1043
1044 The abbreviations for the days of week are: @samp{Sun}, @samp{Mon},
1045 @samp{Tue}, @samp{Wed}, @samp{Thu}, @samp{Fri}, and @samp{Sat}.
1046
1047 The abbreviations for the months are: @samp{Jan}, @samp{Feb},
1048 @samp{Mar}, @samp{Apr}, @samp{May}, @samp{Jun}, @samp{Jul}, @samp{Aug},
1049 @samp{Sep}, @samp{Oct}, @samp{Nov}, and @samp{Dec}.
1050
1051 The return value points to a statically allocated string, which might be
1052 overwritten by subsequent calls to @code{asctime} or @code{ctime}.
1053 (But no other library function overwrites the contents of this
1054 string.)
1055 @end deftypefun
1056
1057 @comment time.h
1058 @comment POSIX.1c
1059 @deftypefun {char *} asctime_r (const struct tm *@var{brokentime}, char *@var{buffer})
1060 This function is similar to @code{asctime} but instead of placing the
1061 result in a static buffer it writes the string in the buffer pointed to
1062 by the parameter @var{buffer}.  This buffer should have room
1063 for at least 26 bytes, including the terminating null.
1064
1065 If no error occurred the function returns a pointer to the string the
1066 result was written into, i.e., it returns @var{buffer}.  Otherwise
1067 return @code{NULL}.
1068 @end deftypefun
1069
1070
1071 @comment time.h
1072 @comment ISO
1073 @deftypefun {char *} ctime (const time_t *@var{time})
1074 The @code{ctime} function is similar to @code{asctime}, except that you
1075 specify the calendar time argument as a @code{time_t} simple time value
1076 rather than in broken-down local time format.  It is equivalent to
1077
1078 @smallexample
1079 asctime (localtime (@var{time}))
1080 @end smallexample
1081
1082 @code{ctime} sets the variable @code{tzname}, because @code{localtime}
1083 does so.  @xref{Time Zone Functions}.
1084 @end deftypefun
1085
1086 @comment time.h
1087 @comment POSIX.1c
1088 @deftypefun {char *} ctime_r (const time_t *@var{time}, char *@var{buffer})
1089 This function is similar to @code{ctime}, but places the result in the
1090 string pointed to by @var{buffer}.  It is equivalent to (written using
1091 gcc extensions, @pxref{Statement Exprs,,,gcc,Porting and Using gcc}):
1092
1093 @smallexample
1094 (@{ struct tm tm; asctime_r (localtime_r (time, &tm), buf); @})
1095 @end smallexample
1096
1097 If no error occurred the function returns a pointer to the string the
1098 result was written into, i.e., it returns @var{buffer}.  Otherwise
1099 return @code{NULL}.
1100 @end deftypefun
1101
1102
1103 @comment time.h
1104 @comment ISO
1105 @deftypefun size_t strftime (char *@var{s}, size_t @var{size}, const char *@var{template}, const struct tm *@var{brokentime})
1106 This function is similar to the @code{sprintf} function (@pxref{Formatted
1107 Input}), but the conversion specifications that can appear in the format
1108 template @var{template} are specialized for printing components of the date
1109 and time @var{brokentime} according to the locale currently specified for
1110 time conversion (@pxref{Locales}).
1111
1112 Ordinary characters appearing in the @var{template} are copied to the
1113 output string @var{s}; this can include multibyte character sequences.
1114 Conversion specifiers are introduced by a @samp{%} character, followed
1115 by an optional flag which can be one of the following.  These flags
1116 are all GNU extensions. The first three affect only the output of
1117 numbers:
1118
1119 @table @code
1120 @item _
1121 The number is padded with spaces.
1122
1123 @item -
1124 The number is not padded at all.
1125
1126 @item 0
1127 The number is padded with zeros even if the format specifies padding
1128 with spaces.
1129
1130 @item ^
1131 The output uses uppercase characters, but only if this is possible
1132 (@pxref{Case Conversion}).
1133 @end table
1134
1135 The default action is to pad the number with zeros to keep it a constant
1136 width.  Numbers that do not have a range indicated below are never
1137 padded, since there is no natural width for them.
1138
1139 Following the flag an optional specification of the width is possible.
1140 This is specified in decimal notation.  If the natural size of the
1141 output is of the field has less than the specified number of characters,
1142 the result is written right adjusted and space padded to the given
1143 size.
1144
1145 An optional modifier can follow the optional flag and width
1146 specification.  The modifiers, which are POSIX.2 extensions, are:
1147
1148 @table @code
1149 @item E
1150 Use the locale's alternate representation for date and time.  This
1151 modifier applies to the @code{%c}, @code{%C}, @code{%x}, @code{%X},
1152 @code{%y} and @code{%Y} format specifiers.  In a Japanese locale, for
1153 example, @code{%Ex} might yield a date format based on the Japanese
1154 Emperors' reigns.
1155
1156 @item O
1157 Use the locale's alternate numeric symbols for numbers.  This modifier
1158 applies only to numeric format specifiers.
1159 @end table
1160
1161 If the format supports the modifier but no alternate representation
1162 is available, it is ignored.
1163
1164 The conversion specifier ends with a format specifier taken from the
1165 following list.  The whole @samp{%} sequence is replaced in the output
1166 string as follows:
1167
1168 @table @code
1169 @item %a
1170 The abbreviated weekday name according to the current locale.
1171
1172 @item %A
1173 The full weekday name according to the current locale.
1174
1175 @item %b
1176 The abbreviated month name according to the current locale.
1177
1178 @item %B
1179 The full month name according to the current locale.
1180
1181 @item %c
1182 The preferred calendar time representation for the current locale.
1183
1184 @item %C
1185 The century of the year.  This is equivalent to the greatest integer not
1186 greater than the year divided by 100.
1187
1188 This format is a POSIX.2 extension and also appears in @w{ISO C99}.
1189
1190 @item %d
1191 The day of the month as a decimal number (range @code{01} through @code{31}).
1192
1193 @item %D
1194 The date using the format @code{%m/%d/%y}.
1195
1196 This format is a POSIX.2 extension and also appears in @w{ISO C99}.
1197
1198 @item %e
1199 The day of the month like with @code{%d}, but padded with blank (range
1200 @code{ 1} through @code{31}).
1201
1202 This format is a POSIX.2 extension and also appears in @w{ISO C99}.
1203
1204 @item %F
1205 The date using the format @code{%Y-%m-%d}.  This is the form specified
1206 in the @w{ISO 8601} standard and is the preferred form for all uses.
1207
1208 This format is a @w{ISO C99} extension.
1209
1210 @item %g
1211 The year corresponding to the ISO week number, but without the century
1212 (range @code{00} through @code{99}).  This has the same format and value
1213 as @code{%y}, except that if the ISO week number (see @code{%V}) belongs
1214 to the previous or next year, that year is used instead.
1215
1216 This format was introduced in @w{ISO C99}.
1217
1218 @item %G
1219 The year corresponding to the ISO week number.  This has the same format
1220 and value as @code{%Y}, except that if the ISO week number (see
1221 @code{%V}) belongs to the previous or next year, that year is used
1222 instead.
1223
1224 This format was introduced in @w{ISO C99} but was previously available
1225 as a GNU extension.
1226
1227 @item %h
1228 The abbreviated month name according to the current locale.  The action
1229 is the same as for @code{%b}.
1230
1231 This format is a POSIX.2 extension and also appears in @w{ISO C99}.
1232
1233 @item %H
1234 The hour as a decimal number, using a 24-hour clock (range @code{00} through
1235 @code{23}).
