shortened node names
authormelissa <melissa>
Thu, 14 May 1992 18:22:19 +0000 (18:22 +0000)
committermelissa <melissa>
Thu, 14 May 1992 18:22:19 +0000 (18:22 +0000)
20 files changed:
manual/=float.texinfo
manual/=limits.texinfo
manual/=process.texinfo
manual/arith.texi
manual/filesys.texi
manual/intro.texi
manual/io.texi
manual/job.texi
manual/lang.texi
manual/libc.texinfo
manual/llio.texi
manual/math.texi
manual/memory.texi
manual/search.texi
manual/setjmp.texi
manual/socket.texi
manual/stdio.texi
manual/sysinfo.texi
manual/terminal.texi
manual/time.texi

index 7962cf1..88e001e 100644 (file)
@@ -9,7 +9,7 @@ quantities, algorithms for manipulating floating-point data often need
 to be parameterized in terms of the accuracy of the representation.
 Some of the functions in the C library itself need this information; for
 example, the algorithms for printing and reading floating-point numbers
-(@pxref{Input/Output on Streams}) and for calculating trigonometric and
+(@pxref{I/O on Streams}) and for calculating trigonometric and
 irrational functions (@pxref{Mathematics}) use information about the
 underlying floating-point representation to avoid round-off error and
 loss of accuracy.  User programs that implement numerical analysis
index e38e75a..b56895a 100644 (file)
@@ -160,7 +160,7 @@ quantities, algorithms for manipulating floating-point data often need
 to be parameterized in terms of the accuracy of the representation.
 Some of the functions in the C library itself need this information; for
 example, the algorithms for printing and reading floating-point numbers
-(@pxref{Input/Output on Streams}) and for calculating trigonometric and
+(@pxref{I/O on Streams}) and for calculating trigonometric and
 irrational functions (@pxref{Mathematics}) use information about the
 underlying floating-point representation to avoid round-off error and
 loss of accuracy.  User programs that implement numerical analysis
index 7a940d2..63c723e 100644 (file)
@@ -60,14 +60,14 @@ arguments are interpreted in the same way (as file names, for example),
 you are usually better off using @code{getopt} to do the parsing.
 
 @menu
-* Program Argument Syntax Conventions::  By convention, program
+* Argument Syntax Conventions::  By convention, program
                                                  options are specified by a
                                                  leading hyphen.
 * Parsing Program Arguments::   The @code{getopt} function.
-* Example of Parsing Program Arguments::  An example of @code{getopt}.
+* Example Using getopt::  An example of @code{getopt}.
 @end menu
 
-@node Program Argument Syntax Conventions, Parsing Program Arguments,  , Program Arguments
+@node Argument Syntax Conventions, Parsing Program Arguments,  , Program Arguments
 @subsection Program Argument Syntax Conventions
 @cindex program argument syntax
 @cindex syntax, for program arguments
@@ -124,7 +124,7 @@ Options may be supplied in any order, or appear multiple times.  The
 interpretation is left up to the particular application program.
 @end itemize
 
-@node Parsing Program Arguments, Example of Parsing Program Arguments, Program Argument Syntax Conventions, Program Arguments
+@node Parsing Program Arguments, Example Using getopt, Argument Syntax Conventions, Program Arguments
 @subsection Parsing Program Arguments
 @cindex program arguments, parsing
 @cindex command arguments, parsing
@@ -207,7 +207,7 @@ option character.  In addition, if the external variable @code{opterr}
 is nonzero, @code{getopt} prints an error message.
 @end deftypefun
 
-@node Example of Parsing Program Arguments,  , Parsing Program Arguments, Program Arguments
+@node Example Using getopt,  , Parsing Program Arguments, Program Arguments
 @subsection Example of Parsing Program Arguments
 
 Here is an example showing how @code{getopt} is typically used.  The
@@ -753,7 +753,7 @@ primitive functions to do each step individually instead.
                                         completed.
 * Process Completion Status::   How to interpret the status value 
                                          returned from a child process.
-* BSD Process Completion Functions::  More functions, for backward
+* BSD wait Functions::  More functions, for backward
                                          compatibility.
 * Process Creation Example::    A complete example program.
 @end menu
@@ -1266,7 +1266,7 @@ sigchld_handler (int signum)
 @end example
 @end deftypefun
 
-@node Process Completion Status, BSD Process Completion Functions, Process Completion, Creating New Processes
+@node Process Completion Status, BSD wait Functions, Process Completion, Creating New Processes
 @subsection Process Completion Status
 
 If the exit status value (@pxref{Program Termination}) of the child
@@ -1325,7 +1325,7 @@ number of the signal that caused the child process to stop.
 @end deftypefn
 
 
-@node BSD Process Completion Functions, Process Creation Example, Process Completion Status, Creating New Processes
+@node BSD wait Functions, Process Creation Example, Process Completion Status, Creating New Processes
 @subsection BSD Process Completion Functions
 
 The GNU library also provides these related facilities for compatibility
@@ -1393,7 +1393,7 @@ structure.
 hasn't been written yet.  Put in a cross-reference here.
 @end deftypefun
 
-@node Process Creation Example,  , BSD Process Completion Functions, Creating New Processes
+@node Process Creation Example,  , BSD wait Functions, Creating New Processes
 @subsection Process Creation Example
 
 Here is an example program showing how you might write a function
index 6ebac8b..89c4a9d 100644 (file)
@@ -8,7 +8,7 @@ fractional parts.  These functions are declared in the header file
 
 @menu
 * Normalization Functions::     Hacks for radix-2 representations.
-* Rounding and Remainder Functions::  Determinining the integer and
+* Rounding and Remainders::  Determinining the integer and
                                         fractional parts of a float.
 * Integer Division::            Functions for performing integer
                                         division.
@@ -17,7 +17,7 @@ fractional parts.  These functions are declared in the header file
 * Predicates on Floats::        Some miscellaneous test functions.
 @end menu
 
-@node Normalization Functions, Rounding and Remainder Functions,  , Arithmetic
+@node Normalization Functions, Rounding and Remainders,  , Arithmetic
 @section Normalization Functions
 @cindex normalization functions (floating-point)
 
@@ -81,7 +81,7 @@ quotient between @code{1} (inclusive) and @code{2} (exclusive).
 @end deftypefun
 
 
-@node Rounding and Remainder Functions, Integer Division, Normalization Functions, Arithmetic
+@node Rounding and Remainders, Integer Division, Normalization Functions, Arithmetic
 @section Rounding and Remainder Functions
 @cindex rounding functions
 @cindex remainder functions
@@ -172,7 +172,7 @@ The @var{denominator} is zero.
 @end deftypefun
 
 
-@node Integer Division, Parsing of Numbers, Rounding and Remainder Functions, Arithmetic
+@node Integer Division, Parsing of Numbers, Rounding and Remainders, Arithmetic
 @section Integer Division
 @cindex integer division functions
 
index 11e7057..6645ece 100644 (file)
@@ -1,9 +1,9 @@
-@node File System Interface, Pipes and FIFOs, Low-Level Input/Output, Top
+@node File System Interface, Pipes and FIFOs, Low-Level I/O, Top
 @chapter File System Interface
 
 This chapter describes the GNU C library's functions for manipulating
 files.  Unlike the input and output functions described in
-@ref{Input/Output on Streams} and @ref{Low-Level Input/Output}, these
+@ref{I/O on Streams} and @ref{Low-Level I/O}, these
 functions are concerned with operating on the files themselves, rather
 than on their contents.
 
@@ -148,7 +148,7 @@ the directory stream to retrieve these entries, represented as
 @code{struct dirent} objects.  The name of the file for each entry is
 stored in the @code{d_name} member of this structure.  There are obvious
 parallels here to the stream facilities for ordinary files, described in
-@ref{Input/Output on Streams}.
+@ref{I/O on Streams}.
 
 @menu
 * Directory Entries::           Format of one directory entry.
@@ -241,7 +241,7 @@ directory, cannot support any additional open files at the moment.
 
 The @code{DIR} type is typically implemented using a file descriptor,
 and the @code{opendir} function in terms of the @code{open} function.
-@xref{Low-Level Input/Output}.  Directory streams and the underlying
+@xref{Low-Level I/O}.  Directory streams and the underlying
 file descriptors are closed on @code{exec} (@pxref{Executing a File}).
 @end deftypefun
 
@@ -972,7 +972,7 @@ The file named by @var{filename} doesn't exist.
 @deftypefun int fstat (int @var{filedes}, struct stat *@var{buf})
 The @code{fstat} function is like @code{stat}, except that it takes an
 open file descriptor as an argument instead of a file name.
-@xref{Low-Level Input/Output}.
+@xref{Low-Level I/O}.
 
