Not needed anymore.
authordrepper <drepper>
Tue, 18 Apr 2000 18:38:13 +0000 (18:38 +0000)
committerdrepper <drepper>
Tue, 18 Apr 2000 18:38:13 +0000 (18:38 +0000)
login/README.utmpd [deleted file]

diff --git a/login/README.utmpd b/login/README.utmpd
deleted file mode 100644 (file)
index b691c36..0000000
+++ /dev/null
@@ -1,175 +0,0 @@
-With the introduction of version 2 of the GNU C Library the format of
-the UTMP and WTMP files changed for some configurations (see Q&A `Why
-does getlogin() always return NULL on my Linux box?' of the FAQ).
-This version of the GNU C Library contains a solution for the problems
-this may cause, by providing an UTMP daemon `utmpd'.
-
-Do I need it?
-=============
-
-If your configuration is one of the following:
-
-                i[3456]86-*-linux-gnu    Linux-2.0 on Intel
-                m68k-*-linux-gnu         Linux-2.0 on Motorola 680x0
-
-you might need it, so please read on.  If it is not, please read the
-section titled `Programming' at the end of this text.
-
-In principle, you only need the daemon if you want to keep using old
-programs linked against the previous version of the Linux C Library
-(libc5).  In addition you will need the daemon if you are running
-Linux on Intel, and you are planning to use iBCS (Intel Binary
-Compatibility Standard).  If you have no libc5 programs left on your
-system and you are not using iBCS, it is probably better not to
-install the daemon since it uses (a small amount of) memory and CPU
-time.  But apart from that it shouldn't hurt to install `utmpd', so
-when in doubt install it anyway.
-
-
-Installation
-============
-
-The installation process (`make install') already places the `utmpd'
-binary in $(sbindir).  The only thing you have to do is modifying your
-startup scripts to start the daemon.  Unfortunately this is a bit of a
-hassle, since the layout of these scripts is not standardized.  You
-should try to find the command that creates the file `/var/run/utmp'.
-This is usually done in a script named `/etc/rc', `/etc/init.d/boot'
-(Debian) or `/etc/rc.d/rc.S' (Slackware).  You could try:
-
-     grep utmp /etc/* /etc/init.d/* /etc/rc.d/*
-
-to find the right script.  The creation of `/var/run/utmp' is usually
-done with a command like:
-
-     : > /var/run/utmp
-
-or
-
-     cat /dev/null > /var/run/utmp
-
-Now add a line before this command to create the file `/var/run/utmpx'
-e.g.
-
-     : > /var/run/utmpx
-
-or
-
-     cat /dev/null > /var/run/utmpx
-
-whatever you prefer, and after this command, add a line to start the
-daemon
-
-     utmpd
-
-The entire fragment could look something like
-
-     # Clean up /var/run and create /var/run/utmp so that we can login.
-     ( cd /var/run && find . ! -type d -exec rm -f -- {} \; )
-     : > /var/run/utmpx
-     : > /var/run/utmp
-     utmpd
-
-If the file `/var/log/wtmp' exists on your system, you will probably
-want to create the file `/var/log/wtmpx'.  Programs linked against the
-GNU C Library will now write to `/var/log/wtmpx', while programs
-linked against the old library will continue to write to
-`/var/log/wtmp'.  Of course this means that the information gets
-spread over two files.  We hope to provide a better solution in the
-future.
-
-After a reboot, user accounting should be working again.  If not,
-please refer to the section titled `Troubleshooting' below before
-submitting a bug report.
-
-
-What is `utmpd' doing?
-======================
-
-After installation there will be two files that store the user
-accounting information: `/var/run/utmp' and `/var/run/utmpx'.  The
-file `/var/run/utmp' will be in the old format so libc5 programs will
-continue to work (even if they are broken and do not use the library
-functions to access the user accounting database).  And on Intel, you
-can safely link `/var/run/utmp' to `/etc/utmp' for iBCS programs.
-Programs linked against the new GNU C Library (glibc2) will contact
-the daemon for all user accounting database access.  The daemon will
-store its information in `/var/run/utmpx' and keeps this file in sync
-with `/var/run/utmp'.  Entries added to `/var/run/utmpx' will be
-converted to the old format and will be added to `/var/run/utmp' and
-vice versa.  This way both libc5 and glibc2 see the same information
-in the same fields of `struct utmp'. Of course libc5 programs see only
-part of the information that glibc2 programs see because not all
-members of the glibc2 `struct utmp' are present in the libc5 `struct
-utmp'.  For the same reason libc5 will see a truncated version of
-those fields where the length of the glibc2 field is larger than the
-corresponding libc5 field (ut_user, ut_line, ut_host).
-
-
-Troubleshooting
-===============
-
-If user accounting is not working on your system, e.g. programs like
-`who' or `logname' return rubbish, or you cannot login, make
-sure that:
-
-*  The file `/var/run/utmpx' exists.
-
-*  The file `/var/log/wtmpx' exists.
-
-*  No program linked against the GNU C Library (libc6) is accessing
-   `/var/run/utmp' directly (see the section on `Programming' below).
-
-If that does not solve your problems, please use the `glibcbug' script
-to report the problem to <bugs@gnu.org>.
-
-The `utmpd' daemon uses `syslogd' to report problems.  It uses the
-`daemon' facility and `warning' and `error' levels.  Alternatively you
-could use the following option to ease debugging:
-
-`--debug'
-    Use this option if you want the daemon to output its warnings and
-    error messages to the terminal instead of sending them to the
-    system logger (`syslogd').  When using this option the daemon does
-    not auto-background itself.
-
-To use this option you should first kill the daemon that is already
-running, and start a fresh one with the desired option:
-
-    kill `cat /var/run/utmpd.pid`
-    utmpd --debug
-
-Please include any warnings or error messages from `utmpd' in your
-bug reports.
-
-
-Programming
-===========
-
-In order for the `utmpd' approach to work it is essential that NO
-program EVER accesses the UTMP and WTMP files directly.  Instead, a
-program should use ONLY the available library functions:
-
-     * utmpname()      Select the database used (UTMP, WTMP, ...).
-     * setutent()      Open the database.
-     * getutent()      Read the next entry from the database.
-     * getutid()       Search for the next entry with a specific ID.
-     * getutline()     Search for the next entry for a specific line.
-     * pututline()     Write an entry to the database.
-     * endutent()      Close the database.
-     * updwtmp()       Add an entry to a database (WTMP, ...).
-
-For details, please refer to `The GNU C Library Reference Manual',
-which also contains information about some additional functions
-derived from BSD and XPG that may be of interest.  The command
-
-    info libc "User Accounting Database"
-
-should point you at the right location.
-
-If you encounter a program that reads from or, even worse, writes to
-the UTMP and WTMP files directly, please report this as a bug to the
-author of that program.  Note that the files referred to by the macros
-`_PATH_UTMP' and `_PATH_WTMP' might even disappear in the future, so
-please do not use these, except in a call to `utmpname()' or
-`updwtmp()', not even to check their existence.