update from main archive 961207
authordrepper <drepper>
Sun, 8 Dec 1996 07:59:00 +0000 (07:59 +0000)
committerdrepper <drepper>
Sun, 8 Dec 1996 07:59:00 +0000 (07:59 +0000)
50 files changed:
io/getwd.c
libio/Makefile
libio/filedoalloc.c
libio/fileops.c
libio/genops.c
libio/iolibio.h
libio/iopopen.c
libio/iovsprintf.c
libio/iovsscanf.c
libio/libio.h
libio/libioP.h
libio/memstream.c
libio/stdio.h
libio/strfile.h
libio/vasprintf.c
libio/vsnprintf.c
login/endutent.c [deleted file]
login/endutent_r.c [deleted file]
login/pututline.c [deleted file]
login/pututline_r.c [deleted file]
login/setutent.c [deleted file]
login/setutent_r.c [deleted file]
manual/=float.texinfo
manual/=limits.texinfo
manual/=process.texinfo
manual/=stdarg.texi
manual/=stddef.texi
manual/arith.texi
manual/conf.texi
manual/creature.texi
manual/ctype.texi
manual/errno.texi
manual/filesys.texi
manual/intro.texi
manual/io.texi
manual/lang.texi
manual/libc.texinfo
manual/locale.texi
manual/maint.texi
manual/math.texi
manual/mbyte.texi
manual/memory.texi
manual/process.texi
manual/search.texi
manual/setjmp.texi
manual/signal.texi
manual/startup.texi
manual/stdio.texi
manual/string.texi
manual/time.texi

index 510a681..506aac8 100644 (file)
@@ -38,10 +38,10 @@ getwd (buf)
       return NULL;
     }
 
-  if (getcwd (tmpbuf, LOCAL_PATH_MAX) == NULL)
+  if (getcwd (tmpbuf, PATH_MAX) == NULL)
     {
       /* We use 1024 here since it should really be enough and because
-        this is a save value.  */
+        this is a safe value.  */
       __strerror_r (errno, buf, 1024);
       return NULL;
     }
index 4266ad4..53a1d7d 100644 (file)
@@ -12,9 +12,9 @@
 # Library General Public License for more details.
 
 # You should have received a copy of the GNU Library General Public
-# License along with the GNU C Library; see the file COPYING.LIB.  If
-# not, write to the Free Software Foundation, Inc., 675 Mass Ave,
-# Cambridge, MA 02139, USA.
+# License along with the GNU C Library; see the file COPYING.LIB.  If not,
+# write to the Free Software Foundation, Inc., 59 Temple Place - Suite 330,
+# Boston, MA 02111-1307, USA.
 
 #
 #      Specific makefile for libio.
@@ -26,7 +26,7 @@ headers       := stdio.h libio.h _G_config.h
 routines       :=                                                            \
        filedoalloc iofclose iofdopen iofflush iofgetpos iofgets iofopen      \
        iofopncook iofprintf iofputs iofread iofsetpos ioftell                \
-       iofwrite iogetdelim iogetline iogets iopadn iopopen ioprims ioputs    \
+       iofwrite iogetdelim iogetline iogets iopadn iopopen ioputs            \
        ioseekoff ioseekpos iosetbuffer iosetvbuf iosprintf ioungetc          \
        iovsprintf iovsscanf                                                  \
                                                                              \
@@ -40,6 +40,8 @@ all: # Make this the default target; it will be defined in Rules.
 
 include ../Makeconfig
 
+CPPFLAGS-.o += -DIO_DEBUG
+
 ifneq (,$(filter %REENTRANT, $(defines)))
 routines += clearerr_u feof_u ferror_u fputc_u getc_u getchar_u                      \
            iofflush_u putc_u putchar_u peekc
@@ -48,7 +50,7 @@ CPPFLAGS += -D_IO_MTSAFE_IO
 endif
 
 aux    :=                                                                    \
-       cleanup fileops genops stdfiles stdio strops
+       fileops genops stdfiles stdio strops
 
 distribute := iolibio.h libioP.h strfile.h Banner
 
index 045bff6..eee489b 100644 (file)
@@ -71,12 +71,14 @@ DEFUN(_IO_file_doallocate, (fp),
   register char *p;
   struct stat st;
 
+#ifndef _LIBC
   /* If _IO_cleanup_registration_needed is non-zero, we should call the
      function it points to.  This is to make sure _IO_cleanup gets called
      on exit.  We call it from _IO_file_doallocate, since that is likely
      to get called by any program that does buffered I/O. */
   if (_IO_cleanup_registration_needed)
     (*_IO_cleanup_registration_needed)();
+#endif
 
   if (fp->_fileno < 0 || _IO_SYSSTAT (fp, &st) < 0)
     {
index d3f4831..ce0e2bb 100644 (file)
@@ -47,7 +47,6 @@ extern int errno;
    The position in the buffer that corresponds to the position
    in external file system is normally _IO_read_end, except in putback
    mode, when it is _IO_save_end.
-   when it is _IO_save_end.
    If the field _fb._offset is >= 0, it gives the offset in
    the file as a whole corresponding to eGptr(). (?)
 
@@ -185,7 +184,7 @@ DEFUN(_IO_file_fopen, (fp, filename, mode),
   _IO_mask_flags(fp, read_write,_IO_NO_READS+_IO_NO_WRITES+_IO_IS_APPENDING);
   if (read_write & _IO_IS_APPENDING)
     if (_IO_SEEKOFF (fp, (_IO_off_t)0, _IO_seek_end, _IOS_INPUT|_IOS_OUTPUT)
-       == _IO_pos_BAD)
+       == _IO_pos_BAD && errno != ESPIPE)
       return NULL;
   _IO_link_in(fp);
   return fp;
@@ -200,7 +199,12 @@ DEFUN(_IO_file_attach, (fp, fd),
   fp->_fileno = fd;
   fp->_flags &= ~(_IO_NO_READS+_IO_NO_WRITES);
   fp->_flags |= _IO_DELETE_DONT_CLOSE;
+  /* Get the current position of the file. */
+  /* We have to do that since that may be junk. */
   fp->_offset = _IO_pos_BAD;
+  if (_IO_SEEKOFF (fp, (_IO_off_t)0, _IO_seek_cur, _IOS_INPUT|_IOS_OUTPUT)
+      == _IO_pos_BAD && errno != ESPIPE)
+    return NULL;
   return fp;
 }
 
index fc4c61d..3a58cd2 100644 (file)
@@ -861,3 +861,7 @@ __io_defs io_defs__;
 #ifdef weak_alias
 weak_alias (_IO_cleanup, _cleanup)
 #endif
+
+#ifdef text_set_element
+text_set_element(__libc_atexit, _cleanup);
+#endif
index 92df6a6..ca863b5 100644 (file)
@@ -56,3 +56,22 @@ extern _IO_FILE* _IO_popen __P((const char*, const char*));
 #ifdef __cplusplus
 }
 #endif
+
+#define _IO_open       __open
+#define _IO_close      __close
+#define        _IO_fork        __fork
+#define        _IO_fcntl       __fcntl
+#define _IO__exit      _exit
+#define _IO_read       __read
+#define _IO_write      __write
+#define _IO_lseek      __lseek
+#define        _IO_getdtablesize       __getdtablesize
+#define _IO_pipe       __pipe
+#define _IO_dup2       __dup2
+#define _IO_execl      execl
+#define _IO_waitpid    __waitpid
+#define _IO_stat        __stat
+#define _IO_getpid      __getpid
+#define _IO_geteuid     __geteuid
+#define _IO_getegid     __getegid
+#define _IO_fstat      __fstat
index dc1e74d..5703c99 100644 (file)
@@ -123,7 +123,7 @@ DEFUN(_IO_proc_open, (fp, command, mode),
          proc_file_chain = proc_file_chain->next;
        }
 
-      _IO_execl("/bin/sh", "sh", "-c", command, NULL);
+      _IO_execl("/bin/sh", "sh", "-c", command, (char *) 0);
       _IO__exit(127);
     }
   _IO_close(child_end);
index b2e8b67..f0c9889 100644 (file)
@@ -38,7 +38,7 @@ _IO_vsprintf (string, format, args)
   int ret;
 
 #ifdef _IO_MTSAFE_IO
-  sf._f._lock = &lock;
+  sf._sbf._f._lock = &lock;
 #endif
   _IO_init ((_IO_FILE *) &sf, 0);
   _IO_JUMPS ((_IO_FILE *) &sf) = &_IO_str_jumps;
index 6e7d8c5..473b714 100644 (file)
@@ -32,7 +32,7 @@ DEFUN(_IO_vsscanf, (string, format, args),
   _IO_strfile sf;
 #ifdef _IO_MTSAFE_IO
   _IO_lock_t lock;
-  sf._f._lock = &lock;
+  sf._sbf._f._lock = &lock;
 #endif
   _IO_init((_IO_FILE*)&sf, 0);
   _IO_JUMPS((_IO_FILE*)&sf) = &_IO_str_jumps;
index 7dd47db..acc34c0 100644 (file)
@@ -52,11 +52,15 @@ the executable file might be covered by the GNU General Public License. */
 #endif
 
 #ifndef __P
+#if _G_HAVE_SYS_CDEFS
+#include <sys/cdefs.h>
+#else
 #ifdef __STDC__
 #define __P(protos) protos
 #else
 #define __P(protos) ()
 #endif
+#endif
 #endif /*!__P*/
 
 /* For backward compatibility */
@@ -79,12 +83,16 @@ the executable file might be covered by the GNU General Public License. */
 #define EOF (-1)
 #endif
 #ifndef NULL
-#if !defined(__cplusplus) || defined(__GNUC__)
+#ifdef __GNUG__
+#define NULL (__null)
+#else
+#if !defined(__cplusplus)
 #define NULL ((void*)0)
 #else
 #define NULL (0)
 #endif
 #endif
+#endif
 
 #define _IOS_INPUT     1
 #define _IOS_OUTPUT    2
@@ -183,6 +191,7 @@ struct _IO_FILE {
 #define _IO_file_flags _flags
 
   /* The following pointers correspond to the C++ streambuf protocol. */
+  /* Note:  Tk uses the _IO_read_ptr and _IO_read_end fields directly. */
   char* _IO_read_ptr;  /* Current read pointer */
   char* _IO_read_end;  /* End of get area. */
   char* _IO_read_base; /* Start of putback+get area. */
@@ -200,10 +209,6 @@ struct _IO_FILE {
 
   struct _IO_FILE *_chain;
 
-#if  !_IO_UNIFIED_JUMPTABLES
-  struct _IO_jump_t *_jumps; /* Jump table */
-#endif
-
   int _fileno;
   int _blksize;
   _IO_off_t _offset;
index d3c871f..008f9b7 100644 (file)
@@ -57,71 +57,180 @@ extern "C" {
 #define _IO_seek_cur 1
 #define _IO_seek_end 2
 
-typedef int (*_IO_overflow_t) __P((_IO_FILE*, int));
-typedef int (*_IO_underflow_t) __P((_IO_FILE*));
-typedef _IO_size_t (*_IO_xsputn_t) __P((_IO_FILE*,const void*,_IO_size_t));
-typedef _IO_size_t (*_IO_xsgetn_t) __P((_IO_FILE*, void*, _IO_size_t));
-typedef _IO_ssize_t (*_IO_read_t) __P((_IO_FILE*, void*, _IO_ssize_t));
-typedef _IO_ssize_t (*_IO_write_t) __P((_IO_FILE*,const void*,_IO_ssize_t));
-typedef int (*_IO_stat_t) __P((_IO_FILE*, void*));
-typedef _IO_fpos_t (*_IO_seek_t) __P((_IO_FILE*, _IO_off_t, int));
-typedef int (*_IO_doallocate_t) __P((_IO_FILE*));
-typedef int (*_IO_pbackfail_t) __P((_IO_FILE*, int));
-typedef _IO_FILE* (*_IO_setbuf_t) __P((_IO_FILE*, char *, _IO_ssize_t));
-typedef int (*_IO_sync_t) __P((_IO_FILE*));
-typedef void (*_IO_finish_t) __P((_IO_FILE*)); /* finalize */
-typedef int (*_IO_close_t) __P((_IO_FILE*)); /* finalize */
-typedef _IO_fpos_t (*_IO_seekoff_t) __P((_IO_FILE*, _IO_off_t, int, int));
-
-/* The _IO_seek_cur and _IO_seek_end options are not allowed. */
-typedef _IO_fpos_t (*_IO_seekpos_t) __P((_IO_FILE*, _IO_fpos_t, int));
+/* THE JUMPTABLE FUNCTIONS.
+
+ * The _IO_FILE type is used to implement the FILE type in GNU libc,
+ * as well as the streambuf class in GNU iostreams for C++.
+ * These are all the same, just used differently.
+ * An _IO_FILE (or FILE) object is allows followed by a pointer to
+ * a jump table (of pointers to functions).  The pointer is accessed
+ * with the _IO_JUMPS macro.  The jump table has a eccentric format,
+ * so as to be compatible with the layout of a C++ virtual function table.
+ * (as implemented by g++).  When a pointer to a steambuf object is
+ * coerced to an (_IO_FILE*), then _IO_JUMPS on the result just
+ * happens to point to the virtual function table of the streambuf.
+ * Thus the _IO_JUMPS function table used for C stdio/libio does
+ * double duty as the virtual functiuon table for C++ streambuf.
+ *
+ * The entries in the _IO_JUMPS function table (and hence also the
+ * virtual functions of a streambuf) are described below.
+ * The first parameter of each function entry is the _IO_FILE/streambuf
+ * object being acted on (i.e. the 'this' parameter).
+ */
 
-#if  !_IO_UNIFIED_JUMPTABLES
-#define _IO_JUMPS(THIS) (THIS)->_jumps
-#else
 #define _IO_JUMPS(THIS) ((struct _IO_FILE_plus*)(THIS))->vtable
-#endif
-
-#if  !_IO_UNIFIED_JUMPTABLES
+#ifdef _G_USING_THUNKS
 #define JUMP_FIELD(TYPE, NAME) TYPE NAME
 #define JUMP0(FUNC, THIS) _IO_JUMPS(THIS)->FUNC(THIS)
 #define JUMP1(FUNC, THIS, X1) _IO_JUMPS(THIS)->FUNC(THIS, X1)
 #define JUMP2(FUNC, THIS, X1, X2) _IO_JUMPS(THIS)->FUNC(THIS, X1, X2)
-#define JUMP3(FUNC, THIS, X1, X2, X3) _IO_JUMPS(THIS)->FUNC(THIS, X1, X2, X3)
+#define JUMP3(FUNC, THIS, X1,X2,X3) _IO_JUMPS(THIS)->FUNC(THIS, X1,X2, X3)
 #define JUMP_INIT(NAME, VALUE) VALUE
+#define JUMP_INIT_DUMMY JUMP_INIT(dummy, 0), JUMP_INIT(dummy2, 0)
 #else
+/* These macros will change when we re-implement vtables to use "thunks"! */
 #define JUMP_FIELD(TYPE, NAME) struct { short delta1, delta2; TYPE pfn; } NAME
 #define JUMP0(FUNC, THIS) _IO_JUMPS(THIS)->FUNC.pfn(THIS)
 #define JUMP1(FUNC, THIS, X1) _IO_JUMPS(THIS)->FUNC.pfn(THIS, X1)
 #define JUMP2(FUNC, THIS, X1, X2) _IO_JUMPS(THIS)->FUNC.pfn(THIS, X1, X2)
 #define JUMP3(FUNC, THIS, X1,X2,X3) _IO_JUMPS(THIS)->FUNC.pfn(THIS, X1,X2, X3)
 #define JUMP_INIT(NAME, VALUE) {0, 0, VALUE}
-#endif
 #define JUMP_INIT_DUMMY JUMP_INIT(dummy, 0)
+#endif
 
+/* The 'finish' function does any final cleaning up of an _IO_FILE object.
+   It does not delete (free) it, but does everything else to finalize it/
+   It matches the streambuf::~streambuf virtual destructor.  */
+typedef void (*_IO_finish_t) __P((_IO_FILE*)); /* finalize */
 #define _IO_FINISH(FP) JUMP0(__finish, FP)
+
+/* The 'overflow' hook flushes the buffer.
+   The second argument is a character, or EOF.
+   It matches the streambuf::overflow virtual function. */
+typedef int (*_IO_overflow_t) __P((_IO_FILE*, int));
 #define _IO_OVERFLOW(FP, CH) JUMP1(__overflow, FP, CH)
+
+/* The 'underflow' hook tries to fills the get buffer.
+   It returns the next character (as an unsigned char) or EOF.  The next
+   character remains in the get buffer, and the get postion is not changed.
+   It matches the streambuf::underflow virtual function. */
+typedef int (*_IO_underflow_t) __P((_IO_FILE*));
 #define _IO_UNDERFLOW(FP) JUMP0(__underflow, FP)
+
+/* The 'uflow' hook returns the next character in the input stream
+   (cast to unsigned char), and increments the read position;
+   EOF is returned on failure.
+   It matches the streambuf::uflow virtual function, which is not in the
+   cfront implementation, but was added to C++ by the ANSI/ISO committee. */
 #define _IO_UFLOW(FP) JUMP0(__uflow, FP)
+
+/* The 'pbackfail' hook handles backing up.
+   It matches the streambuf::pbackfail virtual function. */
+typedef int (*_IO_pbackfail_t) __P((_IO_FILE*, int));
 #define _IO_PBACKFAIL(FP, CH) JUMP1(__pbackfail, FP, CH)
+
+/* The 'xsputn' hook writes upto N characters from buffer DATA.
+   Returns the number of character actually written.
+   It matches the streambuf::xsputn virtual function. */
+typedef _IO_size_t (*_IO_xsputn_t)
+  __P((_IO_FILE *FP, const void *DATA, _IO_size_t N));
 #define _IO_XSPUTN(FP, DATA, N) JUMP2(__xsputn, FP, DATA, N)
+
+/* The 'xsgetn' hook reads upto N characters into buffer DATA.
+   Returns the number of character actually read.
+   It matches the streambuf::xsgetn virtual function. */
+typedef _IO_size_t (*_IO_xsgetn_t) __P((_IO_FILE*FP, void*DATA, _IO_size_t N));
 #define _IO_XSGETN(FP, DATA, N) JUMP2(__xsgetn, FP, DATA, N)
+
+/* The 'seekoff' hook moves the stream position to a new position
+   relative to the start of the file (if DIR==0), the current position
+   (MODE==1), or the end of the file (MODE==2).
+   It matches the streambuf::seekoff virtual function.
+   It is also used for the ANSI fseek function. */
+typedef _IO_fpos_t (*_IO_seekoff_t)
+  __P((_IO_FILE* FP, _IO_off_t OFF, int DIR, int MODE));
 #define _IO_SEEKOFF(FP, OFF, DIR, MODE) JUMP3(__seekoff, FP, OFF, DIR, MODE)
+
+/* The 'seekpos' hook also moves the stream position,
+   but to an absolute position given by a fpos_t (seekpos).
+   It matches the streambuf::seekpos virtual function.
+   It is also used for the ANSI fgetpos and fsetpos functions.  */
+/* The _IO_seek_cur and _IO_seek_end options are not allowed. */
+typedef _IO_fpos_t (*_IO_seekpos_t) __P((_IO_FILE*, _IO_fpos_t, int));
 #define _IO_SEEKPOS(FP, POS, FLAGS) JUMP2(__seekpos, FP, POS, FLAGS)
+
+/* The 'setbuf' hook gives a buffer to the file.
+   It matches the streambuf::setbuf virtual function. */
+typedef _IO_FILE* (*_IO_setbuf_t) __P((_IO_FILE*, char *, _IO_ssize_t));
 #define _IO_SETBUF(FP, BUFFER, LENGTH) JUMP2(__setbuf, FP, BUFFER, LENGTH)
+
+/* The 'sync' hook attempts to synchronize the internal data structures
+   of the file with the external state.
+   It matches the streambuf::sync virtual function. */
+typedef int (*_IO_sync_t) __P((_IO_FILE*));
 #define _IO_SYNC(FP) JUMP0(__sync, FP)
+
+/* The 'doallocate' hook is used to tell the file to allocate a buffer.
+   It matches the streambuf::doallocate virtual function, which is not
+   in the ANSI/ISO C++ standard, but is part traditional implementations. */
+typedef int (*_IO_doallocate_t) __P((_IO_FILE*));
 #define _IO_DOALLOCATE(FP) JUMP0(__doallocate, FP)
+
+/* The following four hooks (sysread, syswrite, sysclose, sysseek, and
+   sysstat) are low-level hooks specific to this implementation.
+   There is no correspondance in the ANSI/ISO C++ standard library.
+   The hooks basically correspond to the Unix system functions
+   (read, write, close, lseek, and stat) except that a _IO_FILE*
+   parameter is used instead of a integer file descriptor;  the default
+   implementation used for normal files just calls those functions.
+   The advantage of overriding these functions instead of the higher-level
+   ones (underflow, overflow etc) is that you can leave all the buffering
+   higher-level functions.  */
+
+/* The 'sysread' hook is used to read data from the external file into
+   an existing buffer.  It generalizes the Unix read(2) function.
+   It matches the streambuf::sys_read virtual function, which is
+   specific to this implementaion. */
+typedef _IO_ssize_t (*_IO_read_t) __P((_IO_FILE*, void*, _IO_ssize_t));
 #define _IO_SYSREAD(FP, DATA, LEN) JUMP2(__read, FP, DATA, LEN)
+
+/* The 'syswrite' hook is used to write data from an existing buffer
+   to an external file.  It generalizes the Unix write(2) function.
+   It matches the streambuf::sys_write virtual function, which is
+   specific to this implementaion. */
+typedef _IO_ssize_t (*_IO_write_t) __P((_IO_FILE*,const void*,_IO_ssize_t));
 #define _IO_SYSWRITE(FP, DATA, LEN) JUMP2(__write, FP, DATA, LEN)
+
+/* The 'sysseek' hook is used to re-position an external file.
+   It generalizes the Unix lseek(2) function.
+   It matches the streambuf::sys_seek virtual function, which is
+   specific to this implementaion. */
+typedef _IO_fpos_t (*_IO_seek_t) __P((_IO_FILE*, _IO_off_t, int));
 #define _IO_SYSSEEK(FP, OFFSET, MODE) JUMP2(__seek, FP, OFFSET, MODE)
+
+/* The 'sysclose' hook is used to finalize (close, finish up) an
+   external file.  It generalizes the Unix close(2) function.
+   It matches the streambuf::sys_close virtual function, which is
+   specific to this implementation. */
+typedef int (*_IO_close_t) __P((_IO_FILE*)); /* finalize */
 #define _IO_SYSCLOSE(FP) JUMP0(__close, FP)
+
+/* The 'sysstat' hook is used to get information about an external file
+   into a struct stat buffer.  It generalizes the Unix fstat(2) call.
+   It matches the streambuf::sys_stat virtual function, which is
+   specific to this implementaion. */
+typedef int (*_IO_stat_t) __P((_IO_FILE*, void*));
 #define _IO_SYSSTAT(FP, BUF) JUMP1(__stat, FP, BUF)
 
+
 #define _IO_CHAR_TYPE char /* unsigned char ? */
 #define _IO_INT_TYPE int
 
 struct _IO_jump_t {
     JUMP_FIELD(_G_size_t, __dummy);
+#ifdef _G_USING_THUNKS
+    JUMP_FIELD(_G_size_t, __dummy2);
+#endif
     JUMP_FIELD(_IO_finish_t, __finish);
     JUMP_FIELD(_IO_overflow_t, __overflow);
     JUMP_FIELD(_IO_underflow_t, __underflow);
@@ -147,16 +256,13 @@ struct _IO_jump_t {
 };
 
 /* We always allocate an extra word following an _IO_FILE.
+   This contains a pointer to the function jump table used.
    This is for compatibility with C++ streambuf; the word can
    be used to smash to a pointer to a virtual function table. */
 
 struct _IO_FILE_plus {
   _IO_FILE file;
-#if _IO_UNIFIED_JUMPTABLES
   const struct _IO_jump_t *vtable;
-#else
-  const void *vtable;
-#endif
 };
 
 /* Generic functions */
@@ -225,7 +331,7 @@ extern void _IO_flush_all_linebuffered __P((void));
 #define _IO_have_backup(fp) ((fp)->_IO_save_base != NULL)
 #define _IO_in_backup(fp) ((fp)->_flags & _IO_IN_BACKUP)
 #define _IO_have_markers(fp) ((fp)->_markers != NULL)
-#define _IO_blen(p) ((fp)->_IO_buf_end - (fp)->_IO_buf_base)
+#define _IO_blen(fp) ((fp)->_IO_buf_end - (fp)->_IO_buf_base)
 
 /* Jumptable functions for files. */
 
@@ -290,12 +396,16 @@ extern void (*_IO_cleanup_registration_needed) __P ((void));
 #define EOF (-1)
 #endif
 #ifndef NULL
-#if !defined(__cplusplus) || defined(__GNUC__)
+#ifdef __GNUG__
+#define NULL (__null)
+#else
+#if !defined(__cplusplus)
 #define NULL ((void*)0)
 #else
 #define NULL (0)
 #endif
 #endif
+#endif
 
 #define FREE_BUF(_B) free(_B)
 #define ALLOC_BUF(_S) (char*)malloc(_S)
@@ -337,22 +447,17 @@ extern int _IO_vscanf __P((const char *, _IO_va_list));
 }
 #endif
 
-#if  _IO_UNIFIED_JUMPTABLES
-#define _IO_FJUMP /* nothing */
-#else
-#define _IO_FJUMP &_IO_file_jumps,
-#endif
 #ifdef _IO_MTSAFE_IO
 /* check following! */
 #define FILEBUF_LITERAL(CHAIN, FLAGS, FD) \
        { _IO_MAGIC+_IO_LINKED+_IO_IS_FILEBUF+FLAGS, \
-         0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, CHAIN, _IO_FJUMP FD, \
+         0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, CHAIN, FD, \
           0, 0, 0, 0, { 0 }, &_IO_stdfile_##FD##_lock }
 #else
 /* check following! */
 #define FILEBUF_LITERAL(CHAIN, FLAGS, FD) \
        { _IO_MAGIC+_IO_LINKED+_IO_IS_FILEBUF+FLAGS, \
-          0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, CHAIN, _IO_FJUMP FD }
+          0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, CHAIN, FD }
 #endif
 
 /* VTABLE_LABEL defines NAME as of the CLASS class.
@@ -402,7 +507,7 @@ extern struct _IO_fake_stdiobuf _IO_stdin_buf, _IO_stdout_buf, _IO_stderr_buf;
 #define MAYBE_SET_EINVAL /* nothing */
 #endif
 
-#ifdef DEBUG
+#ifdef IO_DEBUG
 #define CHECK_FILE(FILE,RET) \
        if ((FILE) == NULL) { MAYBE_SET_EINVAL; return RET; } \
        else { COERCE_FILE(FILE); \
index 8f9c8ac..ddcce67 100644 (file)
@@ -77,21 +77,21 @@ open_memstream (bufloc, sizeloc)
   if (new_f == NULL)
     return NULL;
 #ifdef _IO_MTSAFE_IO
-  new_f->fp._sf._f._lock = &new_f->lock;
+  new_f->fp._sf._sbf._f._lock = &new_f->lock;
 #endif
 
   buf = ALLOC_BUF (_IO_BUFSIZ);
-  _IO_init (&new_f->fp._sf._f, 0);
-  _IO_JUMPS (&new_f->fp._sf._f) = &_IO_mem_jumps;
-  _IO_str_init_static (&new_f->fp._sf._f, buf, _IO_BUFSIZ, buf);
-  new_f->fp._sf._f._flags &= ~_IO_USER_BUF;
+  _IO_init (&new_f->fp._sf._sbf._f, 0);
+  _IO_JUMPS (&new_f->fp._sf._sbf._f) = &_IO_mem_jumps;
+  _IO_str_init_static (&new_f->fp._sf._sbf._f, buf, _IO_BUFSIZ, buf);
+  new_f->fp._sf._sbf._f._flags &= ~_IO_USER_BUF;
   new_f->fp._sf._s._allocate_buffer = (_IO_alloc_type) malloc;
   new_f->fp._sf._s._free_buffer = (_IO_free_type) free;
 
   new_f->fp.bufloc = bufloc;
   new_f->fp.sizeloc = sizeloc;
 