 Like @code{stat}, @code{fstat} returns @code{0} on success and @code{-1}
 on failure.  The following @code{errno} error conditions are defined for
index 7e70a3a..249f7ad 100644 (file)
@@ -665,17 +665,17 @@ for searching and sorting arrays.  You can use these functions on any
 kind of array by providing an appropriate comparison function.
 
 @item
-@ref{Input/Output Overview}, gives an overall look at the input and output
+@ref{I/O Overview}, gives an overall look at the input and output
 facilities in the library, and contains information about basic concepts
 such as file names.
 
 @item
-@ref{Input/Output on Streams}, describes I/O operations involving
+@ref{I/O on Streams}, describes I/O operations involving
 streams (or @code{FILE *} objects).  These are the normal C library
 functions from @file{stdio.h}.
 
 @item
-@ref{Low-Level Input/Output}, contains information about I/O operations
+@ref{Low-Level I/O}, contains information about I/O operations
 on file descriptors.  File descriptors are a lower-level mechanism
 specific to the Unix family of operating systems.
 
index e8d3179..e3b61f0 100644 (file)
@@ -1,4 +1,4 @@
-@node Input/Output Overview, Input/Output on Streams, Searching and Sorting, Top
+@node I/O Overview, I/O on Streams, Searching and Sorting, Top
 @chapter Input/Output Overview
 
 Most programs need to do either input (reading data) or output (writing
@@ -12,11 +12,11 @@ and output.  Other chapters relating to the GNU I/O facilities are:
 
 @itemize @bullet
 @item
-@ref{Input/Output on Streams}, which covers the high-level functions
+@ref{I/O on Streams}, which covers the high-level functions
 that operate on streams, including formatted input and output.
 
 @item
-@ref{Low-Level Input/Output}, which covers the basic I/O and control
+@ref{Low-Level I/O}, which covers the basic I/O and control
 functions on file descriptors.
 
 @item
@@ -39,11 +39,11 @@ how input and output to terminal or other serial devices are processed.
 
 
 @menu
-* Input/Output Concepts::       Some basic information and terminology.
+* I/O Concepts::       Some basic information and terminology.
 * File Names::                  How to refer to a file.
 @end menu
 
-@node Input/Output Concepts, File Names,  , Input/Output Overview
+@node I/O Concepts, File Names,  , I/O Overview
 @section Input/Output Concepts
 
 Before you can read or write the contents of a file, you must establish
@@ -69,7 +69,7 @@ output operations on it.
 * File Position::               
 @end menu
 
-@node Streams and File Descriptors, File Position,  , Input/Output Concepts
+@node Streams and File Descriptors, File Position,  , I/O Concepts
 @subsection Streams and File Descriptors
 
 When you want to do input or output to a file, you have a choice of two
@@ -123,7 +123,7 @@ all, or may only implement a subset of the GNU functions that operate on
 file descriptors.  Most of the file descriptor functions in the GNU
 library are included in the POSIX.1 standard, however.
 
-@node File Position,  , Streams and File Descriptors, Input/Output Concepts
+@node File Position,  , Streams and File Descriptors, I/O Concepts
 @subsection File Position 
 
 One of the attributes of an open file is its @dfn{file position}
@@ -167,7 +167,7 @@ By contrast, if you open a descriptor and then duplicate it to get
 another descriptor, these two descriptors share the same file position:
 changing the file position of one descriptor will affect the other.
 
-@node File Names,  , Input/Output Concepts, Input/Output Overview
+@node File Names,  , I/O Concepts, I/O Overview
 @section File Names
 
 In order to open a connection to a file, or to perform other operations
@@ -185,7 +185,7 @@ operating system works with them.
 * Directories::                 Directories contain entries for files.
 * File Name Resolution::        A file name specifies how to look up a file.
 * File Name Errors::            Error conditions relating to file names.
-* Portability of File Names::   
+* File Name Portability::   
 @end menu
 
 
@@ -295,7 +295,7 @@ for file names---for example, files containing C source code usually
 have names suffixed with @samp{.c}---but there is nothing in the file
 system itself that enforces this kind of convention.
 
-@node File Name Errors, Portability of File Names, File Name Resolution, File Names
+@node File Name Errors, File Name Portability, File Name Resolution, File Names
 @subsection File Name Errors
 
 @cindex file name syntax errors
@@ -328,7 +328,7 @@ exists, but it isn't a directory.
 @end table
 
 
-@node Portability of File Names,  , File Name Errors, File Names
+@node File Name Portability,  , File Name Errors, File Names
 @subsection Portability of File Names
 
 The rules for the syntax of file names discussed in @ref{File Names},
index 96fd113..295295d 100644 (file)
@@ -234,7 +234,7 @@ back to the shell.
 have been stopped.
 
 @item
-@ref{The Missing Pieces}, discusses other parts of the shell.
+@ref{Missing Pieces}, discusses other parts of the shell.
 @end itemize
 @end iftex
 
@@ -247,7 +247,7 @@ have been stopped.
 * Stopped and Terminated Jobs::  Reporting job status.
 * Continuing Stopped Jobs::     How to continue a stopped job in
                                 the foreground or background.
-* The Missing Pieces::          Other parts of the shell.
+* Missing Pieces::          Other parts of the shell.
 @end menu
 
 @node Data Structures, Initializing the Shell,  , Implementing a Shell
@@ -870,7 +870,7 @@ do_job_notification (void)
 @end example
 
 
-@node Continuing Stopped Jobs, The Missing Pieces, Stopped and Terminated Jobs, Implementing a Shell
+@node Continuing Stopped Jobs, Missing Pieces, Stopped and Terminated Jobs, Implementing a Shell
 @subsection Continuing Stopped Jobs
 
 @cindex stopped jobs, continuing
@@ -923,7 +923,7 @@ continue_job (job *j, int foreground)
 @end example
 
 
-@node The Missing Pieces,  , Continuing Stopped Jobs, Implementing a Shell
+@node Missing Pieces,  , Continuing Stopped Jobs, Implementing a Shell
 @subsection The Missing Pieces
 
 The code extracts for the sample shell included in this chapter are only
index 6316d0d..b16b5b0 100644 (file)
@@ -673,7 +673,7 @@ to take account of  the accuracy of the representation.
 
 Some of the functions in the C library itself need this information; for
 example, the algorithms for printing and reading floating-point numbers
-(@pxref{Input/Output on Streams}) and for calculating trigonometric and
+(@pxref{I/O on Streams}) and for calculating trigonometric and
 irrational functions (@pxref{Mathematics}) use it to avoid round-off
 error and loss of accuracy.  User programs that implement numerical
 analysis techniques also often need this information in order to
index 972af93..53dd9e8 100644 (file)
@@ -56,9 +56,9 @@ This is the reference manual for version 0.00 of the GNU C Library.
                                          the behavior of library functions.
 * Searching and Sorting::       General searching and sorting
                                         functions.
-* Input/Output Overview::       Introduction to the i/o facilities.
-* Input/Output on Streams::     High-level, portable i/o facilities.
-* Low-Level Input/Output::      Low-level, less portable i/o.
+* I/O Overview::       Introduction to the i/o facilities.
+* I/O on Streams::     High-level, portable i/o facilities.
+* Low-Level I/O::      Low-level, less portable i/o.
 * File System Interface::       Functions for manipulating files.
 * Pipes and FIFOs::             A simple interprocess communication
                                         mechanism.
@@ -178,7 +178,7 @@ Obstacks
 * Preparing to Use Obstacks::   Preparations needed before you can
                                         use obstacks.
 * Allocation in an Obstack::    Allocating objects in an obstack.
-* Freeing Objects in an Obstack::  Freeing objects in an obstack.
+* Freeing Obstack Objects::  Freeing objects in an obstack.
 * Obstack Functions and Macros::  The obstack functions are both
                                         functions and macros.
 * Growing Objects::             Making an object bigger by stages.
@@ -186,7 +186,7 @@ Obstacks
                                         complicated) growing.
 * Status of an Obstack::        Inquiries about the status of an
                                         obstack.
-* Alignment of Data in Obstacks::  Controlling alignment of objects
+* Obstacks Data Alignment::  Controlling alignment of objects
                                         in obstacks.
 * Obstack Chunks::              How obstacks obtain and release chunks.
                                         Efficiency considerations.
@@ -262,12 +262,12 @@ Searching and Sorting
 * Array Sort Function::         The @code{qsort} function.
 * Search/Sort Example::         An example program.
 
