Test for calling pthread_join in a canceled thread where the call would
[kopensolaris-gnu/glibc.git] / INSTALL
diff --git a/INSTALL b/INSTALL
index e424610..8d61b3e 100644 (file)
--- a/INSTALL
+++ b/INSTALL
@@ -1,5 +1,5 @@
-Appendix A Installing the GNU C Library
-***************************************
+Installing the GNU C Library
+****************************
 
 Before you do anything else, you should read the file `FAQ' located at
 the top level of the source tree.  This file answers common questions
@@ -9,46 +9,37 @@ installation.  It is updated more frequently than this manual.
    Features can be added to GNU Libc via "add-on" bundles.  These are
 separate tar files, which you unpack into the top level of the source
 tree.  Then you give `configure' the `--enable-add-ons' option to
-activate them, and they will be compiled into the library.  As of the
-2.2 release, one important component of glibc is distributed as
-"official" add-ons: the linuxthreads add-on.  Unless you are doing an
-unusual installation, you should get this.
-
-   Support for POSIX threads is maintained by someone else, so it's in a
-separate package.  It is only available for GNU/Linux systems, but this
-will change in the future.  Get it from the same place you got the main
-bundle; the file is `glibc-linuxthreads-VERSION.tar.gz'.
+activate them, and they will be compiled into the library.
 
    You will need recent versions of several GNU tools: definitely GCC
 and GNU Make, and possibly others.  *Note Tools for Compilation::,
 below.
 
-A.1 Configuring and compiling GNU Libc
-======================================
+Configuring and compiling GNU Libc
+==================================
 
-GNU libc can be compiled in the source directory, but we strongly advise
-building it in a separate build directory.  For example, if you have
-unpacked the glibc sources in `/src/gnu/glibc-2.3', create a directory
+GNU libc cannot be compiled in the source directory.  You must build it
+in a separate build directory.  For example, if you have unpacked the
+glibc sources in `/src/gnu/glibc-2.4', create a directory
 `/src/gnu/glibc-build' to put the object files in.  This allows
-removing the whole build directory in case an error occurs, which is the
-safest way to get a fresh start and should always be done.
+removing the whole build directory in case an error occurs, which is
+the safest way to get a fresh start and should always be done.
 
    From your object directory, run the shell script `configure' located
 at the top level of the source tree.  In the scenario above, you'd type
 
-     $ ../glibc-2.3/configure ARGS...
+     $ ../glibc-2.4/configure ARGS...
 
-   Please note that even if you're building in a separate build
+   Please note that even though you're building in a separate build
 directory, the compilation needs to modify a few files in the source
 directory, especially some files in the manual subdirectory.
 
-`configure' takes many options, but you can get away with knowing only
-two: `--prefix' and `--enable-add-ons'.  The `--prefix' option tells
-`configure' where you want glibc installed. This defaults to
-`/usr/local'.  The `--enable-add-ons' option tells `configure' to use
-all the add-on bundles it finds in the source directory.  Since
-important functionality is provided in add-ons, you should always
-specify this option.
+`configure' takes many options, but the only one that is usually
+mandatory is `--prefix'.  This option tells `configure' where you want
+glibc installed.  This defaults to `/usr/local', but the normal setting
+to install as the standard system library is `--prefix=/usr' for
+GNU/Linux systems and `--prefix=' (an empty prefix) for GNU/Hurd
+systems.
 
    It may also be useful to set the CC and CFLAGS variables in the
 environment when running `configure'.  CC selects the C compiler that
@@ -80,12 +71,16 @@ will be used, and CFLAGS sets optimization options for the compiler.
      ones found in `/usr/include'.
 