-  return &new_f->fp._sf._f;
+  return &new_f->fp._sf._sbf._f;
 }
 
 
index 75d22f9..ba5fa54 100644 (file)
@@ -73,7 +73,10 @@ typedef _IO_fpos_t fpos_t;
 
 #include <stdio_lim.h>
 
+#ifdef __USE_SVID
+/* Default path prefix for `tempnam' and `tmpnam'.  */
 #define P_tmpdir      "/tmp"
+#endif
 
 /* For use by debuggers. These are linked in if printf or fprintf are used. */
 extern FILE *stdin, *stdout, *stderr; /* TODO */
index 4934a06..76044f8 100644 (file)
@@ -36,9 +36,27 @@ struct _IO_str_fields
   _IO_free_type _free_buffer;
 };
 
-typedef struct _IO_strfile_
+/* This is needed for the Irix6 N32 ABI, which has a 64 bit off_t type,
+   but a 32 bit pointer type.  In this case, we get 4 bytes of padding
+   after the vtable pointer.  Putting them in a structure together solves
+   this problem.  */
+
+struct _IO_streambuf
 {
   struct _IO_FILE _f;
   const void *_vtable;
+};
+
+typedef struct _IO_strfile_
+{
+  struct _IO_streambuf _sbf;
   struct _IO_str_fields _s;
 } _IO_strfile;
+
+/* dynamic: set when the array object is allocated (or reallocated)  as
+   necessary to hold a character sequence that can change in length. */
+#define _IO_STR_DYNAMIC(FP) ((FP)->_s._allocate_buffer != (_IO_alloc_type)0)
+
+/* frozen: set when the program has requested that the array object not
+   be altered, reallocated, or freed. */
+#define _IO_STR_FROZEN(FP) ((FP)->_f._IO_file_flags & _IO_USER_BUF)
index 57a3b08..f8dba80 100644 (file)
@@ -46,22 +46,22 @@ _IO_vasprintf (result_ptr, format, args)
   if (string == NULL)
     return -1;
 #ifdef _IO_MTSAFE_IO
-  sf._f._lock = &lock;
+  sf._sbf._f._lock = &lock;
 #endif
   _IO_init((_IO_FILE*)&sf, 0);
   _IO_JUMPS((_IO_FILE*)&sf) = &_IO_str_jumps;
   _IO_str_init_static ((_IO_FILE*)&sf, string, init_string_size, string);
-  sf._f._flags &= ~_IO_USER_BUF;
+  sf._sbf._f._flags &= ~_IO_USER_BUF;
   sf._s._allocate_buffer = (_IO_alloc_type)malloc;
   sf._s._free_buffer = (_IO_free_type)free;
   ret = _IO_vfprintf((_IO_FILE*)&sf, format, args);
   if (ret < 0)
     return ret;
-  *result_ptr = (char*)realloc(sf._f._IO_buf_base,
-                              (sf._f._IO_write_ptr - sf._f._IO_write_base) +1);
+  *result_ptr = (char*)realloc(sf._sbf._f._IO_buf_base,
+                              (sf._sbf._f._IO_write_ptr - sf._sbf._f._IO_write_base) +1);
   if (*result_ptr == NULL)
-    *result_ptr = sf._f._IO_buf_base;
-  (*result_ptr)[sf._f._IO_write_ptr-sf._f._IO_write_base] = '\0';
+    *result_ptr = sf._sbf._f._IO_buf_base;
+  (*result_ptr)[sf._sbf._f._IO_write_ptr-sf._sbf._f._IO_write_base] = '\0';
   return ret;
 }
 weak_alias (_IO_vasprintf, vasprintf)
index 9f767b5..9ec0691 100644 (file)
@@ -36,7 +36,7 @@ _IO_vsnprintf (string, maxlen, format, args)
   int ret;
 #ifdef _IO_MTSAFE_IO
   _IO_lock_t lock;
-  sf._f._lock = &lock;
+  sf._sbf._f._lock = &lock;
 #endif
   _IO_init ((_IO_FILE *) &sf, 0);
   _IO_JUMPS ((_IO_FILE *) &sf) = &_IO_str_jumps;
diff --git a/login/endutent.c b/login/endutent.c
deleted file mode 100644 (file)
index 3df95be..0000000
+++ /dev/null
@@ -1,31 +0,0 @@
-/* Copyright (C) 1996 Free Software Foundation, Inc.
-This file is part of the GNU C Library.
-Contributed by Ulrich Drepper <drepper@cygnus.com>, 1996.
-
-The GNU C Library is free software; you can redistribute it and/or
-modify it under the terms of the GNU Library General Public License as
-published by the Free Software Foundation; either version 2 of the
-License, or (at your option) any later version.
-
-The GNU C Library is distributed in the hope that it will be useful,
-but WITHOUT ANY WARRANTY; without even the implied warranty of
-MERCHANTABILITY or FITNESS FOR A PARTICULAR PURPOSE.  See the GNU
-Library General Public License for more details.
-
-You should have received a copy of the GNU Library General Public
-License along with the GNU C Library; see the file COPYING.LIB.  If
-not, write to the Free Software Foundation, Inc., 59 Temple Place - Suite 330,
-Boston, MA 02111-1307, USA.  */
-
-#include <utmp.h>
-
-
-/* The global data defined in setutent.c.  */
-extern struct utmp_data __utmp_data;
-
-
-void
-endutent (void)
-{
-  __endutent_r (&__utmp_data);
-}
diff --git a/login/endutent_r.c b/login/endutent_r.c
deleted file mode 100644 (file)
index a531054..0000000
+++ /dev/null
@@ -1,33 +0,0 @@
-/* Copyright (C) 1996 Free Software Foundation, Inc.
-This file is part of the GNU C Library.
-Contributed by Ulrich Drepper <drepper@cygnus.com>, 1996.
-
-The GNU C Library is free software; you can redistribute it and/or
-modify it under the terms of the GNU Library General Public License as
-published by the Free Software Foundation; either version 2 of the
-License, or (at your option) any later version.
-
-The GNU C Library is distributed in the hope that it will be useful,
-but WITHOUT ANY WARRANTY; without even the implied warranty of
-MERCHANTABILITY or FITNESS FOR A PARTICULAR PURPOSE.  See the GNU
-Library General Public License for more details.
-
-You should have received a copy of the GNU Library General Public
-License along with the GNU C Library; see the file COPYING.LIB.  If
-not, write to the Free Software Foundation, Inc., 59 Temple Place - Suite 330,
-Boston, MA 02111-1307, USA.  */
-
-#include <unistd.h>
-#include <utmp.h>
-
-
-void
-__endutent_r (struct utmp_data *utmp_data)
-{
-  if (utmp_data->ut_fd != -1)
-    {
-      close (utmp_data->ut_fd);
-      utmp_data->ut_fd = -1;
-    }
-}
-weak_alias (__endutent_r, endutent_r)
diff --git a/login/pututline.c b/login/pututline.c
deleted file mode 100644 (file)
index 7af3efb..0000000
+++ /dev/null
@@ -1,34 +0,0 @@
-/* Copyright (C) 1996 Free Software Foundation, Inc.
-This file is part of the GNU C Library.
-Contributed by Ulrich Drepper <drepper@cygnus.com>, 1996.
-
-The GNU C Library is free software; you can redistribute it and/or
-modify it under the terms of the GNU Library General Public License as
-published by the Free Software Foundation; either version 2 of the
-License, or (at your option) any later version.
-
-The GNU C Library is distributed in the hope that it will be useful,
-but WITHOUT ANY WARRANTY; without even the implied warranty of
-MERCHANTABILITY or FITNESS FOR A PARTICULAR PURPOSE.  See the GNU
-Library General Public License for more details.
-
-You should have received a copy of the GNU Library General Public
-License along with the GNU C Library; see the file COPYING.LIB.  If
-not, write to the Free Software Foundation, Inc., 59 Temple Place - Suite 330,
-Boston, MA 02111-1307, USA.  */
-
-#include <utmp.h>
-
-
-/* The global data defined in setutent.c.  */
-extern struct utmp_data __utmp_data;
-
-
-struct utmp *
-pututline (const struct utmp *utmp)
-{
-  if (__pututline_r (utmp, &__utmp_data) < 0)
-    return NULL;
-
-  return (struct utmp *) utmp;
-}
diff --git a/login/pututline_r.c b/login/pututline_r.c
deleted file mode 100644 (file)
index 33ba96f..0000000
+++ /dev/null
@@ -1,133 +0,0 @@
-/* Copyright (C) 1996 Free Software Foundation, Inc.
-This file is part of the GNU C Library.
-Contributed by Ulrich Drepper <drepper@cygnus.com>, 1996.
-
-The GNU C Library is free software; you can redistribute it and/or
-modify it under the terms of the GNU Library General Public License as
-published by the Free Software Foundation; either version 2 of the
-License, or (at your option) any later version.
-
-The GNU C Library is distributed in the hope that it will be useful,
-but WITHOUT ANY WARRANTY; without even the implied warranty of
-MERCHANTABILITY or FITNESS FOR A PARTICULAR PURPOSE.  See the GNU
-Library General Public License for more details.
-
-You should have received a copy of the GNU Library General Public
-License along with the GNU C Library; see the file COPYING.LIB.  If
-not, write to the Free Software Foundation, Inc., 59 Temple Place - Suite 330,
-Boston, MA 02111-1307, USA.  */
-
-#include <alloca.h>
-#include <errno.h>
-#include <stdlib.h>
-#include <string.h>
-#include <unistd.h>
-#include <utmp.h>
-#include <sys/file.h>
-#include <sys/stat.h>
-
-
-/* XXX An alternative solution would be to call a SUID root program
-   which write the new value.  */
-
-int
-__pututline_r (const struct utmp *id, struct utmp_data *utmp_data)
-{
-  struct stat st;
-  int result = 0;
-
-#if _HAVE_UT_TYPE - 0
-  /* Test whether ID has any of the legal types because we have to
-     prevent illegal entries.  */
-  if (id->ut_type != RUN_LVL && id->ut_type != BOOT_TIME
-      && id->ut_type != OLD_TIME && id->ut_type != NEW_TIME
-      && id->ut_type != INIT_PROCESS && id->ut_type != LOGIN_PROCESS
-      && id->ut_type != USER_PROCESS && id->ut_type != DEAD_PROCESS)
-    /* No, using '<' and '>' for the test is not possible.  */
-    {
-      __set_errno (EINVAL);
-      return -1;
-    }
-#endif
-
-  /* Open utmp file if not already done.  */
-  if (utmp_data->ut_fd == -1)
-    {
-      setutent_r (utmp_data);
-      if (utmp_data->ut_fd == -1)
-       return -1;
-    }
-
-#if _HAVE_UT_ID - 0
-  /* Check whether we need to reposition.  Repositioning is necessary
-     either if the data in UTMP_DATA is not valid or if the ids don't
-     match: */
-  if (id->ut_id[0]
-      && (utmp_data->loc_utmp < (off_t) sizeof (struct utmp)
-         || strncmp (utmp_data->ubuf.ut_id, id->ut_id,
-                     sizeof (id->ut_id)) != 0))
-    {
-      /* We must not overwrite the data in UTMP_DATA since ID may be
-        aliasing it.  */
-      struct utmp_data *data_tmp = alloca (sizeof (*data_tmp));
-      struct utmp *dummy;
-
-      *data_tmp = *utmp_data;
-      utmp_data = data_tmp;
-
-      if (getutid_r (id, &dummy, utmp_data) < 0 && errno != ESRCH)
-       return -1;
-    }
-#endif
-
-  /* Try to lock the file.  */
-  if (flock (utmp_data->ut_fd, LOCK_EX | LOCK_NB) < 0 && errno != ENOSYS)
-    {
-      /* Oh, oh.  The file is already locked.  Wait a bit and try again.  */
-      sleep (1);
-
-      /* This time we ignore the error.  */
-      (void) flock (utmp_data->ut_fd, LOCK_EX | LOCK_NB);
-    }
-
-  /* Find out how large the file is.  */
-  result = fstat (utmp_data->ut_fd, &st);
-
-  if (result >= 0)
-    /* Position file correctly.  */
-    if (utmp_data->loc_utmp < (off_t) sizeof (struct utmp)
-       || (off_t) (utmp_data->loc_utmp - sizeof (struct utmp)) > st.st_size)
-      /* Not located at any valid entry.  Add at the end.  */
-      {
-       result = lseek (utmp_data->ut_fd, 0L, SEEK_END);
-       if (result >= 0)
-         /* Where we'll be if the write succeeds.  */
-         utmp_data->loc_utmp = st.st_size + sizeof (struct utmp);
-      }
-    else
-      result =
-       lseek (utmp_data->ut_fd, utmp_data->loc_utmp - sizeof (struct utmp),
-              SEEK_SET);
-
-  if (result >= 0)
-    /* Write the new data.  */
-    if (write (utmp_data->ut_fd, id, sizeof (struct utmp))
-       != sizeof (struct utmp))
-      {
-       /* If we appended a new record this is only partially written.
-          Remove it.  */
-       if (utmp_data->loc_utmp > st.st_size)
-         {
-           (void) ftruncate (utmp_data->ut_fd, st.st_size);
-           utmp_data->loc_utmp = st.st_size;
-         }
-
-       result = -1;
-      }
-
-  /* And unlock the file.  */
-  (void) flock (utmp_data->ut_fd, LOCK_UN);
-
-  return result;
-}
-weak_alias (__pututline_r, pututline_r)
diff --git a/login/setutent.c b/login/setutent.c
deleted file mode 100644 (file)
index 32d2f8c..0000000
+++ /dev/null
@@ -1,31 +0,0 @@
-/* Copyright (C) 1996 Free Software Foundation, Inc.
-This file is part of the GNU C Library.
-Contributed by Ulrich Drepper <drepper@cygnus.com>, 1996.
-
-The GNU C Library is free software; you can redistribute it and/or
-modify it under the terms of the GNU Library General Public License as
-published by the Free Software Foundation; either version 2 of the
-License, or (at your option) any later version.
-
-The GNU C Library is distributed in the hope that it will be useful,
-but WITHOUT ANY WARRANTY; without even the implied warranty of
-MERCHANTABILITY or FITNESS FOR A PARTICULAR PURPOSE.  See the GNU
-Library General Public License for more details.
-
-You should have received a copy of the GNU Library General Public
-License along with the GNU C Library; see the file COPYING.LIB.  If
-not, write to the Free Software Foundation, Inc., 59 Temple Place - Suite 330,
-Boston, MA 02111-1307, USA.  */
-
-#include <utmp.h>
-
-/* Global variable with values for non-reentrent functions.  If must
-   be initialized so that field `ut_fd' is set to -1.  */
-struct utmp_data __utmp_data = { ut_fd: -1 };
-
-
-void
-setutent (void)
-{
-  __setutent_r (&__utmp_data);
-}
diff --git a/login/setutent_r.c b/login/setutent_r.c
deleted file mode 100644 (file)
index 46700e7..0000000
+++ /dev/null
@@ -1,76 +0,0 @@
-/* Copyright (C) 1996 Free Software Foundation, Inc.
-This file is part of the GNU C Library.
-Contributed by Ulrich Drepper <drepper@cygnus.com>, 1996.
-
-The GNU C Library is free software; you can redistribute it and/or
-modify it under the terms of the GNU Library General Public License as
-published by the Free Software Foundation; either version 2 of the
-License, or (at your option) any later version.
-
-The GNU C Library is distributed in the hope that it will be useful,
-but WITHOUT ANY WARRANTY; without even the implied warranty of
-MERCHANTABILITY or FITNESS FOR A PARTICULAR PURPOSE.  See the GNU
-Library General Public License for more details.
-
-You should have received a copy of the GNU Library General Public
-License along with the GNU C Library; see the file COPYING.LIB.  If
-not, write to the Free Software Foundation, Inc., 59 Temple Place - Suite 330,
-Boston, MA 02111-1307, USA.  */
-
-#include <fcntl.h>
-#include <stdio.h>
-#include <stdlib.h>
-#include <string.h>
-#include <utmp.h>
-
-/* This is the default name.  */
-static const char default_utmp_name[] = _PATH_UTMP;
-
-/* Current file name.  */
-static const char *utmp_file_name = (const char *) default_utmp_name;
-
-
-void
-__setutent_r (struct utmp_data *utmp_data)
-{
-  /* Before the UTMP_DATA is used before the first time the UT_FD
-     field must be set to -1.  */
-  if (utmp_data->ut_fd == -1)
-    {
-      utmp_data->ut_fd = open (utmp_file_name, O_RDWR);
-      if (utmp_data->ut_fd == -1)
-       {
-         /* Hhm, read-write access did not work.  Try read-only.  */
-         utmp_data->ut_fd = open (utmp_file_name, O_RDONLY);
-         if (utmp_data->ut_fd == -1)
-           {
-             perror (_("while opening UTMP file"));
-             return;
-           }
-       }
-    }
-
-  /* Remember we are at beginning of file.  */
-  utmp_data->loc_utmp = 0;
-#if _HAVE_UT_TYPE - 0
-  utmp_data->ubuf.ut_type = UT_UNKNOWN;
-#endif
-}
-weak_alias (__setutent_r, setutent_r)
-
-
-int
-__utmpname (const char *file)
-{
-  char *fname = __strdup (file);
-  if (fname == NULL)
-    return 0;
-
-  if (utmp_file_name != default_utmp_name)
-    free ((void *) utmp_file_name);
-
-  utmp_file_name = fname;
-
-  return 1;
-}
-weak_alias (__utmpname, utmpname)
index a8c9015..d4e3920 100644 (file)
@@ -1,4 +1,4 @@
-@node Floating-Point Limits 
+@node Floating-Point Limits
 @chapter Floating-Point Limits
 @pindex <float.h>
 @cindex floating-point number representation
@@ -75,7 +75,7 @@ unsigned quantity.
 @cindex mantissa (of floating-point number)
 @cindex significand (of floating-point number)
 
-@item 
+@item
 The @dfn{precision} of the mantissa.  If the base of the representation
 is @var{b}, then the precision is the number of base-@var{b} digits in
 the mantissa.  This is a constant for the particular representation.
@@ -124,14 +124,14 @@ expression, so the other macros listed here cannot be reliably used in
 places that require constant expressions, such as @samp{#if}
 preprocessing directives and array size specifications.
 
-Although the ANSI C standard specifies minimum and maximum values for
+Although the @w{ISO C} standard specifies minimum and maximum values for
 most of these parameters, the GNU C implementation uses whatever
 floating-point representations are supported by the underlying hardware.
-So whether GNU C actually satisfies the ANSI C requirements depends on
+So whether GNU C actually satisfies the @w{ISO C} requirements depends on
 what machine it is running on.
 
 @comment float.h
-@comment ANSI
+@comment ISO
 @defvr Macro FLT_ROUNDS
 This value characterizes the rounding mode for floating-point addition.
 The following values indicate standard rounding modes:
@@ -155,7 +155,7 @@ mode.
 @end defvr
 
 @comment float.h
-@comment ANSI
+@comment ISO
 @defvr Macro FLT_RADIX
 This is the value of the base, or radix, of exponent representation.
 This is guaranteed to be a constant expression, unlike the other macros
@@ -163,28 +163,28 @@ described in this section.
 @end defvr
 
 @comment float.h
-@comment ANSI
+@comment ISO
 @defvr Macro FLT_MANT_DIG
 This is the number of base-@code{FLT_RADIX} digits in the floating-point
 mantissa for the @code{float} data type.
 @end defvr
 
 @comment float.h
-@comment ANSI
+@comment ISO
 @defvr Macro DBL_MANT_DIG
 This is the number of base-@code{FLT_RADIX} digits in the floating-point
 mantissa for the @code{double} data type.
 @end defvr
 
 @comment float.h
-@comment ANSI
+@comment ISO
 @defvr Macro LDBL_MANT_DIG
 This is the number of base-@code{FLT_RADIX} digits in the floating-point
 mantissa for the @code{long double} data type.
 @end defvr
 
 @comment float.h
-@comment ANSI
+@comment ISO
 @defvr Macro FLT_DIG
 This is the number of decimal digits of precision for the @code{float}
 data type.  Technically, if @var{p} and @var{b} are the precision and
@@ -198,14 +198,14 @@ The value of this macro is guaranteed to be at least @code{6}.
 @end defvr
 
 @comment float.h
-@comment ANSI
+@comment ISO
 @defvr Macro DBL_DIG
 This is similar to @code{FLT_DIG}, but is for the @code{double} data
 type.  The value of this macro is guaranteed to be at least @code{10}.
 @end defvr
 
 @comment float.h
-@comment ANSI
+@comment ISO
 @defvr Macro LDBL_DIG
 This is similar to @code{FLT_DIG}, but is for the @code{long double}
 data type.  The value of this macro is guaranteed to be at least
@@ -213,7 +213,7 @@ data type.  The value of this macro is guaranteed to be at least
 @end defvr
 
 @comment float.h
-@comment ANSI
+@comment ISO
 @defvr Macro FLT_MIN_EXP
 This is the minimum negative integer such that the mathematical value
 @code{FLT_RADIX} raised to this power minus 1 can be represented as a
@@ -223,21 +223,21 @@ represented in the exponent field of the number.
 @end defvr
 
 @comment float.h
-@comment ANSI
+@comment ISO
 @defvr Macro DBL_MIN_EXP
 This is similar to @code{FLT_MIN_EXP}, but is for the @code{double} data
 type.
 @end defvr
 
 @comment float.h
-@comment ANSI
+@comment ISO
 @defvr Macro LDBL_MIN_EXP
 This is similar to @code{FLT_MIN_EXP}, but is for the @code{long double}
 data type.
 @end defvr
 
 @comment float.h
-@comment ANSI
+@comment ISO
 @defvr Macro FLT_MIN_10_EXP
 This is the minimum negative integer such that the mathematical value
 @code{10} raised to this power minus 1 can be represented as a
@@ -246,14 +246,14 @@ guaranteed to be no greater than @code{-37}.
 @end defvr
 
 @comment float.h
-@comment ANSI
+@comment ISO
 @defvr Macro DBL_MIN_10_EXP
 This is similar to @code{FLT_MIN_10_EXP}, but is for the @code{double}
 data type.
 @end defvr
 
 @comment float.h
-@comment ANSI
+@comment ISO
 @defvr Macro LDBL_MIN_10_EXP
 This is similar to @code{FLT_MIN_10_EXP}, but is for the @code{long
 double} data type.
@@ -262,7 +262,7 @@ double} data type.
 
 
 @comment float.h
-@comment ANSI
+@comment ISO
 @defvr Macro FLT_MAX_EXP
 This is the maximum negative integer such that the mathematical value
 @code{FLT_RADIX} raised to this power minus 1 can be represented as a
@@ -272,21 +272,21 @@ in the exponent field of the number.
 @end defvr
 
 @comment float.h
-@comment ANSI
+@comment ISO
 @defvr Macro DBL_MAX_EXP
 This is similar to @code{FLT_MAX_EXP}, but is for the @code{double} data
 type.
 @end defvr
 
 @comment float.h
-@comment ANSI
+@comment ISO
 @defvr Macro LDBL_MAX_EXP
 This is similar to @code{FLT_MAX_EXP}, but is for the @code{long double}
 data type.
 @end defvr
 
 @comment float.h
-@comment ANSI
+@comment ISO
 @defvr Macro FLT_MAX_10_EXP
 This is the maximum negative integer such that the mathematical value
 @code{10} raised to this power minus 1 can be represented as a
@@ -295,14 +295,14 @@ guaranteed to be at least @code{37}.
 @end defvr
 
 @comment float.h
-@comment ANSI
+@comment ISO
 @defvr Macro DBL_MAX_10_EXP
 This is similar to @code{FLT_MAX_10_EXP}, but is for the @code{double}
 data type.
 @end defvr
 
 @comment float.h
-@comment ANSI
+@comment ISO
 @defvr Macro LDBL_MAX_10_EXP
 This is similar to @code{FLT_MAX_10_EXP}, but is for the @code{long
 double} data type.
@@ -310,7 +310,7 @@ double} data type.
 
 
 @comment float.h
-@comment ANSI
+@comment ISO
 @defvr Macro FLT_MAX
 The value of this macro is the maximum representable floating-point
 number of type @code{float}, and is guaranteed to be at least
@@ -318,7 +318,7 @@ number of type @code{float}, and is guaranteed to be at least
 @end defvr
 
 @comment float.h
-@comment ANSI
+@comment ISO
 @defvr Macro DBL_MAX
 The value of this macro is the maximum representable floating-point
 number of type @code{double}, and is guaranteed to be at least
@@ -326,7 +326,7 @@ number of type @code{double}, and is guaranteed to be at least
 @end defvr
 
 @comment float.h
-@comment ANSI
+@comment ISO
 @defvr Macro LDBL_MAX
 The value of this macro is the maximum representable floating-point
 number of type @code{long double}, and is guaranteed to be at least
@@ -335,7 +335,7 @@ number of type @code{long double}, and is guaranteed to be at least
 
 
 @comment float.h
-@comment ANSI
+@comment ISO
 @defvr Macro FLT_MIN
 The value of this macro is the minimum normalized positive
 floating-point number that is representable by type @code{float}, and is
@@ -343,7 +343,7 @@ guaranteed to be no more than @code{1E-37}.
 @end defvr
 
 @comment float.h
-@comment ANSI
+@comment ISO
 @defvr Macro DBL_MIN
 The value of this macro is the minimum normalized positive
 floating-point number that is representable by type @code{double}, and
@@ -351,7 +351,7 @@ is guaranteed to be no more than @code{1E-37}.
 @end defvr
 
 @comment float.h
-@comment ANSI
+@comment ISO
 @defvr Macro LDBL_MIN
 The value of this macro is the minimum normalized positive
 floating-point number that is representable by type @code{long double},
@@ -360,7 +360,7 @@ and is guaranteed to be no more than @code{1E-37}.
 
 
 @comment float.h
-@comment ANSI
+@comment ISO
 @defvr Macro FLT_EPSILON
 This is the minimum positive floating-point number of type @code{float}
 such that @code{1.0 + FLT_EPSILON != 1.0} is true.  It's guaranteed to
@@ -368,14 +368,14 @@ be no greater than @code{1E-5}.
 @end defvr
 
 @comment float.h
-@comment ANSI
+@comment ISO
 @defvr Macro DBL_EPSILON
 This is similar to @code{FLT_EPSILON}, but is for the @code{double}
 type.  The maximum value is @code{1E-9}.
 @end defvr
 
 @comment float.h
-@comment ANSI
+@comment ISO
 @defvr Macro LDBL_EPSILON
 This is similar to @code{FLT_EPSILON}, but is for the @code{long double}
 type.  The maximum value is @code{1E-9}.
@@ -388,7 +388,8 @@ type.  The maximum value is @code{1E-9}.
 