-Input/Output Overview
+I/O Overview
 
-* Input/Output Concepts::       Some basic information and terminology.
+* I/O Concepts::       Some basic information and terminology.
 * File Names::                  How to refer to a file.
 
-Input/Output Concepts
+I/O Concepts
 
 * Streams and File Descriptors::  The GNU Library provides two ways
                                         to access the contents of files.
@@ -278,9 +278,9 @@ File Names
 * Directories::                 Directories contain entries for files.
 * File Name Resolution::        A file name specifies how to look up a file.
 * File Name Errors::            Error conditions relating to file names.
-* Portability of File Names::   
+* File Name Portability::   
 
-Input/Output on Streams
+I/O on Streams
 
 * Streams::                     About the data type representing a stream.
 * Standard Streams::            Streams to the standard input and output 
@@ -323,7 +323,7 @@ Formatted Output
 * Other Output Conversions::    Details about formatting of strings,
                                          characters, pointers, and the like.
 * Formatted Output Functions::  Descriptions of the actual functions.
-* Variable Arguments Output Functions::  @code{vprintf} and friends.
+* Variable Arguments Output::  @code{vprintf} and friends.
 * Parsing a Template String::   What kinds of args
                                          does a given template call for?
 
@@ -343,7 +343,7 @@ Formatted Input
 * String Input Conversions::    Details of conversions for reading strings.
 * Other Input Conversions::     Details of miscellaneous other conversions.
 * Formatted Input Functions::   Descriptions of the actual functions.
-* Variable Arguments Input Functions::  @code{vscanf} and friends.
+* Variable Arguments Input::  @code{vscanf} and friends.
 
 Stream Buffering
 
@@ -361,7 +361,7 @@ Programming Your Own Custom Streams
 * Streams and Cookies::         
 * Hook Functions::              
 
-Low-Level Input/Output
+Low-Level I/O
 
 * Opening and Closing Files::   How to open and close file descriptors.
 * I/O Primitives::              Reading and writing data.
@@ -436,11 +436,11 @@ Sockets
                                          initializing sockets.
 * Domains and Protocols::       How to specify the communications
                                         protocol for a socket.
-* The Local Domain::            Details about the local (Unix) domain.
-* The Internet Domain::         Details about the Internet domain.
+* Local Domain::            Details about the local (Unix) domain.
+* Internet Domain::         Details about the Internet domain.
 * Types of Sockets::            Different socket types have different
                                         semantics for data transmission.
-* Byte Stream Socket Operations::  Operations on sockets with connection
+* Byte Stream Sockets::  Operations on sockets with connection
                                         state.
 * Datagram Socket Operations::  Operations on datagram sockets.
 * Socket Options::              Miscellaneous low-level socket options.
@@ -453,7 +453,7 @@ Socket Creation and Naming
                                         before it can receive data.
 * Socket Pairs::                These are created like pipes.
 
-The Internet Domain
+Internet Domain
 
 * Protocols Database::          Selecting a communications protocol.
 * Internet Socket Naming::      How socket names are specified in the Internet
@@ -467,7 +467,7 @@ The Internet Domain
                                  host address and port numbers.
 * Internet Socket Example::     Putting it all together.
 
-Byte Stream Socket Operations
+Byte Stream Sockets
 
 * Establishing a Connection::   The socket must be connected before it
                                  can transmit data.
@@ -523,9 +523,9 @@ Mathematics
 * Domain and Range Errors::     How overflow conditions and the like
                                         are reported.
 * Not a Number::                Making NANs and testing for NANs.
-* Trigonometric Functions::     Sine, cosine, and tangent.
-* Inverse Trigonometric Functions::  Arc sine, arc cosine, and arc tangent.
-* Exponentiation and Logarithms::  Also includes square root.
+* Trig Functions::     Sine, cosine, and tangent.
+* Inverse Trig Functions::  Arc sine, arc cosine, and arc tangent.
+* Exponents and Logarithms::  Also includes square root.
 * Hyperbolic Functions::        Hyperbolic sine and friends.
 * Pseudo-Random Numbers::       Functions for generating pseudo-random
                                         numbers.
@@ -539,7 +539,7 @@ Pseudo-Random Numbers
 Low-Level Arithmetic Functions
 
 * Normalization Functions::     Hacks for radix-2 representations.
-* Rounding and Remainder Functions::  Determinining the integer and
+* Rounding and Remainders::  Determinining the integer and
                                         fractional parts of a float.
 * Integer Division::            Functions for performing integer
                                         division.
@@ -572,16 +572,16 @@ Calendar Time
 * Broken-down Time::            Facilities for manipulating local time.
 * Formatting Date and Time::    Converting times to strings.
 * TZ Variable::                 How users specify the time zone.
-* Time Zone Functions::         Functions to examine or specify the time zone.
+* TZ Functions::         Functions to examine or specify the time zone.
 * Time Functions Example::      An example program showing use of some of
                                 the time functions.
 
 Non-Local Exits
 
-* Introduction to Non-Local Exits::  An overview of how and when to use
+* Intro to Non-Local Exits::  An overview of how and when to use
                                         these facilities.
 * Functions for Non-Local Exits::  Details of the interface.
-* Non-Local Exits and Blocked Signals::  Portability issues.
+* Non-Local Exits and Signals::  Portability issues.
 
 Signal Handling
 
@@ -681,11 +681,11 @@ Processes
 
 Program Arguments
 
-* Program Argument Syntax Conventions::  By convention, program
+* Argument Syntax Conventions::  By convention, program
                                                  options are specified by a
                                                  leading hyphen.
 * Parsing Program Arguments::   The @code{getopt} function.
-* Example of Parsing Program Arguments::  An example of @code{getopt}.
+* Example Using getopt::  An example of @code{getopt}.
 
 Environment Variables
 
@@ -714,7 +714,7 @@ Creating New Processes
                                         completed.
 * Process Completion Status::   How to interpret the status value 
                                          returned from a child process.
-* BSD Process Completion Functions::  More functions, for backward
+* BSD wait Functions::  More functions, for backward
                                          compatibility.
 * Process Creation Example::    A complete example program.
 
@@ -738,7 +738,7 @@ Implementing a Job Control Shell
 * Stopped and Terminated Jobs::  Reporting job status.
 * Continuing Stopped Jobs::     How to continue a stopped job in
                                 the foreground or background.
-* The Missing Pieces::          Other parts of the shell.
+* Missing Pieces::          Other parts of the shell.
 
 Functions for Job Control
 
@@ -786,7 +786,7 @@ System Information
 
 * Host Identification::         Determining the name of the
                                                  machine.
-* Hardware/Software Type Identification::  Determining the hardware type
+* Hardware/Software Type ID::  Determining the hardware type
                                                  of the machine and what
                                                  operating system it is
                                                  running.
@@ -850,9 +850,9 @@ Library Maintenance
                                          you may have with the GNU C library.
 * Porting::                     How to port the GNU C library to
                                          a new machine or operating system.
-* Compatibility with Traditional C::  Using the GNU C library with non-ANSI
+* Traditional C Compatibility::  Using the GNU C library with non-ANSI
                                          C compilers.
-* Contributors to the GNU C Library::  Contributors to the GNU C Library.
+* GNU C Library Contributors::  Contributors to the GNU C Library.
 
 Porting the GNU C Library
 
index d37f792..6a4c3fe 100644 (file)
@@ -1,4 +1,4 @@
-@node Low-Level Input/Output, File System Interface, Input/Output on Streams, Top
+@node Low-Level I/O, File System Interface, I/O on Streams, Top
 @chapter Low-Level Input/Output
 
 This chapter describes functions for performing low-level input/output
@@ -34,7 +34,7 @@ for which there are no equivalents on streams.
 @end menu
 
 
-@node Opening and Closing Files, I/O Primitives,  , Low-Level Input/Output
+@node Opening and Closing Files, I/O Primitives,  , Low-Level I/O
 @section Opening and Closing Files
 
 @cindex opening a file descriptor
@@ -235,7 +235,7 @@ Closing Streams}) instead of trying to close its underlying file
 descriptor with @code{close}.  This flushes any buffered output and
 updates the stream object to indicate that it is closed.
 