 `--enable-add-ons[=LIST]'
-     Enable add-on packages in your source tree.  If this option is
+     Specify add-on packages to include in the build.  If this option is
      specified with no list, it enables all the add-on packages it
-     finds.  If you do not wish to use some add-on packages that you
-     have present in your source tree, give this option a list of the
-     add-ons that you _do_ want used, like this:
-     `--enable-add-ons=linuxthreads'
+     finds in the main source directory; this is the default behavior.
+     You may specify an explicit list of add-ons to use in LIST,
+     separated by spaces or commas (if you use spaces, remember to
+     quote them from the shell).  Each add-on in LIST can be an
+     absolute directory name or can be a directory name relative to the
+     main source directory, or relative to the build directory (that
+     is, the current working directory).  For example,
+     `--enable-add-ons=nptl,../glibc-libidn-2.4'.
 
 `--enable-kernel=VERSION'
      This option is currently only useful on GNU/Linux systems.  The
@@ -168,11 +163,10 @@ produce a lot of output, some of which may look like errors from `make'
 but isn't.  Look for error messages from `make' containing `***'.
 Those indicate that something is seriously wrong.
 
-   The compilation process can take several hours.  Expect at least two
-hours for the default configuration on i586 for GNU/Linux.  For Hurd,
-times are much longer.  Some complex modules may take a very long time
-to compile, as much as several minutes on slower machines.  Do not
-panic if the compiler appears to hang.
+   The compilation process can take a long time, depending on the
+configuration and the speed of your machine.  Some complex modules may
+take a very long time to compile, as much as several minutes on slower
+machines.  Do not panic if the compiler appears to hang.
 
    If you want to run a parallel make, simply pass the `-j' option with
 an appropriate numeric parameter to `make'.  You need a recent GNU
@@ -214,8 +208,8 @@ library.  You may need to set `AR' and `RANLIB' to cross-compiling
 versions of `ar' and `ranlib' if the native tools are not configured to
 work with object files for the target you configured for.
 
-A.2 Installing the C Library
-============================
+Installing the C Library
+========================
 
 To install the library and its header files, and the Info files of the
 manual, type `env LANGUAGE=C LC_ALL=C make install'.  This will build
@@ -288,8 +282,8 @@ which is in `/usr/share/zoneinfo' to the file `/etc/localtime'.  For
 Germany, you might execute `ln -s /usr/share/zoneinfo/Europe/Berlin
 /etc/localtime'.
 
-A.3 Recommended Tools for Compilation
-=====================================
+Recommended Tools for Compilation
+=================================
 
 We recommend installing the following GNU tools before attempting to
 build the GNU C library:
@@ -302,11 +296,18 @@ build the GNU C library:
      recommend GNU `make' version 3.79.  All earlier versions have
      severe bugs or lack features.
 
-   * GCC 3.2 or newer
+   * GCC 3.4 or newer, GCC 4.1 recommended
 
      The GNU C library can only be compiled with the GNU C compiler
-     family.  As of the 2.3 release, GCC 3.2 or higher is required.  As
-     of this writing, GCC 3.2 is the compiler we advise to use.
+     family.  For the 2.3 releases, GCC 3.2 or higher is required; GCC
+     3.4 is the compiler we advise to use for 2.3 versions.  For the
+     2.4 release, GCC 3.4 or higher is required; as of this writing,
+     GCC 4.1 is the compiler we advise to use for current versions.  On
+     certain machines including `powerpc64', compilers prior to GCC 4.0
+     have bugs that prevent them compiling the C library code in the
+     2.4 release.  On other machines, GCC 4.1 is required to build the C
+     library with support for the correct `long double' type format;
+     these include `powerpc' (32 bit), `s390' and `s390x'.
 
      You can use whatever compiler you like to compile programs that
      use GNU libc, but be aware that both GCC 2.7 and 2.8 have bugs in
@@ -316,7 +317,7 @@ build the GNU C library:
      Check the FAQ for any special compiler issues on particular
      platforms.
 