 Here is an example showing how these parameters work for a common
 floating point representation, specified by the @cite{IEEE Standard for
-Binary Floating-Point Arithmetic (ANSI/IEEE Std 754-1985)}.
+Binary Floating-Point Arithmetic (ANSI/IEEE Std 754-1985 or ANSI/IEEE
+Std 854-1987)}.
 
 The IEEE single-precision float representation uses a base of 2.  There
 is a sign bit, a mantissa with 23 bits plus one hidden bit (so the total
@@ -411,6 +412,3 @@ FLT_MIN             1.17549435E-38F
 FLT_MAX             3.40282347E+38F
 FLT_EPSILON         1.19209290E-07F
 @end example
-
-
-
index 3e384dd..7b55d70 100644 (file)
@@ -12,7 +12,7 @@ floating-point types supported by the GNU C library.
 * Floating-Point Limits ::              Parameters which characterize
                                          supported floating-point
                                          representations on a particular
-                                         system. 
+                                         system.
 @end menu
 
 @node Integer Representation Limits, Floating-Point Limits ,  , Representation Limits
@@ -37,32 +37,32 @@ macros are all integer constant expressions.
 @pindex limits.h
 
 @comment limits.h
-@comment ANSI
+@comment ISO
 @deftypevr Macro int CHAR_BIT
 This is the number of bits in a @code{char}, usually eight.
 @end deftypevr
 
 @comment limits.h
-@comment ANSI
+@comment ISO
 @deftypevr Macro int SCHAR_MIN
 This is the minimum value that can be represented by a @code{signed char}.
 @end deftypevr
 
 @comment limits.h
-@comment ANSI
+@comment ISO
 @deftypevr Macro int SCHAR_MAX
 This is the maximum value that can be represented by a @code{signed char}.
 @end deftypevr
 
 @comment limits.h
-@comment ANSI
+@comment ISO
 @deftypevr Macro int UCHAR_MAX
 This is the maximum value that can be represented by a @code{unsigned char}.
 (The minimum value of an @code{unsigned char} is zero.)
 @end deftypevr
 
 @comment limits.h
-@comment ANSI
+@comment ISO
 @deftypevr Macro int CHAR_MIN
 This is the minimum value that can be represented by a @code{char}.
 It's equal to @code{SCHAR_MIN} if @code{char} is signed, or zero
@@ -70,7 +70,7 @@ otherwise.
 @end deftypevr
 
 @comment limits.h
-@comment ANSI
+@comment ISO
 @deftypevr Macro int CHAR_MAX
 This is the maximum value that can be represented by a @code{char}.
 It's equal to @code{SCHAR_MAX} if @code{char} is signed, or
@@ -78,7 +78,7 @@ It's equal to @code{SCHAR_MAX} if @code{char} is signed, or
 @end deftypevr
 
 @comment limits.h
-@comment ANSI
+@comment ISO
 @deftypevr Macro int SHRT_MIN
 This is the minimum value that can be represented by a @code{signed
 short int}.  On most machines that the GNU C library runs on,
@@ -86,21 +86,21 @@ short int}.  On most machines that the GNU C library runs on,
 @end deftypevr
 
 @comment limits.h
-@comment ANSI
+@comment ISO
 @deftypevr Macro int SHRT_MAX
 This is the maximum value that can be represented by a @code{signed
 short int}.
 @end deftypevr
 
 @comment limits.h
-@comment ANSI
+@comment ISO
 @deftypevr Macro int USHRT_MAX
 This is the maximum value that can be represented by an @code{unsigned
 short int}.  (The minimum value of an @code{unsigned short int} is zero.)
 @end deftypevr
 
 @comment limits.h
-@comment ANSI
+@comment ISO
 @deftypevr Macro int INT_MIN
 This is the minimum value that can be represented by a @code{signed
 int}.  On most machines that the GNU C system runs on, an @code{int} is
@@ -108,21 +108,21 @@ a 32-bit quantity.
 @end deftypevr
 
 @comment limits.h
-@comment ANSI
+@comment ISO
 @deftypevr Macro int INT_MAX
 This is the maximum value that can be represented by a @code{signed
 int}.
 @end deftypevr
 
 @comment limits.h
-@comment ANSI
+@comment ISO
 @deftypevr Macro {unsigned int} UINT_MAX
 This is the maximum value that can be represented by an @code{unsigned
 int}.  (The minimum value of an @code{unsigned int} is zero.)
 @end deftypevr
 
 @comment limits.h
-@comment ANSI
+@comment ISO
 @deftypevr Macro {long int} LONG_MIN
 This is the minimum value that can be represented by a @code{signed long
 int}.  On most machines that the GNU C system runs on, @code{long}
@@ -130,14 +130,14 @@ integers are 32-bit quantities, the same size as @code{int}.
 @end deftypevr
 
 @comment limits.h
-@comment ANSI
+@comment ISO
 @deftypevr Macro {long int} LONG_MAX
 This is the maximum value that can be represented by a @code{signed long
 int}.
 @end deftypevr
 
 @comment limits.h
-@comment ANSI
+@comment ISO
 @deftypevr Macro {unsigned long int} ULONG_MAX
 This is the maximum value that can be represented by an @code{unsigned
 long int}.  (The minimum value of an @code{unsigned long int} is zero.)
@@ -180,9 +180,9 @@ particular system.
 @menu
 * Floating-Point Representation::       Definitions of terminology.
 * Floating-Point Parameters::           Descriptions of the library
-                                         facilities. 
+                                         facilities.
 * IEEE Floating Point::                 An example of a common
-                                         representation. 
+                                         representation.
 @end menu
 
 @node Floating-Point Representation, Floating-Point Parameters,  , Floating-Point Limits
@@ -233,7 +233,7 @@ unsigned integer.
 @cindex mantissa (of floating-point number)
 @cindex significand (of floating-point number)
 
-@item 
+@item
 The @dfn{precision} of the mantissa.  If the base of the representation
 is @var{b}, then the precision is the number of base-@var{b} digits in
 the mantissa.  This is a constant for the particular representation.
@@ -286,14 +286,14 @@ expression.  The other macros listed here cannot be reliably used in
 places that require constant expressions, such as @samp{#if}
 preprocessing directives or array size specifications.
 
-Although the ANSI C standard specifies minimum and maximum values for
+Although the @w{ISO C} standard specifies minimum and maximum values for
 most of these parameters, the GNU C implementation uses whatever
 floating-point representations are supported by the underlying hardware.
-So whether GNU C actually satisfies the ANSI C requirements depends on
+So whether GNU C actually satisfies the @w{ISO C} requirements depends on
 what machine it is running on.
 
 @comment float.h
-@comment ANSI
+@comment ISO
 @deftypevr Macro int FLT_ROUNDS
 This value characterizes the rounding mode for floating-point addition.
 The following values indicate standard rounding modes:
@@ -317,7 +317,7 @@ mode.
 @end deftypevr
 
 @comment float.h
-@comment ANSI
+@comment ISO
 @deftypevr Macro int FLT_RADIX
 This is the value of the base, or radix, of exponent representation.
 This is guaranteed to be a constant expression, unlike the other macros
@@ -325,28 +325,28 @@ described in this section.
 @end deftypevr
 
 @comment float.h
-@comment ANSI
+@comment ISO
 @deftypevr Macro int FLT_MANT_DIG
 This is the number of base-@code{FLT_RADIX} digits in the floating-point
 mantissa for the @code{float} data type.
 @end deftypevr
 
 @comment float.h
-@comment ANSI
+@comment ISO
 @deftypevr Macro int DBL_MANT_DIG
 This is the number of base-@code{FLT_RADIX} digits in the floating-point
 mantissa for the @code{double} data type.
 @end deftypevr
 
 @comment float.h
-@comment ANSI
+@comment ISO
 @deftypevr Macro int LDBL_MANT_DIG
 This is the number of base-@code{FLT_RADIX} digits in the floating-point
 mantissa for the @code{long double} data type.
 @end deftypevr
 
 @comment float.h
-@comment ANSI
+@comment ISO
 @deftypevr Macro int FLT_DIG
 This is the number of decimal digits of precision for the @code{float}
 data type.  Technically, if @var{p} and @var{b} are the precision and
@@ -360,14 +360,14 @@ The value of this macro is guaranteed to be at least @code{6}.
 @end deftypevr
 
 @comment float.h
-@comment ANSI
+@comment ISO
 @deftypevr Macro int DBL_DIG
 This is similar to @code{FLT_DIG}, but is for the @code{double} data
 type.  The value of this macro is guaranteed to be at least @code{10}.
 @end deftypevr
 
 @comment float.h
-@comment ANSI
+@comment ISO
 @deftypevr Macro int LDBL_DIG
 This is similar to @code{FLT_DIG}, but is for the @code{long double}
 data type.  The value of this macro is guaranteed to be at least
@@ -375,7 +375,7 @@ data type.  The value of this macro is guaranteed to be at least
 @end deftypevr
 
 @comment float.h
-@comment ANSI
+@comment ISO
 @deftypevr Macro int FLT_MIN_EXP
 This is the minimum negative integer such that the mathematical value
 @code{FLT_RADIX} raised to this power minus 1 can be represented as a
@@ -385,21 +385,21 @@ represented in the exponent field of the number.
 @end deftypevr
 
 @comment float.h
-@comment ANSI
+@comment ISO
 @deftypevr Macro int DBL_MIN_EXP
 This is similar to @code{FLT_MIN_EXP}, but is for the @code{double} data
 type.
 @end deftypevr
 
 @comment float.h
-@comment ANSI
+@comment ISO
 @deftypevr Macro int LDBL_MIN_EXP
 This is similar to @code{FLT_MIN_EXP}, but is for the @code{long double}
 data type.
 @end deftypevr
 
 @comment float.h
-@comment ANSI
+@comment ISO
 @deftypevr Macro int FLT_MIN_10_EXP
 This is the minimum negative integer such that the mathematical value
 @code{10} raised to this power minus 1 can be represented as a
@@ -408,14 +408,14 @@ guaranteed to be no greater than @code{-37}.
 @end deftypevr
 
 @comment float.h
-@comment ANSI
+@comment ISO
 @deftypevr Macro int DBL_MIN_10_EXP
 This is similar to @code{FLT_MIN_10_EXP}, but is for the @code{double}
 data type.
 @end deftypevr
 
 @comment float.h
-@comment ANSI
+@comment ISO
 @deftypevr Macro int LDBL_MIN_10_EXP
 This is similar to @code{FLT_MIN_10_EXP}, but is for the @code{long
 double} data type.
@@ -424,7 +424,7 @@ double} data type.
 
 
 @comment float.h
-@comment ANSI
+@comment ISO
 @deftypevr Macro int FLT_MAX_EXP
 This is the maximum negative integer such that the mathematical value
 @code{FLT_RADIX} raised to this power minus 1 can be represented as a
@@ -434,21 +434,21 @@ in the exponent field of the number.
 @end deftypevr
 
 @comment float.h
-@comment ANSI
+@comment ISO
 @deftypevr Macro int DBL_MAX_EXP
 This is similar to @code{FLT_MAX_EXP}, but is for the @code{double} data
 type.
 @end deftypevr
 
 @comment float.h
-@comment ANSI
+@comment ISO
 @deftypevr Macro int LDBL_MAX_EXP
 This is similar to @code{FLT_MAX_EXP}, but is for the @code{long double}
 data type.
 @end deftypevr
 
 @comment float.h
-@comment ANSI
+@comment ISO
 @deftypevr Macro int FLT_MAX_10_EXP
 This is the maximum negative integer such that the mathematical value
 @code{10} raised to this power minus 1 can be represented as a
@@ -457,14 +457,14 @@ guaranteed to be at least @code{37}.
 @end deftypevr
 
 @comment float.h
-@comment ANSI
+@comment ISO
 @deftypevr Macro int DBL_MAX_10_EXP
 This is similar to @code{FLT_MAX_10_EXP}, but is for the @code{double}
 data type.
 @end deftypevr
 
 @comment float.h
-@comment ANSI
+@comment ISO
 @deftypevr Macro int LDBL_MAX_10_EXP
 This is similar to @code{FLT_MAX_10_EXP}, but is for the @code{long
 double} data type.
@@ -472,7 +472,7 @@ double} data type.
 
 
 @comment float.h
-@comment ANSI
+@comment ISO
 @deftypevr Macro double FLT_MAX
 The value of this macro is the maximum representable floating-point
 number of type @code{float}, and is guaranteed to be at least
@@ -480,7 +480,7 @@ number of type @code{float}, and is guaranteed to be at least
 @end deftypevr
 
 @comment float.h
-@comment ANSI
+@comment ISO
 @deftypevr Macro double DBL_MAX
 The value of this macro is the maximum representable floating-point
 number of type @code{double}, and is guaranteed to be at least
@@ -488,7 +488,7 @@ number of type @code{double}, and is guaranteed to be at least
 @end deftypevr
 
 @comment float.h
-@comment ANSI
+@comment ISO
 @deftypevr Macro {long double} LDBL_MAX
 The value of this macro is the maximum representable floating-point
 number of type @code{long double}, and is guaranteed to be at least
@@ -497,7 +497,7 @@ number of type @code{long double}, and is guaranteed to be at least
 
 
 @comment float.h
-@comment ANSI
+@comment ISO
 @deftypevr Macro double FLT_MIN
 The value of this macro is the minimum normalized positive
 floating-point number that is representable by type @code{float}, and is
@@ -505,7 +505,7 @@ guaranteed to be no more than @code{1E-37}.
 @end deftypevr
 
 @comment float.h
-@comment ANSI
+@comment ISO
 @deftypevr Macro double DBL_MIN
 The value of this macro is the minimum normalized positive
 floating-point number that is representable by type @code{double}, and
@@ -513,7 +513,7 @@ is guaranteed to be no more than @code{1E-37}.
 @end deftypevr
 
 @comment float.h
-@comment ANSI
+@comment ISO
 @deftypevr Macro {long double} LDBL_MIN
 The value of this macro is the minimum normalized positive
 floating-point number that is representable by type @code{long double},
@@ -522,7 +522,7 @@ and is guaranteed to be no more than @code{1E-37}.
 
 
 @comment float.h
-@comment ANSI
+@comment ISO
 @deftypevr Macro double FLT_EPSILON
 This is the minimum positive floating-point number of type @code{float}
 such that @code{1.0 + FLT_EPSILON != 1.0} is true.  It's guaranteed to
@@ -530,14 +530,14 @@ be no greater than @code{1E-5}.
 @end deftypevr
 
 @comment float.h
-@comment ANSI
+@comment ISO
 @deftypevr Macro double DBL_EPSILON
 This is similar to @code{FLT_EPSILON}, but is for the @code{double}
 type.  The maximum value is @code{1E-9}.
 @end deftypevr
 
 @comment float.h
-@comment ANSI
+@comment ISO
 @deftypevr Macro {long double} LDBL_EPSILON
 This is similar to @code{FLT_EPSILON}, but is for the @code{long double}
 type.  The maximum value is @code{1E-9}.
@@ -546,15 +546,15 @@ type.  The maximum value is @code{1E-9}.
 
 @node IEEE Floating Point,  , Floating-Point Parameters, Floating-Point Limits
 @subsection IEEE Floating Point
-@cindex IEEE floating-point representation 
+@cindex IEEE floating-point representation
 @cindex floating-point, IEEE
 @cindex IEEE Std 754
 
 
 Here is an example showing how these parameters work for a common
 floating point representation, specified by the @cite{IEEE Standard for
-Binary Floating-Point Arithmetic (ANSI/IEEE Std 754-1985)}.  Nearly
-all computers today use this format.
+Binary Floating-Point Arithmetic (ANSI/IEEE Std 754-1985 or ANSI/IEEE
+Std 854-1987)}.  Nearly all computers today use this format.
 
 The IEEE single-precision float representation uses a base of 2.  There
 is a sign bit, a mantissa with 23 bits plus one hidden bit (so the total
index 63c723e..4618cff 100644 (file)
@@ -90,7 +90,7 @@ Option names are single alphanumeric (as for @code{isalnum};
 see @ref{Classification of Characters}).
 
 @item
-Certain options require an argument.  For example, the @samp{-o} 
+Certain options require an argument.  For example, the @samp{-o}
 command of the ld command requires an argument---an output file name.
 
 @item
@@ -326,7 +326,7 @@ The value of an environment variable can be accessed with the
 @pindex stdlib.h
 
 @comment stdlib.h
-@comment ANSI
+@comment ISO
 @deftypefun {char *} getenv (const char *@var{name})
 This function returns a string that is the value of the environment
 variable @var{name}.  You must not modify this string.  In some systems
@@ -353,7 +353,7 @@ may not be available in other systems.
 You can deal directly with the underlying representation of environment
 objects to add more variables to the environment (for example, to
 communicate with another program you are about to execute; see
-@ref{Executing a File}).  
+@ref{Executing a File}).
 
 @comment unistd.h
 @comment POSIX.1
@@ -410,7 +410,7 @@ uses this environment variable, as do many shells and other utilities
 which are implemented in terms of those functions.
 
 The syntax of a path is a sequence of directory names separated by
-colons.  An empty string instead of a directory name stands for the 
+colons.  An empty string instead of a directory name stands for the
 current directory.  (@xref{Working Directory}.)
 
 A typical value for this environment variable might be a string like:
@@ -499,10 +499,10 @@ more detail in @ref{Signal Handling}.  The @code{abort} function causes
 a terminal that kills the program.
 
 @menu
-* Normal Program Termination::  
+* Normal Program Termination::
 * Exit Status::                 Exit Status
 * Cleanups on Exit::            Cleanups on Exit
-* Aborting a Program::          
+* Aborting a Program::
 * Termination Internals::       Termination Internals
 @end menu
 
@@ -510,7 +510,7 @@ a terminal that kills the program.
 @subsection Normal Program Termination
 
 @comment stdlib.h
-@comment ANSI
+@comment ISO
 @deftypefun void exit (int @var{status})
 The @code{exit} function causes normal program termination with status
 @var{status}.  This function does not return.
@@ -521,7 +521,7 @@ function or by calling @code{exit}, the following actions occur in
 sequence:
 
 @enumerate
-@item 
+@item
 Functions that were registered with the @code{atexit} or @code{on_exit}
 functions are called in the reverse order of their registration.  This
 mechanism allows your application to specify its own ``cleanup'' actions
@@ -529,12 +529,12 @@ to be performed at program termination.  Typically, this is used to do
 things like saving program state information in a file, or unlock locks
 in shared data bases.
 
-@item 
+@item
 All open streams are closed; writing out any buffered output data.  See
 @ref{Opening and Closing Streams}.  In addition, temporary files opened
 with the @code{tmpfile} function are removed; see @ref{Temporary Files}.
 
-@item 
+@item
 @code{_exit} is called.  @xref{Termination Internals}
 @end enumerate
 
@@ -582,7 +582,7 @@ are declared in the file @file{stdlib.h}.
 @pindex stdlib.h
 
 @comment stdlib.h
-@comment ANSI
+@comment ISO
 @deftypevr Macro int EXIT_SUCCESS
 This macro can be used with the @code{exit} function to indicate
 successful program completion.
@@ -593,7 +593,7 @@ expression.
 @end deftypevr
 
 @comment stdlib.h
-@comment ANSI
+@comment ISO
 @deftypevr Macro int EXIT_FAILURE
 This macro can be used with the @code{exit} function to indicate
 unsuccessful program completion in a general sense.
@@ -611,14 +611,14 @@ mean that there was difficulty in opening the files.
 @subsection Cleanups on Exit
 
 @comment stdlib.h
-@comment ANSI
+@comment ISO
 @deftypefun int atexit (void (*@var{function}))
 The @code{atexit} function registers the function @var{function} to be
 called at normal program termination.  The @var{function} is called with
 no arguments.
 
 The return value from @code{atexit} is zero on success and nonzero if
-the function cannot be registered. 
+the function cannot be registered.
 @end deftypefun
 
 @comment stdlib.h
@@ -666,7 +666,7 @@ for this function is in @file{stdlib.h}.
 @pindex stdlib.h
 
 @comment stdlib.h
-@comment ANSI
+@comment ISO
 @deftypefun void abort ()
 The @code{abort} function causes abnormal program termination, without
 executing functions registered with @code{atexit} or @code{on_exit}.
@@ -751,7 +751,7 @@ primitive functions to do each step individually instead.
                                         program.
 * Process Completion::          How to tell when a child process has
                                         completed.
-* Process Completion Status::   How to interpret the status value 
+* Process Completion Status::   How to interpret the status value
                                          returned from a child process.
 * BSD wait Functions::  More functions, for backward
                                          compatibility.
@@ -771,7 +771,7 @@ until the subprogram terminates before you can do anything else.
 @pindex stdlib.h
 
 @comment stdlib.h
-@comment ANSI
+@comment ISO
 @deftypefun int system (const char *@var{command})
 This function executes @var{command} as a shell command.  In the GNU C
 library, it always uses the default shell @code{sh} to run the command.
@@ -937,7 +937,7 @@ The child doesn't inherit alarms set by the parent process.
 The set of pending signals (@pxref{Delivery of Signal}) for the child
 process is cleared.  (The child process inherits its mask of blocked
 signals and signal actions from the parent process.)
-@end itemize 
+@end itemize
 
 
 @comment unistd.h
@@ -1009,7 +1009,7 @@ passed as the last such argument.
 @deftypefun int execve (const char *@var{filename}, char *const @var{argv}@t{[]}, char *const @var{env}@t{[]})
 This is similar to @code{execv}, but permits you to specify the environment
 for the new program explicitly as the @var{env} argument.  This should
-be an array of strings in the same format as for the @code{environ} 
+be an array of strings in the same format as for the @code{environ}
 variable; see @ref{Environment Access}.
 @end deftypefun
 
@@ -1369,7 +1369,7 @@ equivalent macros.
 If @var{usage} is a null pointer, this function is equivalent to
 @code{waitpid (-1, @var{status_ptr}, @var{options})}.
 
-The @var{usage} argument may also be a pointer to a 
+The @var{usage} argument may also be a pointer to a
 @code{struct rusage} object.  Information about system resources used by
 terminated processes (but not stopped processes) is returned in this
 structure.
@@ -1384,7 +1384,7 @@ hasn't been written yet.  Put in a cross-reference here.
 If @var{usage} is a null pointer, this function is equivalent to
 @code{waitpid (@var{pid}, @var{status_ptr}, @var{options})}.
 
-The @var{usage} argument may also be a pointer to a 
+The @var{usage} argument may also be a pointer to a
 @code{struct rusage} object.  Information about system resources used by
 terminated processes (but not stopped processes) is returned in this
 structure.
@@ -1410,7 +1410,7 @@ argument using the equivalent of @samp{sh -c @var{command}}.
 /* @r{Execute the command using this shell program.}  */
 #define SHELL "/bin/sh"
 
-int 
+int
 my_system (char *command)
 @{
   int status;
@@ -1442,7 +1442,7 @@ example.
 Remember that the first @code{argv} argument supplied to the program
 represents the name of the program being executed.  That is why, in the
 call to @code{execl}, @code{SHELL} is supplied once to name the program
-to execute and a second time to supply a value for @code{argv[0]}.  
+to execute and a second time to supply a value for @code{argv[0]}.
 
 The @code{execl} call in the child process doesn't return if it is
 successful.  If it fails, you must do something to make the child
index 384c992..a209efc 100644 (file)
@@ -5,7 +5,7 @@
 @cindex variable number of arguments
 @cindex optional arguments
 
-ANSI C defines a syntax as part of the kernel language for specifying
+@w{ISO C} defines a syntax as part of the kernel language for specifying
 functions that take a variable number or type of arguments.  (Such
 functions are also referred to as @dfn{variadic functions}.)  However,
 the kernel language provides no mechanism for actually accessing
@@ -32,7 +32,7 @@ Every call to the function should supply the same number and type of
 arguments as specified in the function definition.
 
 On the other hand, sometimes a function performs an operation that can
-meaningfully accept an unlimited number of arguments.  
+meaningfully accept an unlimited number of arguments.
 
 For example, consider a function that joins its arguments into a linked
 list.  It makes sense to connect any number of arguments together into a
@@ -80,11 +80,11 @@ function can accept additional arguments of unspecified type by putting
 @samp{@dots{}} at the end of the arguments.  For example,
 
 @example
-int 
+int
 func (const char *a, int b, @dots{})
 @{
   @dots{}
-@}     
+@}
 @end example
 
 @noindent
@@ -92,7 +92,7 @@ outlines a definition of a function @code{func} which returns an
 @code{int} and takes at least two arguments, the first two being a
 @code{const char *} and an @code{int}.@refill
 
-An obscure restriction placed by the ANSI C standard is that the last
+An obscure restriction placed by the @w{ISO C} standard is that the last
 required argument must not be declared @code{register} in the function
 definition.  Furthermore, this argument must not be of a function or
 array type, and may not be, for example, a @code{char} or @code{short
@@ -101,7 +101,7 @@ int} (whether signed or not) or a @code{float}.
 @strong{Compatibility Note:} Many older C dialects provide a similar,
 but incompatible, mechanism for defining functions with variable numbers
 of arguments.  In particular, the @samp{@dots{}} syntax is a new feature
-of ANSI C.
+of @w{ISO C}.
 
 
 @node Receiving the Argument Values, How Many Arguments, Syntax for Variable Arguments, How Variable Arguments are Used
@@ -207,13 +207,13 @@ These macros are defined in the header file @file{stdarg.h}.
 @pindex stdarg.h
 
 @comment stdarg.h
-@comment ANSI
+@comment ISO
 @deftp {Data Type} va_list
 The type @code{va_list} is used for argument pointer variables.
 @end deftp
 
 @comment stdarg.h
-@comment ANSI
+@comment ISO
 @deftypefn {Macro} void va_start (va_list @var{ap}, @var{last_required})
 This macro initialized the argument pointer variable @var{ap} to point
 to the first of the optional arguments of the current function;
@@ -221,14 +221,14 @@ to the first of the optional arguments of the current function;
 @end deftypefn
 
 @comment stdarg.h
-@comment ANSI
+@comment ISO
 @deftypefn {Macro} @var{type} va_arg (va_list @var{ap}, @var{type})
 The @code{va_arg} macro returns the value of the next optional argument,
 and changes the internal state of @var{ap} to move past this argument.
-Thus, successive uses of @code{va_arg} return successive optional 
+Thus, successive uses of @code{va_arg} return successive optional
 arguments.
 The type of the value returned by @code{va_arg} is the @var{type}
-specified in the call.  
+specified in the call.
 
 The @var{type} must match the type of the actual argument, and must not
 be @code{char} or @code{short int} or @code{float}.  (Remember that the
@@ -236,7 +236,7 @@ default argument promotions apply to optional arguments.)
 @end deftypefn
 
 @comment stdarg.h
-@comment ANSI
+@comment ISO
 @deftypefn {Macro} void va_end (va_list @var{ap})
 This ends the use of @var{ap}.  After a @code{va_end} call, further
 @code{va_arg} calls with the same @var{ap} may not work.  You should invoke
@@ -263,7 +263,7 @@ way the variable arguments facility is commonly used.)
 @example
 #include <stdarg.h>
 
-int 
+int
 add_em_up (int count, @dots{})
 @{
   va_list ap;
index 28d4b26..e15fd73 100644 (file)
@@ -9,7 +9,7 @@ definitions, your program should include the header file
 @pindex stddef.h
 
 @comment stddef.h
-@comment ANSI
+@comment ISO
 @deftp {Data Type} ptrdiff_t
 This is the signed integer type of the result of subtracting two
 pointers.  For example, with the declaration @code{char *p1, *p2;}, the
@@ -20,7 +20,7 @@ exists only for this purpose.
 @end deftp
 
 @comment stddef.h
-@comment ANSI
+@comment ISO
 @deftp {Data Type} size_t
 This is an unsigned integer type used to represent the sizes of objects.
 The result of the @code{sizeof} operator is of this type, and functions
@@ -30,12 +30,12 @@ objects of arbitrary sizes accept arguments of this type to specify
 object sizes.
 @end deftp
 
-In the GNU system @code{size_t} is equivalent to one of the types 
+In the GNU system @code{size_t} is equivalent to one of the types
 @code{unsigned int} and @code{unsigned long int}.  These types have
 identical properties on the GNU system, and for most purposes, you
-can use them interchangeably.  However, they are distinct types, 
+can use them interchangeably.  However, they are distinct types,
 and in certain contexts, you may not treat them as identical.  For
-example, when you specify the type of a function argument in a 
+example, when you specify the type of a function argument in a
 function prototype, it makes a difference which one you use.  If
 the system header files declare @code{malloc} with an argument
 of type @code{size_t} and you declare @code{malloc} with an argument
@@ -47,12 +47,12 @@ supposed to have type @code{size_t}, always write the type as
 actually be.
 