-@node I/O Primitives, File Position Primitive, Opening and Closing Files, Low-Level Input/Output
+@node I/O Primitives, File Position Primitive, Opening and Closing Files, Low-Level I/O
 @section Input and Output Primitives
 
 This section describes the functions for performing primitive input and
@@ -382,7 +382,7 @@ functions that write to streams, such as @code{fputc}.
 about writing to a pipe and the interaction with the @code{O_NONBLOCK} 
 flag and the @code{PIPE_BUF} parameter.  Is this really important?
 
-@node File Position Primitive, Descriptors and Streams, I/O Primitives, Low-Level Input/Output
+@node File Position Primitive, Descriptors and Streams, I/O Primitives, Low-Level I/O
 @section Setting the File Position of a Descriptor
 
 Just as you can set the file position of a stream with @code{fseek}, you
@@ -506,7 +506,7 @@ This is an arithmetic data type used to represent file sizes.
 In the GNU system, this is equivalent to @code{fpos_t} or @code{long int}.
 @end deftp
 
-@node Descriptors and Streams, Stream/Descriptor Precautions, File Position Primitive, Low-Level Input/Output
+@node Descriptors and Streams, Stream/Descriptor Precautions, File Position Primitive, Low-Level I/O
 @section Descriptors and Streams
 @cindex streams, and file descriptors
 @cindex converting file descriptor to stream
@@ -585,7 +585,7 @@ standard error output.
 @end table
 @cindex standard error file descriptor
 
-@node Stream/Descriptor Precautions, Waiting for I/O, Descriptors and Streams, Low-Level Input/Output
+@node Stream/Descriptor Precautions, Waiting for I/O, Descriptors and Streams, Low-Level I/O
 @section Precautions for Mixing Streams and Descriptors
 @cindex channels
 @cindex streams and descriptors
@@ -645,7 +645,7 @@ construct a stream for the pipe using @code{fdopen}, but you should do
 all subsequent I/O operations on the stream and never on the file
 descriptor.
 
-@node Waiting for I/O, Control Operations, Stream/Descriptor Precautions, Low-Level Input/Output
+@node Waiting for I/O, Control Operations, Stream/Descriptor Precautions, Low-Level I/O
 @section Waiting for Input or Output
 @cindex waiting for input or output
 @cindex multiplexing input
@@ -843,7 +843,7 @@ There is another example showing the use of @code{select} to multiplex
 input from multiple sockets in @ref{Byte Stream Socket Example}.
 
 
-@node Control Operations, Duplicating Descriptors, Waiting for I/O, Low-Level Input/Output
+@node Control Operations, Duplicating Descriptors, Waiting for I/O, Low-Level I/O
 @section Control Operations on Files
 
 @cindex control operations on files
@@ -908,7 +908,7 @@ Set process or process group ID to receive @code{SIGIO} signals.
 @end deftypefun
 
 
-@node Duplicating Descriptors, Descriptor Flags, Control Operations, Low-Level Input/Output
+@node Duplicating Descriptors, Descriptor Flags, Control Operations, Low-Level I/O
 @section Duplicating Descriptors
 
 @cindex duplicating file descriptors
@@ -1025,7 +1025,7 @@ There is also a more detailed example showing how to implement redirection
 in the context of a pipeline of processes in @ref{Launching Jobs}.
 
 
-@node Descriptor Flags, File Status Flags, Duplicating Descriptors, Low-Level Input/Output
+@node Descriptor Flags, File Status Flags, Duplicating Descriptors, Low-Level I/O
 @section File Descriptor Flags
 @cindex file descriptor flags
 
@@ -1124,7 +1124,7 @@ set_cloexec_flag (int desc, int value)
 @}
 @end example
 
-@node File Status Flags, File Locks, Descriptor Flags, Low-Level Input/Output
+@node File Status Flags, File Locks, Descriptor Flags, Low-Level I/O
 @section File Status Flags
 @cindex file status flags
 
@@ -1275,7 +1275,7 @@ set_nonblock_flag (int desc, int value)
 @}
 @end example
 
-@node File Locks, Interrupt Input, File Status Flags, Low-Level Input/Output
+@node File Locks, Interrupt Input, File Status Flags, Low-Level I/O
 @section File Locks
 
 @cindex file locks
@@ -1515,7 +1515,7 @@ controlling access to a file.  There is still potential for access to
 the file by programs that don't use the lock protocol.
 @end table
 
-@node Interrupt Input,  , File Locks, Low-Level Input/Output
+@node Interrupt Input,  , File Locks, Low-Level I/O
 @section Interrupt-Driven Input
 
 @cindex interrupt-driven input
index 3fbeffd..ba92b2c 100644 (file)
@@ -22,9 +22,9 @@ In the meantime, you should avoid using these names yourself.
 * Domain and Range Errors::     How overflow conditions and the like
                                         are reported.
 * Not a Number::                Making NANs and testing for NANs.
-* Trigonometric Functions::     Sine, cosine, and tangent.
-* Inverse Trigonometric Functions::  Arc sine, arc cosine, and arc tangent.
-* Exponentiation and Logarithms::  Also includes square root.
+* Trig Functions::     Sine, cosine, and tangent.
+* Inverse Trig Functions::  Arc sine, arc cosine, and arc tangent.
+* Exponents and Logarithms::  Also includes square root.
 * Hyperbolic Functions::        Hyperbolic sine and friends.
 * Pseudo-Random Numbers::       Functions for generating pseudo-random
                                         numbers.
@@ -88,7 +88,7 @@ For more information about floating-point representations and limits,
 @xref{Floating-Point Limits}.  In particular, the macro @code{DBL_MAX}
 might be more appropriate than @code{HUGE_VAL} for many uses.
 
-@node Not a Number, Trigonometric Functions, Domain and Range Errors, Mathematics
+@node Not a Number, Trig Functions, Domain and Range Errors, Mathematics
 @section ``Not a Number'' Values
 @cindex NAN
 @cindex not a number
@@ -117,7 +117,7 @@ a number'' values---that is to say, on all machines that support IEEE
 floating point.
 @end deftypevr
 
-@node Trigonometric Functions, Inverse Trigonometric Functions, Not a Number, Mathematics
+@node Trig Functions, Inverse Trig Functions, Not a Number, Mathematics
 @section Trigonometric Functions
 @cindex trigonometric functions
 
@@ -170,7 +170,7 @@ negative @code{HUGE_VAL}.
 @end deftypefun
 
 
-@node Inverse Trigonometric Functions, Exponentiation and Logarithms, Trigonometric Functions, Mathematics
+@node Inverse Trig Functions, Exponents and Logarithms, Trig Functions, Mathematics
 @section Inverse Trigonometric Functions
 @cindex inverse trigonmetric functions
 
@@ -249,7 +249,7 @@ function is not defined in this case.
 @end deftypefun
 
 
-@node Exponentiation and Logarithms, Hyperbolic Functions, Inverse Trigonometric Functions, Mathematics
+@node Exponents and Logarithms, Hyperbolic Functions, Inverse Trig Functions, Mathematics
 @section Exponentiation and Logarithms
 @cindex exponentiation functions
 @cindex power functions
@@ -371,12 +371,12 @@ It is computed in a way that is accurate even if the value of @var{x} is
 near zero.
 @end deftypefun
 
-@node Hyperbolic Functions, Pseudo-Random Numbers, Exponentiation and Logarithms, Mathematics
+@node Hyperbolic Functions, Pseudo-Random Numbers, Exponents and Logarithms, Mathematics
 @section Hyperbolic Functions
 @cindex hyperbolic functions
 
 The functions in this section are related to the exponential functions;
-see @ref{Exponentiation and Logarithms}.
+see @ref{Exponents and Logarithms}.
 