-   * GNU `binutils' 2.13 or later
+   * GNU `binutils' 2.15 or later
 
      You must use GNU `binutils' (as and ld) to build the GNU C library.
      No other assembler or linker has the necessary functionality at the
@@ -330,11 +331,10 @@ build the GNU C library:
      installation mechanism for the info files is not present or works
      differently.
 
-   * GNU `awk' 3.0, or some other POSIX awk
+   * GNU `awk' 3.0, or higher
 
-     `Awk' is used in several places to generate files.  The scripts
-     should work with any POSIX-compliant `awk' implementation; `gawk'
-     3.0 and `mawk' 1.3 are known to work.
+     `Awk' is used in several places to generate files.  `gawk' 3.0 is
+     known to work.
 
    * Perl 5
 
@@ -362,80 +362,8 @@ and if you change any of the message translation files you will need
 You may also need these packages if you upgrade your source tree using
 patches, although we try to avoid this.
 
-A.4 Supported Configurations
-============================
-
-The GNU C Library currently supports configurations that match the
-following patterns:
-
-     alpha*-*-linux
-     arm-*-linux
-     cris-*-linux
-     hppa-*-linux
-     iX86-*-gnu
-     iX86-*-linux
-     ia64-*-linux
-     m68k-*-linux
-     mips*-*-linux
-     powerpc-*-linux
-     s390-*-linux
-     s390x-*-linux
-     sparc-*-linux
-     sparc64-*-linux
-     x86_64-*-linux
-
-   Former releases of this library (version 2.1 and/or 2.0) used to run
-on the following configurations:
-
-     arm-*-linuxaout
-     arm-*-none
-
-   Very early releases (version 1.09.1 and perhaps earlier versions)
-used to run on the following configurations:
-
-     alpha-dec-osf1
-     alpha-*-linuxecoff
-     iX86-*-bsd4.3
-     iX86-*-isc2.2
-     iX86-*-isc3.N
-     iX86-*-sco3.2
-     iX86-*-sco3.2v4
-     iX86-*-sysv
-     iX86-*-sysv4
-     iX86-force_cpu386-none
-     iX86-sequent-bsd
-     i960-nindy960-none
-     m68k-hp-bsd4.3
-     m68k-mvme135-none
-     m68k-mvme136-none
-     m68k-sony-newsos3
-     m68k-sony-newsos4
-     m68k-sun-sunos4.N
-     mips-dec-ultrix4.N
-     mips-sgi-irix4.N
-     sparc-sun-solaris2.N
-     sparc-sun-sunos4.N
-
-   Since no one has volunteered to test and fix these configurations,
-they are not supported at the moment.  They probably don't compile;
-they definitely don't work anymore.  Porting the library is not hard.
-If you are interested in doing a port, please contact the glibc
-maintainers.  Start at `http://www.gnu.org/software/libc/' and read the
-references there on how to go about getting involved and contacting the
-developers.
-
-   Valid cases of `iX86' include `i386', `i486', `i586', and `i686'.
-All of those configurations produce a library that can run on this
-processor and newer processors.  The GCC compiler by default generates
-code that's optimized for the machine it's configured for and will use
-the instructions available on that machine.  For example if your GCC is
-configured for `i686', gcc will optimize for `i686' and might issue
-some `i686' specific instructions.  To generate code for other models,
-you have to configure for that model and give GCC the appropriate
-`-march=' and `-mcpu=' compiler switches via CFLAGS.
-
-A.5 Specific advice for GNU/Linux systems
-=========================================
+Specific advice for GNU/Linux systems
+=====================================
 
 If you are installing GNU libc on a GNU/Linux system, you need to have
 the header files from a 2.2 or newer kernel around for reference.  For
@@ -489,8 +417,8 @@ kernel-side thread support.  `nscd' happens to hit these bugs
 particularly hard, but you might have problems with any threaded
 program.
 
-A.6 Reporting Bugs
-==================
+Reporting Bugs
+==============
 
 There are probably bugs in the GNU C library.  There are certainly
 errors and omissions in this manual.  If you report them, they will get