finished lecture 20 notes
[kspaans/MATH237] / lec12-0601.tex
1 \documentclass{article}
2 \usepackage{fullpage}
3 \usepackage{amsmath}
4 \author{Kyle Spaans}
5 \date{June 1, 2009}
6 \title{Calculus 3 Lecture Notes}
7 \begin{document}
8 \maketitle
9
10 \section*{Lecture 12 -- Directional Derivatives}
11 Recalling the definition of a directional derivative, if $f$ has continuous
12 partials at $\vec{a}$, then
13 \[ D_{\vec{u}}f(\vec{a}) = \nabla f(\vec{a}) \cdot \vec{u} \]
14
15 \paragraph*{Example 1}
16 Given $f(x,y) = 2x^2 + 3y^2$ calculate the rate of change of $f(x,y)$ at point
17 $(2,1)$ in direction of point $(5,5)$. We need the gradient and the direction.
18 We can use the formula given above. We can see by inspection that the partials
19 are continuous. So we compute the gradient and the direction:
20 $\nabla f = (f_x, f_y) = (4x, 6y)$ so $\nalba f(2,1) = (8,6)$. We find the
21 direction by finding the vector from the wanted point to the direction point.
22 Let $\vec{U} = (3,4) = (5,5) - (2,1)$, $\|\vec{U}\| = 5$ so the unit vector
23 $\displaystyle vec{u} = \frac{\vec{U}}{\|\vec{U}\|} = (\frac{3}{5},
24  \frac{4}{5})$
25 We can plug these in now to get the answer $\frac{48}{5}$.
26
27 We can get the same answer using the earlier equation with limits.
28
29 \end{document}