 @comment math.h
 @comment ANSI
@@ -618,4 +618,4 @@ This function returns the absolute value of the floating-point number
 @end deftypefun
 
 There is also the function @code{cabs} for computing the absolute value
-of a complex number; see @ref{Exponentiation and Logarithms}.
+of a complex number; see @ref{Exponents and Logarithms}.
index ce8a18d..e92dfeb 100644 (file)
@@ -671,7 +671,7 @@ the padding needed to start each object on a suitable boundary.
 * Preparing to Use Obstacks::   Preparations needed before you can
                                         use obstacks.
 * Allocation in an Obstack::    Allocating objects in an obstack.
-* Freeing Objects in an Obstack::  Freeing objects in an obstack.
+* Freeing Obstack Objects::  Freeing objects in an obstack.
 * Obstack Functions and Macros::  The obstack functions are both
                                         functions and macros.
 * Growing Objects::             Making an object bigger by stages.
@@ -679,7 +679,7 @@ the padding needed to start each object on a suitable boundary.
                                         complicated) growing.
 * Status of an Obstack::        Inquiries about the status of an
                                         obstack.
-* Alignment of Data in Obstacks::  Controlling alignment of objects
+* Obstacks Data Alignment::  Controlling alignment of objects
                                         in obstacks.
 * Obstack Chunks::              How obstacks obtain and release chunks.
                                         Efficiency considerations.
@@ -794,7 +794,7 @@ struct obstack *myobstack_ptr
 obstack_init (myobstack_ptr);
 @end example
 
-@node Allocation in an Obstack, Freeing Objects in an Obstack, Preparing to Use Obstacks, Obstacks
+@node Allocation in an Obstack, Freeing Obstack Objects, Preparing to Use Obstacks, Obstacks
 @subsection Allocation in an Obstack
 @cindex allocation (obstacks)
 
@@ -860,7 +860,7 @@ obstack_savestring (char *addr, size_t size)
 Contrast this with the previous example of @code{savestring} using
 @code{malloc} (@pxref{Basic Allocation}).
 
-@node Freeing Objects in an Obstack, Obstack Functions and Macros, Allocation in an Obstack, Obstacks
+@node Freeing Obstack Objects, Obstack Functions and Macros, Allocation in an Obstack, Obstacks
 @subsection Freeing Objects in an Obstack
 @cindex freeing (obstacks)
 
@@ -892,7 +892,7 @@ the objects in a chunk become free, the obstack library automatically
 frees the chunk (@pxref{Preparing to Use Obstacks}).  Then other
 obstacks, or non-obstack allocation, can reuse the space of the chunk.
 
-@node Obstack Functions and Macros, Growing Objects, Freeing Objects in an Obstack, Obstacks
+@node Obstack Functions and Macros, Growing Objects, Freeing Obstack Objects, Obstacks
 @subsection Obstack Functions and Macros
 @cindex macros
 
@@ -1125,7 +1125,7 @@ add_string (struct obstack *obstack, char *ptr, size_t len)
 @}
 @end example
 
-@node Status of an Obstack, Alignment of Data in Obstacks, Extra Fast Growing Objects, Obstacks
+@node Status of an Obstack, Obstacks Data Alignment, Extra Fast Growing Objects, Obstacks
 @subsection Status of an Obstack
 @cindex obstack status
 @cindex status of obstack
@@ -1167,7 +1167,7 @@ obstack_next_free (@var{obstack_ptr}) - obstack_base (@var{obstack_ptr})
 @end example
 @end deftypefun
 
-@node Alignment of Data in Obstacks, Obstack Chunks, Status of an Obstack, Obstacks
+@node Obstacks Data Alignment, Obstack Chunks, Status of an Obstack, Obstacks
 @subsection Alignment of Data in Obstacks
 @cindex alignment (in obstacks)
 
@@ -1207,7 +1207,7 @@ alignment mask take effect immediately by calling @code{obstack_finish}.
 This will finish a zero-length object and then do proper alignment for
 the next object.
 
-@node Obstack Chunks, Obstacks and Signal Handling, Alignment of Data in Obstacks, Obstacks
+@node Obstack Chunks, Obstacks and Signal Handling, Obstacks Data Alignment, Obstacks
 @subsection Obstack Chunks
 @cindex efficiency of chunks
 @cindex chunks
@@ -1331,7 +1331,7 @@ from @var{address}, followed by a null character at the end.
 
 @item obstack_free (@var{obstack_ptr}, @var{object})
 Free @var{object} (and everything allocated in the specified obstack
-more recently than @var{object}).  @xref{Freeing Objects in an Obstack}.
+more recently than @var{object}).  @xref{Freeing Obstack Objects}.
 
 @item obstack_blank (@var{obstack_ptr}, @var{size})
 Add @var{size} uninitialized bytes to a growing object.
@@ -1372,7 +1372,7 @@ Get the amount of room now available for growing the current object.
 
 @item obstack_alignment_mask (@var{obstack_ptr})
 The mask used for aligning the beginning of an object.  This is an
-lvalue.  @xref{Alignment of Data in Obstacks}.
+lvalue.  @xref{Obstacks Data Alignment}.
 
 @item obstack_chunk_size (@var{obstack_ptr})
 The size for allocating chunks.  This is an lvalue.  @xref{Obstack Chunks}.
index 7d30242..9dd4c26 100644 (file)
@@ -1,4 +1,4 @@
-@node Searching and Sorting, Input/Output Overview, Locales, Top
+@node Searching and Sorting, I/O Overview, Locales, Top
 @chapter Searching and Sorting 
 
 This chapter describes functions for searching and sorting arrays of
index 5f44400..6eb1abf 100644 (file)
@@ -10,13 +10,13 @@ do such @dfn{non-local exits} using the @code{setjmp} and @code{longjmp}
 functions.
 
 @menu
-* Introduction to Non-Local Exits::  An overview of how and when to use
+* Intro to Non-Local Exits::  An overview of how and when to use
                                         these facilities.
 * Functions for Non-Local Exits::  Details of the interface.
-* Non-Local Exits and Blocked Signals::  Portability issues.
+* Non-Local Exits and Signals::  Portability issues.
 @end menu
 
-@node Introduction to Non-Local Exits, Functions for Non-Local Exits,  , Non-Local Exits
+@node Intro to Non-Local Exits, Functions for Non-Local Exits,  , Non-Local Exits
 @section Introduction to Non-Local Exits
 
 As an example of a situation where a non-local exit can be useful,
@@ -86,7 +86,7 @@ else
   @dots{}
 @end example
 
-@node Functions for Non-Local Exits, Non-Local Exits and Blocked Signals, Introduction to Non-Local Exits, Non-Local Exits
+@node Functions for Non-Local Exits, Non-Local Exits and Signals, Intro to Non-Local Exits, Non-Local Exits
 @section Functions for Non-Local Exits
 
 Here are the details on the functions and data structures used for
@@ -168,7 +168,7 @@ function containing the @code{setjmp} call that have been changed since
 the call to @code{setjmp} are indeterminate, unless you have declared
 them @code{volatile}.
 
-@node Non-Local Exits and Blocked Signals,  , Functions for Non-Local Exits, Non-Local Exits
+@node Non-Local Exits and Signals,  , Functions for Non-Local Exits, Non-Local Exits
 @section Non-Local Exits and Blocked Signals
 
 In BSD Unix systems, @code{setjmp} and @code{longjmp} also save and
index cea4382..9992868 100644 (file)
@@ -21,11 +21,11 @@ are described.
                                          initializing sockets.
 * Domains and Protocols::       How to specify the communications
                                         protocol for a socket.
-* The Local Domain::            Details about the local (Unix) domain.
-* The Internet Domain::         Details about the Internet domain.
+* Local Domain::            Details about the local (Unix) domain.
+* Internet Domain::         Details about the Internet domain.
 * Types of Sockets::            Different socket types have different
                                         semantics for data transmission.
-* Byte Stream Socket Operations::  Operations on sockets with connection
+* Byte Stream Sockets::  Operations on sockets with connection
                                         state.
 * Datagram Socket Operations::  Operations on datagram sockets.
 * Socket Options::              Miscellaneous low-level socket options.
@@ -198,7 +198,7 @@ side, but this is optional; a name is assigned automatically if you
 don't.
 
 The details of how sockets are named vary depending on the particular
-domain of the socket.  @xref{The Local Domain}, or @ref{The Internet
+domain of the socket.  @xref{Local Domain}, or @ref{The Internet
 Domain}, for specific information.
 
 Here are descriptions of the functions for setting or inquiring about
@@ -315,7 +315,7 @@ This is a synonym for @code{AF_LOCAL}.
 @comment BSD
 @deftypevr Macro int AF_INET
 This is the address family for sockets in the Internet domain.
-@xref{The Internet Domain}.
+@xref{Internet Domain}.
 @end deftypevr
 
 @strong{Incomplete:}  There are a bunch more of these.
@@ -369,7 +369,7 @@ in the local domain.  Is this true of the GNU system also?
 
