lec 30 notes done, lec 26,27 notes half complete master
authorKyle Spaans <kspaans@student.math.uwaterloo.ca>
Fri, 17 Jul 2009 14:10:18 +0000 (10:10 -0400)
committerKyle Spaans <kspaans@student.math.uwaterloo.ca>
Fri, 17 Jul 2009 14:10:18 +0000 (10:10 -0400)
lec26-0706.tex [new file with mode: 0644]
lec27-0708.tex [new file with mode: 0644]
lec30-0715.tex [new file with mode: 0644]

diff --git a/lec26-0706.tex b/lec26-0706.tex
new file mode 100644 (file)
index 0000000..4b7bb7e
--- /dev/null
@@ -0,0 +1,35 @@
+\documentclass{article}
+\usepackage{fullpage}
+\usepackage{amsmath}
+\author{Kyle Spaans}
+\date{July 6, 2009}
+\title{Calculus 3 Lecture Notes}
+\begin{document}
+\maketitle
+
+\section*{Lecture 26 -- Mappings Continued}
+Restate the Jacobian.
+
+\paragraph*{Example 1}
+$(u,v) = G(x,y) = (\frac{x}{y}, x - y) \,\, (p,q) = F(u,v) = (uv, u + v)$
+Calculate $D(F \circ G)$ at the point $(x,y) = (3,1)$.
+
+\subsection*{Inverse Mappings}
+We can find the mapping from $(u,v)$ back to $(x,y)$.
+
+\paragraph*{Example 2}
+Image of domain $D$ under $F$. We have to areas in a Cartesian graph. One from
+$y = 0$ to $y = \frac{\pi}{2}$ and the other from $y = 2\pi$ to $y =
+\frac{5\pi}{2}$, both from $x = 0$ to $x = 1$. Both of these functions will map
+to the same quarter of a unit circle in polar coordinates (defined by $F$).
+
+\subsubsection*{Definitions}
+Mapping and one-to-one.
+
+\subsection*{The Jacobian of an Inverse Mapping}
+$DF^{-1} = (DF)^{-1}$ valid if one-to-one and partials are continuous.
+
+\paragraph*{Example 3}
+$(u,v) = F(x,y) = (x + y, \frac{x}{x + y}) \, y \neq -x$ Find $DF, DF^{-1}$ and
+verify $DF \cdot DF^{-1} = I$.
+\end{document}
diff --git a/lec27-0708.tex b/lec27-0708.tex
new file mode 100644 (file)
index 0000000..a5caac6
--- /dev/null
@@ -0,0 +1,13 @@
+\documentclass{article}
+\usepackage{fullpage}
+\usepackage{amsmath}
+\author{Kyle Spaans}
+\date{July 8, 2009}
+\title{Calculus 3 Lecture Notes}
+\begin{document}
+\maketitle
+
+\section*{Lecture 27 -- Inverse Mappings}
+Last time we were calculating the inverse of composite mappings. We said
+$D(F \circ G) = DF \cdot DG$. Jacobians $F : R^2 \rightarrow R^2$...
+\end{document}
diff --git a/lec30-0715.tex b/lec30-0715.tex
new file mode 100644 (file)
index 0000000..57151d9
--- /dev/null
@@ -0,0 +1,57 @@
+\documentclass{article}
+\usepackage{fullpage}
+\usepackage{amsmath}
+\author{Kyle Spaans}
+\date{July 15, 2009}
+\title{Calculus 3 Lecture Notes}
+\begin{document}
+\maketitle
+
+\section*{Lecture 30 -- Change of Variables in Double Integrals}
+\[ \iint \limits_{D_{xy}} \! f(x,y) \, dA \]
+Why do we want to change the variables? Two reasons: $f(x(u,v),y(u,v))$ is
+sometimes easier to integrate, and $D_{uv}$ can be easier to derive than
+$D_{x,y}$.
+
+\paragraph*{Example 1}
+Change $\displaystyle \iint \limits_D \! f(x,y) \, dx \, dy$ into polar
+coordinates. Use the Jacobian:
+\[ \frac{\partial(x,y)}{\partial(r,\theta)} = 
+   \left | \begin{array}{cc}
+   x_r & x_{\theta} \\
+   y_r & y_{\theta}
+   \end{array} \right | = 
+   \left | \begin{array}{cc}
+   \cos \theta & -r \sin \theta \\
+   \sin \theta &  r \cos \theta
+   \end{array} \right | \]
+giving $r \cos^2 \theta + r \sin^2 \theta -r$ to get
+\[ \iint \limits_{D_{xy}} \! f(x,y) \, dx \, dy  = 
+   \iint \limits_{D_{r \theta}} \! f(x(r,\theta),y(r,\theta)) r \, dr \,
+   d\theta \]
+
+\paragraph*{Example 2}
+Use the polar coordinates to calculate the volume of a sphere of radius $R$. We
+know the centre of the sphere is at $(0,0,0)$ (for simplicity). Let's calculate
+only the upper half of the volume (doable because the shape is symmetric) and
+multiply the volume by 2.
+\[ V = 2 \iint \limits_{z \ge 0} \! f(x,y) \, dx \, dy \]
+We know that $x^2 + y^2 + z^2 = R^2$ means that $f(x,y) = z = \sqrt{R^2 - x^2 -
+y^2}$. Substitute in polar coordinates to get $\sqrt{R^2 - r^2 \cos^2 \theta -
+r^2 \sin^2 \theta} = \sqrt{R^2 - r^2}$.
+\[ V = 2 \int_0^R \int_0^{2\pi} \! \sqrt{R^2 - r^2} r  \, dr \, d\theta \]
+We get the new change-of-variables $D$ from $0 \le r \le R$ and $0 \le \theta
+\le 2\pi$. Since $r$ does not depend on $\theta$, and vice-versa, the order of
+integration is not important. Let's integrate $r$ first:
+\[ 2 \left. \int_0^{2\pi} (R^2 - r^2)^{\frac{3}{2}} \frac{2}{3} \frac{-1}{2}
+   \right |_0^R \, d\theta \]
+\[ 2 \left. \int_0^{2\pi} (R^2)^{\frac{3}{2}} \frac{1}{3}\, d\theta = 2R^3 \theta
+   \right |_0^{2\pi} = \frac{4\pi}{3} R^3 \]
+
+\subsection*{Tips for changing variables}
+\begin{enumerate}
+\item Substitute $r,\theta \rightarrow x,y$
+\item Dont't forget $r$, the Jacobian when changing variables
+\item Change the limits too
+\end{enumerate}
+\end{document}