Finish gettext section.
[kopensolaris-gnu/glibc.git] / manual / users.texi
index 7c8a00f..ca9dee4 100644 (file)
@@ -1,6 +1,5 @@
-@node Users and Groups, System Information, Job Control, Top
+@node Users and Groups
 @chapter Users and Groups
-@cindex persona
 
 Every user who can log in on the system is identified by a unique number
 called the @dfn{user ID}.  Each process has an effective user ID which
@@ -25,29 +24,37 @@ database of all the defined groups.  There are library functions you
 can use to examine these databases.
 
 @menu
-* User and Group IDs::          Each user has a unique numeric ID; likewise for groups.
+* User and Group IDs::          Each user has a unique numeric ID;
+                                likewise for groups.
 * Process Persona::             The user IDs and group IDs of a process.
 * Why Change Persona::          Why a program might need to change
-                        its user and/or group IDs.
-* How Change Persona::          Restrictions on changing the user and group IDs.
-* Reading Persona::             How to examine the process's user and group IDs.
-* Setting User ID::             
-* Setting Groups::              
-* Enable/Disable Setuid::       
-* Setuid Program Example::      Setuid Program Example
-* Tips for Setuid::             
+                                its user and/or group IDs.
+* How Change Persona::          Changing the user and group IDs.
+* Reading Persona::             How to examine the user and group IDs.
+
+* Setting User ID::             Functions for setting the user ID.
+* Setting Groups::              Functions for setting the group IDs.
+
+* Enable/Disable Setuid::       Turning setuid access on and off.
+* Setuid Program Example::      The pertinent parts of one sample program.
+* Tips for Setuid::             How to avoid granting unlimited access.
+
 * Who Logged In::               Getting the name of the user who logged in,
-                        or of the real user ID of the current process.
+                                or of the real user ID of the current process.
+
+* User Accounting Database::    Keeping information about users and various
+                                 actions in databases.
 
 * User Database::               Functions and data structures for
-                         accessing the user database.
+                                accessing the user database.
 * Group Database::              Functions and data structures for
-                         accessing the group database.
+                                accessing the group database.
+* Netgroup Database::           Functions for accessing the netgroup database.
 * Database Example::            Example program showing use of database
-                        inquiry functions.
+                                inquiry functions.
 @end menu
 
-@node User and Group IDs, Process Persona,  , Users and Groups
+@node User and Group IDs
 @section User and Group IDs
 
 @cindex login name
@@ -68,11 +75,15 @@ not accessible to users who are not a member of that group.  Each group
 has a @dfn{group name} and @dfn{group ID}.  @xref{Group Database},
 for how to find information about a group ID or group name.
 
-@node Process Persona, Why Change Persona, User and Group IDs, Users and Groups
+@node Process Persona
 @section The Persona of a Process
-
+@cindex persona
 @cindex effective user ID
 @cindex effective group ID
+
+@c !!! bogus; not single ID.  set of effective group IDs (and, in GNU,
+@c set of effective UIDs) determines privilege.  lying here and then
+@c telling the truth below is confusing.
 At any time, each process has a single user ID and a group ID which
 determine the privileges of the process.  These are collectively called
 the @dfn{persona} of the process, because they determine ``who it is''
@@ -80,8 +91,9 @@ for purposes of access control.  These IDs are also called the
 @dfn{effective user ID} and @dfn{effective group ID} of the process.
 
 Your login shell starts out with a persona which consists of your user
-ID and your default group ID.  In normal circumstances. all your other
-processes inherit these values.
+ID and your default group ID.
+@c !!! also supplementary group IDs.
+In normal circumstances, all your other processes inherit these values.
 
 @cindex real user ID
 @cindex real group ID
@@ -92,12 +104,12 @@ control, so we do not consider them part of the persona.  But they are
 also important.
 
 Both the real and effective user ID can be changed during the lifetime
-of a process.  @xref{Changing Persona}.
+of a process.  @xref{Why Change Persona}.
 
 @cindex supplementary group IDs
 In addition, a user can belong to multiple groups, so the persona
-includes have @dfn{supplementary group IDs} that also contribute to
-access permission.
+includes @dfn{supplementary group IDs} that also contribute to access
+permission.
 
 For details on how a process's effective user IDs and group IDs affect
 its permission to access files, see @ref{Access Permission}.
@@ -105,18 +117,18 @@ its permission to access files, see @ref{Access Permission}.
 The user ID of a process also controls permissions for sending signals
 using the @code{kill} function.  @xref{Signaling Another Process}.
 
-@node Why Change Persona, How Change Persona, Process Persona, Users and Groups
+@node Why Change Persona
 @section Why Change the Persona of a Process?
 
 The most obvious situation where it is necessary for a process to change
 its user and/or group IDs is the @code{login} program.  When
 @code{login} starts running, its user ID is @code{root}.  Its job is to
 start a shell whose user and group IDs are those of the user who is
-logging in.  In fact, @code{login} must set the real user and group IDs
-as well as its persona.  But this is a special case.
+logging in.  (To accomplish this fully, @code{login} must set the real
+user and group IDs as well as its persona.  But this is a special case.)
 
 The more common case of changing persona is when an ordinary user
-programs needs access to a resource that wouldn't ordinarily be
+program needs access to a resource that wouldn't ordinarily be
 accessible to the user actually running it.
 
 For example, you may have a file that is controlled by your program but
@@ -131,14 +143,14 @@ program itself needs to be able to update this file no matter who is
 running it, but if users can write the file without going through the
 game, they can give themselves any scores they like.  Some people
 consider this undesirable, or even reprehensible.  It can be prevented
-by creating a new user ID and login name (say, @samp{games}) to own the
+by creating a new user ID and login name (say, @code{games}) to own the
 scores file, and make the file writable only by this user.  Then, when
 the game program wants to update this file, it can change its effective
-user ID to be that for @samp{games}.  In effect, the program must
-adopt the persona of @samp{games} so it can write the scores file.
+user ID to be that for @code{games}.  In effect, the program must
+adopt the persona of @code{games} so it can write the scores file.
 
-@node How Change Persona, Reading Persona, Why Change Persona, Users and Groups
-@section How an Application can Change Persona
+@node How Change Persona
+@section How an Application Can Change Persona
 @cindex @code{setuid} programs
 
 The ability to change the persona of a process can be a source of
@@ -146,15 +158,15 @@ unintentional privacy violations, or even intentional abuse.  Because of
 the potential for problems, changing persona is restricted to special
 circumstances.
 
-You can't just arbitrarily set your user ID or group ID to anything you
-want; only privileged users can do that.  Instead, the normal way for a
+You can't arbitrarily set your user ID or group ID to anything you want;
+only privileged processes can do that.  Instead, the normal way for a
 program to change its persona is that it has been set up in advance to
-change to a particular user or group.  This is the function of the suid
-and sgid bits of a file's access mode.
+change to a particular user or group.  This is the function of the setuid
+and setgid bits of a file's access mode.  @xref{Permission Bits}.
 
-When the suid bit of an executable file is set, executing that file
+When the setuid bit of an executable file is set, executing that file
 automatically changes the effective user ID to the user that owns the
-file.  Likewise, executing a file whose sgid bit is set changes the
+file.  Likewise, executing a file whose setgid bit is set changes the
 effective group ID to the group of the file.  @xref{Executing a File}.
 Creating a file that changes to a particular user or group ID thus
 requires full access to that user or group ID.
@@ -166,7 +178,9 @@ A process can always change its effective user (or group) ID back to its
 real ID.  Programs do this so as to turn off their special privileges
 when they are not needed, which makes for more robustness.
 
-@node Reading Persona, Setting User ID, How Change Persona, Users and Groups
+@c !!! talk about _POSIX_SAVED_IDS
+
+@node Reading Persona
 @section Reading the Persona of a Process
 
 Here are detailed descriptions of the functions for reading the user and
@@ -180,37 +194,37 @@ facilities, you must include the header files @file{sys/types.h} and
 @comment POSIX.1
 @deftp {Data Type} uid_t
 This is an integer data type used to represent user IDs.  In the GNU
-library, this is an alias for @code{unsigned short int}.
+library, this is an alias for @code{unsigned int}.
 @end deftp
 
 @comment sys/types.h
 @comment POSIX.1
 @deftp {Data Type} gid_t
 This is an integer data type used to represent group IDs.  In the GNU
-library, this is an alias for @code{unsigned short int}.
+library, this is an alias for @code{unsigned int}.
 @end deftp
 
 @comment unistd.h
 @comment POSIX.1
-@deftypefun uid_t getuid ()
+@deftypefun uid_t getuid (void)
 The @code{getuid} function returns the real user ID of the process.
 @end deftypefun
 
 @comment unistd.h
 @comment POSIX.1
-@deftypefun gid_t getgid ()
+@deftypefun gid_t getgid (void)
 The @code{getgid} function returns the real group ID of the process.
 @end deftypefun
 
 @comment unistd.h
 @comment POSIX.1
-@deftypefun uid_t geteuid ()
+@deftypefun uid_t geteuid (void)
 The @code{geteuid} function returns the effective user ID of the process.
 @end deftypefun
 
 @comment unistd.h
 @comment POSIX.1
-@deftypefun gid_t getegid ()
+@deftypefun gid_t getegid (void)
 The @code{getegid} function returns the effective group ID of the process.
 @end deftypefun
 
@@ -225,44 +239,53 @@ the total number of supplementary group IDs, then @code{getgroups}
 returns a value of @code{-1} and @code{errno} is set to @code{EINVAL}.
 