 
 
-@node Domains and Protocols, The Local Domain, Socket Creation and Naming, Sockets
+@node Domains and Protocols, Local Domain, Socket Creation and Naming, Sockets
 @section Domains and Protocols
 
 The header file @file{sys/socket.h} defines these symbolic constants
@@ -382,7 +382,7 @@ macros as values for the @var{domain} argument to the @code{socket} or
 @comment GNU
 @deftypevr Macro int PF_LOCAL
 This is the domain local to the host machine.  The local domain is
-discussed in more detail in @ref{The Local Domain}.
+discussed in more detail in @ref{Local Domain}.
 
 @strong{Incomplete:}  This isn't actually in the header file yet!!!
 @end deftypevr
@@ -396,7 +396,7 @@ This is a synonym for @code{PF_LOCAL}.
 @comment sys/socket.h
 @comment BSD
 @deftypevr Macro int PF_INET
-This is the Internet protocol (IP) family.  @xref{The Internet Domain},
+This is the Internet protocol (IP) family.  @xref{Internet Domain},
 for more information.
 @end deftypevr
 
@@ -412,7 +412,7 @@ a value of @code{0} as the @var{protocol} argument when creating a
 socket with @code{socket} or @code{socketpair}.
 
 
-@node The Local Domain, The Internet Domain, Domains and Protocols, Sockets
+@node Local Domain, Internet Domain, Domains and Protocols, Sockets
 @section The Local Domain
 @cindex local domain, for sockets
 
@@ -505,7 +505,7 @@ int make_named_socket (const char *filename)
 @}
 @end example
 
-@node The Internet Domain, Types of Sockets, The Local Domain, Sockets
+@node Internet Domain, Types of Sockets, Local Domain, Sockets
 @section The Internet Domain
 @cindex Internet domain, for sockets
 
@@ -526,7 +526,7 @@ conventions used in the Internet domain, @code{PF_INET}.
 * Internet Socket Example::     Putting it all together.
 @end menu
 
-@node Protocols Database, Internet Socket Naming,  , The Internet Domain
+@node Protocols Database, Internet Socket Naming,  , Internet Domain
 @subsection Protocols Database
 @cindex protocols database
 
@@ -615,7 +615,7 @@ This function closes the protocols database.
 @end deftypefun
 
 
-@node Internet Socket Naming, Internet Host Addresses, Protocols Database, The Internet Domain
+@node Internet Socket Naming, Internet Host Addresses, Protocols Database, Internet Domain
 @subsection Internet Socket Naming
 
 In the Internet domain, socket names are a triple consisting of a
@@ -654,7 +654,7 @@ The @var{length} parameter associated with socket names in the Internet
 domain is computed as @code{sizeof (struct sockaddr_in)}.
 
 
-@node Internet Host Addresses, Hosts Database, Internet Socket Naming, The Internet Domain
+@node Internet Host Addresses, Hosts Database, Internet Socket Naming, Internet Domain
 @subsection Internet Host Addresses
 
 @cindex host address, Internet
@@ -808,7 +808,7 @@ in network byte order, and network numbers and local network address
 numbers in host byte order.  @xref{Byte Order Conversion}.
 
 
-@node Hosts Database, Services Database, Internet Host Addresses, The Internet Domain
+@node Hosts Database, Services Database, Internet Host Addresses, Internet Domain
 @subsection Hosts Database
 @cindex hosts database
 @cindex converting host name to address
@@ -956,7 +956,7 @@ This function closes the hosts database.
 @end deftypefun
 
 
-@node Services Database, Networks Database, Hosts Database, The Internet Domain
+@node Services Database, Networks Database, Hosts Database, Internet Domain
 @subsection Services Database
 @cindex services database
 @cindex converting service name to port number
@@ -1060,7 +1060,7 @@ This function closes the services database.
 @end deftypefun
 
 
-@node Networks Database, Byte Order Conversion, Services Database, The Internet Domain
+@node Networks Database, Byte Order Conversion, Services Database, Internet Domain
 @subsection Networks Database
 @cindex networks database
 @cindex converting network number to network name
@@ -1148,7 +1148,7 @@ This function closes the networks database.
 @end deftypefun
 
 
-@node Byte Order Conversion, Internet Socket Example, Networks Database, The Internet Domain
+@node Byte Order Conversion, Internet Socket Example, Networks Database, Internet Domain
 @subsection Byte Order Conversion
 @cindex byte order conversion, for socket
 @cindex converting byte order
@@ -1202,7 +1202,7 @@ This function converts the @code{long} integer @var{netlong} from
 network byte order to host byte order.
 @end deftypefun
 
-@node Internet Socket Example,  , Byte Order Conversion, The Internet Domain
+@node Internet Socket Example,  , Byte Order Conversion, Internet Domain
 @subsection Internet Socket Example
 
 Here is an example showing how to create and name a socket in the
@@ -1270,7 +1270,7 @@ void init_sockaddr (struct sockaddr_in *name, const char *hostname,
 @end example
 
 
-@node Types of Sockets, Byte Stream Socket Operations, The Internet Domain, Sockets
+@node Types of Sockets, Byte Stream Sockets, Internet Domain, Sockets
 @section Types of Sockets
 
 The GNU library includes support for several different kinds of sockets,
@@ -1350,7 +1350,7 @@ socket type.
 @end deftypevr
 
 
-@node Byte Stream Socket Operations, Datagram Socket Operations, Types of Sockets, Sockets
+@node Byte Stream Sockets, Datagram Socket Operations, Types of Sockets, Sockets
 @section Byte Stream Socket Operations
 @cindex byte stream socket
 
@@ -1377,7 +1377,7 @@ connected socket.
 * Out-of-Band Data::            This is an advanced feature.
 @end menu
 
-@node Establishing a Connection, Transferring Data,  , Byte Stream Socket Operations
+@node Establishing a Connection, Transferring Data,  , Byte Stream Sockets
 @subsection Establishing a Connection
 @cindex connecting a socket
 @cindex socket, connecting
@@ -1535,7 +1535,7 @@ There are not enough internal buffers available.
 @end deftypefun
 
 
-@node Transferring Data, Byte Stream Socket Example, Establishing a Connection, Byte Stream Socket Operations
+@node Transferring Data, Byte Stream Socket Example, Establishing a Connection, Byte Stream Sockets
 @subsection Transferring Data
 @cindex reading from a socket
 @cindex writing to a socket
@@ -1638,7 +1638,7 @@ on write operations, and is generally only of interest for diagnostic or
 routing programs.
 @end deftypevr
 
-@node Byte Stream Socket Example, Out-of-Band Data, Transferring Data, Byte Stream Socket Operations
+@node Byte Stream Socket Example, Out-of-Band Data, Transferring Data, Byte Stream Sockets
 @subsection Byte Stream Socket Example
 
 Here are a set of example programs that show communications over a 
@@ -1817,7 +1817,7 @@ void main (void)
 @end example
 
 
-@node Out-of-Band Data,  , Byte Stream Socket Example, Byte Stream Socket Operations
+@node Out-of-Band Data,  , Byte Stream Socket Example, Byte Stream Sockets
 @subsection Out-of-Band Data
 
 @cindex out-of-band data
@@ -1846,12 +1846,12 @@ data to empty out internal buffers before the out-of-band data can be
 delivered.
 
 
-@node Datagram Socket Operations, Socket Options, Byte Stream Socket Operations, Sockets
+@node Datagram Socket Operations, Socket Options, Byte Stream Sockets, Sockets
 @section Datagram Socket Operations
 @cindex datagram socket
 This section describes functions for sending messages on datagram
 sockets (type @code{SOCK_DGRAM}).  Unlike the byte stream sockets
-discussed in @ref{Byte Stream Socket Operations}, these sockets do
+discussed in @ref{Byte Stream Sockets}, these sockets do
 not support any notion of connection state.  Instead, each message
 is addressed individually.
 
index a2ae21a..bd2d0c4 100644 (file)
@@ -1,4 +1,4 @@
-@node Input/Output on Streams, Low-Level Input/Output, Input/Output Overview, Top
+@node I/O on Streams, Low-Level I/O, I/O Overview, Top
 @chapter Input/Output on Streams
 
 This chapter describes the functions for creating streams and performing
@@ -34,7 +34,7 @@ useful here.
 * Other Kinds of Streams::      Other Kinds of Streams
 @end menu
 
-@node Streams, Standard Streams,  , Input/Output on Streams
+@node Streams, Standard Streams,  , I/O on Streams
 @section Streams
 
 For historical reasons, the type of the C data structure that represents
@@ -68,7 +68,7 @@ deal only with pointers to these objects (that is, @code{FILE *} values)
 rather than the objects themselves.
 
