lec 25 notes done
[kspaans/MATH237] / lec25-0703.tex
1 \documentclass{article}
2 \usepackage{fullpage}
3 \usepackage{amsmath}
4 \author{Kyle Spaans}
5 \date{July 3, 2009}
6 \title{Calculus 3 Lecture Notes}
7 \begin{document}
8 \maketitle
9
10 \section*{Lecture 25 -- Linear Approximation of a Mapping}
11 We have a mapping $F: R^2 \rightarrow R^2$, or $(u,v) = \vec{F}(f(x,y),g(x,y))$.
12 Therefore a point $(x,y)$, in a 2D plane gets mapped to another $(u,v)$ in a
13 different 2D plane. What if we move a distance $(\Delta x, \Delta y)$ to
14 $(x + \Delta x, y + \Delta y)$, where is the corresponding point
15 $(u + \Delta u, v + \Delta v)$? If's possible that if we apply $F$ to the shift
16 in coordinates that we will get something crazy like a curve, rather than a
17 line.
18
19 \subsection*{Linear Approximation}
20 Recall the linear approximation
21 \[ f(\vec{x}) \approx L_{\vec{a}}(\vec{x}) = f(\vec{a}) + f_x(\vec{a})(x - a)
22 + f_y(y - b) \]
23 We assume that $L_{\vec{a}}(\vec{x})$ is a good approximation to $f(\vec{x})$
24 near $\vec{a}$ (and that the partials $f_x(\vec{a})$ and $f_y(\vec{a})$ are
25 continuous). If this is true, we can say that 
26 \begin{eqnarray*}
27 \Delta u &=& u(a + \Delta x, b + \Delta y) = u(a,b) \approx
28 L_{\vec{u},\vec{a}}(a + \Delta x, b + \Delta y) - u(a,b) \\
29  &=& f(a,b) + f_x(a,b)(a + \Delta x - a) + f_y(a,b)(b + \Delta y - b) -
30 f(a,b) \\
31  &=& f_x(a,b) \Delta x + f_y(a,b) \Delta y
32 \end{eqnarray*}
33 Similarly, $\Delta v = g_x \Delta x + g_y \Delta y$. We can represent this with
34 a matrix!
35 \[
36 \left (
37 \begin{array}{c}
38 \Delta u \\
39 \Delta v
40 \end{array}
41 \right )
42 =
43 \left (
44 \begin{array}{cc}
45 f_x & f_y \\
46 g_x & g_y
47 \end{array}
48 \right )
49 \left (
50 \begin{array}{c}
51 \Delta x \\
52 \Delta y 
53 \end{array}
54 \right )
55 \]
56 This matrix has a special name, we call it the \textbf{Jacobian Matrix}, or
57 just the Jacobian (named after Jacoby, represented with $J$, the course notes
58 use $DF$). It is analogous to $f'$ for $f(x)$ or $\nabla f$ for $f(x,y)$.
59
60 \paragraph*{Example 1}
61 A mapping $F$ is defined $F(x,y) = (2xy, x^2 - y^2)$. Find the approximate
62 image of $(0.9, 2.1)$. \\
63 A nearby point that's convenient is $(1,2)$, we start by finding the image of
64 this point.
65 \[ F(1,2) = (4,-3) \]
66 Then we need to find $\Delta u$ and $\Delta v$, evaluated at our chosen point.
67 The $\Delta x$ and $\Delta y$ are just the difference between our chosen
68 point and the one whose image we are trying to find.
69 \[
70 \left (
71 \begin{array}{c}
72 \Delta u \\
73 \Delta v
74 \end{array}
75 \right )
76 =
77 \left (
78 \begin{array}{cc}
79 2y & 2x \\
80 2x & -2y
81 \end{array}
82 \right )
83 \left (
84 \begin{array}{c}
85 \Delta x \\
86 \Delta y 
87 \end{array}
88 \right )
89 =
90 \left (
91 \begin{array}{cc}
92 4 & 2 \\
93 2 & -4
94 \end{array}
95 \right )
96 \left (
97 \begin{array}{c}
98 -0.1 \\
99 0.1 
100 \end{array}
101 \right )
102 \]
103 This gives $\Delta u = -0.4 + 0.2$, $\Delta v = -0.2 - 0.4$. We can now
104 calculate the approximate image as $(u + \Delta u, v + \Delta v)$:
105 \[ (4 - 0.2, -3 - 0.6) = (3.8, -3.6) \]
106
107 \subsection*{Composite Mapping and the Chain Rule}
108 This is the same as the linear approximation mapping, but we use the Chain Rule
109 to compute the derivative. It's the same thing, it can just get more
110 complicated with more variables. The composite mapping is given as two mappings,
111 $F: p = p(u,v), q = q(u,v)$ and $G: u = u(x,y), v = v(x,y)$. So the mapping
112 $F \circ G$ is defined by $p = p(u(x,y),v(x,y)), q = q(u(x,y),v(x,y))$.
113
114 Question: Determine $D(F \circ G)$ in terms of $DF$ and $DG$. It's $DF \cdot
115 DG$. Just like the chain rule. Using the Jacobian, we can guess the answer
116 \[
117 \left (
118 \begin{array}{cc}
119 \frac{\partial p}{\partial x} & \frac{\partial p}{\partial y} \\
120 \frac{\partial q}{\partial x} & \frac{\partial q}{\partial y}
121 \end{array}
122 \right )
123 =
124 \left (
125 \begin{array}{cc}
126 \frac{\partial p}{\partial u} & \frac{\partial p}{\partial v} \\
127 \frac{\partial q}{\partial u} & \frac{\partial q}{\partial v}
128 \end{array}
129 \right )
130 \cdot
131 \left (
132 \begin{array}{cc}
133 \frac{\partial u}{\partial x} & \frac{\partial u}{\partial y} \\
134 \frac{\partial v}{\partial x} & \frac{\partial v}{\partial y}
135 \end{array}
136 \right )
137 \]
138 Keep in mind this is just a guess. How do we know if it's true? We can use the
139 Chain Rule on $p(u(x,y),v(x,y))$ to get
140 \[ \frac{\partial p}{\partial x} = \frac{\partial p}{\partial u}
141 \frac{\partial u}{\partial x} + \frac{\partial p}{\partial v}
142 \frac{\partial v}{\partial x} \]
143 (assuming that all partials are continous, we can do similarly for the other
144 components)
145 \end{document}