1236
1237 @item %I
1238 The hour as a decimal number, using a 12-hour clock (range @code{01} through
1239 @code{12}).
1240
1241 @item %j
1242 The day of the year as a decimal number (range @code{001} through @code{366}).
1243
1244 @item %k
1245 The hour as a decimal number, using a 24-hour clock like @code{%H}, but
1246 padded with blank (range @code{ 0} through @code{23}).
1247
1248 This format is a GNU extension.
1249
1250 @item %l
1251 The hour as a decimal number, using a 12-hour clock like @code{%I}, but
1252 padded with blank (range @code{ 1} through @code{12}).
1253
1254 This format is a GNU extension.
1255
1256 @item %m
1257 The month as a decimal number (range @code{01} through @code{12}).
1258
1259 @item %M
1260 The minute as a decimal number (range @code{00} through @code{59}).
1261
1262 @item %n
1263 A single @samp{\n} (newline) character.
1264
1265 This format is a POSIX.2 extension and also appears in @w{ISO C99}.
1266
1267 @item %p
1268 Either @samp{AM} or @samp{PM}, according to the given time value; or the
1269 corresponding strings for the current locale.  Noon is treated as
1270 @samp{PM} and midnight as @samp{AM}.
1271
1272 @ignore
1273 We currently have a problem with makeinfo.  Write @samp{AM} and @samp{am}
1274 both results in `am'.  I.e., the difference in case is not visible anymore.
1275 @end ignore
1276 @item %P
1277 Either @samp{am} or @samp{pm}, according to the given time value; or the
1278 corresponding strings for the current locale, printed in lowercase
1279 characters.  Noon is treated as @samp{pm} and midnight as @samp{am}.
1280
1281 This format was introduced in @w{ISO C99} but was previously available
1282 as a GNU extension.
1283
1284 @item %r
1285 The complete calendar time using the AM/PM format of the current locale.
1286
1287 This format is a POSIX.2 extension and also appears in @w{ISO C99}.
1288
1289 @item %R
1290 The hour and minute in decimal numbers using the format @code{%H:%M}.
1291
1292 This format was introduced in @w{ISO C99} but was previously available
1293 as a GNU extension.
1294
1295 @item %s
1296 The number of seconds since the epoch, i.e., since 1970-01-01 00:00:00 UTC.
1297 Leap seconds are not counted unless leap second support is available.
1298
1299 This format is a GNU extension.
1300
1301 @item %S
1302 The seconds as a decimal number (range @code{00} through @code{60}).
1303
1304 @item %t
1305 A single @samp{\t} (tabulator) character.
1306
1307 This format is a POSIX.2 extension and also appears in @w{ISO C99}.
1308
1309 @item %T
1310 The time of day using decimal numbers using the format @code{%H:%M:%S}.
1311
1312 This format is a POSIX.2 extension.
1313
1314 @item %u
1315 The day of the week as a decimal number (range @code{1} through
1316 @code{7}), Monday being @code{1}.
1317
1318 This format is a POSIX.2 extension and also appears in @w{ISO C99}.
1319
1320 @item %U
1321 The week number of the current year as a decimal number (range @code{00}
1322 through @code{53}), starting with the first Sunday as the first day of
1323 the first week.  Days preceding the first Sunday in the year are
1324 considered to be in week @code{00}.
1325
1326 @item %V
1327 The @w{ISO 8601:1988} week number as a decimal number (range @code{01}
1328 through @code{53}).  ISO weeks start with Monday and end with Sunday.
1329 Week @code{01} of a year is the first week which has the majority of its
1330 days in that year; this is equivalent to the week containing the year's
1331 first Thursday, and it is also equivalent to the week containing January
1332 4.  Week @code{01} of a year can contain days from the previous year.
1333 The week before week @code{01} of a year is the last week (@code{52} or
1334 @code{53}) of the previous year even if it contains days from the new
1335 year.
1336
1337 This format is a POSIX.2 extension and also appears in @w{ISO C99}.
1338
1339 @item %w
1340 The day of the week as a decimal number (range @code{0} through
1341 @code{6}), Sunday being @code{0}.
1342
1343 @item %W
1344 The week number of the current year as a decimal number (range @code{00}
1345 through @code{53}), starting with the first Monday as the first day of
1346 the first week.  All days preceding the first Monday in the year are
1347 considered to be in week @code{00}.
1348
1349 @item %x
1350 The preferred date representation for the current locale.
1351
1352 @item %X
1353 The preferred time of day representation for the current locale.
1354
1355 @item %y
1356 The year without a century as a decimal number (range @code{00} through
1357 @code{99}).  This is equivalent to the year modulo 100.
1358
1359 @item %Y
1360 The year as a decimal number, using the Gregorian calendar.  Years
1361 before the year @code{1} are numbered @code{0}, @code{-1}, and so on.
1362
1363 @item %z
1364 @w{RFC 822}/@w{ISO 8601:1988} style numeric time zone (e.g.,
1365 @code{-0600} or @code{+0100}), or nothing if no time zone is
1366 determinable.
1367
1368 This format was introduced in @w{ISO C99} but was previously available
1369 as a GNU extension.
1370
1371 A full @w{RFC 822} timestamp is generated by the format
1372 @w{@samp{"%a, %d %b %Y %H:%M:%S %z"}} (or the equivalent
1373 @w{@samp{"%a, %d %b %Y %T %z"}}).
1374
1375 @item %Z
1376 The time zone abbreviation (empty if the time zone can't be determined).
1377
1378 @item %%
1379 A literal @samp{%} character.
1380 @end table
1381
1382 The @var{size} parameter can be used to specify the maximum number of
1383 characters to be stored in the array @var{s}, including the terminating
1384 null character.  If the formatted time requires more than @var{size}
1385 characters, @code{strftime} returns zero and the contents of the array
1386 @var{s} are undefined.  Otherwise the return value indicates the
1387 number of characters placed in the array @var{s}, not including the
1388 terminating null character.
1389
1390 @emph{Warning:} This convention for the return value which is prescribed
1391 in @w{ISO C} can lead to problems in some situations.  For certain
1392 format strings and certain locales the output really can be the empty
1393 string and this cannot be discovered by testing the return value only.
1394 E.g., in most locales the AM/PM time format is not supported (most of
1395 the world uses the 24 hour time representation).  In such locales
1396 @code{"%p"} will return the empty string, i.e., the return value is
1397 zero.  To detect situations like this something similar to the following
1398 code should be used:
1399
1400 @smallexample
1401 buf[0] = '\1';
1402 len = strftime (buf, bufsize, format, tp);
1403 if (len == 0 && buf[0] != '\0')
1404   @{
1405     /* Something went wrong in the strftime call.  */
1406     @dots{}
1407   @}
1408 @end smallexample
1409
1410 If @var{s} is a null pointer, @code{strftime} does not actually write
1411 anything, but instead returns the number of characters it would have written.
1412
1413 According to POSIX.1 every call to @code{strftime} implies a call to
1414 @code{tzset}.  So the contents of the environment variable @code{TZ}
1415 is examined before any output is produced.
1416
1417 For an example of @code{strftime}, see @ref{Time Functions Example}.
1418 @end deftypefun
1419
1420 @comment time.h
1421 @comment ISO/Amend1
1422 @deftypefun size_t wcsftime (wchar_t *@var{s}, size_t @var{size}, const wchar_t *@var{template}, const struct tm *@var{brokentime})
1423 The @code{wcsftime} function is equivalent to the @code{strftime}
1424 function with the difference that it operates on wide character
1425 strings.  The buffer where the result is stored, pointed to by @var{s},
1426 must be an array of wide characters.  The parameter @var{size} which
1427 specifies the size of the output buffer gives the number of wide
1428 character, not the number of bytes.