 
-@node Standard Streams, Opening Streams, Streams, Input/Output on Streams
+@node Standard Streams, Opening Streams, Streams, I/O on Streams
 @section Standard Streams
 @cindex standard streams
 @cindex streams, standard
@@ -115,7 +115,7 @@ provide similar mechanisms, but the details of how to use them can vary.
 It is probably not a good idea to close any of the standard streams.
 
 
-@node Opening Streams, Closing Streams, Standard Streams, Input/Output on Streams
+@node Opening Streams, Closing Streams, Standard Streams, I/O on Streams
 @section Opening Streams
 
 @cindex opening a stream
@@ -239,7 +239,7 @@ in which use of a standard stream for certain purposes is hard-coded.
 @end deftypefun
 
 
-@node Closing Streams, Simple Output, Opening Streams, Input/Output on Streams
+@node Closing Streams, Simple Output, Opening Streams, I/O on Streams
 @section Closing Streams
 
 @cindex closing a stream
@@ -275,7 +275,7 @@ Handling}), open streams might not be closed properly.  Buffered output
 may not be flushed and files may not be complete.  For more information
 on buffering of streams, see @ref{Stream Buffering}.
 
-@node Simple Output, Character Input, Closing Streams, Input/Output on Streams
+@node Simple Output, Character Input, Closing Streams, I/O on Streams
 @section Simple Output by Characters or Lines
 
 @cindex writing to a stream, by characters
@@ -355,7 +355,7 @@ This function writes the word @var{w} (that is, an @code{int}) to
 recommend you use @code{fwrite} instead (@pxref{Block Input/Output}).
 @end deftypefun
 
-@node Character Input, Line Input, Simple Output, Input/Output on Streams
+@node Character Input, Line Input, Simple Output, I/O on Streams
 @section Character Input
 
 @cindex reading from a stream, by characters
@@ -431,7 +431,7 @@ It's provided for compatibility with SVID.  We recommend you use
 @code{fread} instead (@pxref{Block Input/Output}).
 @end deftypefun
 
-@node Line Input, Unreading, Character Input, Input/Output on Streams
+@node Line Input, Unreading, Character Input, I/O on Streams
 @section Line-Oriented Input
 
 Since many programs interpret input on the basis of lines, it's
@@ -528,7 +528,7 @@ The GNU library includes it for compatibility only.  You should
 @strong{always} use @code{fgets} or @code{getline} instead.
 @end deftypefn
 
-@node Unreading, Formatted Output, Line Input, Input/Output on Streams
+@node Unreading, Formatted Output, Line Input, I/O on Streams
 @section Unreading
 @cindex peeking at input
 @cindex unreading characters
@@ -647,7 +647,7 @@ skip_whitespace (FILE *stream)
 @}
 @end example
 
-@node Formatted Output, Customizing Printf, Unreading, Input/Output on Streams
+@node Formatted Output, Customizing Printf, Unreading, I/O on Streams
 @section Formatted Output
 
 @cindex format string, for @code{printf}
@@ -677,7 +677,7 @@ useful for printing error messages, tables of data, and the like.
 * Other Output Conversions::    Details about formatting of strings,
                                          characters, pointers, and the like.
 * Formatted Output Functions::  Descriptions of the actual functions.
-* Variable Arguments Output Functions::  @code{vprintf} and friends.
+* Variable Arguments Output::  @code{vprintf} and friends.
 * Parsing a Template String::   What kinds of args
                                          does a given template call for?
 @end menu
@@ -1196,7 +1196,7 @@ conversion doesn't use an argument, and no flags, field width,
 precision, or type modifiers are permitted.
 
 
-@node Formatted Output Functions, Variable Arguments Output Functions, Other Output Conversions, Formatted Output
+@node Formatted Output Functions, Variable Arguments Output, Other Output Conversions, Formatted Output
 @subsection Formatted Output Functions
 
 This section describes how to call @code{printf} and related functions.
@@ -1308,7 +1308,7 @@ make_message (char *name, char *value)
 @end smallexample
 @end deftypefun
 
-@node Variable Arguments Output Functions, Parsing a Template String, Formatted Output Functions, Formatted Output
+@node Variable Arguments Output, Parsing a Template String, Formatted Output Functions, Formatted Output
 @subsection Variable Arguments Output Functions
 
 The functions @code{vprintf} and friends are provided so that you can
@@ -1417,7 +1417,7 @@ You could call @code{eprintf} like this:
 eprintf ("file `%s' does not exist\n", filename);
 @end example
 
-@node Parsing a Template String,  , Variable Arguments Output Functions, Formatted Output
+@node Parsing a Template String,  , Variable Arguments Output, Formatted Output
 @subsection Parsing a Template String
 @cindex parsing a template string
 
@@ -1555,7 +1555,7 @@ a base type of @code{PA_DOUBLE} to indicate a type of @code{long double}.
 interpreter, showing how one might validate a list of args and then
 call @code{vprintf}.
 
-@node Customizing Printf, Formatted Input, Formatted Output, Input/Output on Streams
+@node Customizing Printf, Formatted Input, Formatted Output, I/O on Streams
 @section Customizing Printf
 @cindex customizing @code{printf}
 @cindex defining new @code{printf} conversions
@@ -1791,7 +1791,7 @@ The output produced by this program looks like:
 |<Widget 0xffeffb7c: mywidget>      |
 @end example
 
-@node Formatted Input, Block Input/Output, Customizing Printf, Input/Output on Streams
+@node Formatted Input, Block Input/Output, Customizing Printf, I/O on Streams
 @section Formatted Input
 
 @cindex formatted input from a stream
@@ -1812,7 +1812,7 @@ reading arbitrary values under the control of a @dfn{format string} or
 * String Input Conversions::    Details of conversions for reading strings.
 * Other Input Conversions::     Details of miscellaneous other conversions.
 * Formatted Input Functions::   Descriptions of the actual functions.
-* Variable Arguments Input Functions::  @code{vscanf} and friends.
+* Variable Arguments Input::  @code{vscanf} and friends.
 @end menu
 
 @node Formatted Input Basics, Input Conversion Syntax,  , Formatted Input
@@ -2208,7 +2208,7 @@ Finally, the @samp{%%} conversion matches a literal @samp{%} character
 in the input stream, without using an argument.  This conversion does
 not permit any flags, field width, or type modifier to be specified.
 
-@node Formatted Input Functions, Variable Arguments Input Functions, Other Input Conversions, Formatted Input
+@node Formatted Input Functions, Variable Arguments Input, Other Input Conversions, Formatted Input
 @subsection Formatted Input Functions
 
 Here are the descriptions of the functions for performing formatted
@@ -2250,14 +2250,14 @@ as an argument to receive a string read under control of the @samp{%s}
 conversion.
 @end deftypefun
 
-@node Variable Arguments Input Functions,  , Formatted Input Functions, Formatted Input
+@node Variable Arguments Input,  , Formatted Input Functions, Formatted Input
 @subsection Variable Arguments Input Functions
 
 The functions @code{vscanf} and friends are provided so that you can
 define your own variadic @code{scanf}-like functions that make use of
 the same internals as the built-in formatted output functions.
 These functions are analogous to the @code{vprintf} series of output
-functions.  @xref{Variable Arguments Output Functions}, for important
+functions.  @xref{Variable Arguments Output}, for important
 information on how to use them.
 
 @strong{Portability Note:} The functions listed in this section are GNU
@@ -2286,7 +2286,7 @@ This is the equivalent of @code{sscanf} with the variable argument list
 specified directly as for @code{vscanf}.
 @end deftypefun
 
-@node Block Input/Output, EOF and Errors, Formatted Input, Input/Output on Streams
+@node Block Input/Output, EOF and Errors, Formatted Input, I/O on Streams
 @section Block Input/Output
 
 This section describes how to do input and output operations on blocks
@@ -2344,7 +2344,7 @@ only if a write error occurs.
 @end deftypefun
 
 
-@node EOF and Errors, Binary Streams, Block Input/Output, Input/Output on Streams
+@node EOF and Errors, Binary Streams, Block Input/Output, I/O on Streams
 @section End-Of-File and Errors
 
 @cindex end of file, on a stream
@@ -2402,9 +2402,9 @@ stream---such as @code{fputc}, @code{printf}, and @code{fflush}---are
 implemented in terms of @code{write}, and all of the @code{errno} error
 conditions defined for @code{write} are meaningful for these functions.
 For more information about the descriptor-level I/O functions, see
-@ref{Low-Level Input/Output}.
+@ref{Low-Level I/O}.
 