 If @var{count} is zero, then @code{getgroups} just returns the total
-number of supplementary group IDs.
+number of supplementary group IDs.  On systems that do not support
+supplementary groups, this will always be zero.
 
 Here's how to use @code{getgroups} to read all the supplementary group
 IDs:
 
-@example
+@smallexample
+@group
 gid_t *
-read_all_groups ()
+read_all_groups (void)
 @{
-  int ngroups = getgroups (0, 0);
-  gid_t *groups = (gid_t *) xmalloc (ngroups * sizeof (gid_t));
+  int ngroups = getgroups (0, NULL);
+  gid_t *groups
+    = (gid_t *) xmalloc (ngroups * sizeof (gid_t));
   int val = getgroups (ngroups, groups);
   if (val < 0)
-    return 0;
+    @{
+      free (groups);
+      return NULL;
+    @}
   return groups;
 @}
-@end example
+@end group
+@end smallexample
 @end deftypefun
 
-@node Setting User ID, Setting Groups, Reading Persona, Users and Groups
+@node Setting User ID
 @section Setting the User ID
 
-This section describes the functions for altering the user ID
-of a process.  To use these facilities, you must include the header
-files @file{sys/types.h} and @file{unistd.h}.
+This section describes the functions for altering the user ID (real
+and/or effective) of a process.  To use these facilities, you must
+include the header files @file{sys/types.h} and @file{unistd.h}.
 @pindex unistd.h
 @pindex sys/types.h
 
 @comment unistd.h
 @comment POSIX.1
-@deftypefun int setuid (@var{newuid})
+@deftypefun int setuid (uid_t @var{newuid})
 This function sets both the real and effective user ID of the process
 to @var{newuid}, provided that the process has appropriate privileges.
+@c !!! also sets saved-id
 
 If the process is not privileged, then @var{newuid} must either be equal
-to the real user ID or the saved user ID (but only if the system
-supports the @code{_POSIX_SAVED_IDS} feature).  In this case,
-@code{setuid} sets only the effective user ID and not the real user ID.
+to the real user ID or the saved user ID (if the system supports the
+@code{_POSIX_SAVED_IDS} feature).  In this case, @code{setuid} sets only
+the effective user ID and not the real user ID.
+@c !!! xref to discussion of _POSIX_SAVED_IDS
 
 The @code{setuid} function returns a value of @code{0} to indicate
 successful completion, and a value of @code{-1} to indicate an error.
@@ -275,22 +298,24 @@ The value of the @var{newuid} argument is invalid.
 
 @item EPERM
 The process does not have the appropriate privileges; you do not
-have permission to change to the specified ID.  @xref{Controlling Process
-Privileges}.
+have permission to change to the specified ID.
 @end table
 @end deftypefun
 
 @comment unistd.h
 @comment BSD
-@deftypefun int setreuid (int @var{ruid}, int @var{euid})
-This function sets the real user ID of the process to @var{ruid} and
-the effective user ID to @var{euid}.
-
-The @code{setreuid} function is provided for compatibility with 4.2 BSD
-Unix, which does not support saved IDs.  You can use this function to
-swap the effective and real user IDs of the process.  (Privileged users
-can make other changes as well.)  If saved IDs are supported, you should
-use that feature instead of this function.
+@deftypefun int setreuid (uid_t @var{ruid}, uid_t @var{euid})
+This function sets the real user ID of the process to @var{ruid} and the
+effective user ID to @var{euid}.  If @var{ruid} is @code{-1}, it means
+not to change the real user ID; likewise if @var{euid} is @code{-1}, it
+means not to change the effective user ID.
+
+The @code{setreuid} function exists for compatibility with 4.3 BSD Unix,
+which does not support saved IDs.  You can use this function to swap the
+effective and real user IDs of the process.  (Privileged processes are
+not limited to this particular usage.)  If saved IDs are supported, you
+should use that feature instead of this function.  @xref{Enable/Disable
+Setuid}.
 
 The return value is @code{0} on success and @code{-1} on failure.
 The following @code{errno} error conditions are defined for this
@@ -299,19 +324,25 @@ function:
 @table @code
 @item EPERM
 The process does not have the appropriate privileges; you do not
-have permission to change to the specified ID.  @xref{Controlling Process
-Privileges}.
+have permission to change to the specified ID.
 @end table
 @end deftypefun
 
-@node Setting Groups, Enable/Disable Setuid, Setting User ID, Users and Groups
+@node Setting Groups
 @section Setting the Group IDs
 
+This section describes the functions for altering the group IDs (real
+and effective) of a process.  To use these facilities, you must include
+the header files @file{sys/types.h} and @file{unistd.h}.
+@pindex unistd.h
+@pindex sys/types.h
+
 @comment unistd.h
 @comment POSIX.1
-@deftypefun int setgid (@var{newgid})
+@deftypefun int setgid (gid_t @var{newgid})
 This function sets both the real and effective group ID of the process
 to @var{newgid}, provided that the process has appropriate privileges.
+@c !!! also sets saved-id
 
 If the process is not privileged, then @var{newgid} must either be equal
 to the real group ID or the saved group ID.  In this case, @code{setgid}
@@ -321,24 +352,26 @@ The return values and error conditions for @code{setgid} are the same
 as those for @code{setuid}.
 @end deftypefun
 
-
 @comment unistd.h
 @comment BSD
-@deftypefun int setregid (int @var{rgid}, int @var{egid})
+@deftypefun int setregid (gid_t @var{rgid}, fid_t @var{egid})
 This function sets the real group ID of the process to @var{rgid} and
-the effective group ID to @var{egid}.
+the effective group ID to @var{egid}.  If @var{rgid} is @code{-1}, it
+means not to change the real group ID; likewise if @var{egid} is
+@code{-1}, it means not to change the effective group ID.
 
-The @code{setregid} function is provided for compatibility with 4.2 BSD
+The @code{setregid} function is provided for compatibility with 4.3 BSD
 Unix, which does not support saved IDs.  You can use this function to
-swap the effective and real group IDs of the process.  (Privileged users
-can make other changes.)  If saved IDs are supported, you should make use 
-of that feature instead of using this function.
+swap the effective and real group IDs of the process.  (Privileged
+processes are not limited to this usage.)  If saved IDs are supported,
+you should use that feature instead of using this function.
+@xref{Enable/Disable Setuid}.
 
 The return values and error conditions for @code{setregid} are the same
 as those for @code{setreuid}.
 @end deftypefun
 
-The GNU system also lets privileged processes change their supplementary 
+The GNU system also lets privileged processes change their supplementary
 group IDs.  To use @code{setgroups} or @code{initgroups}, your programs
 should include the header file @file{grp.h}.
 @pindex grp.h
@@ -366,58 +399,77 @@ The calling process is not privileged.
 The @code{initgroups} function effectively calls @code{setgroups} to
 set the process's supplementary group IDs to be the normal default for
 the user name @var{user}.  The group ID @var{gid} is also included.
+@c !!! explain that this works by reading the group file looking for
+@c groups USER is a member of.
 @end deftypefun
 
-@node Enable/Disable Setuid, Setuid Program Example, Setting Groups, Users and Groups
-@section Turning Setuid Access On and Off
+@node Enable/Disable Setuid
+@section Enabling and Disabling Setuid Access
 
-You can use @code{setreuid} to swap the real and effective user IDs of
-the process, as follows:
+A typical setuid program does not need its special access all of the
+time.  It's a good idea to turn off this access when it isn't needed,
+so it can't possibly give unintended access.
 
-@example
-setreuid (geteuid (), getuid ());
-@end example
+If the system supports the saved user ID feature, you can accomplish
+this with @code{setuid}.  When the game program starts, its real user ID
+is @code{jdoe}, its effective user ID is @code{games}, and its saved
+user ID is also @code{games}.  The program should record both user ID
+values once at the beginning, like this:
 
-@noindent
-This special case is always allowed---it cannot fail.  A @code{setuid}
-program can use this to turn its special access on and off.  For
-example, suppose a game program has just started, and its real user ID
-is @code{jdoe} while its effective user ID is @code{games}.  In this
-state, the game can write the scores file.  If it swaps the two uids,
-the real becomes @code{games} and the effective becomes @code{jdoe}; now
-the program has only @code{jdoe} to access.  Another swap brings
-@code{games} back to the effective user ID and restores access to the
-scores file.
-
-If the system supports the saved user ID feature, you can accomplish 
-the same job with @code{setuid}.  When the game program starts, its
-real user ID is @code{jdoe}, its effective user ID is @code{games}, and
-its saved user ID is also @code{games}.  The program should record both
-user ID values once at the beginning, like this:
-
-@example
+@smallexample
 user_user_id = getuid ();
 game_user_id = geteuid ();
-@end example
+@end smallexample
 
-Then it can turn off game file access with 
+Then it can turn off game file access with
 
-@example
+@smallexample
 setuid (user_user_id);
-@end example
+@end smallexample
 
 @noindent
-and turn it on with 
+and turn it on with
 
-@example
+@smallexample
 setuid (game_user_id);
-@end example
+@end smallexample
+
+@noindent
+Throughout this process, the real user ID remains @code{jdoe} and the
+saved user ID remains @code{games}, so the program can always set its
+effective user ID to either one.
+
+On other systems that don't support the saved user ID feature, you can
+turn setuid access on and off by using @code{setreuid} to swap the real
+and effective user IDs of the process, as follows:
+
+@smallexample
+setreuid (geteuid (), getuid ());
+@end smallexample
 
 @noindent
-Throughout the process, the real user ID remains @code{jdoe} and the 
-saved user ID remains @code{games}.
+This special case is always allowed---it cannot fail.
 