1429
1430 Also the format string @var{template} is a wide character string.  Since
1431 all characters needed to specify the format string are in the basic
1432 character set it is portably possible to write format strings in the C
1433 source code using the @code{L"..."} notation.  The parameter
1434 @var{brokentime} has the same meaning as in the @code{strftime} call.
1435
1436 The @code{wcsftime} function supports the same flags, modifiers, and
1437 format specifiers as the @code{strftime} function.
1438
1439 The return value of @code{wcsftime} is the number of wide characters
1440 stored in @code{s}.  When more characters would have to be written than
1441 can be placed in the buffer @var{s} the return value is zero, with the
1442 same problems indicated in the @code{strftime} documentation.
1443 @end deftypefun
1444
1445 @node Parsing Date and Time
1446 @subsection Convert textual time and date information back
1447
1448 The @w{ISO C} standard does not specify any functions which can convert
1449 the output of the @code{strftime} function back into a binary format.
1450 This led to a variety of more-or-less successful implementations with
1451 different interfaces over the years.  Then the Unix standard was
1452 extended by the addition of two functions: @code{strptime} and
1453 @code{getdate}.  Both have strange interfaces but at least they are
1454 widely available.
1455
1456 @menu
1457 * Low-Level Time String Parsing::  Interpret string according to given format.
1458 * General Time String Parsing::    User-friendly function to parse data and
1459                                     time strings.
1460 @end menu
1461
1462 @node Low-Level Time String Parsing
1463 @subsubsection Interpret string according to given format
1464
1465 he first function is rather low-level.  It is nevertheless frequently
1466 used in software since it is better known.  Its interface and
1467 implementation are heavily influenced by the @code{getdate} function,
1468 which is defined and implemented in terms of calls to @code{strptime}.
1469
1470 @comment time.h
1471 @comment XPG4
1472 @deftypefun {char *} strptime (const char *@var{s}, const char *@var{fmt}, struct tm *@var{tp})
1473 The @code{strptime} function parses the input string @var{s} according
1474 to the format string @var{fmt} and stores its results in the
1475 structure @var{tp}.
1476
1477 The input string could be generated by a @code{strftime} call or
1478 obtained any other way.  It does not need to be in a human-recognizable
1479 format; e.g. a date passed as @code{"02:1999:9"} is acceptable, even
1480 though it is ambiguous without context.  As long as the format string
1481 @var{fmt} matches the input string the function will succeed.
1482
1483 The format string consists of the same components as the format string
1484 of the @code{strftime} function.  The only difference is that the flags
1485 @code{_}, @code{-}, @code{0}, and @code{^} are not allowed.
1486 @comment Is this really the intention?  --drepper
1487 Several of the distinct formats of @code{strftime} do the same work in
1488 @code{strptime} since differences like case of the input do not matter.
1489 For reasons of symmetry all formats are supported, though.
1490
1491 The modifiers @code{E} and @code{O} are also allowed everywhere the
1492 @code{strftime} function allows them.
1493
1494 The formats are:
1495
1496 @table @code
1497 @item %a
1498 @itemx %A
1499 The weekday name according to the current locale, in abbreviated form or
1500 the full name.
1501
1502 @item %b
1503 @itemx %B
1504 @itemx %h
1505 The month name according to the current locale, in abbreviated form or
1506 the full name.
1507
1508 @item %c
1509 The date and time representation for the current locale.
1510
1511 @item %Ec
1512 Like @code{%c} but the locale's alternative date and time format is used.
1513
1514 @item %C
1515 The century of the year.
1516
1517 It makes sense to use this format only if the format string also
1518 contains the @code{%y} format.
1519
1520 @item %EC
1521 The locale's representation of the period.
1522
1523 Unlike @code{%C} it sometimes makes sense to use this format since some
1524 cultures represent years relative to the beginning of eras instead of
1525 using the Gregorian years.
1526
1527 @item %d
1528 @item %e
1529 The day of the month as a decimal number (range @code{1} through @code{31}).
1530 Leading zeroes are permitted but not required.
1531
1532 @item %Od
1533 @itemx %Oe
1534 Same as @code{%d} but using the locale's alternative numeric symbols.
1535
1536 Leading zeroes are permitted but not required.
1537
1538 @item %D
1539 Equivalent to @code{%m/%d/%y}.
1540
1541 @item %F
1542 Equivalent to @code{%Y-%m-%d}, which is the @w{ISO 8601} date
1543 format.
1544
1545 This is a GNU extension following an @w{ISO C99} extension to
1546 @code{strftime}.
1547
1548 @item %g
1549 The year corresponding to the ISO week number, but without the century
1550 (range @code{00} through @code{99}).
1551
1552 @emph{Note:} Currently, this is not fully implemented.  The format is
1553 recognized, input is consumed but no field in @var{tm} is set.
1554
1555 This format is a GNU extension following a GNU extension of @code{strftime}.
1556
1557 @item %G
1558 The year corresponding to the ISO week number.
1559
1560 @emph{Note:} Currently, this is not fully implemented.  The format is
1561 recognized, input is consumed but no field in @var{tm} is set.
1562
1563 This format is a GNU extension following a GNU extension of @code{strftime}.
1564
1565 @item %H
1566 @itemx %k
1567 The hour as a decimal number, using a 24-hour clock (range @code{00} through
1568 @code{23}).
1569
1570 @code{%k} is a GNU extension following a GNU extension of @code{strftime}.
1571
1572 @item %OH
1573 Same as @code{%H} but using the locale's alternative numeric symbols.
1574
1575 @item %I
1576 @itemx %l
1577 The hour as a decimal number, using a 12-hour clock (range @code{01} through
1578 @code{12}).
1579
1580 @code{%l} is a GNU extension following a GNU extension of @code{strftime}.
1581
1582 @item %OI
1583 Same as @code{%I} but using the locale's alternative numeric symbols.
1584
1585 @item %j
1586 The day of the year as a decimal number (range @code{1} through @code{366}).
1587
1588 Leading zeroes are permitted but not required.
1589
1590 @item %m
1591 The month as a decimal number (range @code{1} through @code{12}).
1592
1593 Leading zeroes are permitted but not required.
1594
1595 @item %Om
1596 Same as @code{%m} but using the locale's alternative numeric symbols.
1597
1598 @item %M
1599 The minute as a decimal number (range @code{0} through @code{59}).
1600
1601 Leading zeroes are permitted but not required.
1602
1603 @item %OM
1604 Same as @code{%M} but using the locale's alternative numeric symbols.
1605
1606 @item %n
1607 @itemx %t
1608 Matches any white space.
1609
1610 @item %p
1611 @item %P
1612 The locale-dependent equivalent to @samp{AM} or @samp{PM}.
1613
1614 This format is not useful unless @code{%I} or @code{%l} is also used.
1615 Another complication is that the locale might not define these values at
1616 all and therefore the conversion fails.
1617
1618 @code{%P} is a GNU extension following a GNU extension to @code{strftime}.
1619
1620 @item %r
1621 The complete time using the AM/PM format of the current locale.
1622
1623 A complication is that the locale might not define this format at all
1624 and therefore the conversion fails.
1625
1626 @item %R
1627 The hour and minute in decimal numbers using the format @code{%H:%M}.
1628
1629 @code{%R} is a GNU extension following a GNU extension to @code{strftime}.
