Regenerated: /usr/bin/perl scripts/gen-FAQ.pl FAQ.in
authordrepper <drepper>
Mon, 8 Mar 1999 13:31:54 +0000 (13:31 +0000)
committerdrepper <drepper>
Mon, 8 Mar 1999 13:31:54 +0000 (13:31 +0000)
FAQ

diff --git a/FAQ b/FAQ
index 5fe4be4..df32611 100644 (file)
--- a/FAQ
+++ b/FAQ
@@ -215,8 +215,15 @@ may not have all the features GNU libc requires.  The current releases of
 egcs (1.0.3 and 1.1.1) should work with the GNU C library (for powerpc see
 question 1.5; for ARM see question 1.6).
 
-{ZW} Due to problems with C++ exception handling, you must use EGCS (any
-version) to compile version 2.1 of GNU libc.  See question 2.8 for details.
+While the GNU CC should be able to compile glibc it is nevertheless adviced
+to use EGCS.  Comparing the sizes of glibc on Intel compiled with a recent
+EGCS and gcc 2.8.1 shows this:
+
+                 text    data     bss     dec     hex filename
+egcs-2.93.10   862897   15944   12824  891665   d9b11 libc.so
+gcc-2.8.1      959965   16468   12152  988585   f15a9 libc.so
+
+Make up your own decision.
 
 
 1.3.   When I try to compile glibc I get only error messages.
@@ -738,15 +745,19 @@ libc.  It doesn't matter what compiler you use to compile your program.
 
 For glibc 2.1, we've chosen to do it the other way around: libc.so
 explicitly provides the EH functions.  This is to prevent other shared
-libraries from doing it.  You must therefore compile glibc 2.1 with EGCS.
-Again, it doesn't matter what compiler you use for your programs.
+libraries from doing it.
+
+{UD} Starting with glibc 2.1.1 you can compile glibc with gcc 2.8.1 or
+newer since we have explicitly add references to the functions causing the
+problem.  But you nevertheless should use EGCS for other reasons
+(see question 1.2).
 
 
 2.9.   How can I compile gcc 2.7.2.1 from the gcc source code using
        glibc 2.x?
 
 {AJ} There's only correct support for glibc 2.0.x in gcc 2.7.2.3 or later.
-But you should get at least gcc 2.8.1 or egcs 1.0.2 (or later versions)
+But you should get at least gcc 2.8.1 or egcs 1.1 (or later versions)
 instead.