-@node Setuid Program Example, Tips for Setuid, Enable/Disable Setuid, Users and Groups
+Why does this have the effect of toggling the setuid access?  Suppose a
+game program has just started, and its real user ID is @code{jdoe} while
+its effective user ID is @code{games}.  In this state, the game can
+write the scores file.  If it swaps the two uids, the real becomes
+@code{games} and the effective becomes @code{jdoe}; now the program has
+only @code{jdoe} access.  Another swap brings @code{games} back to
+the effective user ID and restores access to the scores file.
+
+In order to handle both kinds of systems, test for the saved user ID
+feature with a preprocessor conditional, like this:
+
+@smallexample
+#ifdef _POSIX_SAVED_IDS
+  setuid (user_user_id);
+#else
+  setreuid (geteuid (), getuid ());
+#endif
+@end smallexample
+
+@node Setuid Program Example
 @section Setuid Program Example
 
 Here's an example showing how to set up a program that changes its
@@ -428,14 +480,14 @@ manipulates a file @file{scores} that should be writable only by the game
 program itself.  The program assumes that its executable
 file will be installed with the set-user-ID bit set and owned by the
 same user as the @file{scores} file.  Typically, a system
-administrator will set up an account like @samp{games} for this purpose.
+administrator will set up an account like @code{games} for this purpose.
 
-The executable file is given mode @code{4755}, so that doing an 
+The executable file is given mode @code{4755}, so that doing an
 @samp{ls -l} on it produces output like:
 
-@example
+@smallexample
 -rwsr-xr-x   1 games    184422 Jul 30 15:17 caber-toss
-@end example
+@end smallexample
 
 @noindent
 The set-user-ID bit shows up in the file modes as the @samp{s}.
@@ -443,16 +495,16 @@ The set-user-ID bit shows up in the file modes as the @samp{s}.
 The scores file is given mode @code{644}, and doing an @samp{ls -l} on
 it shows:
 
-@example
+@smallexample
 -rw-r--r--  1 games           0 Jul 31 15:33 scores
-@end example
+@end smallexample
 
 Here are the parts of the program that show how to set up the changed
 user ID.  This program is conditionalized so that it makes use of the
 saved IDs feature if it is supported, and otherwise uses @code{setreuid}
 to swap the effective and real user IDs.
 
-@example
+@smallexample
 #include <stdio.h>
 #include <sys/types.h>
 #include <unistd.h>
@@ -461,13 +513,13 @@ to swap the effective and real user IDs.
 
 /* @r{Save the effective and real UIDs.} */
 
-uid_t euid, ruid;
+static uid_t euid, ruid;
 
 
 /* @r{Restore the effective UID to its original value.} */
 
 void
-do_setuid ()
+do_setuid (void)
 @{
   int status;
 
@@ -483,10 +535,11 @@ do_setuid ()
 @}
 
 
+@group
 /* @r{Set the effective UID to the real UID.} */
 
 void
-undo_setuid ()
+undo_setuid (void)
 @{
   int status;
 
@@ -500,7 +553,7 @@ undo_setuid ()
     exit (status);
     @}
 @}
-
+@end group
 
 /* @r{Main program.} */
 
@@ -515,7 +568,7 @@ main (void)
   /* @r{Do the game and record the score.}  */
   @dots{}
 @}
-@end example
+@end smallexample
 
 Notice how the first thing the @code{main} function does is to set the
 effective user ID back to the real user ID.  This is so that any other
@@ -524,7 +577,7 @@ the real user ID for determining permissions.  Only when the program
 needs to open the scores file does it switch back to the original
 effective user ID, like this:
 
-@example
+@smallexample
 /* @r{Record the score.} */
 
 int
@@ -538,25 +591,28 @@ record_score (int score)
   stream = fopen (SCORES_FILE, "a");
   undo_setuid ();
 
+@group
   /* @r{Write the score to the file.} */
-  if (stream) @{
-    myname = cuserid (NULL);
-    if (score < 0)
-      fprintf (stream, "%10s: Couldn't lift the caber.\n", myname);
-    else
-      fprintf (stream, "%10s: %d feet.\n", myname, score);
-    fclose (stream);
-    return 0;
+  if (stream)
+    @{
+      myname = cuserid (NULL);
+      if (score < 0)
+        fprintf (stream, "%10s: Couldn't lift the caber.\n", myname);
+      else
+        fprintf (stream, "%10s: %d feet.\n", myname, score);
+      fclose (stream);
+      return 0;
     @}
   else
     return -1;
 @}
-@end example
+@end group
+@end smallexample
 
-@node Tips for Setuid, Who Logged In, Setuid Program Example, Users and Groups
+@node Tips for Setuid
 @section Tips for Writing Setuid Programs
 
-It is easy for setuid programs to give the user access that isn't 
+It is easy for setuid programs to give the user access that isn't
 intended---in fact, if you want to avoid this, you need to be careful.
 Here are some guidelines for preventing unintended access and
 minimizing its consequences when it does occur:
@@ -564,7 +620,7 @@ minimizing its consequences when it does occur:
 @itemize @bullet
 @item
 Don't have @code{setuid} programs with privileged user IDs such as
-@samp{root} unless it is absolutely necessary.  If the resource is
+@code{root} unless it is absolutely necessary.  If the resource is
 specific to your particular program, it's better to define a new,
 nonprivileged user ID or group ID just to manage that resource.
 
@@ -597,7 +653,7 @@ would ordinarily have permission to access those files.  You can use the
 uses the real user and group IDs, rather than the effective IDs.
 @end itemize
 
-@node Who Logged In, User Database, Tips for Setuid, Users and Groups
+@node Who Logged In
 @section Identifying Who Logged In
 @cindex login name, determining
 @cindex user ID, determining
@@ -605,7 +661,9 @@ uses the real user and group IDs, rather than the effective IDs.
 You can use the functions listed in this section to determine the login
 name of the user who is running a process, and the name of the user who
 logged in the current session.  See also the function @code{getuid} and
-friends (@pxref{User and Group ID Functions}).
+friends (@pxref{Reading Persona}).  How this information is collected by
+the system and how to control/add/remove information from the background
+storage is described in @ref{User Accounting Database}.
 
 The @code{getlogin} function is declared in @file{unistd.h}, while
 @code{cuserid} and @code{L_cuserid} are declared in @file{stdio.h}.
@@ -614,8 +672,8 @@ The @code{getlogin} function is declared in @file{unistd.h}, while
 
 @comment unistd.h
 @comment POSIX.1
-@deftypefun {char *} getlogin ()
-The @code{getlogin} function returns a pointer to string containing the
+@deftypefun {char *} getlogin (void)
+The @code{getlogin} function returns a pointer to string containing the
 name of the user logged in on the controlling terminal of the process,
 or a null pointer if this information cannot be determined.  The string
 is statically allocated and might be overwritten on subsequent calls to
@@ -624,7 +682,7 @@ this function or to @code{cuserid}.
 
 @comment stdio.h
 @comment POSIX.1
-@deftypefun {char *} cuserid (@var{string})
+@deftypefun {char *} cuserid (char *@var{string})
 The @code{cuserid} function returns a pointer to a string containing a
 user name associated with the effective ID of the process.  If
 @var{string} is not a null pointer, it should be an array that can hold
@@ -632,6 +690,9 @@ at least @code{L_cuserid} characters; the string is returned in this
 array.  Otherwise, a pointer to a string in a static area is returned.
 This string is statically allocated and might be overwritten on
 subsequent calls to this function or to @code{getlogin}.
+
+The use of this function is deprecated since it is marked to be
+withdrawn in XPG4.2 and it is already removed in POSIX.1.
 @end deftypefun
 
 @comment stdio.h
@@ -643,33 +704,636 @@ store a user name.
 
 These functions let your program identify positively the user who is
 running or the user who logged in this session.  (These can differ when
-setuid programs are involved; @xref{Controlling Access Privileges}.)
-The user cannot do anything to fool these functions.
+setuid programs are involved; @xref{Process Persona}.)  The user cannot
+do anything to fool these functions.
 