-@node Binary Streams, File Positioning, EOF and Errors, Input/Output on Streams
+@node Binary Streams, File Positioning, EOF and Errors, I/O on Streams
 @section Text and Binary Streams
 
 The GNU system and other POSIX-compatible operating systems organize all
@@ -2462,7 +2462,7 @@ get the same kind of stream regardless of whether you ask for binary.
 This stream can handle any file content, and has none of the
 restrictions that text streams sometimes have.
 
-@node File Positioning, Portable Positioning, Binary Streams, Input/Output on Streams
+@node File Positioning, Portable Positioning, Binary Streams, I/O on Streams
 @section File Positioning
 @cindex file positioning on a stream
 @cindex positioning a stream
@@ -2559,7 +2559,7 @@ begining of the file.  It is equivalent to calling @code{fseek} on the
 value is discarded and the error indicator for the stream is reset.
 @end deftypefun
 
-@node Portable Positioning, Stream Buffering, File Positioning, Input/Output on Streams
+@node Portable Positioning, Stream Buffering, File Positioning, I/O on Streams
 @section Portable File-Position Functions
 
 On the GNU system, the file position is truly a character count.  You
@@ -2644,7 +2644,7 @@ of zero.  Otherwise, @code{fsetpos} returns a nonzero value and stores
 an implementation-defined positive value in @code{errno}.
 @end deftypefun
 
-@node Stream Buffering, Temporary Files, Portable Positioning, Input/Output on Streams
+@node Stream Buffering, Temporary Files, Portable Positioning, I/O on Streams
 @section Stream Buffering
 
 @cindex buffering of streams
@@ -2669,7 +2669,7 @@ terminal devices, see @ref{Low-Level Terminal Interface}.
 
 You can bypass the stream buffering facilities altogether by using the
 low-level input and output functions that operate on file descriptors
-instead.  @xref{Low-Level Input/Output}.
+instead.  @xref{Low-Level I/O}.
 
 @menu
 * Buffering Concepts::          Terminology is defined here.
@@ -2905,7 +2905,7 @@ This function is provided for compatibility with old BSD code.  Use
 @end deftypefun
 
 
-@node Temporary Files, Other Kinds of Streams, Stream Buffering, Input/Output on Streams
+@node Temporary Files, Other Kinds of Streams, Stream Buffering, I/O on Streams
 @section Temporary Files
 
 If you need to use a temporary file in your program, you can use the
@@ -3000,7 +3000,7 @@ This function is defined for SVID compatibility.
 This macro is the name of the default directory for temporary files.
 @end deftypevr
 
-@node Other Kinds of Streams,  , Temporary Files, Input/Output on Streams
+@node Other Kinds of Streams,  , Temporary Files, I/O on Streams
 @section Other Kinds of Streams
 
 The GNU library provides ways for you to define additional kinds of
index 030da76..aa4a12a 100644 (file)
@@ -7,20 +7,20 @@ information about the particular machine a program is running on.
 @menu
 * Host Identification::         Determining the name of the
                                                  machine.
-* Hardware/Software Type Identification::  Determining the hardware type
+* Hardware/Software Type ID::  Determining the hardware type
                                                  of the machine and what
                                                  operating system it is
                                                  running.
 @end menu
 
 
-@node Host Identification, Hardware/Software Type Identification,  , System Information
+@node Host Identification, Hardware/Software Type ID,  , System Information
 @section Host Identification
 
 The functions listed in this section access information to identify the
 particular machine that a program is running on.  In the GNU system,
 this information is the default Internet host name and host address of
-the machine; see @ref{The Internet Domain}.  These functions are the
+the machine; see @ref{Internet Domain}.  These functions are the
 primitives for the @code{hostname} and @code{hostid} shell commands.
 @pindex hostname
 @pindex hostid
@@ -71,7 +71,7 @@ is usually used only at system boot time.
 @end deftypefun
 
 
-@node Hardware/Software Type Identification,  , Host Identification, System Information
+@node Hardware/Software Type ID,  , Host Identification, System Information
 @section Hardware/Software Type Identification
 
 You can use the @code{uname} function to find out some information about
index 678afef..14b8311 100644 (file)
@@ -8,7 +8,7 @@ change which characters are used for end-of-file, command-line editing,
 sending signals, and similar control functions.
 
 Most of the functions in this chapter operate on file descriptors.
-@xref{Low-Level Input/Output}, for more information about what a file
+@xref{Low-Level I/O}, for more information about what a file
 descriptor is and how to open a file descriptor for a terminal device.
 
 @menu
@@ -64,7 +64,7 @@ isn't associated with a terminal, or the file name cannot be determined.
 Many of the remaining functions in this section refer to the input and
 output queues of a terminal device.  These queues implement a form of
 buffering @emph{within the kernel} independent of the buffering
-implemented by I/O streams (@pxref{Input/Output on Streams}).
+implemented by I/O streams (@pxref{I/O on Streams}).
 
 @cindex terminal input queue
 @cindex typeahead buffer
index eccba1a..913ca73 100644 (file)
@@ -217,7 +217,7 @@ date and time values.
 * Broken-down Time::            Facilities for manipulating local time.
 * Formatting Date and Time::    Converting times to strings.
 * TZ Variable::                 How users specify the time zone.
-* Time Zone Functions::         Functions to examine or specify the time zone.
+* TZ Functions::         Functions to examine or specify the time zone.
 * Time Functions Example::      An example program showing use of some of
                                 the time functions.
 @end menu
@@ -479,7 +479,7 @@ information is not available.
 This field describes the time zone that was used to compute this
 broken-down time value; it is the amount you must add to the local time
 in that zone to get GMT, in units of seconds.  The value is like that of
-the variable @code{timezone} (@pxref{Time Zone Functions}).  You can
+the variable @code{timezone} (@pxref{TZ Functions}).  You can
 also think of this as the ``number of seconds west'' of GMT.  The
 @code{tm_gmtoff} field is a GNU library extension.
 
@@ -541,7 +541,7 @@ If the specified broken-down time cannot be represented as a calendar time,
 the contents of @var{brokentime}.
 
 Calling @code{mktime} also sets the variable @code{tzname} with
-information about the current time zone.  @xref{Time Zone Functions}.
+information about the current time zone.  @xref{TZ Functions}.
 @end deftypefun
 
 @node Formatting Date and Time, TZ Variable, Broken-down Time, Calendar Time
@@ -586,7 +586,7 @@ asctime (localtime (@var{time}))
 @end example
 
 @code{ctime} sets the variable @code{tzname}, because @code{localtime}
-does so.  @xref{Time Zone Functions}.
+does so.  @xref{TZ Functions}.
 @end deftypefun
 
 @comment time.h
@@ -691,7 +691,7 @@ repeat the call, providing a bigger array.
 For an example of @code{strftime}, see @ref{Time Functions Example}.
 @end deftypefun
 
-@node TZ Variable, Time Zone Functions, Formatting Date and Time, Calendar Time
+@node TZ Variable, TZ Functions, Formatting Date and Time, Calendar Time
 @subsection Specifying the Time Zone with @code{TZ}
 
 In the GNU system, a user can specify the time zone by means of the
@@ -801,7 +801,7 @@ operation chooses a time zone by default.  Each operating system has its
 own rules for choosing the default time zone, so there is little we can
 say about them.
 
-@node Time Zone Functions, Time Functions Example, TZ Variable, Calendar Time
+@node TZ Functions, Time Functions Example, TZ Variable, Calendar Time
 @subsection Functions and Variables for Time Zones
 
 @comment time.h
@@ -850,7 +850,7 @@ This variable has a nonzero value if the standard U.S. daylight savings
 time rules apply.
 @end deftypevar
 
-@node Time Functions Example,  , Time Zone Functions, Calendar Time
+@node Time Functions Example,  , TZ Functions, Calendar Time
 @subsection Time Functions Example
 
 Here is an example program showing the use of some of the local time and