1630
1631 @item %s
1632 The number of seconds since the epoch, i.e., since 1970-01-01 00:00:00 UTC.
1633 Leap seconds are not counted unless leap second support is available.
1634
1635 @code{%s} is a GNU extension following a GNU extension to @code{strftime}.
1636
1637 @item %S
1638 The seconds as a decimal number (range @code{0} through @code{60}).
1639
1640 Leading zeroes are permitted but not required.
1641
1642 @strong{Note:} The Unix specification says the upper bound on this value
1643 is @code{61}, a result of a decision to allow double leap seconds.  You
1644 will not see the value @code{61} because no minute has more than one
1645 leap second, but the myth persists.
1646
1647 @item %OS
1648 Same as @code{%S} but using the locale's alternative numeric symbols.
1649
1650 @item %T
1651 Equivalent to the use of @code{%H:%M:%S} in this place.
1652
1653 @item %u
1654 The day of the week as a decimal number (range @code{1} through
1655 @code{7}), Monday being @code{1}.
1656
1657 Leading zeroes are permitted but not required.
1658
1659 @emph{Note:} Currently, this is not fully implemented.  The format is
1660 recognized, input is consumed but no field in @var{tm} is set.
1661
1662 @item %U
1663 The week number of the current year as a decimal number (range @code{0}
1664 through @code{53}).
1665
1666 Leading zeroes are permitted but not required.
1667
1668 @item %OU
1669 Same as @code{%U} but using the locale's alternative numeric symbols.
1670
1671 @item %V
1672 The @w{ISO 8601:1988} week number as a decimal number (range @code{1}
1673 through @code{53}).
1674
1675 Leading zeroes are permitted but not required.
1676
1677 @emph{Note:} Currently, this is not fully implemented.  The format is
1678 recognized, input is consumed but no field in @var{tm} is set.
1679
1680 @item %w
1681 The day of the week as a decimal number (range @code{0} through
1682 @code{6}), Sunday being @code{0}.
1683
1684 Leading zeroes are permitted but not required.
1685
1686 @emph{Note:} Currently, this is not fully implemented.  The format is
1687 recognized, input is consumed but no field in @var{tm} is set.
1688
1689 @item %Ow
1690 Same as @code{%w} but using the locale's alternative numeric symbols.
1691
1692 @item %W
1693 The week number of the current year as a decimal number (range @code{0}
1694 through @code{53}).
1695
1696 Leading zeroes are permitted but not required.
1697
1698 @emph{Note:} Currently, this is not fully implemented.  The format is
1699 recognized, input is consumed but no field in @var{tm} is set.
1700
1701 @item %OW
1702 Same as @code{%W} but using the locale's alternative numeric symbols.
1703
1704 @item %x
1705 The date using the locale's date format.
1706
1707 @item %Ex
1708 Like @code{%x} but the locale's alternative data representation is used.
1709
1710 @item %X
1711 The time using the locale's time format.
1712
1713 @item %EX
1714 Like @code{%X} but the locale's alternative time representation is used.
1715
1716 @item %y
1717 The year without a century as a decimal number (range @code{0} through
1718 @code{99}).
1719
1720 Leading zeroes are permitted but not required.
1721
1722 Note that it is questionable to use this format without
1723 the @code{%C} format.  The @code{strptime} function does regard input
1724 values in the range @math{68} to @math{99} as the years @math{1969} to
1725 @math{1999} and the values @math{0} to @math{68} as the years
1726 @math{2000} to @math{2068}.  But maybe this heuristic fails for some
1727 input data.
1728
1729 Therefore it is best to avoid @code{%y} completely and use @code{%Y}
1730 instead.
1731
1732 @item %Ey
1733 The offset from @code{%EC} in the locale's alternative representation.
1734
1735 @item %Oy
1736 The offset of the year (from @code{%C}) using the locale's alternative
1737 numeric symbols.
1738
1739 @item %Y
1740 The year as a decimal number, using the Gregorian calendar.
1741
1742 @item %EY
1743 The full alternative year representation.
1744
1745 @item %z
1746 Equivalent to the use of @code{%a, %d %b %Y %H:%M:%S %z} in this place.
1747 This is the full @w{ISO 8601} date and time format.
1748
1749 @item %Z
1750 The timezone name.
1751
1752 @emph{Note:} Currently, this is not fully implemented.  The format is
1753 recognized, input is consumed but no field in @var{tm} is set.
1754
1755 @item %%
1756 A literal @samp{%} character.
1757 @end table
1758
1759 All other characters in the format string must have a matching character
1760 in the input string.  Exceptions are white spaces in the input string
1761 which can match zero or more white space characters in the format string.
1762
1763 The @code{strptime} function processes the input string from right to
1764 left.  Each of the three possible input elements (white space, literal,
1765 or format) are handled one after the other.  If the input cannot be
1766 matched to the format string the function stops.  The remainder of the
1767 format and input strings are not processed.
1768
1769 The function returns a pointer to the first character it was unable to
1770 process.  If the input string contains more characters than required by
1771 the format string the return value points right after the last consumed
1772 input character.  If the whole input string is consumed the return value
1773 points to the @code{NULL} byte at the end of the string.  If an error
1774 occurs, i.e. @code{strptime} fails to match all of the format string,
1775 the function returns @code{NULL}.
1776 @end deftypefun
1777
1778 The specification of the function in the XPG standard is rather vague,
1779 leaving out a few important pieces of information.  Most importantly, it
1780 does not specify what happens to those elements of @var{tm} which are
1781 not directly initialized by the different formats.  The
1782 implementations on different Unix systems vary here.
1783
1784 The GNU libc implementation does not touch those fields which are not
1785 directly initialized.  Exceptions are the @code{tm_wday} and
1786 @code{tm_yday} elements, which are recomputed if any of the year, month,
1787 or date elements changed.  This has two implications:
1788
1789 @itemize @bullet
1790 @item
1791 Before calling the @code{strptime} function for a new input string, you
1792 should prepare the @var{tm} structure you pass.  Normally this will mean
1793 initializing all values are to zero.  Alternatively, you can set all
1794 fields to values like @code{INT_MAX}, allowing you to determine which
1795 elements were set by the function call.  Zero does not work here since
1796 it is a valid value for many of the fields.
1797
1798 Careful initialization is necessary if you want to find out whether a
1799 certain field in @var{tm} was initialized by the function call.
1800
1801 @item
1802 You can construct a @code{struct tm} value with several consecutive
1803 @code{strptime} calls.  A useful application of this is e.g. the parsing
1804 of two separate strings, one containing date information and the other
1805 time information.  By parsing one after the other without clearing the
1806 structure in-between, you can construct a complete broken-down time.
1807 @end itemize
1808
1809 The following example shows a function which parses a string which is
1810 contains the date information in either US style or @w{ISO 8601} form:
1811
1812 @smallexample
1813 const char *
1814 parse_date (const char *input, struct tm *tm)
1815 @{
1816   const char *cp;
1817
1818   /* @r{First clear the result structure.}  */
1819   memset (tm, '\0', sizeof (*tm));
1820
1821   /* @r{Try the ISO format first.}  */
1822   cp = strptime (input, "%F", tm);
1823   if (cp == NULL)
1824     @{
1825       /* @r{Does not match.  Try the US form.}  */
1826       cp = strptime (input, "%D", tm);
1827     @}
1828
1829   return cp;
1830 @}
1831 @end smallexample
1832
1833 @node General Time String Parsing
1834 @subsubsection A More User-friendly Way to Parse Times and Dates
1835
1836 The Unix standard defines another function for parsing date strings.
1837 The interface is weird, but if the function happens to suit your
1838 application it is just fine.  It is problematic to use this function
1839 in multi-threaded programs or libraries, since it returns a pointer to
1840 a static variable, and uses a global variable and global state (an
1841 environment variable).