 For most purposes, it is more useful to use the environment variable
 @code{LOGNAME} to find out who the user is.  This is more flexible
 precisely because the user can set @code{LOGNAME} arbitrarily.
-@xref{Environment Variables}.
+@xref{Standard Environment}.
+
+
+@node User Accounting Database
+@section The User Accounting Database
+@cindex user accounting database
+
+Most Unix-like operating systems keep track of logged in users by
+maintaining a user accounting database.  This user accounting database
+stores for each terminal, who has logged on, at what time, the process
+ID of the user's login shell, etc., etc., but also stores information
+about the run level of the system, the time of the last system reboot,
+and possibly more.
+
+The user accounting database typically lives in @file{/etc/utmp},
+@file{/var/adm/utmp} or @file{/var/run/utmp}.  However, these files
+should @strong{never} be accessed directly.  For reading information
+from and writing information to the user accounting database, the
+functions described in this section should be used.
+
+
+@menu
+* Manipulating the Database::   Scanning and modifying the user
+                                 accounting database.
+* XPG Functions::               A standardized way for doing the same thing.
+* Logging In and Out::          Functions from BSD that modify the user
+                                 accounting database.
+@end menu
+
+@node Manipulating the Database
+@subsection Manipulating the User Accounting Database
+
+These functions and the corresponding data structures are declared in
+the header file @file{utmp.h}.
+@pindex utmp.h
+
+@comment utmp.h
+@comment SVID
+@deftp {Data Type} {struct exit_status}
+The @code{exit_status} data structure is used to hold information about
+the exit status of processes marked as @code{DEAD_PROCESS} in the user
+accounting database.
+
+@table @code
+@item short int e_termination
+The exit status of the process.
+
+@item short int e_exit
+The exit status of the process.
+@end table
+@end deftp
+
+@deftp {Data Type} {struct utmp}
+The @code{utmp} data structure is used to hold information about entries
+in the user accounting database.  On the GNU system it has the following
+members:
+
+@table @code
+@item short int ut_type
+Specifies the type of login; one of @code{EMPTY}, @code{RUN_LVL},
+@code{BOOT_TIME}, @code{OLD_TIME}, @code{NEW_TIME}, @code{INIT_PROCESS},
+@code{LOGIN_PROCESS}, @code{USER_PROCESS}, @code{DEAD_PROCESS} or
+@code{ACCOUNTING}.
+
+@item pid_t ut_pid
+The process ID number of the login process.
+
+@item char ut_line[]
+The device name of the tty (without @file{/dev/}).
+
+@item char ut_id[]
+The inittab ID of the process.
+
+@item char ut_user[]
+The user's login name.
+
+@item char ut_host[]
+The name of the host from which the user logged in.
+
+@item struct exit_status ut_exit
+The exit status of a process marked as @code{DEAD_PROCESS}.
+
+@item long ut_session
+The Session ID, used for windowing.
+
+@item struct timeval ut_tv
+Time the entry was made.  For entries of type @code{OLD_TIME} this is
+the time when the system clock changed, and for entries of type
+@code{NEW_TIME} this is the time the system clock was set to.
+
+@item int32_t ut_addr_v6[4]
+The Internet address of a remote host.
+@end table
+@end deftp
+
+The @code{ut_type}, @code{ut_pid}, @code{ut_id}, @code{ut_tv}, and
+@code{ut_host} fields are not available on all systems.  Portable
+applications therefore should be prepared for these situations.  To help
+doing this the @file{utmp.h} header provides macros
+@code{_HAVE_UT_TYPE}, @code{_HAVE_UT_PID}, @code{_HAVE_UT_ID},
+@code{_HAVE_UT_TV}, and @code{_HAVE_UT_HOST} if the respective field is
+available.  The programmer can handle the situations by using
+@code{#ifdef} in the program code.
+
+The following macros are defined for use as values for the
+@code{ut_type} member of the @code{utmp} structure.  The values are
+integer constants.
+
+@table @code
+@comment utmp.h
+@comment SVID
+@vindex EMPTY
+@item EMPTY
+This macro is used to indicate that the entry contains no valid user
+accounting information.
+
+@comment utmp.h
+@comment SVID
+@vindex RUN_LVL
+@item RUN_LVL
+This macro is used to identify the systems runlevel.
+
+@comment utmp.h
+@comment SVID
+@vindex BOOT_TIME
+@item BOOT_TIME
+This macro is used to identify the time of system boot.
+
+@comment utmp.h
+@comment SVID
+@vindex OLD_TIME
+@item OLD_TIME
+This macro is used to identify the time when the system clock changed.
+
+@comment utmp.h
+@comment SVID
+@vindex NEW_TIME
+@item NEW_TIME
+This macro is used to identify the time after the system changed.
+
+@comment utmp.h
+@comment SVID
+@vindex INIT_PROCESS
+@item INIT_PROCESS
+This macro is used to identify a process spawned by the init process.
+
+@comment utmp.h
+@comment SVID
+@vindex LOGIN_PROCESS
+@item LOGIN_PROCESS
+This macro is used to identify the session leader of a logged in user.
+
+@comment utmp.h
+@comment SVID
+@vindex USER_PROCESS
+@item USER_PROCESS
+This macro is used to identify a user process.
+
+@comment utmp.h
+@comment SVID
+@vindex DEAD_PROCESS
+@item DEAD_PROCESS
+This macro is used to identify a terminated process.
+
+@comment utmp.h
+@comment SVID
+@vindex ACCOUNTING
+@item ACCOUNTING
+???
+@end table
+
+The size of the @code{ut_line}, @code{ut_id}, @code{ut_user} and
+@code{ut_host} arrays can be found using the @code{sizeof} operator.
+
+Many older systems have, instead of an @code{ut_tv} member, an
+@code{ut_time} member, usually of type @code{time_t}, for representing
+the time associated with the entry.  Therefore, for backwards
+compatibility only, @file{utmp.h} defines @code{ut_time} as an alias for
+@code{ut_tv.tv_sec}.
+
+@comment utmp.h
+@comment SVID
+@deftypefun void setutent (void)
+This function opens the user accounting database to begin scanning it.
+You can then call @code{getutent}, @code{getutid} or @code{getutline} to
+read entries and @code{pututline} to write entries.
+
+If the database is already open, it resets the input to the beginning of
+the database.
+@end deftypefun
+
+@comment utmp.h
+@comment SVID
+@deftypefun {struct utmp *} getutent (void)
+The @code{getutent} function reads the next entry from the user
+accounting database.  It returns a pointer to the entry, which is
+statically allocated and may be overwritten by subsequent calls to
+@code{getutent}.  You must copy the contents of the structure if you
+wish to save the information or you can use the @code{getutent_r}
+function which stores the data in a user-provided buffer.
+
+A null pointer is returned in case no further entry is available.
+@end deftypefun
+
+@comment utmp.h
+@comment SVID
+@deftypefun void endutent (void)
+This function closes the user accounting database.
+@end deftypefun
+
+@comment utmp.h
+@comment SVID
+@deftypefun {struct utmp *} getutid (const struct utmp *@var{id})
+This function searches forward from the current point in the database
+for an entry that matches @var{id}.  If the @code{ut_type} member of the
+@var{id} structure is one of @code{RUN_LVL}, @code{BOOT_TIME},
+@code{OLD_TIME} or @code{NEW_TIME} the entries match if the
+@code{ut_type} members are identical.  If the @code{ut_type} member of
+the @var{id} structure is @code{INIT_PROCESS}, @code{LOGIN_PROCESS},
+@code{USER_PROCESS} or @code{DEAD_PROCESS}, the entries match if the the
+@code{ut_type} member of the entry read from the database is one of
+these four, and the @code{ut_id} members match.  However if the
+@code{ut_id} member of either the @var{id} structure or the entry read
+from the database is empty it checks if the @code{ut_line} members match
+instead.  If a matching entry is found, @code{getutid} returns a pointer
+to the entry, which is statically allocated, and may be overwritten by a
+subsequent call to @code{getutent}, @code{getutid} or @code{getutline}.
+You must copy the contents of the structure if you wish to save the
+information.
+
+A null pointer is returned in case the end of the database is reached
+without a match.
+
+The @code{getutid} function may cache the last read entry.  Therefore,
+if you are using @code{getutid} to search for multiple occurrences, it
+is necessary to zero out the static data after each call.  Otherwise
+@code{getutid} could just return a pointer to the same entry over and
+over again.
+@end deftypefun
+
+@comment utmp.h
+@comment SVID
+@deftypefun {struct utmp *} getutline (const struct utmp *@var{line})
+This function searches forward from the current point in the database
+until it finds an entry whose @code{ut_type} value is
+@code{LOGIN_PROCESS} or @code{USER_PROCESS}, and whose @code{ut_line}
+member matches the @code{ut_line} member of the @var{line} structure.
+If it finds such an entry, it returns a pointer to the entry which is
+statically allocated, and may be overwritten by a subsequent call to
+@code{getutent}, @code{getutid} or @code{getutline}.  You must copy the
+contents of the structure if you wish to save the information.
+
+A null pointer is returned in case the end of the database is reached
+without a match.
+
+The @code{getutline} function may cache the last read entry.  Therefore
+if you are using @code{getutline} to search for multiple occurrences, it
+is necessary to zero out the static data after each call.  Otherwise
+@code{getutline} could just return a pointer to the same entry over and
+over again.
+@end deftypefun
+
+@comment utmp.h
+@comment SVID
+@deftypefun {struct utmp *} pututline (const struct utmp *@var{utmp})
+The @code{pututline} function inserts the entry @code{*@var{utmp}} at
+the appropriate place in the user accounting database.  If it finds that
+it is not already at the correct place in the database, it uses
+@code{getutid} to search for the position to insert the entry, however
+this will not modify the static structure returned by @code{getutent},
+@code{getutid} and @code{getutline}.  If this search fails, the entry
+is appended to the database.
+
+The @code{pututline} function returns a pointer to a copy of the entry
+inserted in the user accounting database, or a null pointer if the entry
+could not be added.  The following @code{errno} error conditions are
+defined for this function:
+
+@table @code
+@item EPERM
+The process does not have the appropriate privileges; you cannot modify
+the user accounting database.
+@end table
+@end deftypefun
+
+All the @code{get*} functions mentioned before store the information
+they return in a static buffer.  This can be a problem in multi-threaded
+programs since the data return for the request is overwritten be the
+return value data in another thread.  Therefore the GNU C Library
+provides as extensions three more functions which return the data in a
+user-provided buffer.
+
+@comment utmp.h
+@comment GNU
+@deftypefun int getutent_r (struct utmp *@var{buffer}, struct utmp **@var{result})
+The @code{getutent_r} is equivalent to the @code{getutent} function.  It
+returns the next entry from the database.  But instead of storing the
+information in a static buffer it stores it in the buffer pointed to by
+the parameter @var{buffer}.
+
+If the call was successful, the function returns @code{0} and the
+pointer variable pointed to by the parameter @var{result} contains a
+pointer to the buffer which contains the result (this is most probably
+the same value as @var{buffer}).  If something went wrong during the
+execution of @code{getutent_r} the function returns @code{-1}.
+
+This function is a GNU extension.
+@end deftypefun
+
+@comment utmp.h
+@comment GNU
+@deftypefun int getutid_r (const struct utmp *@var{id}, struct utmp *@var{buffer}, struct utmp **@var{result})
+This function retrieves just like @code{getutid} the next entry matching
+the information stored in @var{id}.  But the result is stored in the
+buffer pointed to by the parameter @var{buffer}.
+
+If successful the function returns @code{0} and the pointer variable
+pointed to by the parameter @var{result} contains a pointer to the
+buffer with the result (probably the same as @var{result}.  If not
+successful the function return @code{-1}.
+
+This function is a GNU extension.
+@end deftypefun
+
+@comment utmp.h
+@comment GNU
+@deftypefun int getutline_r (const struct utmp *@var{line}, struct utmp *@var{buffer}, struct utmp **@var{result})
+This function retrieves just like @code{getutline} the next entry
+matching the information stored in @var{line}.  But the result is stored
+in the buffer pointed to by the parameter @var{buffer}.
+
+If successful the function returns @code{0} and the pointer variable
+pointed to by the parameter @var{result} contains a pointer to the
+buffer with the result (probably the same as @var{result}.  If not
+successful the function return @code{-1}.
 
