Incorporated review comments from RMS.
authorsandra <sandra>
Thu, 22 Aug 1991 19:18:01 +0000 (19:18 +0000)
committersandra <sandra>
Thu, 22 Aug 1991 19:18:01 +0000 (19:18 +0000)
manual/io.texi

index 6d3d5f6..51de118 100644 (file)
@@ -170,7 +170,6 @@ These strings are called @dfn{file names}.
 @menu
 * Directories::                        Directories contain entries for files.
 * File Name Resolution::       A file name specifies how to look up a file.
-* Restrictions on File Names:: 
 * File Name Errors::           Error conditions relating to file names.
 * Portability of File Names::
 @end menu
@@ -273,49 +272,6 @@ can specify a file name of @file{/} to refer to the root directory, but
 you can't have an empty file name.  If you want to refer to the current
 working directory, use a file name of @file{.} or @file{./}.
 
-
-@node Restrictions on File Names
-@subsection Restrictions on File Names
-
-Individual file name components of a file name string may not be longer
-than @code{NAME_MAX} characters.  The GNU system always flags names that
-are too long as an error condition, but other implementations might just
-quietly truncate the name instead.
-
-In addition, the total size of a file name string (including its
-terminating null character) can be at most @code{PATH_MAX} characters.
-@xref{File System Parameters}.
-
-Upper- and lower-case characters are considered distinct in file names.
-Portable file name components can contain only the letters @samp{a}
-through @samp{z} and @samp{A} through @samp{Z}; the digits @samp{0}
-through @samp{9}; and the characters @samp{.} (period), @samp{_}
-(underscore), and @samp{-} (hyphen).  A hyphen can't be used as the
-first character of a portable file name component.
-
-For example, the following file name components are all portable:
-
-@example
-"foo.text"
-"version.13.notes"
-"README-FIRST"
-@end example
-
-@noindent
-but these file name components are not:
-
-@example
-"-delete-me"
-"vmshost::[LUSER]LOGIN.COM"
-@end example
-
-Of course, most POSIX implementations are much less restrictive than
-this about what characters can appear in file name components, but
-different implementations might support different extensions.
-
-@strong{Incomplete:}  What should I say about the GNU system in this
-respect?
-
 Unlike some other operating systems, the GNU system doesn't have any
 built-in support for file types (or extensions) or file versions as part
 of its file name syntax.  Many programs and utilities use conventions
@@ -323,7 +279,6 @@ for file names --- for example, files containing C source code usually
 have names suffixed with @samp{.c} --- but there is nothing in the file
 system itself that enforces this kind of convention.
 
-
 @node File Name Errors
 @subsection File Name Errors
 
@@ -360,9 +315,8 @@ exists, but the file isn't a directory.
 @subsection Portability of File Names
 
 The rules for the syntax of file names discussed in @ref{File Names},
-are the rules normally used by the GNU system and by other operating
-systems that are compatible with the POSIX.1 standard.  However, other
-operating systems may use other conventions.
+are the rules normally used by the GNU system and by other POSIX
+systems.  However, other operating systems may use other conventions.
 
 There are two reasons why it can be important for you to be aware of
 file name portability issues:
@@ -390,3 +344,11 @@ for concepts such as structured directories and file types or
 extensions.  Some concepts such as file versions might be supported in
 some operating systems and not by others.
 
+The POSIX.1 standard allows implementations to put additional
+restrictions on file name syntax, concerning what characters are
+permitted in file names and on the length of file name and file name
+component strings.  However, in the GNU system, you do not need to
+worry about these restrictions; any character is permitted in a file
+name string, and there are no limits on the length of file name strings.
+
+