 @strong{Compatibility Note:}  Types such as @code{size_t} are new
-features of ANSI C.  Older, pre-ANSI C implementations have
+features of @w{ISO C}.  Older, pre-ANSI C implementations have
 traditionally used @code{unsigned int} for representing object sizes
 and @code{int} for pointer subtraction results.
 
 @comment stddef.h
-@comment ANSI
+@comment ISO
 @deftypevr Macro {void *} NULL
 @cindex null pointer
 This is a null pointer constant.  It can be assigned to any pointer
@@ -60,7 +60,7 @@ variable since it has type @code{void *}, and is guaranteed not to
 point to any real object.  This macro is the best way to get a null
 pointer value.  You can also use @code{0} or @code{(void *)0} as a null
 pointer constant, but using @code{NULL} makes the purpose of the
-constant more evident.  
+constant more evident.
 
 When passing a null pointer as an argument to a function for which there
 is no prototype declaration in scope, you should explicitly cast
@@ -70,7 +70,7 @@ thing.
 @end deftypevr
 
 @comment stddef.h
-@comment ANSI
+@comment ISO
 @deftypefn {Macro} size_t offsetof (@var{type}, @var{member})
 This expands to a integer constant expression that is the offset of the
 structure member named @var{member} in a @code{struct} of type
index 5607c4c..e60216e 100644 (file)
@@ -97,7 +97,7 @@ to @code{-HUGE_VAL} as a value.
 
 In the BSD library, on certain machines, @code{infnan} raises a fatal
 signal in all cases.  The GNU library does not do likewise, because that
-does not fit the ANSI C specification.
+does not fit the @w{ISO C} specification.
 @end deftypefun
 
 @strong{Portability Note:} The functions listed in this section are BSD
@@ -120,7 +120,7 @@ Prototypes for @code{abs} and @code{labs} are in @file{stdlib.h};
 @code{fabs} and @code{cabs} are declared in @file{math.h}.
 
 @comment stdlib.h
-@comment ANSI
+@comment ISO
 @deftypefun int abs (int @var{number})
 This function returns the absolute value of @var{number}.
 
@@ -130,14 +130,14 @@ cannot be represented; thus, @w{@code{abs (INT_MIN)}} is not defined.
 @end deftypefun
 
 @comment stdlib.h
-@comment ANSI
+@comment ISO
 @deftypefun {long int} labs (long int @var{number})
 This is similar to @code{abs}, except that both the argument and result
 are of type @code{long int} rather than @code{int}.
 @end deftypefun
 
 @comment math.h
-@comment ANSI
+@comment ISO
 @deftypefun double fabs (double @var{number})
 This function returns the absolute value of the floating-point number
 @var{number}.
@@ -172,7 +172,7 @@ those cases.
 All these functions are declared in @file{math.h}.
 
 @comment math.h
-@comment ANSI
+@comment ISO
 @deftypefun double frexp (double @var{value}, int *@var{exponent})
 The @code{frexp} function is used to split the number @var{value}
 into a normalized fraction and an exponent.
@@ -191,7 +191,7 @@ zero is stored in @code{*@var{exponent}}.
 @end deftypefun
 
 @comment math.h
-@comment ANSI
+@comment ISO
 @deftypefun double ldexp (double @var{value}, int @var{exponent})
 This function returns the result of multiplying the floating-point
 number @var{value} by 2 raised to the power @var{exponent}.  (It can
@@ -258,7 +258,7 @@ numbers, this is impossible.  The functions listed here return the
 result as a @code{double} instead to get around this problem.
 
 @comment math.h
-@comment ANSI
+@comment ISO
 @deftypefun double ceil (double @var{x})
 The @code{ceil} function rounds @var{x} upwards to the nearest integer,
 returning that value as a @code{double}.  Thus, @code{ceil (1.5)}
@@ -266,7 +266,7 @@ is @code{2.0}.
 @end deftypefun
 
 @comment math.h
-@comment ANSI
+@comment ISO
 @deftypefun double floor (double @var{x})
 The @code{ceil} function rounds @var{x} downwards to the nearest
 integer, returning that value as a @code{double}.  Thus, @code{floor
@@ -285,7 +285,7 @@ you explicit select another.
 @end deftypefun
 
 @comment math.h
-@comment ANSI
+@comment ISO
 @deftypefun double modf (double @var{value}, double *@var{integer-part})
 This function breaks the argument @var{value} into an integer part and a
 fractional part (between @code{-1} and @code{1}, exclusive).  Their sum
@@ -298,7 +298,7 @@ returns @code{0.5} and stores @code{2.0} into @code{intpart}.
 @end deftypefun
 
 @comment math.h
-@comment ANSI
+@comment ISO
 @deftypefun double fmod (double @var{numerator}, double @var{denominator})
 This function computes the remainder from the division of
 @var{numerator} by @var{denominator}.  Specifically, the return value is
@@ -353,7 +353,7 @@ To use these facilities, you should include the header file
 @file{stdlib.h} in your program.
 
 @comment stdlib.h
-@comment ANSI
+@comment ISO
 @deftp {Data Type} div_t
 This is a structure type used to hold the result returned by the @code{div}
 function.  It has the following members:
@@ -368,7 +368,7 @@ The remainder from the division.
 @end deftp
 
 @comment stdlib.h
-@comment ANSI
+@comment ISO
 @deftypefun div_t div (int @var{numerator}, int @var{denominator})
 This function @code{div} computes the quotient and remainder from
 the division of @var{numerator} by @var{denominator}, returning the
@@ -389,7 +389,7 @@ Now @code{result.quot} is @code{-3} and @code{result.rem} is @code{2}.
 @end deftypefun
 
 @comment stdlib.h
-@comment ANSI
+@comment ISO
 @deftp {Data Type} ldiv_t
 This is a structure type used to hold the result returned by the @code{ldiv}
 function.  It has the following members:
@@ -407,7 +407,7 @@ type @code{long int} rather than @code{int}.)
 @end deftp
 
 @comment stdlib.h
-@comment ANSI
+@comment ISO
 @deftypefun ldiv_t ldiv (long int @var{numerator}, long int @var{denominator})
 The @code{ldiv} function is similar to @code{div}, except that the
 arguments are of type @code{long int} and the result is returned as a
@@ -442,7 +442,7 @@ one by one.
 These functions are declared in @file{stdlib.h}.
 
 @comment stdlib.h
-@comment ANSI
+@comment ISO
 @deftypefun {long int} strtol (const char *@var{string}, char **@var{tailptr}, int @var{base})
 The @code{strtol} (``string-to-long'') function converts the initial
 part of @var{string} to a signed integer, which is returned as a value
@@ -502,7 +502,7 @@ There is an example at the end of this section.
 @end deftypefun
 
 @comment stdlib.h
-@comment ANSI
+@comment ISO
 @deftypefun {unsigned long int} strtoul (const char *@var{string}, char **@var{tailptr}, int @var{base})
 The @code{strtoul} (``string-to-unsigned-long'') function is like
 @code{strtol} except it deals with unsigned numbers, and returns its
@@ -558,7 +558,7 @@ as well.
 @end deftypefun
 
 @comment stdlib.h
-@comment ANSI
+@comment ISO
 @deftypefun {long int} atol (const char *@var{string})
 This function is similar to the @code{strtol} function with a @var{base}
 argument of @code{10}, except that it need not detect overflow errors.
@@ -567,7 +567,7 @@ existing code; using @code{strtol} is more robust.
 @end deftypefun
 
 @comment stdlib.h
-@comment ANSI
+@comment ISO
 @deftypefun int atoi (const char *@var{string})
 This function is like @code{atol}, except that it returns an @code{int}
 value rather than @code{long int}.  The @code{atoi} function is also
@@ -640,7 +640,7 @@ sum_ints_from_string (char *string)
 These functions are declared in @file{stdlib.h}.
 
 @comment stdlib.h
-@comment ANSI
+@comment ISO
 @deftypefun double strtod (const char *@var{string}, char **@var{tailptr})
 The @code{strtod} (``string-to-double'') function converts the initial
 part of @var{string} to a floating-point number, which is returned as a
@@ -736,7 +736,7 @@ which will handle numbers represented using the grouping scheme of the
 current locale (@pxref{Parsing of Integers}).
 
 @comment stdlib.h
-@comment ANSI
+@comment ISO
 @deftypefun double atof (const char *@var{string})
 This function is similar to the @code{strtod} function, except that it
 need not detect overflow and underflow errors.  The @code{atof} function
index 86afeca..4f9326e 100644 (file)
@@ -298,7 +298,7 @@ below.
 
 The normal return value from @code{sysconf} is the value you requested.
 A value of @code{-1} is returned both if the implementation does not
-impose a limit, and in case of an error.  
+impose a limit, and in case of an error.
 
 The following @code{errno} error conditions are defined for this function:
 
@@ -467,7 +467,7 @@ Inquire about the virtual memory page size of the machine.
 @c @xref{XXX getpagesize}. !!! ???
 @end table
 
-@node Examples of Sysconf 
+@node Examples of Sysconf
 @subsection Examples of @code{sysconf}
 
 We recommend that you first test for a macro definition for the
@@ -656,8 +656,8 @@ This is the BSD name for @code{NAME_MAX}.  It is defined in
 @end deftypevr
 
 @comment stdio.h
-@comment ANSI
-@deftypevr Macro int FILENAME_MAX 
+@comment ISO
+@deftypevr Macro int FILENAME_MAX
 The value of this macro is an integer constant expression that
 represents the maximum length of a file name string.  It is defined in
 @file{stdio.h}.
@@ -699,7 +699,7 @@ library.
 @comment POSIX.1
 @deftypevr Macro int _POSIX_CHOWN_RESTRICTED
 If this option is in effect, the @code{chown} function is restricted so
-that the only changes permitted to nonprivileged processes is to change 
+that the only changes permitted to nonprivileged processes is to change
 the group owner of a file to either be the effective group ID of the
 process, or one of its supplementary group IDs.  @xref{File Owner}.
 @end deftypevr
index 423dce4..d5dfb6a 100644 (file)
@@ -6,7 +6,7 @@ The exact set of features available when you compile a source file
 is controlled by which @dfn{feature test macros} you define.
 
 If you compile your programs using @samp{gcc -ansi}, you get only the
-ANSI C library features, unless you explicitly request additional
+@w{ISO C} library features, unless you explicitly request additional
 features by defining one or more of the feature macros.
 @xref{Invoking GCC,, GNU CC Command Options, gcc.info, The GNU CC Manual},
 for more information about GCC options.@refill
@@ -24,7 +24,7 @@ self-contained way.
 @defvr Macro _POSIX_SOURCE
 If you define this macro, then the functionality from the POSIX.1
 standard (IEEE Standard 1003.1) is available, as well as all of the
-ANSI C facilities.
+@w{ISO C} facilities.
 @end defvr
 
 @comment (none)
@@ -35,14 +35,14 @@ functionality from the POSIX.1 standard (IEEE Standard 1003.1) is made
 available.  If you define this macro with a value of @code{2}, then both
 the functionality from the POSIX.1 standard and the functionality from
 the POSIX.2 standard (IEEE Standard 1003.2) are made available.  This is
-in addition to the ANSI C facilities.
+in addition to the @w{ISO C} facilities.
 @end defvr
 
 @comment (none)
 @comment GNU
 @defvr Macro _BSD_SOURCE
 If you define this macro, functionality derived from 4.3 BSD Unix is
-included as well as the ANSI C, POSIX.1, and POSIX.2 material.
+included as well as the @w{ISO C}, POSIX.1, and POSIX.2 material.
 
 Some of the features derived from 4.3 BSD Unix conflict with the
 corresponding features specified by the POSIX.1 standard.  If this
@@ -67,7 +67,7 @@ the normal C library.
 @comment GNU
 @defvr Macro _SVID_SOURCE
 If you define this macro, functionality derived from SVID is
-included as well as the ANSI C, POSIX.1, POSIX.2, and X/Open material.
+included as well as the @w{ISO C}, POSIX.1, POSIX.2, and X/Open material.
 @end defvr
 
 @comment (none)
@@ -89,7 +89,7 @@ available which are necessary for the X/Open Unix brand.
 @comment (none)
 @comment GNU
 @defvr Macro _GNU_SOURCE
-If you define this macro, everything is included: ANSI C, POSIX.1,
+If you define this macro, everything is included: @w{ISO C}, POSIX.1,
 POSIX.2, BSD, SVID, X/Open, and GNU extensions.  In the cases where
 POSIX.1 conflicts with BSD, the POSIX definitions take precedence.
 
index e7a7946..2b97dfb 100644 (file)
@@ -44,7 +44,7 @@ particular class of characters; each has a name starting with @samp{is}.
 Each of them takes one argument, which is a character to test, and
 returns an @code{int} which is treated as a boolean value.  The
 character argument is passed as an @code{int}, and it may be the
-constant value @code{EOF} instead of a real character.  
+constant value @code{EOF} instead of a real character.
 
 The attributes of any given character can vary between locales.
 @xref{Locales}, for more information on locales.@refill
@@ -54,21 +54,21 @@ These functions are declared in the header file @file{ctype.h}.
 
 @cindex lower-case character
 @comment ctype.h
-@comment ANSI
+@comment ISO
 @deftypefun int islower (int @var{c})
 Returns true if @var{c} is a lower-case letter.
 @end deftypefun
 
 @cindex upper-case character
 @comment ctype.h
-@comment ANSI
+@comment ISO
 @deftypefun int isupper (int @var{c})
 Returns true if @var{c} is an upper-case letter.
 @end deftypefun
 
 @cindex alphabetic character
 @comment ctype.h
-@comment ANSI
+@comment ISO
 @deftypefun int isalpha (int @var{c})
 Returns true if @var{c} is an alphabetic character (a letter).  If
 @code{islower} or @code{isupper} is true of a character, then
@@ -83,14 +83,14 @@ additional characters.
 @cindex digit character
 @cindex decimal digit character
 @comment ctype.h
-@comment ANSI
+@comment ISO
 @deftypefun int isdigit (int @var{c})
 Returns true if @var{c} is a decimal digit (@samp{0} through @samp{9}).
 @end deftypefun
 
 @cindex alphanumeric character
 @comment ctype.h
-@comment ANSI
+@comment ISO
 @deftypefun int isalnum (int @var{c})
 Returns true if @var{c} is an alphanumeric character (a letter or
 number); in other words, if either @code{isalpha} or @code{isdigit} is
@@ -99,7 +99,7 @@ true of a character, then @code{isalnum} is also true.
 
 @cindex hexadecimal digit character
 @comment ctype.h
-@comment ANSI
+@comment ISO
 @deftypefun int isxdigit (int @var{c})
 Returns true if @var{c} is a hexadecimal digit.
 Hexadecimal digits include the normal decimal digits @samp{0} through
@@ -109,7 +109,7 @@ Hexadecimal digits include the normal decimal digits @samp{0} through
 
 @cindex punctuation character
 @comment ctype.h
-@comment ANSI
+@comment ISO
 @deftypefun int ispunct (int @var{c})
 Returns true if @var{c} is a punctuation character.
 This means any printing character that is not alphanumeric or a space
@@ -118,7 +118,7 @@ character.
 
 @cindex whitespace character
 @comment ctype.h
-@comment ANSI
+@comment ISO
 @deftypefun int isspace (int @var{c})
 Returns true if @var{c} is a @dfn{whitespace} character.  In the standard
 @code{"C"} locale, @code{isspace} returns true for only the standard
@@ -155,7 +155,7 @@ This function is a GNU extension.
 
 @cindex graphic character
 @comment ctype.h
-@comment ANSI
+@comment ISO
 @deftypefun int isgraph (int @var{c})
 Returns true if @var{c} is a graphic character; that is, a character
 that has a glyph associated with it.  The whitespace characters are not
@@ -164,7 +164,7 @@ considered graphic.
 
 @cindex printing character
 @comment ctype.h
-@comment ANSI
+@comment ISO
 @deftypefun int isprint (int @var{c})
 Returns true if @var{c} is a printing character.  Printing characters
 include all the graphic characters, plus the space (@samp{ }) character.
@@ -172,7 +172,7 @@ include all the graphic characters, plus the space (@samp{ }) character.
 
 @cindex control character
 @comment ctype.h
-@comment ANSI
+@comment ISO
 @deftypefun int iscntrl (int @var{c})
 Returns true if @var{c} is a control character (that is, a character that
 is not a printing character).
@@ -203,7 +203,7 @@ character to convert, and return the converted character as an
 @code{int}.  If the conversion is not applicable to the argument given,
 the argument is returned unchanged.
 
-@strong{Compatibility Note:} In pre-ANSI C dialects, instead of
+@strong{Compatibility Note:} In pre-@w{ISO C} dialects, instead of
 returning the argument unchanged, these functions may fail when the
 argument is not suitable for the conversion.  Thus for portability, you
 may need to write @code{islower(c) ? toupper(c) : c} rather than just
@@ -213,7 +213,7 @@ These functions are declared in the header file @file{ctype.h}.
 @pindex ctype.h
 
 @comment ctype.h
-@comment ANSI
+@comment ISO
 @deftypefun int tolower (int @var{c})
 If @var{c} is an upper-case letter, @code{tolower} returns the corresponding
 lower-case letter.  If @var{c} is not an upper-case letter,
@@ -221,7 +221,7 @@ lower-case letter.  If @var{c} is not an upper-case letter,
 @end deftypefun
 
 @comment ctype.h
-@comment ANSI
+@comment ISO
 @deftypefun int toupper (int @var{c})
 If @var{c} is a lower-case letter, @code{tolower} returns the corresponding
 upper-case letter.  Otherwise @var{c} is returned unchanged.
index f96c260..47d9857 100644 (file)
@@ -36,7 +36,7 @@ variable @code{errno}.  This variable is declared in the header file
 @pindex errno.h
 
 @comment errno.h
-@comment ANSI
+@comment ISO
 @deftypevr {Variable} {volatile int} errno
 The variable @code{errno} contains the system error number.  You can
 change the value of @code{errno}.
@@ -62,7 +62,7 @@ result of calling other library functions which might fail.  You should
 assume that any library function might alter @code{errno} when the
 function returns an error.
 
-@strong{Portability Note:} ANSI C specifies @code{errno} as a
+@strong{Portability Note:} @w{ISO C} specifies @code{errno} as a
 ``modifiable lvalue'' rather than as a variable, permitting it to be
 implemented as a macro.  For example, its expansion might involve a
 function call, like @w{@code{*_errno ()}}.  In fact, that is what it is
@@ -397,7 +397,7 @@ unless it has handled or blocked @code{SIGPIPE}.
 @end deftypevr
 
 @comment errno.h
-@comment ANSI: Numerical argument out of domain
+@comment ISO: Numerical argument out of domain
 @deftypevr Macro int EDOM
 @comment errno 33 @c DO NOT REMOVE
 Domain error; used by mathematical functions when an argument value does
@@ -405,7 +405,7 @@ not fall into the domain over which the function is defined.
 @end deftypevr
 
 @comment errno.h
-@comment ANSI: Numerical result out of range
+@comment ISO: Numerical result out of range
 @deftypevr Macro int ERANGE
 @comment errno 34 @c DO NOT REMOVE
 Range error; used by mathematical functions when the result value is
@@ -1198,7 +1198,7 @@ for a given error code; the variable
 name of the program that encountered the error.
 
 @comment string.h
-@comment ANSI
+@comment ISO
 @deftypefun {char *} strerror (int @var{errnum})
 The @code{strerror} function maps the error code (@pxref{Checking for
 Errors}) specified by the @var{errnum} argument to a descriptive error
@@ -1215,7 +1215,7 @@ The function @code{strerror} is declared in @file{string.h}.
 @end deftypefun
 
 @comment stdio.h
-@comment ANSI
+@comment ISO
 @deftypefun void perror (const char *@var{message})
 This function prints an error message to the stream @code{stderr};
 see @ref{Standard Streams}.
@@ -1239,7 +1239,7 @@ messages or embedded newlines.  Each error message begins with a capital
 letter and does not include any terminating punctuation.
 
 @strong{Compatibility Note:}  The @code{strerror} function is a new
-feature of ANSI C.  Many older C systems do not support this function
+feature of @w{ISO C}.  Many older C systems do not support this function
 yet.
 
 @cindex program name
index 3132526..39d4082 100644 (file)
@@ -714,9 +714,9 @@ The prototype for this function is declared in the header file
 @end deftypefun
 
 @comment stdio.h
-@comment ANSI
+@comment ISO
 @deftypefun int remove (const char *@var{filename})
-This is the ANSI C function to remove a file.  It works like
+This is the @w{ISO C} function to remove a file.  It works like
 @code{unlink} for files and like @code{rmdir} for directories.
 @code{remove} is declared in @file{stdio.h}.
 @pindex stdio.h
@@ -729,7 +729,7 @@ The @code{rename} function is used to change a file's name.
 
 @cindex renaming a file
 @comment stdio.h
-@comment ANSI
+@comment ISO
 @deftypefun int rename (const char *@var{oldname}, const char *@var{newname})
 The @code{rename} function renames the file name @var{oldname} with
 @var{newname}.  The file formerly accessible under the name
@@ -1981,19 +1981,19 @@ These facilities are declared in the header file @file{stdio.h}.
 @pindex stdio.h
 
 @comment stdio.h
-@comment ANSI
+@comment ISO
 @deftypefun {FILE *} tmpfile (void)
 This function creates a temporary binary file for update mode, as if by
 calling @code{fopen} with mode @code{"wb+"}.  The file is deleted
 automatically when it is closed or when the program terminates.  (On
-some other ANSI C systems the file may fail to be deleted if the program
+some other @w{ISO C} systems the file may fail to be deleted if the program
 terminates abnormally).
 
 This function is reentrant.
 @end deftypefun
 
 @comment stdio.h
-@comment ANSI
+@comment ISO
 @deftypefun {char *} tmpnam (char *@var{result})
 This function constructs and returns a file name that is a valid file
 name and that does not name any existing file.  If the @var{result}
@@ -2021,7 +2021,7 @@ This function is reentrant because the non-reentrant situation of
 @end deftypefun
 
 @comment stdio.h
-@comment ANSI
+@comment ISO
 @deftypevr Macro int L_tmpnam
 The value of this macro is an integer constant expression that represents
 the minimum allocation size of a string large enough to hold the
@@ -2029,7 +2029,7 @@ file name generated by the @code{tmpnam} function.
 @end deftypevr
 
 @comment stdio.h
-@comment ANSI
+@comment ISO
 @deftypevr Macro int TMP_MAX
 The macro @code{TMP_MAX} is a lower bound for how many temporary names
 you can create with @code{tmpnam}.  You can rely on being able to call
index 382f35c..b4cb344 100644 (file)
@@ -9,7 +9,7 @@ programs.
 @cindex library
 
 The GNU C library, described in this document, defines all of the
-library functions that are specified by the ANSI C standard, as well as
+library functions that are specified by the @w{ISO C} standard, as well as
 additional features specific to POSIX and other derivatives of the Unix
 operating system, and extensions specific to the GNU system.
 
@@ -33,8 +33,8 @@ portability.
 
 This manual is written with the assumption that you are at least
 somewhat familiar with the C programming language and basic programming
-concepts.  Specifically, familiarity with ANSI standard C
-(@pxref{ANSI C}), rather than ``traditional'' pre-ANSI C dialects, is
+concepts.  Specifically, familiarity with ISO standard C
+(@pxref{ISO C}), rather than ``traditional'' pre-ISO C dialects, is
 assumed.
 
 The GNU C library includes several @dfn{header files}, each of which
@@ -61,7 +61,7 @@ specific information about them.
 @cindex standards
 
 This section discusses the various standards and other sources that the
-GNU C library is based upon.  These sources include the ANSI C and
+GNU C library is based upon.  These sources include the @w{ISO C} and
 POSIX standards, and the System V and Berkeley Unix implementations.
 
 The primary focus of this manual is to tell you how to make effective
@@ -77,44 +77,48 @@ other symbols provided by the library.  This list also states which
 standards each function or symbol comes from.
 
 @menu
-* ANSI C::                      The American National Standard for the
-                                C programming language.
-* POSIX::                       The IEEE 1003 standards for operating
-                                 systems.
+* ISO C::                      The international standard for the C
+                                 programming language.
+* POSIX::                       The ISO/IEC 9945 (aka IEEE 1003) standards
+                                 for operating systems.
 * Berkeley Unix::               BSD and SunOS.
 * SVID::                        The System V Interface Description.
 @end menu
 
-@node ANSI C, POSIX,  , Standards and Portability
-@subsection ANSI C
-@cindex ANSI C
+@node ISO C, POSIX,  , Standards and Portability
+@subsection ISO C
+@cindex ISO C
 
 The GNU C library is compatible with the C standard adopted by the
 American National Standards Institute (ANSI):
-@cite{American National Standard X3.159-1989---``ANSI C''}.
+@cite{American National Standard X3.159-1989---``ANSI C''} and later
+by the International Standardization Organizaion (ISO):
+@cite{ISO/IEC 9899:1990, ``Programming languages---C''}.
+We here refer to the standard as @w{ISO C} since this is the more
+general standard in respect of ratification.
 The header files and library facilities that make up the GNU library are
-a superset of those specified by the ANSI C standard.@refill
+a superset of those specified by the @w{ISO C} standard.@refill
 
 @pindex gcc
-If you are concerned about strict adherence to the ANSI C standard, you
+If you are concerned about strict adherence to the @w{ISO C} standard, you
 should use the @samp{-ansi} option when you compile your programs with
-the GNU C compiler.  This tells the compiler to define @emph{only} ANSI
+the GNU C compiler.  This tells the compiler to define @emph{only} ISO
 standard features from the library header files, unless you explicitly
 ask for additional features.  @xref{Feature Test Macros}, for
 information on how to do this.
 
-Being able to restrict the library to include only ANSI C features is
-important because ANSI C puts limitations on what names can be defined
+Being able to restrict the library to include only @w{ISO C} features is
+important because @w{ISO C} puts limitations on what names can be defined
 by the library implementation, and the GNU extensions don't fit these
 limitations.  @xref{Reserved Names}, for more information about these
 restrictions.
 
 This manual does not attempt to give you complete details on the
-differences between ANSI C and older dialects.  It gives advice on how
+differences between @w{ISO C} and older dialects.  It gives advice on how
 to write programs to work portably under multiple C dialects, but does
 not aim for completeness.
 