1842
1843 @comment time.h
1844 @comment Unix98
1845 @defvar getdate_err
1846 This variable of type @code{int} contains the error code of the last
1847 unsuccessful call to @code{getdate}.  Defined values are:
1848
1849 @table @math
1850 @item 1
1851 The environment variable @code{DATEMSK} is not defined or null.
1852 @item 2
1853 The template file denoted by the @code{DATEMSK} environment variable
1854 cannot be opened.
1855 @item 3
1856 Information about the template file cannot retrieved.
1857 @item 4
1858 The template file is not a regular file.
1859 @item 5
1860 An I/O error occurred while reading the template file.
1861 @item 6
1862 Not enough memory available to execute the function.
1863 @item 7
1864 The template file contains no matching template.
1865 @item 8
1866 The input date is invalid, but would match a template otherwise.  This
1867 includes dates like February 31st, and dates which cannot be represented
1868 in a @code{time_t} variable.
1869 @end table
1870 @end defvar
1871
1872 @comment time.h
1873 @comment Unix98
1874 @deftypefun {struct tm *} getdate (const char *@var{string})
1875 The interface to @code{getdate} is the simplest possible for a function
1876 to parse a string and return the value.  @var{string} is the input
1877 string and the result is returned in a statically-allocated variable.
1878
1879 The details about how the string is processed are hidden from the user.
1880 In fact, they can be outside the control of the program.  Which formats
1881 are recognized is controlled by the file named by the environment
1882 variable @code{DATEMSK}.  This file should contain
1883 lines of valid format strings which could be passed to @code{strptime}.
1884
1885 The @code{getdate} function reads these format strings one after the
1886 other and tries to match the input string.  The first line which
1887 completely matches the input string is used.
1888
1889 Elements not initialized through the format string retain the values
1890 present at the time of the @code{getdate} function call.
1891
1892 The formats recognized by @code{getdate} are the same as for
1893 @code{strptime}.  See above for an explanation.  There are only a few
1894 extensions to the @code{strptime} behavior:
1895
1896 @itemize @bullet
1897 @item
1898 If the @code{%Z} format is given the broken-down time is based on the
1899 current time of the timezone matched, not of the current timezone of the
1900 runtime environment.
1901
1902 @emph{Note}: This is not implemented (currently).  The problem is that
1903 timezone names are not unique.  If a fixed timezone is assumed for a
1904 given string (say @code{EST} meaning US East Coast time), then uses for
1905 countries other than the USA will fail.  So far we have found no good
1906 solution to this.
1907
1908 @item
1909 If only the weekday is specified the selected day depends on the current
1910 date.  If the current weekday is greater or equal to the @code{tm_wday}
1911 value the current week's day is chosen, otherwise the day next week is chosen.
1912
1913 @item
1914 A similar heuristic is used when only the month is given and not the
1915 year.  If the month is greater than or equal to the current month, then
1916 the current year is used.  Otherwise it wraps to next year.  The first
1917 day of the month is assumed if one is not explicitly specified.
1918
1919 @item
1920 The current hour, minute, and second are used if the appropriate value is
1921 not set through the format.
1922
1923 @item
1924 If no date is given tomorrow's date is used if the time is
1925 smaller than the current time.  Otherwise today's date is taken.
1926 @end itemize
1927
1928 It should be noted that the format in the template file need not only
1929 contain format elements.  The following is a list of possible format
1930 strings (taken from the Unix standard):
1931
1932 @smallexample
1933 %m
1934 %A %B %d, %Y %H:%M:%S
1935 %A
1936 %B
1937 %m/%d/%y %I %p
1938 %d,%m,%Y %H:%M
1939 at %A the %dst of %B in %Y
1940 run job at %I %p,%B %dnd
1941 %A den %d. %B %Y %H.%M Uhr
1942 @end smallexample
1943
1944 As you can see, the template list can contain very specific strings like
1945 @code{run job at %I %p,%B %dnd}.  Using the above list of templates and
1946 assuming the current time is Mon Sep 22 12:19:47 EDT 1986 we can obtain the
1947 following results for the given input.
1948
1949 @multitable {xxxxxxxxxxxx} {xxxxxxxxxx} {xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx}
1950 @item        Input @tab     Match @tab Result
1951 @item        Mon @tab       %a @tab    Mon Sep 22 12:19:47 EDT 1986
1952 @item        Sun @tab       %a @tab    Sun Sep 28 12:19:47 EDT 1986
1953 @item        Fri @tab       %a @tab    Fri Sep 26 12:19:47 EDT 1986
1954 @item        September @tab %B @tab    Mon Sep 1 12:19:47 EDT 1986
1955 @item        January @tab   %B @tab    Thu Jan 1 12:19:47 EST 1987
1956 @item        December @tab  %B @tab    Mon Dec 1 12:19:47 EST 1986
1957 @item        Sep Mon @tab   %b %a @tab Mon Sep 1 12:19:47 EDT 1986
1958 @item        Jan Fri @tab   %b %a @tab Fri Jan 2 12:19:47 EST 1987
1959 @item        Dec Mon @tab   %b %a @tab Mon Dec 1 12:19:47 EST 1986
1960 @item        Jan Wed 1989 @tab  %b %a %Y @tab Wed Jan 4 12:19:47 EST 1989
1961 @item        Fri 9 @tab     %a %H @tab Fri Sep 26 09:00:00 EDT 1986
1962 @item        Feb 10:30 @tab %b %H:%S @tab Sun Feb 1 10:00:30 EST 1987
1963 @item        10:30 @tab     %H:%M @tab Tue Sep 23 10:30:00 EDT 1986
1964 @item        13:30 @tab     %H:%M @tab Mon Sep 22 13:30:00 EDT 1986
1965 @end multitable
1966
1967 The return value of the function is a pointer to a static variable of
1968 type @w{@code{struct tm}}, or a null pointer if an error occurred.  The
1969 result is only valid until the next @code{getdate} call, making this
1970 function unusable in multi-threaded applications.
1971
1972 The @code{errno} variable is @emph{not} changed.  Error conditions are
1973 stored in the global variable @code{getdate_err}.  See the
1974 description above for a list of the possible error values.
1975
1976 @emph{Warning:} The @code{getdate} function should @emph{never} be
1977 used in SUID-programs.  The reason is obvious: using the
1978 @code{DATEMSK} environment variable you can get the function to open
1979 any arbitrary file and chances are high that with some bogus input
1980 (such as a binary file) the program will crash.
1981 @end deftypefun
1982
1983 @comment time.h
1984 @comment GNU
1985 @deftypefun int getdate_r (const char *@var{string}, struct tm *@var{tp})
1986 The @code{getdate_r} function is the reentrant counterpart of
1987 @code{getdate}.  It does not use the global variable @code{getdate_err}
1988 to signal an error, but instead returns an error code.  The same error
1989 codes as described in the @code{getdate_err} documentation above are
1990 used, with 0 meaning success.
1991
1992 Moreover, @code{getdate_r} stores the broken-down time in the variable
1993 of type @code{struct tm} pointed to by the second argument, rather than
1994 in a static variable.
1995
1996 This function is not defined in the Unix standard.  Nevertheless it is
1997 available on some other Unix systems as well.