-@node User Database, Group Database, Who Logged In, Users and Groups
+This function is a GNU extension.
+@end deftypefun
+
+
+In addition to the user accounting database, most systems keep a number
+of similar databases.  For example most systems keep a log file with all
+previous logins (usually in @file{/etc/wtmp} or @file{/var/log/wtmp}).
+
+For specifying which database to examine, the following function should
+be used.
+
+@comment utmp.h
+@comment SVID
+@deftypefun int utmpname (const char *@var{file})
+The @code{utmpname} function changes the name of the database to be
+examined to @var{file}, and closes any previously opened database.  By
+default @code{getutent}, @code{getutid}, @code{getutline} and
+@code{pututline} read from and write to the user accounting database.
+
+The following macros are defined for use as the @var{file} argument:
+
+@deftypevr Macro {char *} _PATH_UTMP
+This macro is used to specify the user accounting database.
+@end deftypevr
+
+@deftypevr Macro {char *} _PATH_WTMP
+This macro is used to specify the user accounting log file.
+@end deftypevr
+
+The @code{utmpname} function returns a value of @code{0} if the new name
+was successfully stored, and a value of @code{-1} to indicate an error.
+Note that @code{utmpname} does not try open the database, and that
+therefore the return value does not say anything about whether the
+database can be successfully opened.
+@end deftypefun
+
+Specially for maintaining log-like databases the GNU C Library provides
+the following function:
+
+@comment utmp.h
+@comment SVID
+@deftypefun void updwtmp (const char *@var{wtmp_file}, const struct utmp *@var{utmp})
+The @code{updwtmp} function appends the entry *@var{utmp} to the
+database specified by @var{wtmp_file}.  For possible values for the
+@var{wtmp_file} argument see the @code{utmpname} function.
+@end deftypefun
+
+@strong{Portability Note:} Although many operating systems provide a
+subset of these functions, they are not standardized.  There are often
+subtle differences in the return types, and there are considerable
+differences between the various definitions of @code{struct utmp}.  When
+programming for the GNU system, it is probably probably best to stick
+with the functions described in this section.  If however, you want your
+program to be portable, consider using the XPG functions described in
+@ref{XPG Functions}, or take a look at the BSD compatible functions in
+@ref{Logging In and Out}.
+
+
+@node XPG Functions
+@subsection XPG User Accounting Database Functions
+
+These functions, described in the X/Open Portability Guide, are declared
+in the header file @file{utmpx.h}.
+@pindex utmpx.h
+
+@deftp {Data Type} {struct utmpx}
+The @code{utmpx} data structure contains at least the following members:
+
+@table @code
+@item short int ut_type
+Specifies the type of login; one of @code{EMPTY}, @code{RUN_LVL},
+@code{BOOT_TIME}, @code{OLD_TIME}, @code{NEW_TIME}, @code{INIT_PROCESS},
+@code{LOGIN_PROCESS}, @code{USER_PROCESS} or @code{DEAD_PROCESS}.
+
+@item pid_t ut_pid
+The process ID number of the login process.
+
+@item char ut_line[]
+The device name of the tty (without @file{/dev/}).
+
+@item char ut_id[]
+The inittab ID of the process.
+
+@item char ut_user[]
+The user's login name.
+
+@item struct timeval ut_tv
+Time the entry was made.  For entries of type @code{OLD_TIME} this is
+the time when the system clock changed, and for entries of type
+@code{NEW_TIME} this is the time the system clock was set to.
+@end table
+On the GNU system, @code{struct utmpx} is identical to @code{struct
+utmp} except for the fact that including @file{utmpx.h} does not make
+visible the declaration of @code{struct exit_status}.
+@end deftp
+
+The following macros are defined for use as values for the
+@code{ut_type} member of the @code{utmpx} structure.  The values are
+integer constants and are, on the GNU system, identical to the
+definitions in @file{utmp.h}.
+
+@table @code
+@comment utmpx.h
+@comment XPG4.2
+@vindex EMPTY
+@item EMPTY
+This macro is used to indicate that the entry contains no valid user
+accounting information.
+
+@comment utmpx.h
+@comment XPG4.2
+@vindex RUN_LVL
+@item RUN_LVL
+This macro is used to identify the systems runlevel.
+
+@comment utmpx.h
+@comment XPG4.2
+@vindex BOOT_TIME
+@item BOOT_TIME
+This macro is used to identify the time of system boot.
+
+@comment utmpx.h
+@comment XPG4.2
+@vindex OLD_TIME
+@item OLD_TIME
+This macro is used to identify the time when the system clock changed.
+
+@comment utmpx.h
+@comment XPG4.2
+@vindex NEW_TIME
+@item NEW_TIME
+This macro is used to identify the time after the system changed.
+
+@comment utmpx.h
+@comment XPG4.2
+@vindex INIT_PROCESS
+@item INIT_PROCESS
+This macro is used to identify a process spawned by the init process.
+
+@comment utmpx.h
+@comment XPG4.2
+@vindex LOGIN_PROCESS
+@item LOGIN_PROCESS
+This macro is used to identify the session leader of a logged in user.
+
+@comment utmpx.h
+@comment XPG4.2
+@vindex USER_PROCESS
+@item USER_PROCESS
+This macro is used to identify a user process.
+
+@comment utmpx.h
+@comment XPG4.2
+@vindex DEAD_PROCESS
+@item DEAD_PROCESS
+This macro is used to identify a terminated process.
+@end table
+
+The size of the @code{ut_line}, @code{ut_id} and @code{ut_user} arrays
+can be found using the @code{sizeof} operator.
+
+@comment utmpx.h
+@comment XPG4.2
+@deftypefun void setutxent (void)
+This function is similar to @code{setutent}.  On the GNU system it is
+simply an alias for @code{setutent}.
+@end deftypefun
+
+@comment utmpx.h
+@comment XPG4.2
+@deftypefun {struct utmpx *} getutxent (void)
+The @code{getutxent} function is similar to @code{getutent}, but returns
+a pointer to a @code{struct utmpx} instead of @code{struct utmp}.  On
+the GNU system it simply is an alias for @code{getutent}.
+@end deftypefun
+
+@comment utmpx.h
+@comment XPG4.2
+@deftypefun void endutxent (void)
+This function is similar to @code{endutent}.  On the GNU system it is
+simply an alias for @code{endutent}.
+@end deftypefun
+
+@comment utmpx.h
+@comment XPG4.2
+@deftypefun {struct utmpx *} getutxid (const struct utmpx *@var{id})
+This function is similar to @code{getutid}, but uses @code{struct utmpx}
+instead of @code{struct utmp}.  On the GNU system it is simply an alias
+for @code{getutid}.
+@end deftypefun
+
+@comment utmpx.h
+@comment XPG4.2
+@deftypefun {struct utmpx *} getutxline (const struct utmpx *@var{line})
+This function is similar to @code{getutid}, but uses @code{struct utmpx}
+instead of @code{struct utmp}.  On the GNU system it is simply an alias
+for @code{getutline}.
+@end deftypefun
+
+@comment utmpx.h
+@comment XPG4.2
+@deftypefun {struct utmpx *} pututxline (const struct utmpx *@var{utmp})
+The @code{pututxline} function provides functionality identical to
+@code{pututline}, but uses @code{struct utmpx} instead of @code{struct
+utmp}.  On the GNU system @code{pututxline} is simply an alias for
+@code{pututline}.
+@end deftypefun
+
+
+@node Logging In and Out
+@subsection Logging In and Out
+
+These functions, derived from BSD, are available in the separate
+@file{libutil} library, and declared in @file{utmp.h}.
+@pindex utmp.h
+
+Note that the @code{ut_user} member of @code{struct utmp} is called
+@code{ut_name} in BSD.  Therefore, @code{ut_name} is defined as an alias
+for @code{ut_user} in @file{utmp.h}.
+
+@comment utmp.h
+@comment BSD
+@deftypefun int login_tty (int @var{filedes})
+This function makes @var{filedes} the controlling terminal of the
+current process, redirects standard input, standard output and
+standard error output to this terminal, and closes @var{filedes}.
+
+This function returns @code{0} on successful completion, and @code{-1}
+on error.
+@end deftypefun
+
+@comment utmp.h
+@comment BSD
+@deftypefun void login (const struct utmp *@var{entry})
+The @code{login} functions inserts an entry into the user accounting
+database.  The @code{ut_line} member is set to the name of the terminal
+on standard input.  If standard input is not a terminal @code{login}
+uses standard output or standard error output to determine the name of
+the terminal.  If @code{struct utmp} has a @code{ut_type} member,
+@code{login} sets it to @code{USER_PROCESS}, and if there is an
+@code{ut_pid} member, it will be set to the process ID of the current
+process.  The remaining entries are copied from @var{entry}.
+
+A copy of the entry is written to the user accounting log file.
+@end deftypefun
+
+@comment utmp.h
+@comment BSD
+@deftypefun int logout (const char *@var{ut_line})
+This function modifies the user accounting database to indicate that the
+user on @var{ut_line} has logged out.
+
+The @code{logout} function returns @code{1} if the entry was successfully
+written to the database, or @code{0} on error.
+@end deftypefun
+
+@comment utmp.h
+@comment BSD
+@deftypefun void logwtmp (const char *@var{ut_line}, const char *@var{ut_name}, const char *@var{ut_host})
+The @code{logwtmp} function appends an entry to the user accounting log
+file, for the current time and the information provided in the
+@var{ut_line}, @var{ut_name} and @var{ut_host} arguments.
+@end deftypefun
+
+@strong{Portability Note:} The BSD @code{struct utmp} only has the
+@code{ut_line}, @code{ut_name}, @code{ut_host} and @code{ut_time}
+members.  Older systems do not even have the @code{ut_host} member.
+
+
+@node User Database
 @section User Database
 @cindex user database
 @cindex password database
 @pindex /etc/passwd
 