-@node POSIX, Berkeley Unix, ANSI C, Standards and Portability
+@node POSIX, Berkeley Unix, ISO C, Standards and Portability
 @subsection POSIX (The Portable Operating System Interface)
 @cindex POSIX
 @cindex POSIX.1
@@ -128,8 +132,8 @@ Interface for Computer Environments}.  POSIX is derived mostly from
 various versions of the Unix operating system.
 
 The library facilities specified by the POSIX standards are a superset
-of those required by ANSI C; POSIX specifies additional features for
-ANSI C functions, as well as specifying new additional functions.  In
+of those required by @w{ISO C}; POSIX specifies additional features for
+@w{ISO C} functions, as well as specifying new additional functions.  In
 general, the additional requirements and functionality defined by the
 POSIX standards are aimed at providing lower-level support for a
 particular kind of operating system environment, rather than general
@@ -139,7 +143,7 @@ system environments.@refill
 The GNU C library implements all of the functions specified in
 @cite{IEEE Std 1003.1-1990, the POSIX System Application Program
 Interface}, commonly referred to as POSIX.1.  The primary extensions to
-the ANSI C facilities specified by this standard include file system
+the @w{ISO C} facilities specified by this standard include file system
 interface primitives (@pxref{File System Interface}), device-specific
 terminal control functions (@pxref{Low-Level Terminal Interface}), and
 process control functions (@pxref{Processes}).
@@ -175,7 +179,7 @@ The GNU C library defines facilities from some versions of Unix which
 are not formally standardized, specifically from the 4.2 BSD, 4.3 BSD,
 and 4.4 BSD Unix systems (also known as @dfn{Berkeley Unix}) and from
 @dfn{SunOS} (a popular 4.2 BSD derivative that includes some Unix System
-V functionality).  These systems support most of the ANSI and POSIX
+V functionality).  These systems support most of the @w{ISO C} and POSIX
 facilities, and 4.4 BSD and newer releases of SunOS in fact support them all.
 
 The BSD facilities include symbolic links (@pxref{Symbolic Links}), the
@@ -193,7 +197,7 @@ the AT&T Unix System V operating system.  It is to some extent a
 superset of the POSIX standard (@pxref{POSIX}).
 
 The GNU C library defines some of the facilities required by the SVID
-that are not also required by the ANSI or POSIX standards, for
+that are not also required by the @w{ISO C} or POSIX standards, for
 compatibility with  System V Unix and other Unix systems (such as
 SunOS) which include these facilities.  However, many of the more
 obscure and less generally useful facilities required by the SVID are
@@ -295,7 +299,7 @@ program needs to include multiple header files, the order in which they
 are included doesn't matter.
 
 @strong{Compatibility Note:} Inclusion of standard header files in any
-order and any number of times works in any ANSI C implementation.
+order and any number of times works in any @w{ISO C} implementation.
 However, this has traditionally not been the case in many older C
 implementations.
 
@@ -384,7 +388,7 @@ just makes your program slower.
 @cindex name space
 
 The names of all library types, macros, variables and functions that
-come from the ANSI C standard are reserved unconditionally; your program
+come from the @w{ISO C} standard are reserved unconditionally; your program
 @strong{may not} redefine these names.  All other library names are
 reserved if your program explicitly includes the header file that
 defines or declares them.  There are several reasons for these
index 84fd0a9..aa9e21c 100644 (file)
@@ -119,14 +119,14 @@ and formatted output functions (@pxref{Formatted Output}).
 
 If you are concerned about portability of your programs to systems other
 than GNU, you should also be aware that file descriptors are not as
-portable as streams.  You can expect any system running ANSI C to
+portable as streams.  You can expect any system running @w{ISO C} to
 support streams, but non-GNU systems may not support file descriptors at
 all, or may only implement a subset of the GNU functions that operate on
 file descriptors.  Most of the file descriptor functions in the GNU
 library are included in the POSIX.1 standard, however.
 
 @node File Position,  , Streams and File Descriptors, I/O Concepts
-@subsection File Position 
+@subsection File Position
 
 One of the attributes of an open file is its @dfn{file position} that
 keeps track of where in the file the next character is to be read or
@@ -163,11 +163,11 @@ given file at the same time.  In order for each program to be able to
 read the file at its own pace, each program must have its own file
 pointer, which is not affected by anything the other programs do.
 
-In fact, each opening of a file creates a separate file position.  
+In fact, each opening of a file creates a separate file position.
 Thus, if you open a file twice even in the same program, you get two
 streams or descriptors with independent file positions.
 
-By contrast, if you open a descriptor and then duplicate it to get 
+By contrast, if you open a descriptor and then duplicate it to get
 another descriptor, these two descriptors share the same file position:
 changing the file position of one descriptor will affect the other.
 
@@ -285,7 +285,7 @@ The file named @file{b}, in the directory named @file{a} in the root directory.
 The file named @file{a}, in the current working directory.
 
 @item /a/./b
-This is the same as @file{/a/b}.  
+This is the same as @file{/a/b}.
 
 @item ./a
 The file named @file{a}, in the current working directory.
@@ -295,7 +295,7 @@ The file named @file{a}, in the parent directory of the current working
 directory.
 @end table
 
-@c An empty string may ``work'', but I think it's confusing to 
+@c An empty string may ``work'', but I think it's confusing to
 @c try to describe it.  It's not a useful thing for users to use--rms.
 A file name that names a directory may optionally end in a @samp{/}.
 You can specify a file name of @file{/} to refer to the root directory,
@@ -323,7 +323,7 @@ this manual as the @dfn{usual file name errors}.
 
 @table @code
 @item EACCES
-The process does not have search permission for a directory component 
+The process does not have search permission for a directory component
 of the file name.
 
 @item ENAMETOOLONG
@@ -363,7 +363,7 @@ There are two reasons why it can be important for you to be aware of
 file name portability issues:
 
 @itemize @bullet
-@item 
+@item
 If your program makes assumptions about file name syntax, or contains
 embedded literal file name strings, it is more difficult to get it to
 run under other operating systems that use different syntax conventions.
@@ -377,7 +377,7 @@ operating system over a network, or read and write disks in formats used
 by other operating systems.
 @end itemize
 
-The ANSI C standard says very little about file name syntax, only that
+The @w{ISO C} standard says very little about file name syntax, only that
 file names are strings.  In addition to varying restrictions on the
 length of file names and what characters can validly appear in a file
 name, different operating systems use different conventions and syntax
@@ -392,5 +392,3 @@ component strings.  However, in the GNU system, you do not need to worry
 about these restrictions; any character except the null character is
 permitted in a file name string, and there are no limits on the length
 of file name strings.
-
-
index 18a1da3..39bba83 100644 (file)
@@ -46,7 +46,7 @@ would rather have a program crash, visibly, than have it return nonsense
 without indicating anything might be wrong.
 
 @comment assert.h
-@comment ANSI
+@comment ISO
 @deftypefn Macro void assert (int @var{expression})
 Verify the programmer's belief that @var{expression} should be nonzero
 at this point in the program.
@@ -139,7 +139,7 @@ problems that @emph{do not} represent bugs in the program.
 @cindex variadic functions
 @cindex optional arguments
 
-ANSI C defines a syntax for declaring a function to take a variable
+@w{ISO C} defines a syntax for declaring a function to take a variable
 number or type of arguments.  (Such functions are referred to as
 @dfn{varargs functions} or @dfn{variadic functions}.)  However, the
 language itself provides no mechanism for such functions to access their
@@ -191,7 +191,7 @@ These are good reasons to define a @dfn{variadic} function which can
 handle as many arguments as the caller chooses to pass.
 
 Some functions such as @code{open} take a fixed set of arguments, but
-occasionally ignore the last few.  Strict adherence to ANSI C requires
+occasionally ignore the last few.  Strict adherence to @w{ISO C} requires
 these functions to be defined as variadic; in practice, however, the GNU
 C compiler and most other C compilers let you define such a function to
 take a fixed set of arguments---the most it can ever use---and then only
@@ -229,7 +229,7 @@ additional variable arguments.  @xref{Calling Variadics}.
                          variable arguments functions.
 * Argument Macros::      Detailed specification of the macros
                          for accessing variable arguments.
-* Old Varargs::                 The pre-ANSI way of defining variadic functions.
+* Old Varargs::                 The pre-ISO way of defining variadic functions.
 @end menu
 
 @node Variadic Prototypes
@@ -241,7 +241,7 @@ additional variable arguments.  @xref{Calling Variadics}.
 A function that accepts a variable number of arguments must be declared
 with a prototype that says so.   You write the fixed arguments as usual,
 and then tack on @samp{@dots{}} to indicate the possibility of
-additional arguments.  The syntax of ANSI C requires at least one fixed
+additional arguments.  The syntax of @w{ISO C} requires at least one fixed
 argument before the @samp{@dots{}}.  For example,
 
 @smallexample
@@ -264,7 +264,7 @@ definition.  Furthermore, this argument's type must be
 @dfn{self-promoting}: that is, the default promotions must not change
 its type.  This rules out array and function types, as well as
 @code{float}, @code{char} (whether signed or not) and @w{@code{short int}}
-(whether signed or not).  This is actually an ANSI C requirement.
+(whether signed or not).  This is actually an @w{ISO C} requirement.
 
 @node Receiving Arguments
 @subsubsection Receiving the Argument Values
@@ -328,7 +328,7 @@ argument values, but at its own pace.
 argument pointer value to a subroutine, you must not keep using the same
 argument pointer value after that subroutine returns.  For full
 portability, you should just pass it to @code{va_end}.  This is actually
-an ANSI C requirement, but most ANSI C compilers work happily
+an @w{ISO C} requirement, but most ANSI C compilers work happily
 regardless.
 
 @node How Many Arguments
@@ -419,13 +419,13 @@ These macros are defined in the header file @file{stdarg.h}.
 @pindex stdarg.h
 
 @comment stdarg.h
-@comment ANSI
+@comment ISO
 @deftp {Data Type} va_list
 The type @code{va_list} is used for argument pointer variables.
 @end deftp
 
 @comment stdarg.h
-@comment ANSI
+@comment ISO
 @deftypefn {Macro} void va_start (va_list @var{ap}, @var{last-required})
 This macro initializes the argument pointer variable @var{ap} to point
 to the first of the optional arguments of the current function;
@@ -436,7 +436,7 @@ found in the header file @file{varargs.h}.
 @end deftypefn
 
 @comment stdarg.h
-@comment ANSI
+@comment ISO
 @deftypefn {Macro} @var{type} va_arg (va_list @var{ap}, @var{type})
 The @code{va_arg} macro returns the value of the next optional argument,
 and modifies the value of @var{ap} to point to the subsequent argument.
@@ -450,7 +450,7 @@ of the actual argument.
 @end deftypefn
 
 @comment stdarg.h
-@comment ANSI
+@comment ISO
 @deftypefn {Macro} void va_end (va_list @var{ap})
 This ends the use of @var{ap}.  After a @code{va_end} call, further
 @code{va_arg} calls with the same @var{ap} may not work.  You should invoke
@@ -480,10 +480,10 @@ arguments facility.
 @subsubsection Old-Style Variadic Functions
 
 @pindex varargs.h
-Before ANSI C, programmers used a slightly different facility for
+Before @w{ISO C}, programmers used a slightly different facility for
 writing variadic functions.  The GNU C compiler still supports it;
-currently, it is more portable than the ANSI C facility, since support
-for ANSI C is still not universal.  The header file which defines the
+currently, it is more portable than the @w{ISO C} facility, since support
+for @w{ISO C} is still not universal.  The header file which defines the
 old-fashioned variadic facility is called @file{varargs.h}.
 
 Using @file{varargs.h} is almost the same as using @file{stdarg.h}.
@@ -548,7 +548,7 @@ You can assign it to any pointer variable since it has type @code{void
 @code{NULL}.
 
 @comment stddef.h
-@comment ANSI
+@comment ISO
 @deftypevr Macro {void *} NULL
 This is a null pointer constant.
 @end deftypevr
@@ -571,13 +571,13 @@ recommend instead adding a prototype for the function you are calling.
 The result of subtracting two pointers in C is always an integer, but the
 precise data type varies from C compiler to C compiler.  Likewise, the
 data type of the result of @code{sizeof} also varies between compilers.
-ANSI defines standard aliases for these two types, so you can refer to
+ISO defines standard aliases for these two types, so you can refer to
 them in a portable fashion.  They are defined in the header file
 @file{stddef.h}.
 @pindex stddef.h
 
 @comment stddef.h
-@comment ANSI
+@comment ISO
 @deftp {Data Type} ptrdiff_t
 This is the signed integer type of the result of subtracting two
 pointers.  For example, with the declaration @code{char *p1, *p2;}, the
@@ -588,7 +588,7 @@ type that exists only for this purpose.
 @end deftp
 
 @comment stddef.h
-@comment ANSI
+@comment ISO
 @deftp {Data Type} size_t
 This is an unsigned integer type used to represent the sizes of objects.
 The result of the @code{sizeof} operator is of this type, and functions
@@ -616,7 +616,7 @@ possibility of error, when a function argument or value is supposed to
 have type @code{size_t}, never declare its type in any other way.
 
 @strong{Compatibility Note:} Implementations of C before the advent of
-ANSI C generally used @code{unsigned int} for representing object sizes
+@w{ISO C} generally used @code{unsigned int} for representing object sizes
 and @code{int} for pointer subtraction results.  They did not
 necessarily define either @code{size_t} or @code{ptrdiff_t}.  Unix
 systems did define @code{size_t}, in @file{sys/types.h}, but the
@@ -665,7 +665,7 @@ bits in an integer data type.  But you can compute it from the macro
 
 @table @code
 @comment limits.h
-@comment ANSI
+@comment ISO
 @item CHAR_BIT
 This is the number of bits in a @code{char}---eight, on most systems.
 The value has type @code{int}.
@@ -705,23 +705,23 @@ described by the macro---thus, @code{ULONG_MAX} has type
 @comment Extra blank lines make it look better.
 @table @code
 @comment limits.h
-@comment ANSI
+@comment ISO
 @item SCHAR_MIN
 
 This is the minimum value that can be represented by a @w{@code{signed char}}.
 
 @comment limits.h
-@comment ANSI
+@comment ISO
 @item SCHAR_MAX
 @comment limits.h
-@comment ANSI
+@comment ISO
 @itemx UCHAR_MAX
 
 These are the maximum values that can be represented by a
 @w{@code{signed char}} and @w{@code{unsigned char}}, respectively.
 
 @comment limits.h
-@comment ANSI
+@comment ISO
 @item CHAR_MIN
 
 This is the minimum value that can be represented by a @code{char}.
@@ -729,7 +729,7 @@ It's equal to @code{SCHAR_MIN} if @code{char} is signed, or zero
 otherwise.
 
 @comment limits.h
-@comment ANSI
+@comment ISO
 @item CHAR_MAX
 
 This is the maximum value that can be represented by a @code{char}.
@@ -737,7 +737,7 @@ It's equal to @code{SCHAR_MAX} if @code{char} is signed, or
 @code{UCHAR_MAX} otherwise.
 
 @comment limits.h
-@comment ANSI
+@comment ISO
 @item SHRT_MIN
 
 This is the minimum value that can be represented by a @w{@code{signed
@@ -745,10 +745,10 @@ short int}}.  On most machines that the GNU C library runs on,
 @code{short} integers are 16-bit quantities.
 
 @comment limits.h
-@comment ANSI
+@comment ISO
 @item SHRT_MAX
 @comment limits.h
-@comment ANSI
+@comment ISO
 @itemx USHRT_MAX
 
 These are the maximum values that can be represented by a
@@ -756,7 +756,7 @@ These are the maximum values that can be represented by a
 respectively.
 
 @comment limits.h
-@comment ANSI
+@comment ISO
 @item INT_MIN
 
 This is the minimum value that can be represented by a @w{@code{signed
@@ -764,17 +764,17 @@ int}}.  On most machines that the GNU C system runs on, an @code{int} is
 a 32-bit quantity.
 
 @comment limits.h
-@comment ANSI
+@comment ISO
 @item INT_MAX
 @comment limits.h
-@comment ANSI
+@comment ISO
 @itemx UINT_MAX
 
 These are the maximum values that can be represented by, respectively,
 the type @w{@code{signed int}} and the type @w{@code{unsigned int}}.
 
 @comment limits.h
-@comment ANSI
+@comment ISO
 @item LONG_MIN
 
 This is the minimum value that can be represented by a @w{@code{signed
@@ -782,10 +782,10 @@ long int}}.  On most machines that the GNU C system runs on, @code{long}
 integers are 32-bit quantities, the same size as @code{int}.
 
 @comment limits.h
-@comment ANSI
+@comment ISO
 @item LONG_MAX
 @comment limits.h
-@comment ANSI
+@comment ISO
 @itemx ULONG_MAX
 
 These are the maximum values that can be represented by a
@@ -803,7 +803,7 @@ long long int}}.  On most machines that the GNU C system runs on,
 @comment GNU
 @item LONG_LONG_MAX
 @comment limits.h
-@comment ANSI
+@comment ISO
 @itemx ULONG_LONG_MAX
 
 These are the maximum values that can be represented by a @code{signed
@@ -962,16 +962,16 @@ expression.  The other macros listed here cannot be reliably used in
 places that require constant expressions, such as @samp{#if}
 preprocessing directives or in the dimensions of static arrays.
 
-Although the ANSI C standard specifies minimum and maximum values for
+Although the @w{ISO C} standard specifies minimum and maximum values for
 most of these parameters, the GNU C implementation uses whatever values
 describe the floating point representation of the target machine.  So in
-principle GNU C actually satisfies the ANSI C requirements only if the
+principle GNU C actually satisfies the @w{ISO C} requirements only if the
 target machine is suitable.  In practice, all the machines currently
 supported are suitable.
 
 @table @code
 @comment float.h
-@comment ANSI
+@comment ISO
 @item FLT_ROUNDS
 This value characterizes the rounding mode for floating point addition.
 The following values indicate standard rounding modes:
@@ -1011,7 +1011,7 @@ the IEEE single-precision standard.
 @end smallexample
 
 @comment float.h
-@comment ANSI
+@comment ISO
 @item FLT_RADIX
 This is the value of the base, or radix, of exponent representation.
 This is guaranteed to be a constant expression, unlike the other macros
@@ -1019,7 +1019,7 @@ described in this section.  The value is 2 on all machines we know of
 except the IBM 360 and derivatives.
 
 @comment float.h
-@comment ANSI
+@comment ISO
 @item FLT_MANT_DIG
 This is the number of base-@code{FLT_RADIX} digits in the floating point
 mantissa for the @code{float} data type.  The following expression
@@ -1036,7 +1036,7 @@ float radix = FLT_RADIX;
 where @code{radix} appears @code{FLT_MANT_DIG} times.
 
 @comment float.h
-@comment ANSI
+@comment ISO
 @item DBL_MANT_DIG
 @itemx LDBL_MANT_DIG
 This is the number of base-@code{FLT_RADIX} digits in the floating point
@@ -1045,7 +1045,7 @@ respectively.
 
 @comment Extra blank lines make it look better.
 @comment float.h
-@comment ANSI
+@comment ISO
 @item FLT_DIG
 
 This is the number of decimal digits of precision for the @code{float}
@@ -1057,10 +1057,10 @@ point number with @var{p} base @var{b} digits and back again, without
 change to the @var{q} decimal digits.
 
 The value of this macro is supposed to be at least @code{6}, to satisfy
-ANSI C.
+@w{ISO C}.
 
 @comment float.h
-@comment ANSI
+@comment ISO
 @item DBL_DIG
 @itemx LDBL_DIG
 
@@ -1069,7 +1069,7 @@ These are similar to @code{FLT_DIG}, but for the data types
 macros are supposed to be at least @code{10}.
 
 @comment float.h
-@comment ANSI
+@comment ISO
 @item FLT_MIN_EXP
 This is the smallest possible exponent value for type @code{float}.
 More precisely, is the minimum negative integer such that the value
@@ -1077,7 +1077,7 @@ More precisely, is the minimum negative integer such that the value
 normalized floating point number of type @code{float}.
 
 @comment float.h
-@comment ANSI
+@comment ISO
 @item DBL_MIN_EXP
 @itemx LDBL_MIN_EXP
 
@@ -1085,21 +1085,21 @@ These are similar to @code{FLT_MIN_EXP}, but for the data types
 @code{double} and @code{long double}, respectively.
 
 @comment float.h
-@comment ANSI
+@comment ISO
 @item FLT_MIN_10_EXP
 This is the minimum negative integer such that @code{10} raised to this
 power minus 1 can be represented as a normalized floating point number
 of type @code{float}.  This is supposed to be @code{-37} or even less.
 
 @comment float.h
-@comment ANSI
+@comment ISO
 @item DBL_MIN_10_EXP
 @itemx LDBL_MIN_10_EXP
 These are similar to @code{FLT_MIN_10_EXP}, but for the data types
 @code{double} and @code{long double}, respectively.
 
 @comment float.h
-@comment ANSI
+@comment ISO
 @item FLT_MAX_EXP
 This is the largest possible exponent value for type @code{float}.  More
 precisely, this is the maximum positive integer such that value
@@ -1107,28 +1107,28 @@ precisely, this is the maximum positive integer such that value
 floating point number of type @code{float}.
 
 @comment float.h
-@comment ANSI
+@comment ISO
 @item DBL_MAX_EXP
 @itemx LDBL_MAX_EXP
 These are similar to @code{FLT_MAX_EXP}, but for the data types
 @code{double} and @code{long double}, respectively.
 
 @comment float.h
-@comment ANSI
+@comment ISO
 @item FLT_MAX_10_EXP
 This is the maximum positive integer such that @code{10} raised to this
 power minus 1 can be represented as a normalized floating point number
 of type @code{float}.  This is supposed to be at least @code{37}.
 
 @comment float.h
-@comment ANSI
+@comment ISO
 @item DBL_MAX_10_EXP
 @itemx LDBL_MAX_10_EXP
 These are similar to @code{FLT_MAX_10_EXP}, but for the data types
 @code{double} and @code{long double}, respectively.
 
 @comment float.h
-@comment ANSI
+@comment ISO
 @item FLT_MAX
 
 The value of this macro is the maximum number representable in type
@@ -1138,7 +1138,7 @@ has type @code{float}.
 The smallest representable number is @code{- FLT_MAX}.
 
 @comment float.h
-@comment ANSI
+@comment ISO
 @item DBL_MAX
 @itemx LDBL_MAX
 
@@ -1147,7 +1147,7 @@ These are similar to @code{FLT_MAX}, but for the data types
 macro's value is the same as the type it describes.
 
 @comment float.h
-@comment ANSI
+@comment ISO
 @item FLT_MIN
 
 The value of this macro is the minimum normalized positive floating
@@ -1155,7 +1155,7 @@ point number that is representable in type @code{float}.  It is supposed
 to be no more than @code{1E-37}.
 
 @comment float.h
-@comment ANSI
+@comment ISO
 @item DBL_MIN
 @itemx LDBL_MIN
 
@@ -1164,7 +1164,7 @@ These are similar to @code{FLT_MIN}, but for the data types
 macro's value is the same as the type it describes.
 
 @comment float.h
-@comment ANSI
+@comment ISO
 @item FLT_EPSILON
 
 This is the minimum positive floating point number of type @code{float}
@@ -1172,7 +1172,7 @@ such that @code{1.0 + FLT_EPSILON != 1.0} is true.  It's supposed to
 be no greater than @code{1E-5}.
 
 @comment float.h
-@comment ANSI
+@comment ISO
 @item DBL_EPSILON
 @itemx LDBL_EPSILON
 
@@ -1236,7 +1236,7 @@ You can use @code{offsetof} to measure the location within a structure
 type of a particular structure member.
 
 @comment stddef.h
-@comment ANSI
+@comment ISO
 @deftypefn {Macro} size_t offsetof (@var{type}, @var{member})
 This expands to a integer constant expression that is the offset of the
 structure member named @var{member} in a the structure type @var{type}.
index d6024ed..fa3f3e4 100644 (file)
@@ -175,9 +175,10 @@ Introduction
 
 Standards and Portability
 
-* ANSI C::                      The American National Standard for the
+* ISO C::                       The American National Standard for the
                                  C programming language.
-* POSIX::                       The IEEE 1003 standards for operating systems.
+* POSIX::                       The ISO/IEC 9945 (aka IEEE 1003) standards
+                                 for operating systems.
 * Berkeley Unix::               BSD and SunOS.
 * SVID::                        The System V Interface Description.
 
@@ -365,7 +366,7 @@ I/O on Streams
 * Binary Streams::              Some systems distinguish between text files
                                  and binary files.
 * File Positioning::            About random-access streams.
-* Portable Positioning::        Random access on peculiar ANSI C systems.
+* Portable Positioning::        Random access on peculiar ISO C systems.
 * Stream Buffering::            How to control buffering of streams.
 * Temporary Files::             How to open a temporary file.
 * Other Kinds of Streams::      Other Kinds of Streams
@@ -609,7 +610,7 @@ Mathematics
 
 Pseudo-Random Numbers
 
-* ANSI Random::                 @code{rand} and friends.
+* ISO Random::                  @code{rand} and friends.
 * BSD Random::                  @code{random} and friends.
 
 Low-Level Arithmetic Functions
index d2d7557..cfe6b7e 100644 (file)
@@ -9,7 +9,7 @@ the language spoken.
 @cindex internationalization
 @cindex locales
 @dfn{Internationalization} of software means programming it to be able
-to adapt to the user's favorite conventions.  In ANSI C,
+to adapt to the user's favorite conventions.  In @w{ISO C},
 internationalization works by means of @dfn{locales}.  Each locale
 specifies a collection of conventions, one convention for each purpose.
 The user chooses a set of conventions by specifying a locale (via
@@ -21,15 +21,15 @@ will follow the conventions preferred by the user.
 
 @menu
 * Effects of Locale::           Actions affected by the choice of
-                                 locale. 
+                                 locale.
 * Choosing Locale::             How the user specifies a locale.
 * Locale Categories::           Different purposes for which you can
-                                 select a locale. 
+                                 select a locale.
 * Setting the Locale::          How a program specifies the locale
-                                 with library functions. 
+                                 with library functions.
 * Standard Locales::            Locale names available on all systems.
 * Numeric Formatting::          How to format numbers according to the
-                                 chosen locale. 
+                                 chosen locale.
 @end menu
 
 @node Effects of Locale, Choosing Locale,  , Locales
@@ -128,14 +128,14 @@ use as an argument to @code{setlocale}.
 
 @table @code
 @comment locale.h
-@comment ANSI
+@comment ISO
 @item LC_COLLATE
 @vindex LC_COLLATE
 This category applies to collation of strings (functions @code{strcoll}
 and @code{strxfrm}); see @ref{Collation Functions}.
 
 @comment locale.h
-@comment ANSI
+@comment ISO
 @item LC_CTYPE
 @vindex LC_CTYPE
 This category applies to classification and conversion of characters,
@@ -143,48 +143,44 @@ and to multibyte and wide characters;
 see @ref{Character Handling} and @ref{Extended Characters}.
 
 @comment locale.h
-@comment ANSI
+@comment ISO
 @item LC_MONETARY
 @vindex LC_MONETARY
 This category applies to formatting monetary values; see @ref{Numeric
 Formatting}.
 
 @comment locale.h
-@comment ANSI
+@comment ISO
 @item LC_NUMERIC
 @vindex LC_NUMERIC
 This category applies to formatting numeric values that are not
 monetary; see @ref{Numeric Formatting}.
 
 @comment locale.h
-@comment ANSI
+@comment ISO
 @item LC_TIME
 @vindex LC_TIME
 This category applies to formatting date and time values; see
 @ref{Formatting Date and Time}.
 
