finished lecture 1 notes
[kspaans/MATH237] / lec01-0504.tex
1 \documentclass{article}
2 \usepackage{fullpage}
3 \usepackage{amsmath}
4 \author{Kyle Spaans}
5 \date{May 4, 2009}
6 \title{Calculus 3 Lecture Notes}
7 \begin{document}
8 \maketitle
9
10 \section*{Lecture 1 -- Functions of Several Variables}
11 We will consider functions of the form $z = f(x,y)$ (explicitly defined) and
12 $f(x,y,z) = c$ (for a constant $c$, implicitly defined) or we can say
13 $f: D \rightarrow R$. These functions will most be ones we've already seen before
14 in \emph{Calculus 1} and \emph{Calculus 2}, but the algebra will be different
15 since we're working with multiple variables.
16
17 How can we visualize these functions? Drawing will become important later, so
18 we are going to learn this now. We can follow two simple steps to help us
19 draw a function:
20 \begin{enumerate}
21 \item Fix a single variable (usually $z$) and plot the resulting function for
22       a couple of values. \label{draw1}
23 \item Fix each of the other variables in turn (generally by setting them $= 0$)
24       and plot those functions. \label{draw2}
25 \end{enumerate}
26 Consider $x^2 + y^2 = z^2$. Following \ref{draw1}, we let
27 $z = c \Rightarrow x^2 + y^2 = c^2$. This is essentially a circle, having
28 different radii for different values of $c$. We can draw this in 2D, with x-
29 and y-axes, and different ``lines'' (called ``level curves'') for each value of
30 $c$. Consider that when $c = 0$, the graph collapses to a point at the origin.
31 Continuing with step \ref{draw2} we let $y = 0 \Rightarrow x^2 = x^2$, which
32 implies that $z = x$ and $z = -x$. This gives us a graph with the z- and x-axes
33 called the ''cross-section''. Repeating for $x$, let
34 $x = 0 \Rightarrow y^2 = z^2$, which in this case gives us a similar graph for
35 the z- and y-axes.
36
37 Combining all of this, we see a cone in our 3D plot. What if we let $y = k$?
38 This gives us $x^2 + k^2 = z^2$, which is the equation for a hyperbola
39 ($\frac{x^2}{k^2} - \frac{z^2}{k^2} = 1$). For next lecture, make sure you've
40 refreshed your memory about hyperbolas and their equations.
41
42 \end{document}