Fix punctuation after xref.
authordrepper <drepper>
Mon, 16 Nov 1998 11:55:40 +0000 (11:55 +0000)
committerdrepper <drepper>
Mon, 16 Nov 1998 11:55:40 +0000 (11:55 +0000)
14 files changed:
manual/arith.texi
manual/filesys.texi
manual/lang.texi
manual/llio.texi
manual/locale.texi
manual/memory.texi
manual/message.texi
manual/pattern.texi
manual/search.texi
manual/signal.texi
manual/startup.texi
manual/stdio.texi
manual/time.texi
manual/users.texi

index 79bbcfd..3f78c11 100644 (file)
@@ -239,7 +239,7 @@ exceptions happened.
 Alternatively, you can enable @dfn{traps} for exceptions.  In that case,
 when an exception is raised, your program will receive the @code{SIGFPE}
 signal.  The default action for this signal is to terminate the
-program.  @xref{Signal Handling} for how you can change the effect of
+program.  @xref{Signal Handling}, for how you can change the effect of
 the signal.
 
 @findex matherr
@@ -851,7 +851,7 @@ sqrt (creal (@var{z}) * creal (@var{z}) + cimag (@var{z}) * cimag (@var{z}))
 This function should always be used instead of the direct formula
 because it takes special care to avoid losing precision.  It may also
 take advantage of hardware support for this operation. See @code{hypot}
-in @xref{Exponents and Logarithms}.
+in @ref{Exponents and Logarithms}.
 @end deftypefun
 
 @node Normalization Functions
index 518b9e2..a473560 100644 (file)
@@ -3,10 +3,9 @@
 @chapter File System Interface
 
 This chapter describes the GNU C library's functions for manipulating
-files.  Unlike the input and output functions described in
-@ref{I/O on Streams} and @ref{Low-Level I/O}, these
-functions are concerned with operating on the files themselves, rather
-than on their contents.
+files.  Unlike the input and output functions (@pxref{I/O on Streams};
+@pxref{Low-Level I/O}), these functions are concerned with operating
+on the files themselves, rather than on their contents.
 
 Among the facilities described in this chapter are functions for
 examining or modifying directories, functions for renaming and deleting
@@ -396,7 +395,7 @@ the current working directory:
 The order in which files appear in a directory tends to be fairly
 random.  A more useful program would sort the entries (perhaps by
 alphabetizing them) before printing them; see
-@ref{Scanning Directory Content} and @ref{Array Sort Function}.
+@ref{Scanning Directory Content}, and @ref{Array Sort Function}.
 
 
 @node Random Access Directory
index ff80e16..6e90bfd 100644 (file)
@@ -528,7 +528,7 @@ old-fashioned variadic facility is called @file{varargs.h}.
 
 Using @file{varargs.h} is almost the same as using @file{stdarg.h}.
 There is no difference in how you call a variadic function;
-@xref{Calling Variadics}.  The only difference is in how you define
+see @ref{Calling Variadics}.  The only difference is in how you define
 them.  First of all, you must use old-style non-prototype syntax, like
 this:
 
@@ -572,7 +572,7 @@ function.
 @end deftypefn
 
 The other argument macros, @code{va_arg} and @code{va_end}, are the same
-in @file{varargs.h} as in @file{stdarg.h}; see @ref{Argument Macros} for
+in @file{varargs.h} as in @file{stdarg.h}; see @ref{Argument Macros}, for
 details.
 
 It does not work to include both @file{varargs.h} and @file{stdarg.h} in
index cf3e1a7..eb78153 100644 (file)
@@ -3625,4 +3625,4 @@ unknown device.
 
 Most IOCTLs are OS-specific and/or only used in special system utilities,
 and are thus beyond the scope of this document.  For an example of the use
-of an IOCTL, @xref{Out-of-Band Data}.
+of an IOCTL, see @ref{Out-of-Band Data}.
index b4b7f4b..8b6f3fc 100644 (file)
@@ -140,7 +140,7 @@ and @code{strxfrm}); see @ref{Collation Functions}.
 @item LC_CTYPE
 This category applies to classification and conversion of characters,
 and to multibyte and wide characters;
-see @ref{Character Handling} and @ref{Extended Characters}.
+see @ref{Character Handling}, and @ref{Extended Characters}.
 