-@ignore   This is apparently a feature that was in some early
-draft of the POSIX.2 standard, but it's not listed in draft 11.  Do we
-still support this anyway?  Is there a corresponding environment
-variable?
-
 @comment locale.h
-@comment GNU
-@item LC_RESPONSE
-@vindex LC_RESPONSE
-This category applies to recognizing ``yes'' or ``no'' responses to
-questions.
+@comment XOPEN
+@item LC_MESSAGES
+@vindex LC_MESSAGES
+This category applies to selecting the language used in the user interface
+for message translation.
+@ignore  see @ref{gettext} and @ref{catgets}
 @end ignore
 
 @comment locale.h
-@comment ANSI
+@comment ISO
 @item LC_ALL
 @vindex LC_ALL
 This is not an environment variable; it is only a macro that you can use
 with @code{setlocale} to set a single locale for all purposes.
 
 @comment locale.h
-@comment ANSI
+@comment ISO
 @item LANG
 @vindex LANG
 If this environment variable is defined, its value specifies the locale
@@ -197,7 +193,7 @@ to use for all purposes except as overridden by the variables above.
 A C program inherits its locale environment variables when it starts up.
 This happens automatically.  However, these variables do not
 automatically control the locale used by the library functions, because
-ANSI C says that all programs start by default in the standard @samp{C}
+@w{ISO C} says that all programs start by default in the standard @samp{C}
 locale.  To use the locales specified by the environment, you must call
 @code{setlocale}.  Call it as follows:
 
@@ -217,9 +213,9 @@ general use or for a specific category.
 The symbols in this section are defined in the header file @file{locale.h}.
 
 @comment locale.h
-@comment ANSI
+@comment ISO
 @deftypefun {char *} setlocale (int @var{category}, const char *@var{locale})
-The function @code{setlocale} sets the current locale for 
+The function @code{setlocale} sets the current locale for
 category @var{category} to @var{locale}.
 
 If @var{category} is @code{LC_ALL}, this specifies the locale for all
@@ -238,7 +234,7 @@ Concatenation}) if you want to save it past any further calls to
 @code{setlocale} itself.)
 
 You should not modify the string returned by @code{setlocale}.
-It might be the same string that was passed as an argument in a 
+It might be the same string that was passed as an argument in a
 previous call to @code{setlocale}.
 
 When you read the current locale for category @code{LC_ALL}, the value
@@ -277,23 +273,23 @@ with_other_locale (char *new_locale,
 
   /* @r{Get the name of the current locale.}  */
   old_locale = setlocale (LC_ALL, NULL);
-  
+
   /* @r{Copy the name so it won't be clobbered by @code{setlocale}.} */
   saved_locale = strdup (old_locale);
   if (old_locale == NULL)
     fatal ("Out of memory");
-  
+
   /* @r{Now change the locale and do some stuff with it.} */
   setlocale (LC_ALL, new_locale);
   (*subroutine) (argument);
-  
+
   /* @r{Restore the original locale.} */
   setlocale (LC_ALL, saved_locale);
   free (saved_locale);
 @}
 @end smallexample
 
-@strong{Portability Note:} Some ANSI C systems may define additional
+@strong{Portability Note:} Some @w{ISO C} systems may define additional
 locale categories.  For portability, assume that any symbol beginning
 with @samp{LC_} might be defined in @file{locale.h}.
 
@@ -306,7 +302,7 @@ are these three standard ones:
 @table @code
 @item "C"
 This is the standard C locale.  The attributes and behavior it provides
-are specified in the ANSI C standard.  When your program starts up, it
+are specified in the @w{ISO C} standard.  When your program starts up, it
 initially uses this locale by default.
 
 @item "POSIX"
@@ -343,7 +339,7 @@ conventions of the current locale, you can use the function
 @cindex numeric value formatting
 
 @comment locale.h
-@comment ANSI
+@comment ISO
 @deftypefun {struct lconv *} localeconv (void)
 The @code{localeconv} function returns a pointer to a structure whose
 components contain information about how numeric and monetary values
@@ -356,7 +352,7 @@ value.
 @end deftypefun
 
 @comment locale.h
-@comment ANSI
+@comment ISO
 @deftp {Data Type} {struct lconv}
 This is the data type of the value returned by @code{localeconv}.
 @end deftp
@@ -436,7 +432,7 @@ international and local formats, respectively.  (Most often, both
 members have the same value.)
 
 In the standard @samp{C} locale, both of these members have the value
-@code{CHAR_MAX}, meaning ``unspecified''.  The ANSI standard doesn't say
+@code{CHAR_MAX}, meaning ``unspecified''.  The ISO standard doesn't say
 what to do when you find this the value; we recommend printing no
 fractional digits.  (This locale also specifies the empty string for
 @code{mon_decimal_point}, so printing any fractional digits would be
@@ -469,7 +465,7 @@ assumed to be in Canadian dollars.
 The local currency symbol for the selected locale.
 
 In the standard @samp{C} locale, this member has a value of @code{""}
-(the empty string), meaning ``unspecified''.  The ANSI standard doesn't
+(the empty string), meaning ``unspecified''.  The ISO standard doesn't
 say what to do when you find this value; we recommend you simply print
 the empty string as you would print any other string found in the
 appropriate member.
@@ -496,13 +492,13 @@ amounts (or zero), and the @code{n_cs_precedes} member applies to
 negative amounts.
 
 In the standard @samp{C} locale, both of these members have a value of
-@code{CHAR_MAX}, meaning ``unspecified''.  The ANSI standard doesn't say
+@code{CHAR_MAX}, meaning ``unspecified''.  The ISO standard doesn't say
 what to do when you find this value, but we recommend printing the
 currency symbol before the amount.  That's right for most countries.
 In other words, treat all nonzero values alike in these members.
 
 The POSIX standard says that these two members apply to the
-@code{int_curr_symbol} as well as the @code{currency_symbol}.  The ANSI
+@code{int_curr_symbol} as well as the @code{currency_symbol}.  The ISO
 C standard seems to imply that they should apply only to the
 @code{currency_symbol}---so the @code{int_curr_symbol} should always
 precede the amount.
@@ -521,7 +517,7 @@ amounts (or zero), and the @code{n_sep_by_space} member applies to
 negative amounts.
 
 In the standard @samp{C} locale, both of these members have a value of
-@code{CHAR_MAX}, meaning ``unspecified''.  The ANSI standard doesn't say
+@code{CHAR_MAX}, meaning ``unspecified''.  The ISO standard doesn't say
 what you should do when you find this value; we suggest you treat it as
 one (print a space).  In other words, treat all nonzero values alike in
 these members.
@@ -532,7 +528,7 @@ These members apply only to @code{currency_symbol}.  When you use
 
 The POSIX standard says that these two members apply to the
 @code{int_curr_symbol} as well as the @code{currency_symbol}.  But an
-example in the ANSI C standard clearly implies that they should apply
+example in the @w{ISO C} standard clearly implies that they should apply
 only to the @code{currency_symbol}---that the @code{int_curr_symbol}
 contains any appropriate separator, so you should never print an
 additional space.
@@ -556,7 +552,7 @@ These are strings used to indicate positive (or zero) and negative
 In the standard @samp{C} locale, both of these members have a value of
 @code{""} (the empty string), meaning ``unspecified''.
 
-The ANSI standard doesn't say what to do when you find this value; we
+The ISO standard doesn't say what to do when you find this value; we
 recommend printing @code{positive_sign} as you find it, even if it is
 empty.  For a negative value, print @code{negative_sign} as you find it
 unless both it and @code{positive_sign} are empty, in which case print
@@ -592,14 +588,13 @@ Print the sign string right after the currency symbol.
 @samp{C} locale.
 @end table
 
-The ANSI standard doesn't say what you should do when the value is
+The ISO standard doesn't say what you should do when the value is
 @code{CHAR_MAX}.  We recommend you print the sign after the currency
 symbol.
 @end table
 
 It is not clear whether you should let these members apply to the
 international currency format or not.  POSIX says you should, but
-intuition plus the examples in the ANSI C standard suggest you should
+intuition plus the examples in the @w{ISO C} standard suggest you should
 not.  We hope that someone who knows well the conventions for formatting
 monetary quantities will tell us what we should recommend.
-
index 975de53..b7401b8 100644 (file)
@@ -305,7 +305,7 @@ library which you are using.  Also include the files
 you ran @file{configure}.
 
 If you think you have found some way in which the GNU C library does not
-conform to the ANSI and POSIX standards (@pxref{Standards and
+conform to the ISO and POSIX standards (@pxref{Standards and
 Portability}), that is definitely a bug.  Report it!@refill
 
 Send bug reports to the Internet address
@@ -767,8 +767,8 @@ generated are @file{ioctls.h}, @file{errnos.h}, @file{sys/param.h}, and
 
 @c ??? This section is really short now.  Want to keep it? --roland
 
-Although the GNU C library implements the ANSI C library facilities, you
-@emph{can} use the GNU C library with traditional, ``pre-ANSI'' C
+Although the GNU C library implements the @w{ISO C} library facilities, you
+@emph{can} use the GNU C library with traditional, ``pre-ISO'' C
 compilers.  However, you need to be careful because the content and
 organization of the GNU C library header files differs from that of
 traditional C implementations.  This means you may need to make changes
@@ -963,7 +963,7 @@ The random number generation functions @code{random}, @code{srandom},
 @code{rand} and @code{srand} functions, were written by Earl T. Cohen
 for the University of California at Berkeley and are copyrighted by the
 Regents of the University of California.  They have undergone minor
-changes to fit into the GNU C library and to fit the ANSI C standard,
+changes to fit into the GNU C library and to fit the @w{ISO C} standard,
 but the functional code is Berkeley's.@refill
 
 @item
index 7de6d16..870edd5 100644 (file)
@@ -71,12 +71,12 @@ domain or range errors.  In particular, this means that you won't see
 Handling}, for more information about signals.)
 
 @comment math.h
-@comment ANSI
+@comment ISO
 @deftypevr Macro double HUGE_VAL
 An expression representing a particular very large number.  On machines
-that use @w{IEEE 754} floating point format, the value is ``infinity''.
-On other machines, it's typically the largest positive number that can
-be represented.
+that use @w{IEEE 754}/@w{IEEE 854} floating point format, the value is
+``infinity''.  On other machines, it's typically the largest positive
+number that can be represented.
 
 The value of this macro is used as the return value from various
 mathematical @code{double} returning functions in overflow situations.
@@ -132,21 +132,21 @@ You can also compute the value of pi with the expression @code{acos
 
 
 @comment math.h
-@comment ANSI
+@comment ISO
 @deftypefun double sin (double @var{x})
 This function returns the sine of @var{x}, where @var{x} is given in
 radians.  The return value is in the range @code{-1} to @code{1}.
 @end deftypefun
 
 @comment math.h
-@comment ANSI
+@comment ISO
 @deftypefun double cos (double @var{x})
 This function returns the cosine of @var{x}, where @var{x} is given in
 radians.  The return value is in the range @code{-1} to @code{1}.
 @end deftypefun
 
 @comment math.h
-@comment ANSI
+@comment ISO
 @deftypefun double tan (double @var{x})
 This function returns the tangent of @var{x}, where @var{x} is given in
 radians.
@@ -172,7 +172,7 @@ which are the inverses of the sine, cosine and tangent functions,
 respectively.
 
 @comment math.h
-@comment ANSI
+@comment ISO
 @deftypefun double asin (double @var{x})
 This function computes the arc sine of @var{x}---that is, the value whose
 sine is @var{x}.  The value is in units of radians.  Mathematically,
@@ -185,7 +185,7 @@ over the domain @code{-1} to @code{1}.
 @end deftypefun
 
 @comment math.h
-@comment ANSI
+@comment ISO
 @deftypefun double acos (double @var{x})
 This function computes the arc cosine of @var{x}---that is, the value
 whose cosine is @var{x}.  The value is in units of radians.
@@ -199,7 +199,7 @@ over the domain @code{-1} to @code{1}.
 
 
 @comment math.h
-@comment ANSI
+@comment ISO
 @deftypefun double atan (double @var{x})
 This function computes the arc tangent of @var{x}---that is, the value
 whose tangent is @var{x}.  The value is in units of radians.
@@ -209,7 +209,7 @@ returned is the one between @code{-pi/2} and @code{pi/2}
 @end deftypefun
 
 @comment math.h
-@comment ANSI
+@comment ISO
 @deftypefun double atan2 (double @var{y}, double @var{x})
 This is the two argument arc tangent function.  It is similar to computing
 the arc tangent of @var{y}/@var{x}, except that the signs of both arguments
@@ -237,7 +237,7 @@ case.
 @cindex logarithm functions
 
 @comment math.h
-@comment ANSI
+@comment ISO
 @deftypefun double exp (double @var{x})
 The @code{exp} function returns the value of e (the base of natural
 logarithms) raised to power @var{x}.
@@ -247,7 +247,7 @@ magnitude of the result is too large to be representable.
 @end deftypefun
 
 @comment math.h
-@comment ANSI
+@comment ISO
 @deftypefun double log (double @var{x})
 This function returns the natural logarithm of @var{x}.  @code{exp (log
 (@var{x}))} equals @var{x}, exactly in mathematics and approximately in
@@ -266,7 +266,7 @@ The argument is zero.  The log of zero is not defined.
 @end deftypefun
 
 @comment math.h
-@comment ANSI
+@comment ISO
 @deftypefun double log10 (double @var{x})
 This function returns the base-10 logarithm of @var{x}.  Except for the
 different base, it is similar to the @code{log} function.  In fact,
@@ -274,7 +274,7 @@ different base, it is similar to the @code{log} function.  In fact,
 @end deftypefun
 
 @comment math.h
-@comment ANSI
+@comment ISO
 @deftypefun double pow (double @var{base}, double @var{power})
 This is a general exponentiation function, returning @var{base} raised
 to @var{power}.
@@ -294,7 +294,7 @@ An underflow or overflow condition was detected in the result.
 
 @cindex square root function
 @comment math.h
-@comment ANSI
+@comment ISO
 @deftypefun double sqrt (double @var{x})
 This function returns the nonnegative square root of @var{x}.
 
@@ -346,7 +346,7 @@ The functions in this section are related to the exponential functions;
 see @ref{Exponents and Logarithms}.
 
 @comment math.h
-@comment ANSI
+@comment ISO
 @deftypefun double sinh (double @var{x})
 The @code{sinh} function returns the hyperbolic sine of @var{x}, defined
 mathematically as @w{@code{exp (@var{x}) - exp (-@var{x}) / 2}}.  The
@@ -355,7 +355,7 @@ function fails, and sets @code{errno} to @code{ERANGE}, if the value of
 @end deftypefun
 
 @comment math.h
-@comment ANSI
+@comment ISO
 @deftypefun double cosh (double @var{x})
 The @code{cosh} function returns the hyperbolic cosine of @var{x},
 defined mathematically as @w{@code{exp (@var{x}) + exp (-@var{x}) / 2}}.
@@ -364,7 +364,7 @@ of @var{x} is too large; that is, if overflow occurs.
 @end deftypefun
 
 @comment math.h
-@comment ANSI
+@comment ISO
 @deftypefun double tanh (double @var{x})
 This function returns the hyperbolic tangent of @var{x}, whose
 mathematical definition is @w{@code{sinh (@var{x}) / cosh (@var{x})}}.
@@ -424,27 +424,27 @@ generator.  There is no standard meaning for a particular seed value;
 the same seed, used in different C libraries or on different CPU types,
 will give you different random numbers.
 
-The GNU library supports the standard ANSI C random number functions
+The GNU library supports the standard @w{ISO C} random number functions
 plus another set derived from BSD.  We recommend you use the standard
 ones, @code{rand} and @code{srand}.
 
 @menu
-* ANSI Random::      @code{rand} and friends.
+* ISO Random::       @code{rand} and friends.
 * BSD Random::       @code{random} and friends.
 @end menu
 
-@node ANSI Random
-@subsection ANSI C Random Number Functions
+@node ISO Random
+@subsection ISO C Random Number Functions
 
 This section describes the random number functions that are part of
-the ANSI C standard.
+the @w{ISO C} standard.
 
 To use these facilities, you should include the header file
 @file{stdlib.h} in your program.
 @pindex stdlib.h
 
 @comment stdlib.h
-@comment ANSI
+@comment ISO
 @deftypevr Macro int RAND_MAX
 The value of this macro is an integer constant expression that
 represents the maximum possible value returned by the @code{rand}
@@ -454,14 +454,14 @@ may be as low as @code{32767}.
 @end deftypevr
 
 @comment stdlib.h
-@comment ANSI
+@comment ISO
 @deftypefun int rand ()
 The @code{rand} function returns the next pseudo-random number in the
 series.  The value is in the range from @code{0} to @code{RAND_MAX}.
 @end deftypefun
 
 @comment stdlib.h
-@comment ANSI
+@comment ISO
 @deftypefun void srand (unsigned int @var{seed})
 This function establishes @var{seed} as the seed for a new series of
 pseudo-random numbers.  If you call @code{rand} before a seed has been
index c058cbf..15f185b 100644 (file)
@@ -26,7 +26,7 @@ character codes.
                                  and vice versa.
 * Length of Char::              how many bytes make up one multibyte char.
 * Converting One Char::         Converting a string character by character.
-* Example of Conversion::       Example showing why converting 
+* Example of Conversion::       Example showing why converting
                                 one character at a time may be useful.
 * Shift State::                 Multibyte codes with "shift characters".
 @end menu
@@ -246,7 +246,7 @@ code with @code{MB_CUR_MAX}, and the maximum for @emph{any} multibyte
 code supported on your computer with @code{MB_LEN_MAX}.
 
 @comment limits.h
-@comment ANSI
+@comment ISO
 @deftypevr Macro int MB_LEN_MAX
 This is the maximum length of a multibyte character for any supported
 locale.  It is defined in @file{limits.h}.
@@ -254,7 +254,7 @@ locale.  It is defined in @file{limits.h}.
 @end deftypevr
 
 @comment stdlib.h
-@comment ANSI
+@comment ISO
 @deftypevr Macro int MB_CUR_MAX
 This macro expands into a (possibly non-constant) positive integer
 expression that is the maximum number of bytes in a multibyte character
@@ -320,7 +320,7 @@ is often used to terminate a string of wide characters, just as a single
 byte with value zero often terminates a string of ordinary characters.
 
 @comment stddef.h
-@comment ANSI
+@comment ISO
 @deftp {Data Type} wchar_t
 This is the ``wide character'' type, an integer type whose range is
 large enough to represent all distinct values in any extended character
@@ -358,7 +358,7 @@ functions to convert one character at a time.  @xref{Converting One
 Char}.
 
 @comment stdlib.h
-@comment ANSI
+@comment ISO
 @deftypefun size_t mbstowcs (wchar_t *@var{wstring}, const char *@var{string}, size_t @var{size})
 The @code{mbstowcs} (``multibyte string to wide character string'')
 function converts the null-terminated string of multibyte characters
@@ -398,7 +398,7 @@ mbstowcs_alloc (const char *string)
 @end deftypefun
 
 @comment stdlib.h
-@comment ANSI
+@comment ISO
 @deftypefun size_t wcstombs (char *@var{string}, const wchar_t @var{wstring}, size_t @var{size})
 The @code{wcstombs} (``wide character string to multibyte string'')
 function converts the null-terminated wide character array @var{wstring}
@@ -425,11 +425,11 @@ present if the number is less than @var{size}.
 
 This section describes how to scan a string containing multibyte
 characters, one character at a time.  The difficulty in doing this
-is to know how many bytes each character contains.  Your program 
+is to know how many bytes each character contains.  Your program
 can use @code{mblen} to find this out.
 
 @comment stdlib.h
-@comment ANSI
+@comment ISO
 @deftypefun int mblen (const char *@var{string}, size_t @var{size})
 The @code{mblen} function with a non-null @var{string} argument returns
 the number of bytes that make up the multibyte character beginning at
@@ -468,7 +468,7 @@ with the @code{mbtowc} function.  The @code{wctomb} function does the
 reverse.  These functions are declared in @file{stdlib.h}.
 
 @comment stdlib.h
-@comment ANSI
+@comment ISO
 @deftypefun int mbtowc (wchar_t *@var{result}, const char *@var{string}, size_t @var{size})
 The @code{mbtowc} (``multibyte to wide character'') function when called
 with non-null @var{string} converts the first multibyte character
@@ -502,7 +502,7 @@ shift state.  @xref{Shift State}.
 @end deftypefun
 
 @comment stdlib.h
-@comment ANSI
+@comment ISO
 @deftypefun int wctomb (char *@var{string}, wchar_t @var{wchar})
 The @code{wctomb} (``wide character to multibyte'') function converts
 the wide character code @var{wchar} to its corresponding multibyte
@@ -536,7 +536,7 @@ stored shift state @emph{as well as} storing the multibyte character
 @end deftypefun
 
 @node Example of Conversion, Shift State, Converting One Char, Extended Characters
-@section Character-by-Character Conversion Example 
+@section Character-by-Character Conversion Example
 
 Here is an example that reads multibyte character text from descriptor
 @code{input} and writes the corresponding wide characters to descriptor
index 6cbe77f..bd1a9a5 100644 (file)
@@ -157,7 +157,7 @@ this function is in @file{stdlib.h}.
 @pindex stdlib.h
 
 @comment malloc.h stdlib.h
-@comment ANSI
+@comment ISO
 @deftypefun {void *} malloc (size_t @var{size})
 This function returns a pointer to a newly allocated block @var{size}
 bytes long, or a null pointer if the block could not be allocated.
@@ -179,7 +179,7 @@ memset (ptr, 0, sizeof (struct foo));
 @end smallexample
 
 You can store the result of @code{malloc} into any pointer variable
-without a cast, because ANSI C automatically converts the type
+without a cast, because @w{ISO C} automatically converts the type
 @code{void *} to another type of pointer when necessary.  But the cast
 is necessary in contexts other than assignment operators or if you might
 want your code to run in traditional C.
@@ -263,7 +263,7 @@ The prototype for this function is in @file{stdlib.h}.
 @pindex stdlib.h
 
 @comment malloc.h stdlib.h
-@comment ANSI
+@comment ISO
 @deftypefun void free (void *@var{ptr})
 The @code{free} function deallocates the block of storage pointed at
 by @var{ptr}.
@@ -327,7 +327,7 @@ is declared in @file{stdlib.h}.
 @pindex stdlib.h
 
 @comment malloc.h stdlib.h
-@comment ANSI
+@comment ISO
 @deftypefun {void *} realloc (void *@var{ptr}, size_t @var{newsize})
 The @code{realloc} function changes the size of the block whose address is
 @var{ptr} to be @var{newsize}.
@@ -340,7 +340,7 @@ contents.
 
 If you pass a null pointer for @var{ptr}, @code{realloc} behaves just
 like @samp{malloc (@var{newsize})}.  This can be convenient, but beware
-that older implementations (before ANSI C) may not support this
+that older implementations (before @w{ISO C}) may not support this
 behavior, and will probably crash when @code{realloc} is passed a null
 pointer.
 @end deftypefun
@@ -383,7 +383,7 @@ is declared in @file{stdlib.h}.
 @pindex stdlib.h
 
 @comment malloc.h stdlib.h
-@comment ANSI
+@comment ISO
 @deftypefun {void *} calloc (size_t @var{count}, size_t @var{eltsize})
 This function allocates a block long enough to contain a vector of
 @var{count} elements, each of size @var{eltsize}.  Its contents are
@@ -984,10 +984,10 @@ obstacks, or non-obstack allocation, can reuse the space of the chunk.
 
 The interfaces for using obstacks may be defined either as functions or
 as macros, depending on the compiler.  The obstack facility works with
-all C compilers, including both ANSI C and traditional C, but there are
+all C compilers, including both @w{ISO C} and traditional C, but there are
 precautions you must take if you plan to use compilers other than GNU C.
 
-If you are using an old-fashioned non-ANSI C compiler, all the obstack
+If you are using an old-fashioned @w{non-ISO C} compiler, all the obstack
 ``functions'' are actually defined only as macros.  You can call these
 macros like functions, but you cannot use them in any other way (for
 example, you cannot take their address).
@@ -1006,7 +1006,7 @@ If you use @code{*obstack_list_ptr++} as the obstack pointer argument,
 you will get very strange results since the incrementation may occur
 several times.
 
-In ANSI C, each function has both a macro definition and a function
+In @w{ISO C}, each function has both a macro definition and a function
 definition.  The function definition is used if you take the address of the
 function without calling it.  An ordinary call uses the macro definition by
 default, but you can request the function definition instead by writing the
@@ -1024,12 +1024,11 @@ funcp = obstack_alloc;
 @end smallexample
 
 @noindent
-This is the same situation that exists in ANSI C for the standard library
+This is the same situation that exists in @w{ISO C} for the standard library
 functions.  @xref{Macro Definitions}.
 
 @strong{Warning:} When you do use the macros, you must observe the
-precaution of avoiding side effects in the first operand, even in ANSI
-C.
+precaution of avoiding side effects in the first operand, even in @w{ISO C}.
 
 If you use the GNU C compiler, this precaution is not necessary, because
 various language extensions in GNU C permit defining the macros so as to
index 2f5ba65..d382df5 100644 (file)
@@ -34,7 +34,7 @@ primitive functions to do each step individually instead.
 * Creating a Process::          How to fork a child process.
 * Executing a File::            How to make a process execute another program.
 * Process Completion::          How to tell when a child process has completed.
-* Process Completion Status::   How to interpret the status value 
+* Process Completion Status::   How to interpret the status value
                                  returned from a child process.
 * BSD Wait Functions::         More functions, for backward compatibility.
 * Process Creation Example::    A complete example program.
@@ -51,7 +51,7 @@ it doesn't give you much control over the details: you have to wait
 until the subprogram terminates before you can do anything else.
 
 @comment stdlib.h
-@comment ANSI
+@comment ISO
 @deftypefun int system (const char *@var{command})
 @pindex sh
 This function executes @var{command} as a shell command.  In the GNU C
@@ -224,7 +224,7 @@ The child doesn't inherit alarms set by the parent process.
 The set of pending signals (@pxref{Delivery of Signal}) for the child
 process is cleared.  (The child process inherits its mask of blocked
 signals and signal actions from the parent process.)
-@end itemize 
+@end itemize
 
 
 @comment unistd.h
@@ -300,7 +300,7 @@ passed as the last such argument.
 @deftypefun int execve (const char *@var{filename}, char *const @var{argv}@t{[]}, char *const @var{env}@t{[]})
 This is similar to @code{execv}, but permits you to specify the environment
 for the new program explicitly as the @var{env} argument.  This should
-be an array of strings in the same format as for the @code{environ} 
+be an array of strings in the same format as for the @code{environ}
 variable; see @ref{Environment Access}.
 @end deftypefun
 
@@ -725,7 +725,7 @@ argument using the equivalent of @samp{sh -c @var{command}}.
 #define SHELL "/bin/sh"
 
 @group
-int 
+int
 my_system (const char *command)
 @{
   int status;
@@ -758,7 +758,7 @@ example.
 Remember that the first @code{argv} argument supplied to the program
 represents the name of the program being executed.  That is why, in the
 call to @code{execl}, @code{SHELL} is supplied once to name the program
-to execute and a second time to supply a value for @code{argv[0]}.  
+to execute and a second time to supply a value for @code{argv[0]}.
 
