Regenerated: /usr/bin/perl scripts/gen-FAQ.pl FAQ.in
authordrepper <drepper>
Wed, 27 Dec 2000 03:28:28 +0000 (03:28 +0000)
committerdrepper <drepper>
Wed, 27 Dec 2000 03:28:28 +0000 (03:28 +0000)
FAQ

diff --git a/FAQ b/FAQ
index 889fe63..696d657 100644 (file)
--- a/FAQ
+++ b/FAQ
@@ -182,6 +182,7 @@ please let me know.
 4.7.   Why do so many programs using math functions fail on my AlphaStation?
 4.8.   The conversion table for character set XX does not match with
 what I expect.
+4.9.   How can I find out which version of glibc I am using in the moment?
 
 \f
 ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ 
@@ -1813,6 +1814,30 @@ Before doing this look through the list of known problem first:
   if it cannot directly map a character this is a perfectly good solution
   since the semantics and appearance of the character does not change.
 
+
+4.9.   How can I find out which version of glibc I am using in the moment?
+
+{UD} If you want to find out about the version from the command line simply
+run the libc binary.  This is probably not possible on all platforms but
+where it is simply locate the libc DSO and start it as an application.  On
+Linux like
+
+       /lib/libc.so.6
+
+This will produce all the information you need.
+
+What always will work is to use the API glibc provides.  Compile and run the
+following little program to get the version information:
+
+~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
+#include <stdio.h>
+#include <gnu/libc-version.h>
+int main (void) { puts (gnu_get_libc_version ()); return 0; }
+~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
+
+This interface can also obviously be used to perform tests at runtime if
+this should be necessary.
+
 \f
 ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~