(Heap Consistency Checking): Document limitation of MALLOC_CHECK_ in
authordrepper <drepper>
Thu, 1 Jun 2000 16:32:13 +0000 (16:32 +0000)
committerdrepper <drepper>
Thu, 1 Jun 2000 16:32:13 +0000 (16:32 +0000)
SUID and SGID programs.

manual/memory.texi

index b0996a5..e4bd531 100644 (file)
@@ -5,7 +5,7 @@
 @cindex storage allocation
 
 This chapter describes how processes manage and use memory in a system
-that uses the GNU C library.  
+that uses the GNU C library.
 
 The GNU C Library has several functions for dynamically allocating
 virtual memory in various ways.  They vary in generality and in
@@ -79,7 +79,7 @@ is at which addresses, and that process is called memory allocation.
 Allocation usually brings to mind meting out scarce resources, but in
 the case of virtual memory, that's not a major goal, because there is
 generally much more of it than anyone needs.  Memory allocation within a
-process is mainly just a matter of making sure that the same byte of 
+process is mainly just a matter of making sure that the same byte of
 memory isn't used to store two different things.
 
 Processes allocate memory in two major ways: by exec and
@@ -133,11 +133,11 @@ a contiguous range of virtual addresses.  Three important segments are:
 
 @itemize @bullet
 
-@item 
+@item
 
 The @dfn{text segment} contains a program's instructions and literals and
 static constants.  It is allocated by exec and stays the same size for
-the life of the virtual address space.  
+the life of the virtual address space.
 
 @item
 The @dfn{data segment} is working storage for the program.  It can be
@@ -145,7 +145,7 @@ preallocated and preloaded by exec and the process can extend or shrink
 it by calling functions as described in @xref{Resizing the Data
 Segment}.  Its lower end is fixed.
 
-@item 
+@item
 The @dfn{stack segment} contains a program stack.  It grows as the stack
 grows, but doesn't shrink when the stack shrinks.
 
@@ -790,6 +790,14 @@ immediately.  This can be useful because otherwise a crash may happen
 much later, and the true cause for the problem is then very hard to
 track down.
 
+There is one problem with @code{MALLOC_CHECK_}: in SUID or SGID binaries
+it could possibly be exploited since diverging from the normal programs
+behaviour it now writes something to the standard error desriptor.
+Therefore the use of @code{MALLOC_CHECK_} is disabled by default for
+SUID and SGID binaries.  It can be enabled again by the system
+administrator by adding a file @file{/etc/suid-debug} (the content is
+not important it could be empty).
+
 So, what's the difference between using @code{MALLOC_CHECK_} and linking
 with @samp{-lmcheck}?  @code{MALLOC_CHECK_} is orthogonal with respect to
 @samp{-lmcheck}.  @samp{-lmcheck} has been added for backward
@@ -1034,7 +1042,7 @@ This is the total size of memory occupied by free (not in use) chunks.
 
 @item int keepcost
 This is the size of the top-most releasable chunk that normally
-borders the end of the heap (i.e. the high end of the virtual address 
+borders the end of the heap (i.e. the high end of the virtual address
 space's data segment).
 
 @end table
@@ -2323,7 +2331,7 @@ The function has no effect if @var{addr} is lower than the low end of
 the data segment.  (This is considered success, by the way).
 
 The function fails if it would cause the data segment to overlap another
-segment or exceed the process' data storage limit (@pxref{Limits on 
+segment or exceed the process' data storage limit (@pxref{Limits on
 Resources}).
 
 The function is named for a common historical case where data storage
@@ -2333,7 +2341,7 @@ toward it from the top of the segment and the curtain between them is
 called the @dfn{break}.
 
 The return value is zero on success.  On failure, the return value is
-@code{-1} and @code{errno} is set accordingly.  The following @code{errno} 
+@code{-1} and @code{errno} is set accordingly.  The following @code{errno}
 values are specific to this function:
 
 @table @code
@@ -2392,7 +2400,7 @@ pages.
 @subsection Why Lock Pages
 
 Because page faults cause paged out pages to be paged in transparently,
-a process rarely needs to be concerned about locking pages.  However, 
+a process rarely needs to be concerned about locking pages.  However,
 there are two reasons people sometimes are:
 
 @itemize @bullet
@@ -2457,7 +2465,7 @@ In Linux, locked pages aren't as locked as you might think.
 Two virtual pages that are not shared memory can nonetheless be backed
 by the same real frame.  The kernel does this in the name of efficiency
 when it knows both virtual pages contain identical data, and does it
-even if one or both of the virtual pages are locked.  
+even if one or both of the virtual pages are locked.
 
 But when a process modifies one of those pages, the kernel must get it a
 separate frame and fill it with the page's data.  This is known as a
@@ -2639,7 +2647,7 @@ with @code{munlockall} and @code{munlock}.
 address space and turn off @code{MCL_FUTURE} future locking mode.
 
 The return value is zero if the function succeeds.  Otherwise, it is
-@code{-1} and @code{errno} is set accordingly.  The only way this 
+@code{-1} and @code{errno} is set accordingly.  The only way this
 function can fail is for generic reasons that all functions and system
 calls can fail, so there are no specific @code{errno} values.