 The @code{execl} call in the child process doesn't return if it is
 successful.  If it fails, you must do something to make the child
index d914135..26a8f82 100644 (file)
@@ -1,5 +1,5 @@
 @node Searching and Sorting, Pattern Matching, Locales, Top
-@chapter Searching and Sorting 
+@chapter Searching and Sorting
 
 This chapter describes functions for searching and sorting arrays of
 arbitrary objects.  You pass the appropriate comparison function to be
@@ -10,7 +10,7 @@ and the total number of elements.
 * Comparison Functions::        Defining how to compare two objects.
                                 Since the sort and search facilities
                                  are general, you have to specify the
-                                 ordering. 
+                                 ordering.
 * Array Search Function::       The @code{bsearch} function.
 * Array Sort Function::         The @code{qsort} function.
 * Search/Sort Example::         An example program.
@@ -64,11 +64,11 @@ the header file @file{stdlib.h}.
 @pindex stdlib.h
 
 @comment stdlib.h
-@comment ANSI
+@comment ISO
 @deftypefun {void *} bsearch (const void *@var{key}, const void *@var{array}, size_t @var{count}, size_t @var{size}, comparison_fn_t @var{compare})
 The @code{bsearch} function searches the sorted array @var{array} for an object
 that is equivalent to @var{key}.  The array contains @var{count} elements,
-each of which is of size @var{size} bytes.  
+each of which is of size @var{size} bytes.
 
 The @var{compare} function is used to perform the comparison.  This
 function is called with two pointer arguments and should return an
@@ -97,7 +97,7 @@ To sort an array using an arbitrary comparison function, use the
 @pindex stdlib.h
 
 @comment stdlib.h
-@comment ANSI
+@comment ISO
 @deftypefun void qsort (void *@var{array}, size_t @var{count}, size_t @var{size}, comparison_fn_t @var{compare})
 The @var{qsort} function sorts the array @var{array}.  The array contains
 @var{count} elements, each of which is of size @var{size}.
@@ -191,5 +191,3 @@ Kermit, the frog
 Gonzo, the whatever
 Couldn't find Janice.
 @end smallexample
-
-
index dfdac1c..b8e7a45 100644 (file)
@@ -55,7 +55,7 @@ between an ordinary return and a return made by a call to
 @code{longjmp}, so calls to @code{setjmp} usually appear in an @samp{if}
 statement.
 
-Here is how the example program described above might be set up:  
+Here is how the example program described above might be set up:
 
 @smallexample
 @include setjmp.c.texi
@@ -95,7 +95,7 @@ performing non-local exits.  These facilities are declared in
 @pindex setjmp.h
 
 @comment setjmp.h
-@comment ANSI
+@comment ISO
 @deftp {Data Type} jmp_buf
 Objects of type @code{jmp_buf} hold the state information to
 be restored by a non-local exit.  The contents of a @code{jmp_buf}
@@ -103,7 +103,7 @@ identify a specific place to return to.
 @end deftp
 
 @comment setjmp.h
-@comment ANSI
+@comment ISO
 @deftypefn Macro int setjmp (jmp_buf @var{state})
 When called normally, @code{setjmp} stores information about the
 execution state of the program in @var{state} and returns zero.  If
@@ -112,8 +112,8 @@ execution state of the program in @var{state} and returns zero.  If
 @end deftypefn
 
 @comment setjmp.h
-@comment ANSI
-@deftypefun void longjmp (jmp_buf @var{state}, int @var{value}) 
+@comment ISO
+@deftypefun void longjmp (jmp_buf @var{state}, int @var{value})
 This function restores current execution to the state saved in
 @var{state}, and continues execution from the call to @code{setjmp} that
 established that return point.  Returning from @code{setjmp} by means of
@@ -210,4 +210,3 @@ argument.  If the @code{sigsetjmp} call that set this @var{state} used a
 nonzero @var{savesigs} flag, @code{siglongjmp} also restores the set of
 blocked signals.
 @end deftypefun
-
index bca02c5..088c35d 100644 (file)
@@ -34,7 +34,7 @@ and synchronize.
 * Generating Signals::          How to send a signal to a process.
 * Blocking Signals::            Making the system hold signals temporarily.
 * Waiting for a Signal::        Suspending your program until a signal
-                                 arrives. 
+                                 arrives.
 * Signal Stack::                Using a Separate Signal Stack.
 * BSD Signal Handling::         Additional functions for backward
                                 compatibility with BSD.
@@ -51,11 +51,11 @@ signals.
 * Kinds of Signals::            Some examples of what can cause a signal.
 * Signal Generation::           Concepts of why and how signals occur.
 * Delivery of Signal::          Concepts of what a signal does to the
-                                 process. 
+                                 process.
 @end menu
 
 @node Kinds of Signals
-@subsection Some Kinds of Signals 
+@subsection Some Kinds of Signals
 
 A signal reports the occurrence of an exceptional event.  These are some
 of the events that can cause (or @dfn{generate}, or @dfn{raise}) a
@@ -229,7 +229,7 @@ defined.  Since the signal numbers are allocated consecutively,
 @menu
 * Program Error Signals::       Used to report serious program errors.
 * Termination Signals::         Used to interrupt and/or terminate the
-                                 program. 
+                                 program.
 * Alarm Signals::               Used to indicate expiration of timers.
 * Asynchronous I/O Signals::    Used to indicate input is available.
 * Job Control Signals::         Signals used to support job control.
@@ -279,7 +279,7 @@ files is so that you can examine them with a debugger to investigate
 what caused the error.
 
 @comment signal.h
-@comment ANSI
+@comment ISO
 @deftypevr Macro int SIGFPE
 The @code{SIGFPE} signal reports a fatal arithmetic error.  Although the
 name is derived from ``floating-point exception'', this signal actually
@@ -294,7 +294,8 @@ floating-point number.
 Actual floating-point exceptions are a complicated subject because there
 are many types of exceptions with subtly different meanings, and the
 @code{SIGFPE} signal doesn't distinguish between them.  The @cite{IEEE
-Standard for Binary Floating-Point Arithmetic (ANSI/IEEE Std 754-1985)}
+Standard for Binary Floating-Point Arithmetic (ANSI/IEEE Std 754-1985
+and ANSI/IEEE Std 854-1987)}
 defines various floating-point exceptions and requires conforming
 computer systems to report their occurrences.  However, this standard
 does not specify how the exceptions are reported, or what kinds of
@@ -368,7 +369,7 @@ Floating underflow fault.
 @end table
 
 @comment signal.h
-@comment ANSI
+@comment ISO
 @deftypevr Macro int SIGILL
 The name of this signal is derived from ``illegal instruction''; it
 usually means your program is trying to execute garbage or a privileged
@@ -387,7 +388,7 @@ the system has trouble running the handler for a signal.
 @cindex illegal instruction
 
 @comment signal.h
-@comment ANSI
+@comment ISO
 @deftypevr Macro int SIGSEGV
 @cindex segmentation violation
 This signal is generated when a program tries to read or write outside
@@ -421,7 +422,7 @@ The name of this signal is an abbreviation for ``bus error''.
 @cindex bus error
 
 @comment signal.h
-@comment ANSI
+@comment ISO
 @deftypevr Macro int SIGABRT
 @cindex abort signal
 This signal indicates an error detected by the program itself and
@@ -480,7 +481,7 @@ The (obvious) default action for all of these signals is to cause the
 process to terminate.
 
 @comment signal.h
-@comment ANSI
+@comment ISO
 @deftypevr Macro int SIGTERM
 @cindex termination signal
 The @code{SIGTERM} signal is a generic signal used to cause program
@@ -493,7 +494,7 @@ The shell command @code{kill} generates @code{SIGTERM} by default.
 @end deftypevr
 
 @comment signal.h
-@comment ANSI
+@comment ISO
 @deftypevr Macro int SIGINT
 @cindex interrupt signal
 The @code{SIGINT} (``program interrupt'') signal is sent when the user
@@ -595,7 +596,7 @@ time used by the current process.  The name is an abbreviation for
 @comment BSD
 @deftypevr Macro int SIGPROF
 This signal is typically indicates expiration of a timer that measures
-both CPU time used by the current process, and CPU time expended on 
+both CPU time used by the current process, and CPU time expended on
 behalf of the process by the system.  Such a timer is used to implement
 code profiling facilities, hence the name of this signal.
 @end deftypevr
@@ -623,7 +624,7 @@ On most operating systems, terminals and sockets are the only kinds of
 files that can generate @code{SIGIO}; other kinds, including ordinary
 files, never generate @code{SIGIO} even if you ask them to.
 
-In the GNU system @code{SIGIO} will always be generated properly 
+In the GNU system @code{SIGIO} will always be generated properly
 if you successfully set asynchronous mode with @code{fcntl}.
 @end deftypevr
 
@@ -703,7 +704,7 @@ ignored, or blocked.
 @comment POSIX.1
 @deftypevr Macro int SIGTSTP
 The @code{SIGTSTP} signal is an interactive stop signal.  Unlike
-@code{SIGSTOP}, this signal can be handled and ignored.  
+@code{SIGSTOP}, this signal can be handled and ignored.
 
 Your program should handle this signal if you have a special need to
 leave files or system tables in a secure state when a process is
@@ -719,7 +720,7 @@ support, see @ref{Special Characters}.
 @comment signal.h
 @comment POSIX.1
 @deftypevr Macro int SIGTTIN
-A process cannot read from the the user's terminal while it is running 
+A process cannot read from the the user's terminal while it is running
 as a background job.  When any process in a background job tries to
 read from the terminal, all of the processes in the job are sent a
 @code{SIGTTIN} signal.  The default action for this signal is to
@@ -906,11 +907,11 @@ This function prints a message describing the signal @var{signum} to the
 standard error output stream @code{stderr}; see @ref{Standard Streams}.
 
 If you call @code{psignal} with a @var{message} that is either a null
-pointer or an empty string, @code{psignal} just prints the message 
+pointer or an empty string, @code{psignal} just prints the message
 corresponding to @var{signum}, adding a trailing newline.
 
 If you supply a non-null @var{message} argument, then @code{psignal}
-prefixes its output with this string.  It adds a colon and a space 
+prefixes its output with this string.  It adds a colon and a space
 character to separate the @var{message} from the string corresponding
 to @var{signum}.
 
@@ -969,7 +970,7 @@ The name @code{sighandler_t} for this data type is a GNU extension.
 @end deftp
 
 @comment signal.h
-@comment ANSI
+@comment ISO
 @deftypefun sighandler_t signal (int @var{signum}, sighandler_t @var{action})
 The @code{signal} function establishes @var{action} as the action for
 the signal @var{signum}.
@@ -1086,7 +1087,7 @@ provided only for compatibility with SVID.
 @end deftypefun
 
 @comment signal.h
-@comment ANSI
+@comment ISO
 @deftypevr Macro sighandler_t SIG_ERR
 The value of this macro is used as the return value from @code{signal}
 to indicate an error.
@@ -1139,7 +1140,7 @@ handler is started; this is true regardless of the value in
 handler, you must write code in the handler to unblock it.
 
 @item int sa_flags
-This specifies various flags which can affect the behavior of 
+This specifies various flags which can affect the behavior of
 the signal.  These are described in more detail in @ref{Flags for Sigaction}.
 @end table
 @end deftp
@@ -1201,10 +1202,10 @@ you can rely on using it as an argument to @code{sigaction}.  This
 problem never happens on the GNU system.
 
 So, you're better off using one or the other of the mechanisms
-consistently within a single program.  
+consistently within a single program.
 
 @strong{Portability Note:} The basic @code{signal} function is a feature
-of ANSI C, while @code{sigaction} is part of the POSIX.1 standard.  If
+of @w{ISO C}, while @code{sigaction} is part of the POSIX.1 standard.  If
 you are concerned about portability to non-POSIX systems, then you
 should use the @code{signal} function instead.
 
@@ -1267,7 +1268,7 @@ action for @code{SIGINT} without changing that action.
 struct sigaction query_action;
 
 if (sigaction (SIGINT, NULL, &query_action) < 0)
-  /* @r{@code{sigaction} returns -1 in case of error.} */ 
+  /* @r{@code{sigaction} returns -1 in case of error.} */
 else if (query_action.sa_handler == SIG_DFL)
   /* @r{@code{SIGINT} is handled in the default, fatal manner.} */
 else if (query_action.sa_handler == SIG_IGN)
@@ -1412,7 +1413,7 @@ describes what your handler should do, and what you should avoid.
 
 @menu
 * Handler Returns::             Handlers that return normally, and what
-                                 this means. 
+                                 this means.
 * Termination in Handler::      How handler functions terminate a program.
 * Longjmp in Handler::          Nonlocal transfer of control out of a
                                  signal handler.
@@ -1421,9 +1422,9 @@ describes what your handler should do, and what you should avoid.
 * Merged Signals::             When a second signal arrives before the
                                 first is handled.
 * Nonreentrancy::               Do not call any functions unless you know they
-                                 are reentrant with respect to signals. 
+                                 are reentrant with respect to signals.
 * Atomic Data Access::          A single handler can run in the middle of
-                                 reading or writing a single object. 
+                                 reading or writing a single object.
 @end menu
 
 @node Handler Returns
@@ -1567,7 +1568,7 @@ read_data ()
     waiting_for_input = 1;
     @dots{}
     waiting_for_input = 0;
-  @} else @{ 
+  @} else @{
     @dots{}
   @}
 @}
@@ -1679,7 +1680,7 @@ sigchld_handler (int signo)
     struct process *p;
 
     /* @r{Keep asking for a status until we get a definitive result.}  */
-    do 
+    do
       @{
         errno = 0;
         pid = waitpid (WAIT_ANY, &w, WNOHANG | WUNTRACED);
@@ -1777,7 +1778,7 @@ sig_atomic_t last_process_status_change;
 @end smallexample
 
 @node Nonreentrancy
-@subsection Signal Handling and Nonreentrant Functions 
+@subsection Signal Handling and Nonreentrant Functions
 @cindex restrictions on signal handler functions
 
 Handler functions usually don't do very much.  The best practice is to
@@ -1994,7 +1995,7 @@ one it is, and how many bits it contains, may vary from machine to
 machine.
 
 @comment signal.h
-@comment ANSI
+@comment ISO
 @deftp {Data Type} sig_atomic_t
 This is an integer data type.  Objects of this type are always accessed
 atomically.
@@ -2134,7 +2135,7 @@ function is declared in @file{signal.h}.
 @pindex signal.h
 
 @comment signal.h
-@comment ANSI
+@comment ISO
 @deftypefun int raise (int @var{signum})
 The @code{raise} function sends the signal @var{signum} to the calling
 process.  It returns zero if successful and a nonzero value if it fails.
@@ -2201,7 +2202,7 @@ main (void)
 @end group
 @end smallexample
 
-@strong{Portability note:} @code{raise} was invented by the ANSI C
+@strong{Portability note:} @code{raise} was invented by the @w{ISO C}
 committee.  Older systems may not support it, so using @code{kill} may
 be more portable.  @xref{Signaling Another Process}.
 
@@ -2369,7 +2370,7 @@ them from interrupting sensitive operations.  For instance:
 @itemize @bullet
 @item
 You can use the @code{sigprocmask} function to block signals while you
-modify global variables that are also modified by the handlers for these 
+modify global variables that are also modified by the handlers for these
 signals.
 
 @item
@@ -2381,18 +2382,18 @@ signal handler can run without being interrupted itself by signals.
 @menu
 * Why Block::                           The purpose of blocking signals.
 * Signal Sets::                         How to specify which signals to
-                                         block. 
+                                         block.
 * Process Signal Mask::                 Blocking delivery of signals to your
                                         process during normal execution.
 * Testing for Delivery::                Blocking to Test for Delivery of
-                                         a Signal. 
+                                         a Signal.
 * Blocking for Handler::                Blocking additional signals while a
                                         handler is being run.
 * Checking for Pending Signals::        Checking for Pending Signals
 * Remembering a Signal::                How you can get almost the same
                                          effect as blocking a signal, by
                                          handling it and setting a flag
-                                         to be tested later. 
+                                         to be tested later.
 @end menu
 
 @node Why Block
@@ -2743,7 +2744,7 @@ sigaddset (&base_mask, SIGINT);
 sigaddset (&base_mask, SIGTSTP);
 
 /* @r{Block user interrupts while doing other processing.} */
-sigprocmask (SIG_SETMASK, &base_mask, NULL); 
+sigprocmask (SIG_SETMASK, &base_mask, NULL);
 @dots{}
 
 /* @r{After a while, check to see whether any signals are pending.} */
@@ -2980,7 +2981,7 @@ returns.
 
 The mask remains @var{set} only as long as @code{sigsuspend} is waiting.
 The function @code{sigsuspend} always restores the previous signal mask
-when it returns.  
+when it returns.
 
 The return value and error conditions are the same as for @code{pause}.
 @end deftypefun
@@ -2993,8 +2994,8 @@ sigset_t mask, oldmask;
 
 @dots{}
 
-/* @r{Set up the mask of signals to temporarily block.} */ 
-sigemptyset (&mask); 
+/* @r{Set up the mask of signals to temporarily block.} */
+sigemptyset (&mask);
 sigaddset (&mask, SIGUSR1);
 
 @dots{}
@@ -3121,7 +3122,7 @@ The return value is @code{0} on success and @code{-1} on failure.  If
 You tried to disable a stack that was in fact currently in use.
 
 @item ENOMEM
-The size of the alternate stack was too small.  
+The size of the alternate stack was too small.
 It must be greater than @code{MINSIGSTKSZ}.
 @end table
 @end deftypefun
@@ -3193,7 +3194,7 @@ The BSD facilities are declared in @file{signal.h}.
 
 @menu
 * BSD Handler::                 BSD Function to Establish a Handler.
-* Blocking in BSD::             BSD Functions for Blocking Signals. 
+* Blocking in BSD::             BSD Functions for Blocking Signals.
 @end menu
 
 @node BSD Handler
@@ -3270,7 +3271,7 @@ code @code{EINTR}.  @xref{Interrupted Primitives}.
 @end deftypefun
 
 @node Blocking in BSD
-@subsection BSD Functions for Blocking Signals 
+@subsection BSD Functions for Blocking Signals
 
 @comment signal.h
 @comment BSD
index 1313d4c..b931365 100644 (file)
@@ -36,7 +36,7 @@ The system starts a C program by calling the function @code{main}.  It
 is up to you to write a function named @code{main}---otherwise, you
 won't even be able to link your program without errors.
 
-In ANSI C you can define @code{main} either to take no arguments, or to
+In @w{ISO C} you can define @code{main} either to take no arguments, or to
 take two arguments that represent the command line arguments to the
 program, like this:
 
@@ -519,7 +519,7 @@ The value of an environment variable can be accessed with the
 @pindex stdlib.h
 
 @comment stdlib.h
-@comment ANSI
+@comment ISO
 @deftypefun {char *} getenv (const char *@var{name})
 This function returns a string that is the value of the environment
 variable @var{name}.  You must not modify this string.  In some non-Unix
@@ -742,7 +742,7 @@ Returning from @code{main} is equivalent to calling @code{exit}, and
 the value that @code{main} returns is used as the argument to @code{exit}.
 
 @comment stdlib.h
-@comment ANSI
+@comment ISO
 @deftypefun void exit (int @var{status})
 The @code{exit} function terminates the process with status
 @var{status}.  This function does not return.
@@ -812,7 +812,7 @@ are declared in the file @file{stdlib.h}.
 @pindex stdlib.h
 
 @comment stdlib.h
-@comment ANSI
+@comment ISO
 @deftypevr Macro int EXIT_SUCCESS
 This macro can be used with the @code{exit} function to indicate
 successful program completion.
@@ -823,7 +823,7 @@ expression.
 @end deftypevr
 
 @comment stdlib.h
-@comment ANSI
+@comment ISO
 @deftypevr Macro int EXIT_FAILURE
 This macro can be used with the @code{exit} function to indicate
 unsuccessful program completion in a general sense.
@@ -849,7 +849,7 @@ application, by setting up a cleanup function in the library itself
 using @code{atexit} or @code{on_exit}.
 
 @comment stdlib.h
-@comment ANSI
+@comment ISO
 @deftypefun int atexit (void (*@var{function}) (void))
 The @code{atexit} function registers the function @var{function} to be
 called at normal program termination.  The @var{function} is called with
@@ -891,7 +891,7 @@ for this function is in @file{stdlib.h}.
 @pindex stdlib.h
 
 @comment stdlib.h
-@comment ANSI
+@comment ISO
 @deftypefun void abort (void)
 The @code{abort} function causes abnormal program termination.  This
 does not execute cleanup functions registered with @code{atexit} or
index e6e5614..b721af9 100644 (file)
@@ -25,7 +25,7 @@ representing a communications channel to a file, device, or process.
 * Binary Streams::              Some systems distinguish between text files
                                  and binary files.
 * File Positioning::            About random-access streams.
-* Portable Positioning::        Random access on peculiar ANSI C systems.
+* Portable Positioning::        Random access on peculiar ISO C systems.
 * Stream Buffering::            How to control buffering of streams.
 * Other Kinds of Streams::      Streams that do not necessarily correspond
                                  to an open file.
@@ -47,7 +47,7 @@ only in the technical sense.
 The @code{FILE} type is declared in the header file @file{stdio.h}.
 
 @comment stdio.h
-@comment ANSI
+@comment ISO
 @deftp {Data Type} FILE
 This is the data type used to represent stream objects.  A @code{FILE}
 object holds all of the internal state information about the connection
@@ -78,7 +78,7 @@ These streams are declared in the header file @file{stdio.h}.
 @pindex stdio.h
 
 @comment stdio.h
-@comment ANSI
+@comment ISO
 @deftypevar {FILE *} stdin
 The @dfn{standard input} stream, which is the normal source of input for the
 program.
@@ -86,7 +86,7 @@ program.
 @cindex standard input stream
 
 @comment stdio.h
-@comment ANSI
+@comment ISO
 @deftypevar {FILE *} stdout
 The @dfn{standard output} stream, which is used for normal output from
 the program.
@@ -94,7 +94,7 @@ the program.
 @cindex standard output stream
 
 @comment stdio.h
-@comment ANSI
+@comment ISO
 @deftypevar {FILE *} stderr
 The @dfn{standard error} stream, which is used for error messages and
 diagnostics issued by the program.
@@ -134,7 +134,7 @@ Everything described in this section is declared in the header file
 @file{stdio.h}.
 
 @comment stdio.h
-@comment ANSI
+@comment ISO
 @deftypefun {FILE *} fopen (const char *@var{filename}, const char *@var{opentype})
 The @code{fopen} function opens a stream for I/O to the file
 @var{filename}, and returns a pointer to the stream.
@@ -174,7 +174,7 @@ but output is always appended to the end of the file.
 @end table
 
 As you can see, @samp{+} requests a stream that can do both input and
-output.  The ANSI standard says that when using such a stream, you must
+output.  The ISO standard says that when using such a stream, you must
 call @code{fflush} (@pxref{Stream Buffering}) or a file positioning
 function such as @code{fseek} (@pxref{File Positioning}) when switching
 from reading to writing or vice versa.  Otherwise, internal buffers
@@ -216,7 +216,7 @@ file locking facilities to avoid simultaneous access.  @xref{File
 Locks}.
 
 @comment stdio.h
-@comment ANSI
+@comment ISO
 @deftypevr Macro int FOPEN_MAX
 The value of this macro is an integer constant expression that
 represents the minimum number of streams that the implementation
@@ -230,7 +230,7 @@ resource limit; @pxref{Limits on Resources}.
 @end deftypevr
 
 @comment stdio.h
-@comment ANSI
+@comment ISO
 @deftypefun {FILE *} freopen (const char *@var{filename}, const char *@var{opentype}, FILE *@var{stream})
 This function is like a combination of @code{fclose} and @code{fopen}.
 It first closes the stream referred to by @var{stream}, ignoring any
@@ -261,7 +261,7 @@ stream and the file is cancelled.  After you have closed a stream, you
 cannot perform any additional operations on it.
 
 @comment stdio.h
-@comment ANSI
+@comment ISO
 @deftypefun int fclose (FILE *@var{stream})
 This function causes @var{stream} to be closed and the connection to
 the corresponding file to be broken.  Any buffered output is written
@@ -299,7 +299,7 @@ These functions are declared in the header file @file{stdio.h}.
 @pindex stdio.h
 
 @comment stdio.h
-@comment ANSI
+@comment ISO
 @deftypefun int fputc (int @var{c}, FILE *@var{stream})
 The @code{fputc} function converts the character @var{c} to type
 @code{unsigned char}, and writes it to the stream @var{stream}.
@@ -308,7 +308,7 @@ character @var{c} is returned.
 @end deftypefun
 
 @comment stdio.h
-@comment ANSI
+@comment ISO
 @deftypefun int putc (int @var{c}, FILE *@var{stream})
 This is just like @code{fputc}, except that most systems implement it as
 a macro, making it faster.  One consequence is that it may evaluate the
@@ -318,14 +318,14 @@ use for writing a single character.
 @end deftypefun
 
 @comment stdio.h
-@comment ANSI
+@comment ISO
 @deftypefun int putchar (int @var{c})
 The @code{putchar} function is equivalent to @code{putc} with
 @code{stdout} as the value of the @var{stream} argument.
 @end deftypefun
 
 @comment stdio.h
-@comment ANSI
+@comment ISO
 @deftypefun int fputs (const char *@var{s}, FILE *@var{stream})
 The function @code{fputs} writes the string @var{s} to the stream
 @var{stream}.  The terminating null character is not written.
@@ -348,7 +348,7 @@ outputs the text @samp{Are you hungry?} followed by a newline.
 @end deftypefun
 
 @comment stdio.h
-@comment ANSI
+@comment ISO
 @deftypefun int puts (const char *@var{s})
 The @code{puts} function writes the string @var{s} to the stream
 @code{stdout} followed by a newline.  The terminating null character of
@@ -392,7 +392,7 @@ not @code{EOF}, you can be sure that it will fit in a @samp{char}
 variable without loss of information.
 
 @comment stdio.h
-@comment ANSI
+@comment ISO
 @deftypefun int fgetc (FILE *@var{stream})
 This function reads the next character as an @code{unsigned char} from
 the stream @var{stream} and returns its value, converted to an
@@ -401,7 +401,7 @@ the stream @var{stream} and returns its value, converted to an
 @end deftypefun
 
 @comment stdio.h
-@comment ANSI
+@comment ISO
 @deftypefun int getc (FILE *@var{stream})
 This is just like @code{fgetc}, except that it is permissible (and
 typical) for it to be implemented as a macro that evaluates the
@@ -411,7 +411,7 @@ character.
 @end deftypefun
 
 @comment stdio.h
-@comment ANSI
+@comment ISO
 @deftypefun int getchar (void)
 The @code{getchar} function is equivalent to @code{getc} with @code{stdin}
 as the value of the @var{stream} argument.
@@ -537,7 +537,7 @@ getline (char **lineptr, size_t *n, FILE *stream)
 @end deftypefun
 
 @comment stdio.h
-@comment ANSI
+@comment ISO
 @deftypefun {char *} fgets (char *@var{s}, int @var{count}, FILE *@var{stream})
 The @code{fgets} function reads characters from the stream @var{stream}
 up to and including a newline character and stores them in the string
@@ -560,7 +560,7 @@ error message.  We recommend using @code{getline} instead of @code{fgets}.
 @end deftypefun
 
 @comment stdio.h
-@comment ANSI
+@comment ISO
 @deftypefn {Deprecated function} {char *} gets (char *@var{s})
 The function @code{gets} reads characters from the stream @code{stdin}
 up to the next newline character, and stores them in the string @var{s}.
@@ -650,7 +650,7 @@ The function to unread a character is called @code{ungetc}, because it
 reverses the action of @code{getc}.
 