-This section describes all about now to search and scan the database of
+This section describes all about how to search and scan the database of
 registered users.  The database itself is kept in the file
 @file{/etc/passwd} on most systems, but on some systems a special
 network server gives access to it.
 
 @menu
-* User Data Structure::         
-* Lookup User::                 
-* Scanning All Users::          Scanning the List of All Users
-* Writing a User Entry::        
+* User Data Structure::         What each user record contains.
+* Lookup User::                 How to look for a particular user.
+* Scanning All Users::          Scanning the list of all users, one by one.
+* Writing a User Entry::        How a program can rewrite a user's record.
 @end menu
 
-@node User Data Structure, Lookup User,  , User Database
+@node User Data Structure
 @subsection The Data Structure that Describes a User
 
 The functions and data structures for accessing the system user database
@@ -678,8 +1342,8 @@ are declared in the header file @file{pwd.h}.
 
 @comment pwd.h
 @comment POSIX.1
-@deftp {struct Type} passwd
-The @code{passwd} data structure is used to hold information about 
+@deftp {Data Type} {struct passwd}
+The @code{passwd} data structure is used to hold information about
 entries in the system user data base.  It has at least the following members:
 
 @table @code
@@ -710,7 +1374,7 @@ be used.
 @end table
 @end deftp
 
-@node Lookup User, Scanning All Users, User Data Structure, User Database
+@node Lookup User
 @subsection Looking Up One User
 @cindex converting user ID to user name
 @cindex converting user name to user ID
@@ -731,6 +1395,27 @@ user ID @var{uid}.
 @end deftypefun
 
 @comment pwd.h
+@comment POSIX.1c
+@deftypefun int getpwuid_r (uid_t @var{uid}, struct passwd *@var{result_buf}, char *@var{buffer}, size_t @var{buflen}, struct passwd **@var{result})
+This function is similar to @code{getpwuid} in that is returns
+information about the user whose user ID is @var{uid}.  But the result
+is not placed in a static buffer.  Instead the user supplied structure
+pointed to by @var{result_buf} is filled with the information.  The
+first @var{buflen} bytes of the additional buffer pointed to by
+@var{buffer} are used to contain additional information, normally
+strings which are pointed to by the elements of the result structure.
+
+If the return value is @code{0} the pointer returned in @var{result}
+points to the record which contains the wanted data (i.e., @var{result}
+contains the value @var{result_buf}).  In case the return value is non
+null there is no user in the data base with user ID @var{uid} or the
+buffer @var{buffer} is too small to contain all the needed information.
+In the later case the global @var{errno} variable is set to
+@code{ERANGE}.
+@end deftypefun
+
+
+@comment pwd.h
 @comment POSIX.1
 @deftypefun {struct passwd *} getpwnam (const char *@var{name})
 This function returns a pointer to a statically-allocated structure
@@ -741,7 +1426,28 @@ This structure may be overwritten on subsequent calls to
 A null pointer value indicates there is no user named @var{name}.
 @end deftypefun
 
-@node Scanning All Users, Writing a User Entry, Lookup User, User Database
+@comment pwd.h
+@comment POSIX.1c
+@deftypefun int getpwnam_r (const char *@var{name}, struct passwd *@var{result_buf}, char *@var{buffer}, size_t @var{buflen}, struct passwd **@var{result})
+This function is similar to @code{getpwnam} in that is returns
+information about the user whose user name is @var{name}.  But the result
+is not placed in a static buffer.  Instead the user supplied structure
+pointed to by @var{result_buf} is filled with the information.  The
+first @var{buflen} bytes of the additional buffer pointed to by
+@var{buffer} are used to contain additional information, normally
+strings which are pointed to by the elements of the result structure.
+
+If the return value is @code{0} the pointer returned in @var{result}
+points to the record which contains the wanted data (i.e., @var{result}
+contains the value @var{result_buf}).  In case the return value is non
+null there is no user in the data base with user name @var{name} or the
+buffer @var{buffer} is too small to contain all the needed information.
+In the later case the global @var{errno} variable is set to
+@code{ERANGE}.
+@end deftypefun
+
+
+@node Scanning All Users
 @subsection Scanning the List of All Users
 @cindex scanning the user list
 
@@ -749,53 +1455,87 @@ This section explains how a program can read the list of all users in
 the system, one user at a time.  The functions described here are
 declared in @file{pwd.h}.
 
-The recommended way to scan the users is to open the user file and
-then call @code{fgetgrent} for each successive user:
+You can use the @code{fgetpwent} function to read user entries from a
+particular file.
 
 @comment pwd.h
 @comment SVID
 @deftypefun {struct passwd *} fgetpwent (FILE *@var{stream})
 This function reads the next user entry from @var{stream} and returns a
 pointer to the entry.  The structure is statically allocated and is
-rewritten on subsequent calls to @code{getpwent}.  You must copy the
+rewritten on subsequent calls to @code{fgetpwent}.  You must copy the
 contents of the structure if you wish to save the information.
 
 This stream must correspond to a file in the same format as the standard
 password database file.  This function comes from System V.
 @end deftypefun
 
-Another way to scan all the entries in the group database is with
-@code{setpwent}, @code{getpwent}, and @code{endpwent}.  But this method
-is less robust than @code{fgetpwent}, so we provide it only for
-compatibility with SVID.  In particular, these functions are not
-reentrant and are not suitable for use in programs with multiple threads
-of control.  Calling @code{getpwgid} or @code{getpwnam} can also confuse
-the internal state of these functions.
+@comment pwd.h
+@comment GNU
+@deftypefun int fgetpwent_r (FILE *@var{stream}, struct passwd *@var{result_buf}, char *@var{buffer}, size_t @var{buflen}, struct passwd **@var{result})
+This function is similar to @code{fgetpwent} in that it reads the next
+user entry from @var{stream}.  But the result is returned in the
+structure pointed to by @var{result_buf}.  The
+first @var{buflen} bytes of the additional buffer pointed to by
+@var{buffer} are used to contain additional information, normally
+strings which are pointed to by the elements of the result structure.
+
+This stream must correspond to a file in the same format as the standard
+password database file.
+
+If the function returns null @var{result} points to the structure with
+the wanted data (normally this is in @var{result_buf}).  If errors
+occurred the return value is non-null and @var{result} contains a null
+pointer.
+@end deftypefun
+
+The way to scan all the entries in the user database is with
+@code{setpwent}, @code{getpwent}, and @code{endpwent}.
 