1998
1999 The warning against using @code{getdate} in SUID-programs applies to
2000 @code{getdate_r} as well.
2001 @end deftypefun
2002
2003 @node TZ Variable
2004 @subsection Specifying the Time Zone with @code{TZ}
2005
2006 In POSIX systems, a user can specify the time zone by means of the
2007 @code{TZ} environment variable.  For information about how to set
2008 environment variables, see @ref{Environment Variables}.  The functions
2009 for accessing the time zone are declared in @file{time.h}.
2010 @pindex time.h
2011 @cindex time zone
2012
2013 You should not normally need to set @code{TZ}.  If the system is
2014 configured properly, the default time zone will be correct.  You might
2015 set @code{TZ} if you are using a computer over a network from a
2016 different time zone, and would like times reported to you in the time
2017 zone local to you, rather than what is local to the computer.
2018
2019 In POSIX.1 systems the value of the @code{TZ} variable can be in one of
2020 three formats.  With the GNU C library, the most common format is the
2021 last one, which can specify a selection from a large database of time
2022 zone information for many regions of the world.  The first two formats
2023 are used to describe the time zone information directly, which is both
2024 more cumbersome and less precise.  But the POSIX.1 standard only
2025 specifies the details of the first two formats, so it is good to be
2026 familiar with them in case you come across a POSIX.1 system that doesn't
2027 support a time zone information database.
2028
2029 The first format is used when there is no Daylight Saving Time (or
2030 summer time) in the local time zone:
2031
2032 @smallexample
2033 @r{@var{std} @var{offset}}
2034 @end smallexample
2035
2036 The @var{std} string specifies the name of the time zone.  It must be
2037 three or more characters long and must not contain a leading colon,
2038 embedded digits, commas, nor plus and minus signs.  There is no space
2039 character separating the time zone name from the @var{offset}, so these
2040 restrictions are necessary to parse the specification correctly.
2041
2042 The @var{offset} specifies the time value you must add to the local time
2043 to get a Coordinated Universal Time value.  It has syntax like
2044 [@code{+}|@code{-}]@var{hh}[@code{:}@var{mm}[@code{:}@var{ss}]].  This
2045 is positive if the local time zone is west of the Prime Meridian and
2046 negative if it is east.  The hour must be between @code{0} and
2047 @code{23}, and the minute and seconds between @code{0} and @code{59}.
2048
2049 For example, here is how we would specify Eastern Standard Time, but
2050 without any Daylight Saving Time alternative:
2051
2052 @smallexample
2053 EST+5
2054 @end smallexample
2055
2056 The second format is used when there is Daylight Saving Time:
2057
2058 @smallexample
2059 @r{@var{std} @var{offset} @var{dst} [@var{offset}]@code{,}@var{start}[@code{/}@var{time}]@code{,}@var{end}[@code{/}@var{time}]}
2060 @end smallexample
2061
2062 The initial @var{std} and @var{offset} specify the standard time zone, as
2063 described above.  The @var{dst} string and @var{offset} specify the name
2064 and offset for the corresponding Daylight Saving Time zone; if the
2065 @var{offset} is omitted, it defaults to one hour ahead of standard time.
2066
2067 The remainder of the specification describes when Daylight Saving Time is
2068 in effect.  The @var{start} field is when Daylight Saving Time goes into
2069 effect and the @var{end} field is when the change is made back to standard
2070 time.  The following formats are recognized for these fields:
2071
2072 @table @code
2073 @item J@var{n}
2074 This specifies the Julian day, with @var{n} between @code{1} and @code{365}.
2075 February 29 is never counted, even in leap years.
2076
2077 @item @var{n}
2078 This specifies the Julian day, with @var{n} between @code{0} and @code{365}.
2079 February 29 is counted in leap years.
2080
2081 @item M@var{m}.@var{w}.@var{d}
2082 This specifies day @var{d} of week @var{w} of month @var{m}.  The day
2083 @var{d} must be between @code{0} (Sunday) and @code{6}.  The week
2084 @var{w} must be between @code{1} and @code{5}; week @code{1} is the
2085 first week in which day @var{d} occurs, and week @code{5} specifies the
2086 @emph{last} @var{d} day in the month.  The month @var{m} should be
2087 between @code{1} and @code{12}.
2088 @end table
2089
2090 The @var{time} fields specify when, in the local time currently in
2091 effect, the change to the other time occurs.  If omitted, the default is
2092 @code{02:00:00}.
2093
2094 For example, here is how you would specify the Eastern time zone in the
2095 United States, including the appropriate Daylight Saving Time and its dates
2096 of applicability.  The normal offset from UTC is 5 hours; since this is
2097 west of the prime meridian, the sign is positive.  Summer time begins on
2098 the first Sunday in April at 2:00am, and ends on the last Sunday in October
2099 at 2:00am.
2100
2101 @smallexample
2102 EST+5EDT,M4.1.0/2,M10.5.0/2
2103 @end smallexample
2104
2105 The schedule of Daylight Saving Time in any particular jurisdiction has
2106 changed over the years.  To be strictly correct, the conversion of dates
2107 and times in the past should be based on the schedule that was in effect
2108 then.  However, this format has no facilities to let you specify how the
2109 schedule has changed from year to year.  The most you can do is specify
2110 one particular schedule---usually the present day schedule---and this is
2111 used to convert any date, no matter when.  For precise time zone
2112 specifications, it is best to use the time zone information database
2113 (see below).
2114
2115 The third format looks like this:
2116
2117 @smallexample
2118 :@var{characters}
2119 @end smallexample
2120
2121 Each operating system interprets this format differently; in the GNU C
2122 library, @var{characters} is the name of a file which describes the time
2123 zone.
2124
2125 @pindex /etc/localtime
2126 @pindex localtime
2127 If the @code{TZ} environment variable does not have a value, the
2128 operation chooses a time zone by default.  In the GNU C library, the
2129 default time zone is like the specification @samp{TZ=:/etc/localtime}
2130 (or @samp{TZ=:/usr/local/etc/localtime}, depending on how GNU C library
2131 was configured; @pxref{Installation}).  Other C libraries use their own
2132 rule for choosing the default time zone, so there is little we can say
2133 about them.
2134
2135 @cindex time zone database
2136 @pindex /share/lib/zoneinfo
2137 @pindex zoneinfo
2138 If @var{characters} begins with a slash, it is an absolute file name;
2139 otherwise the library looks for the file
2140 @w{@file{/share/lib/zoneinfo/@var{characters}}}.  The @file{zoneinfo}
2141 directory contains data files describing local time zones in many
2142 different parts of the world.  The names represent major cities, with
2143 subdirectories for geographical areas; for example,
2144 @file{America/New_York}, @file{Europe/London}, @file{Asia/Hong_Kong}.
2145 These data files are installed by the system administrator, who also
2146 sets @file{/etc/localtime} to point to the data file for the local time
2147 zone.  The GNU C library comes with a large database of time zone
2148 information for most regions of the world, which is maintained by a
2149 community of volunteers and put in the public domain.