 @comment locale.h
 @comment ISO
@@ -163,8 +163,8 @@ This category applies to formatting date and time values; see
 @comment XOPEN
 @item LC_MESSAGES
 This category applies to selecting the language used in the user
-interface for message translation (@ref{The Uniforum approach} and
-@ref{Message catalogs a la X/Open}).
+interface for message translation (@pxref{The Uniforum approach};
+@pxref{Message catalogs a la X/Open}).
 
 @comment locale.h
 @comment ISO
index 563cd9c..d55a4d4 100644 (file)
@@ -896,7 +896,7 @@ Allocate a block of @var{size} bytes, starting on an address that is a
 multiple of @var{boundary}.  @xref{Aligned Memory Blocks}.
 
 @item int mallopt (int @var{param}, int @var{value})
-Adjust a tunable parameter.  @xref{Malloc Tunable Parameters}
+Adjust a tunable parameter.  @xref{Malloc Tunable Parameters}.
 
 @item int mcheck (void (*@var{abortfn}) (void))
 Tell @code{malloc} to perform occasional consistency checks on
index c0ab281..bfc7d28 100644 (file)
@@ -279,8 +279,8 @@ functions if no supporting functionality is available.  Since each
 set/message number tuple must be unique the programmer must keep lists
 of the messages at the same time the code is written.  And the work
 between several people working on the same project must be coordinated.
-In @ref{Common Usage} we will see some how these problems can be relaxed
-a bit.
+We will see some how these problems can be relaxed a bit (@pxref{Common
+Usage}).
 
 @deftypefun int catclose (nl_catd @var{catalog_desc})
 The @code{catclose} function can be used to free the resources
@@ -817,8 +817,8 @@ be used.
 
 Please note that above we wrote ``message catalogs'' (plural).  This is
 a speciality of the GNU implementation of these functions and we will
-say more about this in section @xref{Locating gettext catalog} when we
-talk about the ways message catalogs are selected.
+say more about this when we talk about the ways message catalogs are
+selected (@pxref{Locating gettext catalog}).
 
 The @code{gettext} function does not modify the value of the global
 @var{errno} variable.  This is necessary to make it possible to write
index ad0fe68..e06671d 100644 (file)
@@ -393,7 +393,7 @@ Instead of the using the using the normal functions for accessing the
 filesystem the @code{glob} implementation uses the user-supplied
 functions specified in the structure pointed to by @var{pglob}
 parameter.  For more information about the functions refer to the
-sections about directory handling @ref{Accessing Directories} and
+sections about directory handling see @ref{Accessing Directories}, and
 @ref{Reading Attributes}.
 
 @comment glob.h
index ae6d5ef..0bcbc9b 100644 (file)
@@ -429,7 +429,7 @@ extended or searched.
 The @code{tsearch} function searches in the tree pointed to by
 @code{*@var{rootp}} for an element matching @var{key}.  The function
 pointed to by @var{compar} is used to determine whether two elements
-match.  @xref{Comparison Functions} for a specification of the functions
+match.  @xref{Comparison Functions}, for a specification of the functions
 which can be used for the @var{compar} parameter.
 
 If the tree does not contain a matching entry the @var{key} value will
index 2961c4f..f07a748 100644 (file)
@@ -978,7 +978,7 @@ the signal @var{signum}.
 The first argument, @var{signum}, identifies the signal whose behavior
 you want to control, and should be a signal number.  The proper way to
 specify a signal number is with one of the symbolic signal names
-described in @ref{Standard Signals}---don't use an explicit number, because
+(@pxref{Standard Signals})---don't use an explicit number, because
 the numerical code for a given kind of signal may vary from operating
 system to operating system.
 
index bea6c39..1d903b4 100644 (file)
@@ -103,7 +103,7 @@ the options do not take arguments.  Thus, @samp{-abc} is equivalent to
 
 @item
 Option names are single alphanumeric characters (as for @code{isalnum};
-see @ref{Classification of Characters}).
+@pxref{Classification of Characters}).
 