 @comment pwd.h
-@comment SVID, GNU
-@deftypefun void setpwent ()
-This function initializes a stream which @code{getpwent} uses to read
-the user database.
+@comment SVID, BSD
+@deftypefun void setpwent (void)
+This function initializes a stream which @code{getpwent} and
+@code{getpwent_r} use to read the user database.
 @end deftypefun
 
 @comment pwd.h
-@comment SVID, GNU
-@deftypefun {struct passwd *} getpwent ()
+@comment POSIX.1
+@deftypefun {struct passwd *} getpwent (void)
 The @code{getpwent} function reads the next entry from the stream
 initialized by @code{setpwent}.  It returns a pointer to the entry.  The
 structure is statically allocated and is rewritten on subsequent calls
 to @code{getpwent}.  You must copy the contents of the structure if you
 wish to save the information.
+
+A null pointer is returned in case no further entry is available.
+@end deftypefun
+
+@comment pwd.h
+@comment GNU
+@deftypefun int getpwent_r (struct passwd *@var{result_buf}, char *@var{buffer}, int @var{buflen}, struct passwd **@var{result})
+This function is similar to @code{getpwent} in that it returns the next
+entry from the stream initialized by @code{setpwent}.  But in contrast
+to the @code{getpwent} function this function is reentrant since the
+result is placed in the user supplied structure pointed to by
+@var{result_buf}.  Additional data, normally the strings pointed to by
+the elements of the result structure, are placed in the additional
+buffer or length @var{buflen} starting at @var{buffer}.
+
+If the function returns zero @var{result} points to the structure with
+the wanted data (normally this is in @var{result_buf}).  If errors
+occurred the return value is non-zero and @var{result} contains a null
+pointer.
 @end deftypefun
 
 @comment pwd.h
-@comment SVID, GNU
-@deftypefun void endpwent ()
-This function closes the internal stream used by @code{getpwent}.
+@comment SVID, BSD
+@deftypefun void endpwent (void)
+This function closes the internal stream used by @code{getpwent} or
+@code{getpwent_r}.
 @end deftypefun
 
-@node Writing a User Entry,  , Scanning All Users, User Database
+@node Writing a User Entry
 @subsection Writing a User Entry
 
 @comment pwd.h
@@ -803,7 +1543,7 @@ This function closes the internal stream used by @code{getpwent}.
 @deftypefun int putpwent (const struct passwd *@var{p}, FILE *@var{stream})
 This function writes the user entry @code{*@var{p}} to the stream
 @var{stream}, in the format used for the standard user database
-file.  The return value is zero on success and non-zero on failure.
+file.  The return value is zero on success and nonzero on failure.
 
 This function exists for compatibility with SVID.  We recommend that you
 avoid using it, because it makes sense only on the assumption that the
@@ -815,23 +1555,23 @@ would inevitably leave out much of the important information.
 The function @code{putpwent} is declared in @file{pwd.h}.
 @end deftypefun
 
-@node Group Database, Database Example, User Database, Users and Groups
+@node Group Database
 @section Group Database
 @cindex group database
 @pindex /etc/group
 
-This section describes all about now to search and scan the database of
+This section describes all about how to search and scan the database of
 registered groups.  The database itself is kept in the file
 @file{/etc/group} on most systems, but on some systems a special network
 service provides access to it.
 
 @menu
-* Group Data Structure::        
-* Lookup Group::                
-* Scanning All Groups::         Scanning the List of All Groups
+* Group Data Structure::        What each group record contains.
+* Lookup Group::                How to look for a particular group.
+* Scanning All Groups::         Scanning the list of all groups.
 @end menu
 
-@node Group Data Structure, Lookup Group,  , Group Database
+@node Group Data Structure
 @subsection The Data Structure for a Group
 
 The functions and data structures for accessing the system group
@@ -840,7 +1580,7 @@ database are declared in the header file @file{grp.h}.
 
 @comment grp.h
 @comment POSIX.1
-@deftp {Data Type} {struct group} 
+@deftp {Data Type} {struct group}
 The @code{group} structure is used to hold information about an entry in
 the system group database.  It has at least the following members:
 
@@ -858,7 +1598,7 @@ null pointer.
 @end table
 @end deftp
 
-@node Lookup Group, Scanning All Groups, Group Data Structure, Group Database
+@node Lookup Group
 @subsection Looking Up One Group
 @cindex converting group name to group ID
 @cindex converting group ID to group name
@@ -879,7 +1619,27 @@ A null pointer indicates there is no group with ID @var{gid}.
 @end deftypefun
 
 @comment grp.h
-@comment POSIX.1
+@comment POSIX.1c
+@deftypefun int getgrgid_r (gid_t @var{gid}, struct group *@var{result_buf}, char *@var{buffer}, size_t @var{buflen}, struct group **@var{result})
+This function is similar to @code{getgrgid} in that is returns
+information about the group whose group ID is @var{gid}.  But the result
+is not placed in a static buffer.  Instead the user supplied structure
+pointed to by @var{result_buf} is filled with the information.  The
+first @var{buflen} bytes of the additional buffer pointed to by
+@var{buffer} are used to contain additional information, normally
+strings which are pointed to by the elements of the result structure.
+
+If the return value is @code{0} the pointer returned in @var{result}
+points to the record which contains the wanted data (i.e., @var{result}
+contains the value @var{result_buf}).  If the return value is non-zero
+there is no group in the data base with group ID @var{gid} or the
+buffer @var{buffer} is too small to contain all the needed information.
+In the later case the global @var{errno} variable is set to
+@code{ERANGE}.
+@end deftypefun
+
+@comment grp.h
+@comment SVID, BSD
 @deftypefun {struct group *} getgrnam (const char *@var{name})
 This function returns a pointer to a statically-allocated structure
 containing information about the group whose group name is @var{name}.
@@ -889,7 +1649,27 @@ This structure may be overwritten by subsequent calls to
 A null pointer indicates there is no group named @var{name}.
 @end deftypefun
 
-@node Scanning All Groups,  , Lookup Group, Group Database
+@comment grp.h
+@comment POSIX.1c
+@deftypefun int getgrnam_r (const char *@var{name}, struct group *@var{result_buf}, char *@var{buffer}, size_t @var{buflen}, struct group **@var{result})
+This function is similar to @code{getgrnam} in that is returns
+information about the group whose group name is @var{name}.  But the result
+is not placed in a static buffer.  Instead the user supplied structure
+pointed to by @var{result_buf} is filled with the information.  The
+first @var{buflen} bytes of the additional buffer pointed to by
+@var{buffer} are used to contain additional information, normally
+strings which are pointed to by the elements of the result structure.
+
+If the return value is @code{0} the pointer returned in @var{result}
+points to the record which contains the wanted data (i.e., @var{result}
+contains the value @var{result_buf}).  If the return value is non-zero
+there is no group in the data base with group name @var{name} or the
+buffer @var{buffer} is too small to contain all the needed information.
+In the later case the global @var{errno} variable is set to
+@code{ERANGE}.
+@end deftypefun
+
+@node Scanning All Groups
 @subsection Scanning the List of All Groups
 @cindex scanning the group list
 
@@ -897,15 +1677,15 @@ This section explains how a program can read the list of all groups in
 the system, one group at a time.  The functions described here are
 declared in @file{grp.h}.
 
-The recommended way to scan the groups is to open the group file and
-then call @code{fgetgrent} for each successive group:
+You can use the @code{fgetgrent} function to read group entries from a
+particular file.
 
 @comment grp.h
 @comment SVID
 @deftypefun {struct group *} fgetgrent (FILE *@var{stream})
 The @code{fgetgrent} function reads the next entry from @var{stream}.
 It returns a pointer to the entry.  The structure is statically
-allocated and is rewritten on subsequent calls to @code{getgrent}.  You
+allocated and is rewritten on subsequent calls to @code{fgetgrent}.  You
 must copy the contents of the structure if you wish to save the
 information.
 
@@ -913,24 +1693,38 @@ The stream must correspond to a file in the same format as the standard
 group database file.
 @end deftypefun
 
-Another way to scan all the entries in the group database is with
-@code{setgrent}, @code{getgrent}, and @code{endgrent}.  But this method
-is less robust than @code{fgetgrent}, so we provide it only for
-compatibility with SVID.  In particular, these functions are not
-reentrant and are not suitable for use in programs with multiple threads
-of control.  Calling @code{getgrgid} or @code{getgrnam} can also confuse
-the internal state of these functions.
+@comment grp.h
+@comment GNU
+@deftypefun int fgetgrent_r (FILE *@var{stream}, struct group *@var{result_buf}, char *@var{buffer}, size_t @var{buflen}, struct group **@var{result})
+This function is similar to @code{fgetgrent} in that it reads the next
+user entry from @var{stream}.  But the result is returned in the
+structure pointed to by @var{result_buf}.  The
+first @var{buflen} bytes of the additional buffer pointed to by
+@var{buffer} are used to contain additional information, normally
+strings which are pointed to by the elements of the result structure.
+
+This stream must correspond to a file in the same format as the standard
+group database file.
+
+If the function returns zero @var{result} points to the structure with
+the wanted data (normally this is in @var{result_buf}).  If errors
+occurred the return value is non-zero and @var{result} contains a null
+pointer.
+@end deftypefun
+
+The way to scan all the entries in the group database is with
+@code{setgrent}, @code{getgrent}, and @code{endgrent}.
 