2150
2151 @node Time Zone Functions
2152 @subsection Functions and Variables for Time Zones
2153
2154 @comment time.h
2155 @comment POSIX.1
2156 @deftypevar {char *} tzname [2]
2157 The array @code{tzname} contains two strings, which are the standard
2158 names of the pair of time zones (standard and Daylight
2159 Saving) that the user has selected.  @code{tzname[0]} is the name of
2160 the standard time zone (for example, @code{"EST"}), and @code{tzname[1]}
2161 is the name for the time zone when Daylight Saving Time is in use (for
2162 example, @code{"EDT"}).  These correspond to the @var{std} and @var{dst}
2163 strings (respectively) from the @code{TZ} environment variable.  If
2164 Daylight Saving Time is never used, @code{tzname[1]} is the empty string.
2165
2166 The @code{tzname} array is initialized from the @code{TZ} environment
2167 variable whenever @code{tzset}, @code{ctime}, @code{strftime},
2168 @code{mktime}, or @code{localtime} is called.  If multiple abbreviations
2169 have been used (e.g. @code{"EWT"} and @code{"EDT"} for U.S. Eastern War
2170 Time and Eastern Daylight Time), the array contains the most recent
2171 abbreviation.
2172
2173 The @code{tzname} array is required for POSIX.1 compatibility, but in
2174 GNU programs it is better to use the @code{tm_zone} member of the
2175 broken-down time structure, since @code{tm_zone} reports the correct
2176 abbreviation even when it is not the latest one.
2177
2178 Though the strings are declared as @code{char *} the user must refrain
2179 from modifying these strings.  Modifying the strings will almost certainly
2180 lead to trouble.
2181
2182 @end deftypevar
2183
2184 @comment time.h
2185 @comment POSIX.1
2186 @deftypefun void tzset (void)
2187 The @code{tzset} function initializes the @code{tzname} variable from
2188 the value of the @code{TZ} environment variable.  It is not usually
2189 necessary for your program to call this function, because it is called
2190 automatically when you use the other time conversion functions that
2191 depend on the time zone.
2192 @end deftypefun
2193
2194 The following variables are defined for compatibility with System V
2195 Unix.  Like @code{tzname}, these variables are set by calling
2196 @code{tzset} or the other time conversion functions.
2197
2198 @comment time.h
2199 @comment SVID
2200 @deftypevar {long int} timezone
2201 This contains the difference between UTC and the latest local standard
2202 time, in seconds west of UTC.  For example, in the U.S. Eastern time
2203 zone, the value is @code{5*60*60}.  Unlike the @code{tm_gmtoff} member
2204 of the broken-down time structure, this value is not adjusted for
2205 daylight saving, and its sign is reversed.  In GNU programs it is better
2206 to use @code{tm_gmtoff}, since it contains the correct offset even when
2207 it is not the latest one.
2208 @end deftypevar
2209
2210 @comment time.h
2211 @comment SVID
2212 @deftypevar int daylight
2213 This variable has a nonzero value if Daylight Saving Time rules apply.
2214 A nonzero value does not necessarily mean that Daylight Saving Time is
2215 now in effect; it means only that Daylight Saving Time is sometimes in
2216 effect.
2217 @end deftypevar
2218
2219 @node Time Functions Example
2220 @subsection Time Functions Example
2221
2222 Here is an example program showing the use of some of the calendar time
2223 functions.
2224
2225 @smallexample
2226 @include strftim.c.texi
2227 @end smallexample
2228
2229 It produces output like this:
2230
2231 @smallexample
2232 Wed Jul 31 13:02:36 1991
2233 Today is Wednesday, July 31.
2234 The time is 01:02 PM.
2235 @end smallexample
2236
2237
2238 @node Setting an Alarm
2239 @section Setting an Alarm
2240
2241 The @code{alarm} and @code{setitimer} functions provide a mechanism for a
2242 process to interrupt itself in the future.  They do this by setting a
2243 timer; when the timer expires, the process receives a signal.
2244
2245 @cindex setting an alarm
2246 @cindex interval timer, setting
2247 @cindex alarms, setting
2248 @cindex timers, setting
2249 Each process has three independent interval timers available:
2250
2251 @itemize @bullet
2252 @item
2253 A real-time timer that counts elapsed time.  This timer sends a
2254 @code{SIGALRM} signal to the process when it expires.
2255 @cindex real-time timer
2256 @cindex timer, real-time
2257
2258 @item
2259 A virtual timer that counts processor time used by the process.  This timer
2260 sends a @code{SIGVTALRM} signal to the process when it expires.
2261 @cindex virtual timer
2262 @cindex timer, virtual
2263
2264 @item
2265 A profiling timer that counts both processor time used by the process,
2266 and processor time spent in system calls on behalf of the process.  This
2267 timer sends a @code{SIGPROF} signal to the process when it expires.
2268 @cindex profiling timer
2269 @cindex timer, profiling
2270
2271 This timer is useful for profiling in interpreters.  The interval timer
2272 mechanism does not have the fine granularity necessary for profiling
2273 native code.
2274 @c @xref{profil} !!!
2275 @end itemize
2276
2277 You can only have one timer of each kind set at any given time.  If you
2278 set a timer that has not yet expired, that timer is simply reset to the
2279 new value.
2280
2281 You should establish a handler for the appropriate alarm signal using
2282 @code{signal} or @code{sigaction} before issuing a call to
2283 @code{setitimer} or @code{alarm}.  Otherwise, an unusual chain of events
2284 could cause the timer to expire before your program establishes the
2285 handler.  In this case it would be terminated, since termination is the
2286 default action for the alarm signals.  @xref{Signal Handling}.
2287
2288 The @code{setitimer} function is the primary means for setting an alarm.
2289 This facility is declared in the header file @file{sys/time.h}.  The
2290 @code{alarm} function, declared in @file{unistd.h}, provides a somewhat
2291 simpler interface for setting the real-time timer.
2292 @pindex unistd.h
2293 @pindex sys/time.h
2294
2295 @comment sys/time.h
2296 @comment BSD
2297 @deftp {Data Type} {struct itimerval}
2298 This structure is used to specify when a timer should expire.  It contains
2299 the following members:
2300 @table @code
2301 @item struct timeval it_interval
2302 This is the period between successive timer interrupts.  If zero, the
2303 alarm will only be sent once.
2304
2305 @item struct timeval it_value
2306 This is the period between now and the first timer interrupt.  If zero,
2307 the alarm is disabled.
2308 @end table
2309
2310 The @code{struct timeval} data type is described in @ref{Elapsed Time}.
2311 @end deftp
2312
2313 @comment sys/time.h
2314 @comment BSD
2315 @deftypefun int setitimer (int @var{which}, struct itimerval *@var{new}, struct itimerval *@var{old})
2316 The @code{setitimer} function sets the timer specified by @var{which}
2317 according to @var{new}.  The @var{which} argument can have a value of
2318 @code{ITIMER_REAL}, @code{ITIMER_VIRTUAL}, or @code{ITIMER_PROF}.
2319
2320 If @var{old} is not a null pointer, @code{setitimer} returns information
2321 about any previous unexpired timer of the same kind in the structure it
2322 points to.
2323
2324 The return value is @code{0} on success and @code{-1} on failure.  The
2325 following @code{errno} error conditions are defined for this function:
2326
2327 @table @code
2328 @item EINVAL
2329 The timer period is too large.
2330 @end table
2331 @end deftypefun
2332
2333 @comment sys/time.h
2334 @comment BSD
2335 @deftypefun int getitimer (int @var{which}, struct itimerval *@var{old})
2336 The @code{getitimer} function stores information about the timer specified
2337 by @var{which} in the structure pointed at by @var{old}.
2338
2339 The return value and error conditions are the same as for @code{setitimer}.
2340 @end deftypefun
2341
2342 @comment sys/time.h
2343 @comment BSD
2344 @table @code
2345 @item ITIMER_REAL
2346 @findex ITIMER_REAL
2347 This constant can be used as the @var{which} argument to the
2348 @code{setitimer} and @code{getitimer} functions to specify the real-time
2349 timer.
