d5ec74531b482d73bc862fcd2b946fe9d1e667e0
[kspaans/CS350] / lec19-0714.tex
1 \documentclass{article}
2 \usepackage{fullpage}
3 \usepackage{amsmath}
4 \author{Kyle Spaans}
5 \date{July 14, 2009}
6 \title{Operating Systems Lecture Notes}
7 \begin{document}
8 \maketitle 
9
10 \section*{Lecture 19 -- Disk Drives}
11 The unit of access is a \textbf{block} (or sector) of a set size (usually
12 512 bytes). Therefore the disk, or block device, can be thought of as an array
13 of blocks. Internally though, the hard drive has geometry: sectors, tracks,
14 platters, cylinders. The way it all works (spinning platters with moving
15 read/write heads) has performance implications for the kernel. For example,
16 sequential access is more efficient than random access. Knowing these details,
17 and having information out where the data is on disk means the kernel can
18 optimize requests to the disk drive for performance. This is similar to how
19 the kernel masks the block size from user programs who are perfectly allowed
20 to request single bytes.
21
22 \subsection*{Seek Latency}
23 Read/write heads have to \textbf{seek} to the correct cylinder on the platter
24 before data can be read. This implies seek latency for most kinds of requests.
25 We can model seek latency linearly, assuming that moving across $n$ cylinders
26 takes $nt$ time no matter where the heads are on the platter.
27
28 \subsection*{Sectors per track}
29 Some hard drives have the same number of sectors per track on the inside and
30 outside of the platter. These are called constant linear density drives or
31 something like that. Other drives do not have a constant number of sectors
32 per track. They will have a higher density towars the outside of the platter,
33 and therefore higher transfer rates on that part of the disk.
34
35 \subsection*{Rotational Latency}
36 Rotational Latency is the amount of time the read/write heads
37 \end{document}