 @comment grp.h
-@comment SVID, GNU
-@deftypefun void setgrent ()
+@comment SVID, BSD
+@deftypefun void setgrent (void)
 This function initializes a stream for reading from the group data base.
-You use this stream by calling @code{getgrent}.
+You use this stream by calling @code{getgrent} or @code{getgrent_r}.
 @end deftypefun
 
 @comment grp.h
-@comment SVID, GNU
-@deftypefun {struct group *} getgrent ()
+@comment SVID, BSD
+@deftypefun {struct group *} getgrent (void)
 The @code{getgrent} function reads the next entry from the stream
 initialized by @code{setgrent}.  It returns a pointer to the entry.  The
 structure is statically allocated and is rewritten on subsequent calls
@@ -939,25 +1733,191 @@ wish to save the information.
 @end deftypefun
 
 @comment grp.h
-@comment SVID, GNU
-@deftypefun void endgrent ()
-This function closes the internal stream used by @code{getgrent}.
+@comment GNU
+@deftypefun int getgrent_r (struct group *@var{result_buf}, char *@var{buffer}, size_t @var{buflen}, struct group **@var{result})
+This function is similar to @code{getgrent} in that it returns the next
+entry from the stream initialized by @code{setgrent}.  But in contrast
+to the @code{getgrent} function this function is reentrant since the
+result is placed in the user supplied structure pointed to by
+@var{result_buf}.  Additional data, normally the strings pointed to by
+the elements of the result structure, are placed in the additional
+buffer or length @var{buflen} starting at @var{buffer}.
+
+If the function returns zero @var{result} points to the structure with
+the wanted data (normally this is in @var{result_buf}).  If errors
+occurred the return value is non-zero and @var{result} contains a null
+pointer.
 @end deftypefun
 
-@node Database Example,  , Group Database, Users and Groups
+@comment grp.h
+@comment SVID, BSD
+@deftypefun void endgrent (void)
+This function closes the internal stream used by @code{getgrent} or
+@code{getgrent_r}.
+@end deftypefun
+
+@node Netgroup Database
+@section Netgroup Database
+
+@menu
+* Netgroup Data::                  Data in the Netgroup database and where
+                                   it comes from.
+* Lookup Netgroup::                How to look for a particular netgroup.
+* Netgroup Membership::            How to test for netgroup membership.
+@end menu
+
+@node Netgroup Data
+@subsection Netgroup Data
+
+@cindex Netgroup
+Sometimes it is useful group users according to other criterias like the
+ones used in the @xref{Group Database}.  E.g., it is useful to associate
+a certain group of users with a certain machine.  On the other hand
+grouping of host names is not supported so far.
+
+In Sun Microsystems SunOS appeared a new kind of database, the netgroup
+database.  It allows to group hosts, users, and domain freely, giving
+them individual names.  More concrete: a netgroup is a list of triples
+consisting of a host name, a user name, and a domain name, where any of
+the entries can be a wildcard entry, matching all inputs.  A last
+possibility is that names of other netgroups can also be given in the
+list specifying a netgroup.  So one can construct arbitrary hierarchies
+without loops.
+
+Sun's implementation allows netgroups only for the @code{nis} or
+@code{nisplus} service @pxref{Services in the NSS configuration}.  The
+implementation in the GNU C library has no such restriction.  An entry
+in either of the input services must have the following form:
+
+@smallexample
+@var{groupname} ( @var{groupname} | @code{(}@var{hostname}@code{,}@var{username}@code{,}@code{domainname}@code{)} )+
+@end smallexample
+
+Any of the fields in the triple can be empty which means anything
+matches.  While describing the functions we will see that the opposite
+case is useful as well.  I.e., there may be entries which will not
+match any input.  For entries like a name consisting of the single
+character @code{-} shall be used.
+
+@node Lookup Netgroup
+@subsection Looking up one Netgroup
+
+The lookup functions for netgroups are a bit different to all other
+system database handling functions.  Since a single netgroup can contain
+many entries a two-step process is needed.  First a single netgroup is
+selected and then one can iterate over all entries in this netgroup.
+These functions are declared in @file{netdb.h}.
+
+@comment netdb.h
+@deftypefun int setnetgrent (const char *@var{netgroup})
+A call to this function initializes the internal state of the library to
+allow following calls of the @code{getnetgrent} iterate over all entries
+in the netgroup with name @var{netgroup}.
+
+When the call is successful (i.e., when a netgroup with this name exist)
+the return value is @code{1}.  When the return value is @code{0} no
+netgroup of this name is known or some other error occurred.
+@end deftypefun
+
+It is important to remember that there is only one single state for
+iterating the netgroups.  Even if the programmer uses the
+@code{getnetgrent_r} function the result is not really reentrant since
+always only one single netgroup at a time can be processed.  If the
+program needs to process more than one netgroup simultaneously she
+must protect this by using external locking.  This problem was
+introduced in the original netgroups implementation in SunOS and since
+we must stay compatible it is not possible to change this.
+
+Some other functions also use the netgroups state.  Currently these are
+the @code{innetgr} function and parts of the implementation of the
+@code{compat} service part of the NSS implementation.
+
+@comment netdb.h
+@deftypefun int getnetgrent (char **@var{hostp}, char **@var{userp}, char **@var{domainp})
+This function returns the next unprocessed entry of the currently
+selected netgroup.  The string pointers, which addresses are passed in
+the arguments @var{hostp}, @var{userp}, and @var{domainp}, will contain
+after a successful call pointers to appropriate strings.  If the string
+in the next entry is empty the pointer has the value @code{NULL}.
+The returned string pointers are only valid unless no of the netgroup
+related functions are called.
+
+The return value is @code{1} if the next entry was successfully read.  A
+value of @code{0} means no further entries exist or internal errors occurred.
+@end deftypefun
+
+@comment netdb.h
+@deftypefun int getnetgrent_r (char **@var{hostp}, char **@var{userp}, char **@var{domainp}, char *@var{buffer}, int @var{buflen})
+This function is similar to @code{getnetgrent} with only one exception:
+the strings the three string pointers @var{hostp}, @var{userp}, and
+@var{domainp} point to, are placed in the buffer of @var{buflen} bytes
+starting at @var{buffer}.  This means the returned values are valid
+even after other netgroup related functions are called.
+
+The return value is @code{1} if the next entry was successfully read and
+the buffer contains enough room to place the strings in it.  @code{0} is
+returned in case no more entries are found, the buffer is too small, or
+internal errors occurred.
+
+This function is a GNU extension.  The original implementation in the
+SunOS libc does not provide this function.
+@end deftypefun
+
+@comment netdb.h
+@deftypefun void endnetgrent (void)
+This function free all buffers which were allocated to process the last
+selected netgroup.  As a result all string pointers returned by calls
+to @code{getnetgrent} are invalid afterwards.
+@end deftypefun
+
+@node Netgroup Membership
+@subsection Testing for Netgroup Membership
+
+It is often not necessary to scan the whole netgroup since often the
+only interesting question is whether a given entry is part of the
+selected netgroup.
+
+@comment netdb.h
+@deftypefun int innetgr (const char *@var{netgroup}, const char *@var{host}, const char *@var{user}, const char *@var{domain})
+This function tests whether the triple specified by the parameters
+@var{hostp}, @var{userp}, and @var{domainp} is part of the netgroup
+@var{netgroup}.  Using this function has the advantage that
+
+@enumerate
+@item
+no other netgroup function can use the global netgroup state since
+internal locking is used and
+@item
+the function is implemented more efficiently than successive calls
+to the other @code{set}/@code{get}/@code{endnetgrent} functions.
+@end enumerate
+
+Any of the pointers @var{hostp}, @var{userp}, and @var{domainp} can be
+@code{NULL} which means any value is excepted in this position.  This is
+also true for the name @code{-} which should not match any other string
+otherwise.
+
+The return value is @code{1} if an entry matching the given triple is
+found in the netgroup.  The return value is @code{0} if the netgroup
+itself is not found, the netgroup does not contain the triple or
+internal errors occurred.
+@end deftypefun
+
+@node Database Example
 @section User and Group Database Example
 
 Here is an example program showing the use of the system database inquiry
 functions.  The program prints some information about the user running
 the program.
 
-@example
+@smallexample
 @include db.c.texi
-@end example
+@end smallexample
 
 Here is some output from this program:
 
-@example
+@smallexample
+I am Throckmorton Snurd.
 My login name is snurd.
 My uid is 31093.
 My home directory is /home/fsg/snurd.
@@ -965,5 +1925,5 @@ My default shell is /bin/sh.
 My default group is guest (12).
 The members of this group are:
   friedman
-  @dots{}
-@end example
+  tami
+@end smallexample