2350
2351 @comment sys/time.h
2352 @comment BSD
2353 @item ITIMER_VIRTUAL
2354 @findex ITIMER_VIRTUAL
2355 This constant can be used as the @var{which} argument to the
2356 @code{setitimer} and @code{getitimer} functions to specify the virtual
2357 timer.
2358
2359 @comment sys/time.h
2360 @comment BSD
2361 @item ITIMER_PROF
2362 @findex ITIMER_PROF
2363 This constant can be used as the @var{which} argument to the
2364 @code{setitimer} and @code{getitimer} functions to specify the profiling
2365 timer.
2366 @end table
2367
2368 @comment unistd.h
2369 @comment POSIX.1
2370 @deftypefun {unsigned int} alarm (unsigned int @var{seconds})
2371 The @code{alarm} function sets the real-time timer to expire in
2372 @var{seconds} seconds.  If you want to cancel any existing alarm, you
2373 can do this by calling @code{alarm} with a @var{seconds} argument of
2374 zero.
2375
2376 The return value indicates how many seconds remain before the previous
2377 alarm would have been sent.  If there is no previous alarm, @code{alarm}
2378 returns zero.
2379 @end deftypefun
2380
2381 The @code{alarm} function could be defined in terms of @code{setitimer}
2382 like this:
2383
2384 @smallexample
2385 unsigned int
2386 alarm (unsigned int seconds)
2387 @{
2388   struct itimerval old, new;
2389   new.it_interval.tv_usec = 0;
2390   new.it_interval.tv_sec = 0;
2391   new.it_value.tv_usec = 0;
2392   new.it_value.tv_sec = (long int) seconds;
2393   if (setitimer (ITIMER_REAL, &new, &old) < 0)
2394     return 0;
2395   else
2396     return old.it_value.tv_sec;
2397 @}
2398 @end smallexample
2399
2400 There is an example showing the use of the @code{alarm} function in
2401 @ref{Handler Returns}.
2402
2403 If you simply want your process to wait for a given number of seconds,
2404 you should use the @code{sleep} function.  @xref{Sleeping}.
2405
2406 You shouldn't count on the signal arriving precisely when the timer
2407 expires.  In a multiprocessing environment there is typically some
2408 amount of delay involved.
2409
2410 @strong{Portability Note:} The @code{setitimer} and @code{getitimer}
2411 functions are derived from BSD Unix, while the @code{alarm} function is
2412 specified by the POSIX.1 standard.  @code{setitimer} is more powerful than
2413 @code{alarm}, but @code{alarm} is more widely used.
2414
2415 @node Sleeping
2416 @section Sleeping
2417
2418 The function @code{sleep} gives a simple way to make the program wait
2419 for a short interval.  If your program doesn't use signals (except to
2420 terminate), then you can expect @code{sleep} to wait reliably throughout
2421 the specified interval.  Otherwise, @code{sleep} can return sooner if a
2422 signal arrives; if you want to wait for a given interval regardless of
2423 signals, use @code{select} (@pxref{Waiting for I/O}) and don't specify
2424 any descriptors to wait for.
2425 @c !!! select can get EINTR; using SA_RESTART makes sleep win too.
2426
2427 @comment unistd.h
2428 @comment POSIX.1
2429 @deftypefun {unsigned int} sleep (unsigned int @var{seconds})
2430 The @code{sleep} function waits for @var{seconds} or until a signal
2431 is delivered, whichever happens first.
2432
2433 If @code{sleep} function returns because the requested interval is over,
2434 it returns a value of zero.  If it returns because of delivery of a
2435 signal, its return value is the remaining time in the sleep interval.
2436
2437 The @code{sleep} function is declared in @file{unistd.h}.
2438 @end deftypefun
2439
2440 Resist the temptation to implement a sleep for a fixed amount of time by
2441 using the return value of @code{sleep}, when nonzero, to call
2442 @code{sleep} again.  This will work with a certain amount of accuracy as
2443 long as signals arrive infrequently.  But each signal can cause the
2444 eventual wakeup time to be off by an additional second or so.  Suppose a
2445 few signals happen to arrive in rapid succession by bad luck---there is
2446 no limit on how much this could shorten or lengthen the wait.
2447
2448 Instead, compute the calendar time at which the program should stop
2449 waiting, and keep trying to wait until that calendar time.  This won't
2450 be off by more than a second.  With just a little more work, you can use
2451 @code{select} and make the waiting period quite accurate.  (Of course,
2452 heavy system load can cause additional unavoidable delays---unless the
2453 machine is dedicated to one application, there is no way you can avoid
2454 this.)
2455
2456 On some systems, @code{sleep} can do strange things if your program uses
2457 @code{SIGALRM} explicitly.  Even if @code{SIGALRM} signals are being
2458 ignored or blocked when @code{sleep} is called, @code{sleep} might
2459 return prematurely on delivery of a @code{SIGALRM} signal.  If you have
2460 established a handler for @code{SIGALRM} signals and a @code{SIGALRM}
2461 signal is delivered while the process is sleeping, the action taken
2462 might be just to cause @code{sleep} to return instead of invoking your
2463 handler.  And, if @code{sleep} is interrupted by delivery of a signal
2464 whose handler requests an alarm or alters the handling of @code{SIGALRM},
2465 this handler and @code{sleep} will interfere.
2466
2467 On the GNU system, it is safe to use @code{sleep} and @code{SIGALRM} in
2468 the same program, because @code{sleep} does not work by means of
2469 @code{SIGALRM}.
2470
2471 @comment time.h
2472 @comment POSIX.1
2473 @deftypefun int nanosleep (const struct timespec *@var{requested_time}, struct timespec *@var{remaining})
2474 If resolution to seconds is not enough the @code{nanosleep} function can
2475 be used.  As the name suggests the sleep interval can be specified in
2476 nanoseconds.  The actual elapsed time of the sleep interval might be
2477 longer since the system rounds the elapsed time you request up to the
2478 next integer multiple of the actual resolution the system can deliver.
2479
2480 *@code{requested_time} is the elapsed time of the interval you want to
2481 sleep.
2482
2483 The function returns as *@code{remaining} the elapsed time left in the
2484 interval for which you requested to sleep.  If the interval completed
2485 without getting interrupted by a signal, this is zero.
2486
2487 @code{struct timespec} is described in @xref{Elapsed Time}.    
2488
2489 If the function returns because the interval is over the return value is
2490 zero.  If the function returns @math{-1} the global variable @var{errno}
2491 is set to the following values:
2492
2493 @table @code
2494 @item EINTR
2495 The call was interrupted because a signal was delivered to the thread.
2496 If the @var{remaining} parameter is not the null pointer the structure
2497 pointed to by @var{remaining} is updated to contain the remaining
2498 elapsed time.
2499
2500 @item EINVAL
2501 The nanosecond value in the @var{requested_time} parameter contains an
2502 illegal value.  Either the value is negative or greater than or equal to
2503 1000 million.
2504 @end table
2505
2506 This function is a cancellation point in multi-threaded programs.  This
2507 is a problem if the thread allocates some resources (like memory, file
2508 descriptors, semaphores or whatever) at the time @code{nanosleep} is
2509 called.  If the thread gets canceled these resources stay allocated
2510 until the program ends.  To avoid this calls to @code{nanosleep} should
2511 be protected using cancellation handlers.
2512 @c ref pthread_cleanup_push / pthread_cleanup_pop
2513
2514 The @code{nanosleep} function is declared in @file{time.h}.
2515 @end deftypefun
2516
2517