 @comment stdio.h
-@comment ANSI
+@comment ISO
 @deftypefun int ungetc (int @var{c}, FILE *@var{stream})
 The @code{ungetc} function pushes back the character @var{c} onto the
 input stream @var{stream}.  So the next input from @var{stream} will
@@ -736,7 +736,7 @@ These functions are declared in @file{stdio.h}.
 @pindex stdio.h
 
 @comment stdio.h
-@comment ANSI
+@comment ISO
 @deftypefun size_t fread (void *@var{data}, size_t @var{size}, size_t @var{count}, FILE *@var{stream})
 This function reads up to @var{count} objects of size @var{size} into
 the array @var{data}, from the stream @var{stream}.  It returns the
@@ -751,7 +751,7 @@ object.  Therefore, the stream remains at the actual end of the file.
 @end deftypefun
 
 @comment stdio.h
-@comment ANSI
+@comment ISO
 @deftypefun size_t fwrite (const void *@var{data}, size_t @var{size}, size_t @var{count}, FILE *@var{stream})
 This function writes up to @var{count} objects of size @var{size} from
 the array @var{data}, to the stream @var{stream}.  The return value is
@@ -1376,7 +1376,7 @@ just include @file{stdio.h}.
 @pindex stdio.h
 
 @comment stdio.h
-@comment ANSI
+@comment ISO
 @deftypefun int printf (const char *@var{template}, @dots{})
 The @code{printf} function prints the optional arguments under the
 control of the template string @var{template} to the stream
@@ -1385,14 +1385,14 @@ negative value if there was an output error.
 @end deftypefun
 
 @comment stdio.h
-@comment ANSI
+@comment ISO
 @deftypefun int fprintf (FILE *@var{stream}, const char *@var{template}, @dots{})
 This function is just like @code{printf}, except that the output is
 written to the stream @var{stream} instead of @code{stdout}.
 @end deftypefun
 
 @comment stdio.h
-@comment ANSI
+@comment ISO
 @deftypefun int sprintf (char *@var{s}, const char *@var{template}, @dots{})
 This is like @code{printf}, except that the output is stored in the character
 array @var{s} instead of written to a stream.  A null character is written
@@ -1564,7 +1564,7 @@ Prototypes for these functions are declared in @file{stdio.h}.
 @pindex stdio.h
 
 @comment stdio.h
-@comment ANSI
+@comment ISO
 @deftypefun int vprintf (const char *@var{template}, va_list @var{ap})
 This function is similar to @code{printf} except that, instead of taking
 a variable number of arguments directly, it takes an argument list
@@ -1572,14 +1572,14 @@ pointer @var{ap}.
 @end deftypefun
 
 @comment stdio.h
-@comment ANSI
+@comment ISO
 @deftypefun int vfprintf (FILE *@var{stream}, const char *@var{template}, va_list @var{ap})
 This is the equivalent of @code{fprintf} with the variable argument list
 specified directly as for @code{vprintf}.
 @end deftypefun
 
 @comment stdio.h
-@comment ANSI
+@comment ISO
 @deftypefun int vsprintf (char *@var{s}, const char *@var{template}, va_list @var{ap})
 This is the equivalent of @code{sprintf} with the variable argument list
 specified directly as for @code{vprintf}.
@@ -1912,7 +1912,7 @@ The facilities of this section are declared in the header file
 @end menu
 
 @strong{Portability Note:} The ability to extend the syntax of
-@code{printf} template strings is a GNU extension.  ANSI standard C has
+@code{printf} template strings is a GNU extension.  ISO standard C has
 nothing similar.
 
 @node Registering New Conversions
@@ -2658,7 +2658,7 @@ Prototypes for these functions are in the header file @file{stdio.h}.
 @pindex stdio.h
 
 @comment stdio.h
-@comment ANSI
+@comment ISO
 @deftypefun int scanf (const char *@var{template}, @dots{})
 The @code{scanf} function reads formatted input from the stream
 @code{stdin} under the control of the template string @var{template}.
@@ -2672,14 +2672,14 @@ template), then @code{EOF} is returned.
 @end deftypefun
 
 @comment stdio.h
-@comment ANSI
+@comment ISO
 @deftypefun int fscanf (FILE *@var{stream}, const char *@var{template}, @dots{})
 This function is just like @code{scanf}, except that the input is read
 from the stream @var{stream} instead of @code{stdin}.
 @end deftypefun
 
 @comment stdio.h
-@comment ANSI
+@comment ISO
 @deftypefun int sscanf (const char *@var{s}, const char *@var{template}, @dots{})
 This is like @code{scanf}, except that the characters are taken from the
 null-terminated string @var{s} instead of from a stream.  Reaching the
@@ -2750,7 +2750,7 @@ These symbols are declared in the header file @file{stdio.h}.
 @pindex stdio.h
 
 @comment stdio.h
-@comment ANSI
+@comment ISO
 @deftypevr Macro int EOF
 This macro is an integer value that is returned by a number of functions
 to indicate an end-of-file condition, or some other error situation.
@@ -2759,7 +2759,7 @@ value may be some other negative number.
 @end deftypevr
 
 @comment stdio.h
-@comment ANSI
+@comment ISO
 @deftypefun void clearerr (FILE *@var{stream})
 This function clears the end-of-file and error indicators for the
 stream @var{stream}.
@@ -2769,14 +2769,14 @@ end-of-file indicator for the stream.
 @end deftypefun
 
 @comment stdio.h
-@comment ANSI
+@comment ISO
 @deftypefun int feof (FILE *@var{stream})
 The @code{feof} function returns nonzero if and only if the end-of-file
 indicator for the stream @var{stream} is set.
 @end deftypefun
 
 @comment stdio.h
-@comment ANSI
+@comment ISO
 @deftypefun int ferror (FILE *@var{stream})
 The @code{ferror} function returns nonzero if and only if the error
 indicator for the stream @var{stream} is set, indicating that an error
@@ -2799,7 +2799,7 @@ For more information about the descriptor-level I/O functions, see
 The GNU system and other POSIX-compatible operating systems organize all
 files as uniform sequences of characters.  However, some other systems
 make a distinction between files containing text and files containing
-binary data, and the input and output facilities of ANSI C provide for
+binary data, and the input and output facilities of @w{ISO C} provide for
 this distinction.  This section tells you how to write programs portable
 to such systems.
 
@@ -2875,7 +2875,7 @@ are declared in the header file @file{stdio.h}.
 @pindex stdio.h
 
 @comment stdio.h
-@comment ANSI
+@comment ISO
 @deftypefun {long int} ftell (FILE *@var{stream})
 This function returns the current file position of the stream
 @var{stream}.
@@ -2887,7 +2887,7 @@ possibly for other reasons as well.  If a failure occurs, a value of
 @end deftypefun
 
 @comment stdio.h
-@comment ANSI
+@comment ISO
 @deftypefun int fseek (FILE *@var{stream}, long int @var{offset}, int @var{whence})
 The @code{fseek} function is used to change the file position of the
 stream @var{stream}.  The value of @var{whence} must be one of the
@@ -2915,7 +2915,7 @@ function (@pxref{I/O Primitives}) and to specify offsets for file locks
 (@pxref{Control Operations}).
 
 @comment stdio.h
-@comment ANSI
+@comment ISO
 @deftypevr Macro int SEEK_SET
 This is an integer constant which, when used as the @var{whence}
 argument to the @code{fseek} function, specifies that the offset
@@ -2923,7 +2923,7 @@ provided is relative to the beginning of the file.
 @end deftypevr
 
 @comment stdio.h
-@comment ANSI
+@comment ISO
 @deftypevr Macro int SEEK_CUR
 This is an integer constant which, when used as the @var{whence}
 argument to the @code{fseek} function, specifies that the offset
@@ -2931,7 +2931,7 @@ provided is relative to the current file position.
 @end deftypevr
 
 @comment stdio.h
-@comment ANSI
+@comment ISO
 @deftypevr Macro int SEEK_END
 This is an integer constant which, when used as the @var{whence}
 argument to the @code{fseek} function, specifies that the offset
@@ -2939,7 +2939,7 @@ provided is relative to the end of the file.
 @end deftypevr
 
 @comment stdio.h
-@comment ANSI
+@comment ISO
 @deftypefun void rewind (FILE *@var{stream})
 The @code{rewind} function positions the stream @var{stream} at the
 begining of the file.  It is equivalent to calling @code{fseek} on the
@@ -2977,7 +2977,7 @@ An alias for @code{SEEK_END}.
 
 On the GNU system, the file position is truly a character count.  You
 can specify any character count value as an argument to @code{fseek} and
-get reliable results for any random access file.  However, some ANSI C
+get reliable results for any random access file.  However, some @w{ISO C}
 systems do not represent file positions in this way.
 
 On some systems where text streams truly differ from binary streams, it
@@ -3024,7 +3024,7 @@ These symbols are declared in the header file @file{stdio.h}.
 @pindex stdio.h
 
 @comment stdio.h
-@comment ANSI
+@comment ISO
 @deftp {Data Type} fpos_t
 This is the type of an object that can encode information about the
 file position of a stream, for use by the functions @code{fgetpos} and
@@ -3036,7 +3036,7 @@ representation.
 @end deftp
 
 @comment stdio.h
-@comment ANSI
+@comment ISO
 @deftypefun int fgetpos (FILE *@var{stream}, fpos_t *@var{position})
 This function stores the value of the file position indicator for the
 stream @var{stream} in the @code{fpos_t} object pointed to by
@@ -3046,7 +3046,7 @@ value in @code{errno}.
 @end deftypefun
 
 @comment stdio.h
-@comment ANSI
+@comment ISO
 @deftypefun int fsetpos (FILE *@var{stream}, const fpos_t @var{position})
 This function sets the file position indicator for the stream @var{stream}
 to the position @var{position}, which must have been set by a previous
@@ -3157,7 +3157,7 @@ If you want to flush the buffered output at another time, call
 @pindex stdio.h
 
 @comment stdio.h
-@comment ANSI
+@comment ISO
 @deftypefun int fflush (FILE *@var{stream})
 This function causes any buffered output on @var{stream} to be delivered
 to the file.  If @var{stream} is a null pointer, then
@@ -3188,7 +3188,7 @@ file @file{stdio.h}.
 @pindex stdio.h
 
 @comment stdio.h
-@comment ANSI
+@comment ISO
 @deftypefun int setvbuf (FILE *@var{stream}, char *@var{buf}, int @var{mode}, size_t @var{size})
 This function is used to specify that the stream @var{stream} should
 have the buffering mode @var{mode}, which can be either @code{_IOFBF}
@@ -3218,7 +3218,7 @@ be honored.
 @end deftypefun
 
 @comment stdio.h
-@comment ANSI
+@comment ISO
 @deftypevr Macro int _IOFBF
 The value of this macro is an integer constant expression that can be
 used as the @var{mode} argument to the @code{setvbuf} function to
@@ -3226,7 +3226,7 @@ specify that the stream should be fully buffered.
 @end deftypevr
 
 @comment stdio.h
-@comment ANSI
+@comment ISO
 @deftypevr Macro int _IOLBF
 The value of this macro is an integer constant expression that can be
 used as the @var{mode} argument to the @code{setvbuf} function to
@@ -3234,7 +3234,7 @@ specify that the stream should be line buffered.
 @end deftypevr
 
 @comment stdio.h
-@comment ANSI
+@comment ISO
 @deftypevr Macro int _IONBF
 The value of this macro is an integer constant expression that can be
 used as the @var{mode} argument to the @code{setvbuf} function to
@@ -3242,7 +3242,7 @@ specify that the stream should be unbuffered.
 @end deftypevr
 
 @comment stdio.h
-@comment ANSI
+@comment ISO
 @deftypevr Macro int BUFSIZ
 The value of this macro is an integer constant expression that is good
 to use for the @var{size} argument to @code{setvbuf}.  This value is
@@ -3265,7 +3265,7 @@ efficient size.
 @end deftypevr
 
 @comment stdio.h
-@comment ANSI
+@comment ISO
 @deftypefun void setbuf (FILE *@var{stream}, char *@var{buf})
 If @var{buf} is a null pointer, the effect of this function is
 equivalent to calling @code{setvbuf} with a @var{mode} argument of
index ccaf9e4..73a29f4 100644 (file)
@@ -65,7 +65,7 @@ although both are represented by the integer @code{0}.
 
 @cindex string literal
 @dfn{String literals} appear in C program source as strings of
-characters between double-quote characters (@samp{"}).  In ANSI C,
+characters between double-quote characters (@samp{"}).  In @w{ISO C},
 string literals can also be formed by @dfn{string concatenation}:
 @code{"a" "b"} is the same as @code{"ab"}.  Modification of string
 literals is not allowed by the GNU C compiler, because literals
@@ -140,7 +140,7 @@ This function is declared in the header file @file{string.h}.
 @pindex string.h
 
 @comment string.h
-@comment ANSI
+@comment ISO
 @deftypefun size_t strlen (const char *@var{s})
 The @code{strlen} function returns the length of the null-terminated
 string @var{s}.  (In other words, it returns the offset of the terminating
@@ -201,7 +201,7 @@ Output Functions}) and @code{scanf} (@pxref{Formatted Input
 Functions}).
 
 @comment string.h
-@comment ANSI
+@comment ISO
 @deftypefun {void *} memcpy (void *@var{to}, const void *@var{from}, size_t @var{size})
 The @code{memcpy} function copies @var{size} bytes from the object
 beginning at @var{from} into the object beginning at @var{to}.  The
@@ -222,7 +222,7 @@ memcpy (new, old, arraysize * sizeof (struct foo));
 @end deftypefun
 
 @comment string.h
-@comment ANSI
+@comment ISO
 @deftypefun {void *} memmove (void *@var{to}, const void *@var{from}, size_t @var{size})
 @code{memmove} copies the @var{size} bytes at @var{from} into the
 @var{size} bytes at @var{to}, even if those two blocks of space
@@ -242,7 +242,7 @@ or a null pointer if no byte matching @var{c} appeared in the first
 @end deftypefun
 
 @comment string.h
-@comment ANSI
+@comment ISO
 @deftypefun {void *} memset (void *@var{block}, int @var{c}, size_t @var{size})
 This function copies the value of @var{c} (converted to an
 @code{unsigned char}) into each of the first @var{size} bytes of the
@@ -250,7 +250,7 @@ object beginning at @var{block}.  It returns the value of @var{block}.
 @end deftypefun
 
 @comment string.h
-@comment ANSI
+@comment ISO
 @deftypefun {char *} strcpy (char *@var{to}, const char *@var{from})
 This copies characters from the string @var{from} (up to and including
 the terminating null character) into the string @var{to}.  Like
@@ -259,7 +259,7 @@ overlap.  The return value is the value of @var{to}.
 @end deftypefun
 
 @comment string.h
-@comment ANSI
+@comment ISO
 @deftypefun {char *} strncpy (char *@var{to}, const char *@var{from}, size_t @var{size})
 This function is similar to @code{strcpy} but always copies exactly
 @var{size} characters into @var{to}.
@@ -271,7 +271,7 @@ there is no null terminator written into @var{to}.
 If the length of @var{from} is less than @var{size}, then @code{strncpy}
 copies all of @var{from}, followed by enough null characters to add up
 to @var{size} characters in all.  This behavior is rarely useful, but it
-is specified by the ANSI C standard.
+is specified by the @w{ISO C} standard.
 
 The behavior of @code{strncpy} is undefined if the strings overlap.
 
@@ -322,7 +322,7 @@ and @samp{bar} to produce @samp{foobar}, which it then prints.
 @include stpcpy.c.texi
 @end smallexample
 
-This function is not part of the ANSI or POSIX standards, and is not
+This function is not part of the ISO or POSIX standards, and is not
 customary on Unix systems, but we did not invent it either.  Perhaps it
 comes from MS-DOG.
 
@@ -347,7 +347,7 @@ is implemented to be useful in contexts where this behaviour of the
 @code{strncpy} is used.  @code{stpncpy} returns a pointer to the
 @emph{first} written null character.
 
-This function is not part of ANSI or POSIX but was found useful while
+This function is not part of ISO or POSIX but was found useful while
 developing GNU C Library itself.
 
 Its behaviour is undefined if the strings overlap.
@@ -392,7 +392,7 @@ get the address of it.
 @end deftypefun
 
 @comment string.h
-@comment ANSI
+@comment ISO
 @deftypefun {char *} strcat (char *@var{to}, const char *@var{from})
 The @code{strcat} function is similar to @code{strcpy}, except that the
 characters from @var{from} are concatenated or appended to the end of
@@ -414,7 +414,7 @@ This function has undefined results if the strings overlap.
 @end deftypefun
 
 @comment string.h
-@comment ANSI
+@comment ISO
 @deftypefun {char *} strncat (char *@var{to}, const char *@var{from}, size_t @var{size})
 This function is like @code{strcat} except that not more than @var{size}
 characters from @var{from} are appended to the end of @var{to}.  A
@@ -498,7 +498,7 @@ All of these functions are declared in the header file @file{string.h}.
 @pindex string.h
 
 @comment string.h
-@comment ANSI
+@comment ISO
 @deftypefun int memcmp (const void *@var{a1}, const void *@var{a2}, size_t @var{size})
 The function @code{memcmp} compares the @var{size} bytes of memory
 beginning at @var{a1} against the @var{size} bytes of memory beginning
@@ -546,7 +546,7 @@ you are better off writing a specialized comparison function to compare
 @code{struct foo} objects instead of comparing them with @code{memcmp}.
 
 @comment string.h
-@comment ANSI
+@comment ISO
 @deftypefun int strcmp (const char *@var{s1}, const char *@var{s2})
 The @code{strcmp} function compares the string @var{s1} against
 @var{s2}, returning a value that has the same sign as the difference
@@ -579,7 +579,7 @@ are ignored.
 @end deftypefun
 
 @comment string.h
-@comment ANSI
+@comment ISO
 @deftypefun int strncmp (const char *@var{s1}, const char *@var{s2}, size_t @var{size})
 This function is the similar to @code{strcmp}, except that no more than
 @var{size} characters are compared.  In other words, if the two strings are
@@ -650,7 +650,7 @@ same string or set of strings, it is likely to be more efficient to use
 compare the transformed strings with @code{strcmp}.
 
 @comment string.h
-@comment ANSI
+@comment ISO
 @deftypefun int strcoll (const char *@var{s1}, const char *@var{s2})
 The @code{strcoll} function is similar to @code{strcmp} but uses the
 collating sequence of the current locale for collation (the
@@ -687,7 +687,7 @@ sort_strings (char **array, int nstrings)
 
 @cindex converting string to collation order
 @comment string.h
-@comment ANSI
+@comment ISO
 @deftypefun size_t strxfrm (char *@var{to}, const char *@var{from}, size_t @var{size})
 The function @code{strxfrm} transforms @var{string} using the collation
 transformation determined by the locale currently selected for
@@ -792,7 +792,7 @@ sort_strings_fast (char **array, int nstrings)
 @end smallexample
 
 @strong{Compatibility Note:}  The string collation functions are a new
-feature of ANSI C.  Older C dialects have no equivalent feature.
+feature of @w{ISO C}.  Older C dialects have no equivalent feature.
 
 @node Search Functions, Finding Tokens in a String, Collation Functions, String and Array Utilities
 @section Search Functions
@@ -805,7 +805,7 @@ declared in the header file @file{string.h}.
 @cindex string search functions
 
 @comment string.h
-@comment ANSI
+@comment ISO
 @deftypefun {void *} memchr (const void *@var{block}, int @var{c}, size_t @var{size})
 This function finds the first occurrence of the byte @var{c} (converted
 to an @code{unsigned char}) in the initial @var{size} bytes of the
@@ -814,7 +814,7 @@ located byte, or a null pointer if no match was found.
 @end deftypefun
 
 @comment string.h
-@comment ANSI
+@comment ISO
 @deftypefun {char *} strchr (const char *@var{string}, int @var{c})
 The @code{strchr} function finds the first occurrence of the character
 @var{c} (converted to a @code{char}) in the null-terminated string
@@ -841,7 +841,7 @@ specifying a null character as the value of the @var{c} argument.
 @end deftypefun
 
 @comment string.h
-@comment ANSI
+@comment ISO
 @deftypefun {char *} strrchr (const char *@var{string}, int @var{c})
 The function @code{strrchr} is like @code{strchr}, except that it searches
 backwards from the end of the string @var{string} (instead of forwards
@@ -861,7 +861,7 @@ strrchr ("hello, world", 'l')
 @end deftypefun
 
 @comment string.h
-@comment ANSI
+@comment ISO
 @deftypefun {char *} strstr (const char *@var{haystack}, const char *@var{needle})
 This is like @code{strchr}, except that it searches @var{haystack} for a
 substring @var{needle} rather than just a single character.  It
@@ -891,7 +891,7 @@ This function is a GNU extension.
 @end deftypefun
 
 @comment string.h
-@comment ANSI
+@comment ISO
 @deftypefun size_t strspn (const char *@var{string}, const char *@var{skipset})
 The @code{strspn} (``string span'') function returns the length of the
 initial substring of @var{string} that consists entirely of characters that
@@ -906,7 +906,7 @@ strspn ("hello, world", "abcdefghijklmnopqrstuvwxyz")
 @end deftypefun
 
 @comment string.h
-@comment ANSI
+@comment ISO
 @deftypefun size_t strcspn (const char *@var{string}, const char *@var{stopset})
 The @code{strcspn} (``string complement span'') function returns the length
 of the initial substring of @var{string} that consists entirely of characters
@@ -922,7 +922,7 @@ strcspn ("hello, world", " \t\n,.;!?")
 @end deftypefun
 
 @comment string.h
-@comment ANSI
+@comment ISO
 @deftypefun {char *} strpbrk (const char *@var{string}, const char *@var{stopset})
 The @code{strpbrk} (``string pointer break'') function is related to
 @code{strcspn}, except that it returns a pointer to the first character
@@ -953,7 +953,7 @@ in the header file @file{string.h}.
 @pindex string.h
 
 @comment string.h
-@comment ANSI
+@comment ISO
 @deftypefun {char *} strtok (char *@var{newstring}, const char *@var{delimiters})
 A string can be split into tokens by making a series of calls to the
 function @code{strtok}.
index 6bbb15e..b8a95b2 100644 (file)
@@ -93,7 +93,7 @@ such as arithmetic and printing work properly and consistently no matter
 what the underlying representation is.
 
 @comment time.h
-@comment ANSI
+@comment ISO
 @deftypevr Macro int CLOCKS_PER_SEC
 The value of this macro is the number of clock ticks per second measured
 by the @code{clock} function.
@@ -106,14 +106,14 @@ This is an obsolete name for @code{CLOCKS_PER_SEC}.
 @end deftypevr
 
 @comment time.h
-@comment ANSI
+@comment ISO
 @deftp {Data Type} clock_t
 This is the type of the value returned by the @code{clock} function.
 Values of type @code{clock_t} are in units of clock ticks.
 @end deftp
 
 @comment time.h
-@comment ANSI
+@comment ISO
 @deftypefun clock_t clock (void)
 This function returns the elapsed processor time.  The base time is
 arbitrary but doesn't change within a single process.  If the processor
@@ -177,7 +177,7 @@ start-up.  A value of @code{(clock_t)(-1)} is returned to indicate failure.
 @end deftypefun
 
 @strong{Portability Note:} The @code{clock} function described in
-@ref{Basic CPU Time}, is specified by the ANSI C standard.  The
+@ref{Basic CPU Time}, is specified by the @w{ISO C} standard.  The
 @code{times} function is a feature of POSIX.1.  In the GNU system, the
 value returned by the @code{clock} function is equivalent to the sum of
 the @code{tms_utime} and @code{tms_stime} fields returned by
@@ -239,7 +239,7 @@ These facilities are declared in the header file @file{time.h}.
 
 @cindex epoch
 @comment time.h
-@comment ANSI
+@comment ISO
 @deftp {Data Type} time_t
 This is the data type used to represent calendar time.
 When interpreted as an absolute time
@@ -255,7 +255,7 @@ floating-point type.
 @end deftp
 
 @comment time.h
-@comment ANSI
+@comment ISO
 @deftypefun double difftime (time_t @var{time1}, time_t @var{time0})
 The @code{difftime} function returns the number of seconds elapsed
 between time @var{time1} and time @var{time0}, as a value of type
@@ -268,7 +268,7 @@ where subtraction doesn't work directly.
 @end deftypefun
 
 @comment time.h
-@comment ANSI
+@comment ISO
 @deftypefun time_t time (time_t *@var{result})
 The @code{time} function returns the current time as a value of type
 @code{time_t}.  If the argument @var{result} is not a null pointer, the
@@ -457,7 +457,7 @@ zone, and it also indicates which time zone was used.
 The symbols in this section are declared in the header file @file{time.h}.
 
 @comment time.h
-@comment ANSI
+@comment ISO
 @deftp {Data Type} {struct tm}
 This is the data type used to represent a broken-down time.  The structure
 contains at least the following members, which can appear in any order:
@@ -510,17 +510,17 @@ is the number of seconds that you must add to UTC to get local time.
 You can also think of this as the number of seconds east of UTC.  For
 example, for U.S. Eastern Standard Time, the value is @code{-5*60*60}.
 The @code{tm_gmtoff} field is derived from BSD and is a GNU library
-extension; it is not visible in a strict ANSI C environment.
+extension; it is not visible in a strict @w{ISO C} environment.
 
 @item const char *tm_zone
 This field is the name for the time zone that was used to compute this
 broken-down time value.  Like @code{tm_gmtoff}, this field is a BSD and
-GNU extension, and is not visible in a strict ANSI C environment.
+GNU extension, and is not visible in a strict @w{ISO C} environment.
 @end table
 @end deftp
 
 @comment time.h
-@comment ANSI
+@comment ISO
 @deftypefun {struct tm *} localtime (const time_t *@var{time})
 The @code{localtime} function converts the calendar time pointed to by
 @var{time} to broken-down time representation, expressed relative to the
@@ -537,7 +537,7 @@ Zone Functions}.
 @end deftypefun
 
 @comment time.h
-@comment ANSI
+@comment ISO
 @deftypefun {struct tm *} gmtime (const time_t *@var{time})
 This function is similar to @code{localtime}, except that the broken-down
 time is expressed as Coordinated Universal Time (UTC)---that is, as
@@ -548,7 +548,7 @@ universal time.
 @end deftypefun
 
 @comment time.h
-@comment ANSI
+@comment ISO
 @deftypefun time_t mktime (struct tm *@var{brokentime})
 The @code{mktime} function is used to convert a broken-down time structure
 to a calendar time representation.  It also ``normalizes'' the contents of
@@ -579,7 +579,7 @@ These functions are declared in the header file @file{time.h}.
 @pindex time.h
 
 @comment time.h
-@comment ANSI
+@comment ISO
 @deftypefun {char *} asctime (const struct tm *@var{brokentime})
 The @code{asctime} function converts the broken-down time value that
 @var{brokentime} points to into a string in a standard format:
@@ -602,7 +602,7 @@ string.)
 @end deftypefun
 
 @comment time.h
-@comment ANSI
+@comment ISO
 @deftypefun {char *} ctime (const time_t *@var{time})
 The @code{ctime} function is similar to @code{asctime}, except that the
 time value is specified as a @code{time_t} calendar time value rather
@@ -617,7 +617,7 @@ does so.  @xref{Time Zone Functions}.
 @end deftypefun
 
 @comment time.h
-@comment ANSI
+@comment ISO
 @comment POSIX.2
 @deftypefun size_t strftime (char *@var{s}, size_t @var{size}, const char *@var{template}, const struct tm *@var{brokentime})
 This function is similar to the @code{sprintf} function (@pxref{Formatted