 @item
 Certain options require an argument.  For example, the @samp{-o} command
@@ -376,8 +376,8 @@ value is nonzero.
 
 You can deal directly with the underlying representation of environment
 objects to add more variables to the environment (for example, to
-communicate with another program you are about to execute; see
-@ref{Executing a File}).
+communicate with another program you are about to execute;
+@pxref{Executing a File}).
 
 @comment unistd.h
 @comment POSIX.1
@@ -784,7 +784,7 @@ following things happen:
 @item
 All open file descriptors in the process are closed.  @xref{Low-Level I/O}.
 Note that streams are not flushed automatically when the process
-terminates; @xref{I/O on Streams}.
+terminates; see @ref{I/O on Streams}.
 
 @item
 The low-order 8 bits of the return status code are saved to be reported
index 531717c..99a7116 100644 (file)
@@ -3749,7 +3749,7 @@ buffer (for this, try @code{open_memstream}, below).  The buffer is
 freed when the stream is open.
 
 The argument @var{opentype} is the same as in @code{fopen}
-(@xref{Opening Streams}).  If the @var{opentype} specifies
+(@pxref{Opening Streams}).  If the @var{opentype} specifies
 append mode, then the initial file position is set to the first null
 character in the buffer.  Otherwise the initial file position is at the
 beginning of the buffer.
@@ -4342,8 +4342,8 @@ We see the different fields of the message and how the extra glue (the
 colons and the @code{TO FIX} string) are printed.  But only one of the
 three calls to @code{fmtmsg} produced output.  The first call does not
 print anything because the @var{label} parameter is not in the correct
-form.  As specified in @ref{Printing Formatted Messages} the string must
-contain two fields, separated by a colon.  The third @code{fmtmsg} call
+form.  The string must contain two fields, separated by a colon
+(@pxref{Printing Formatted Messages}).  The third @code{fmtmsg} call
 produced no output since the class with the numeric value @code{6} is
 not defined.  Although a class with numeric value @code{5} is also not
 defined by default, the call the @code{addseverity} introduces it and
index 09c3a9f..10ee147 100644 (file)
@@ -675,7 +675,7 @@ does so.  @xref{Time Zone Functions}.
 @deftypefun {char *} ctime_r (const time_t *@var{time}, char *@var{buffer})
 This function is similar to @code{ctime}, only that it places the result
 in the string pointed to by @var{buffer}.  It is equivalent to (written
-using gcc extensions, @xref{Statement Exprs,,,gcc,Porting and Using gcc}.):
+using gcc extensions, @pxref{Statement Exprs,,,gcc,Porting and Using gcc}):
 
 @smallexample
 (@{ struct tm tm; asctime_r (localtime_r (time, &tm), buf); @})
index 28d390c..e1c0430 100644 (file)
@@ -778,7 +778,7 @@ store a user name.
 
 These functions let your program identify positively the user who is
 running or the user who logged in this session.  (These can differ when
-setuid programs are involved; @xref{Process Persona}.)  The user cannot
+setuid programs are involved; see @ref{Process Persona}.)  The user cannot
 do anything to fool these functions.
 
 For most purposes, it is more useful to use the environment variable
@@ -1843,10 +1843,10 @@ The members of this group are:
 @subsection Netgroup Data
 
 @cindex Netgroup
-Sometimes it is useful group users according to other criteria like the
-ones used in the @xref{Group Database}.  E.g., it is useful to associate
-a certain group of users with a certain machine.  On the other hand
-grouping of host names is not supported so far.
+Sometimes it is useful to group users according to other criteria
+(@pxref{Group Database}).  E.g., it is useful to associate a certain
+group of users with a certain machine.  On the other hand grouping of
+host names is not supported so far.
 
 In Sun Microsystems SunOS appeared a new kind of database, the netgroup
 database.  It allows to group hosts, users, and domain freely, giving