lecture 19 notes
authorKyle Spaans <kspaans@student.math.uwaterloo.ca>
Wed, 17 Jun 2009 14:41:42 +0000 (10:41 -0400)
committerKyle Spaans <kspaans@student.math.uwaterloo.ca>
Wed, 17 Jun 2009 14:41:42 +0000 (10:41 -0400)
lec19-0617.tex [new file with mode: 0644]

diff --git a/lec19-0617.tex b/lec19-0617.tex
new file mode 100644 (file)
index 0000000..e0b7eac
--- /dev/null
@@ -0,0 +1,72 @@
+\documentclass{article}
+\usepackage{fullpage}
+\usepackage{amsmath}
+\author{Kyle Spaans}
+\date{June 17, 2009}
+\title{Calculus 3 Lecture Notes}
+\begin{document}
+\maketitle
+
+\section*{Lecture 19 -- Global Extrema}
+When do global extrema exist? Given $f(x,y)$ on domain $D$, what conditions do
+we need to impose on $f$, $D$ such that max and min of $f$ exist? First
+consider simpler examples with $y = f(x)$. If $y = \frac{1}{x}$ and $x > 0$
+there is no minimum because $D = (0,\infty)$ is unbounded on the right and no
+maximum because the left side of the domain is open (imagine the graph of this
+function). Another function that is discontinuous, it has no max.
+
+\paragraph*{Theorem}
+A continuous function $f$ on a closed and bounded domain $D$ reaches its max
+and min. (Note that is sufficient, but not a necessary condition. We'll see an
+example of a discontinuous function that has a minimum.)
+
+Returning to functions of two variables now, things are very similar. $f(x,y) =
+x^2 + y^2$ on $R^2$ % How to get the ``real'' symbol again?
+we can see that there is no max, because $R^2$ is not bounded above. The min is
+$(0,0)$. If we make the function discontinuous by defining $f(0,0) =
+\frac{1}{2}$ then there would be no minimum anymore. However, if we define it
+to be $-\frac{1}{2}$ instead, then the discontinuous function will have a min
+of $-\frac{1}{2}$.
+
+\emph{Definitons:}
+\begin{itemize}
+\item A point $\vec{a} \in D$ is a \textbf{boundary point} if any neighbourhood
+      of $\vec{a}$ contains points belonging to $D$ and points not belonging to
+      $D$.
+\item A set of all boundary points of $D$ forms a \textbf{boundary} of $D$.
+\item If $D$ contains its boundary, it is \textbf{closed} (otherwise it is
+      open).
+\item $D$ is bounded if there is a ball of radius $r$ centered at $\vec{a}$
+      such that $D$ belongs to this ball ($\| \vec{x} - \vec{a} \| \le r$).
+\end{itemize}
+The theorem for maxima and minima is the same for functions of two variables.
+
+\paragraph*{Algorithm for finding global extrema}
+We assume $f$ is continuous and that $\nabla f$ exists.
+\begin{enumerate}
+\item Compute $\nabla f(x) = 0$ (find local extrema)
+\item Check the boundary of $D$ (in function of two variables the boundary can
+      be a curve)
+      \begin{enumerate}
+      \item Parameterize the boundary of $D$ ($x(t), y(t)$).
+      \item Substitute in $f(x(t), y(t))$
+      \item Compute $\frac{d}{dt} f(x(t), y(t)) = 0$ (find all critical points
+            on the boundary)
+      \item If the boundary has corners, add them to the list of critical
+            points.
+      \end{enumerate}
+\item  Check all points for max and min values.
+\end{enumerate}
+
+\paragraph*{Example 1}
+Let $f(x,y) = 100 + 10(3x^2y - y^3)$, $D: x^2 + y^2 \le 1$. Find the max and
+min of $D$. To solve, use the algorithm. Find
+\[ \nabla f(x) = (60xy, 10(3x^2 - 3y^2)) \]
+and where is it equal to 0? We can see that is it when $x,y = 0$. Substitute
+$x = 0$ into $10(3x^2 - 3y^2)$ to get that $y = 0$ again. Therefore the only
+critical point is $(0,0) \in D$. Next, examine the boundary $x^2 + y^2 = 1$.
+Parameterize $x = \cos t$, $y = \sin t$. Compute
+\[ \frac{d}{dt} f(x(t), y(t)) = 30\cos t (\cos^2 t -3\sin^2 t) = 0\]
+And solving that to find where it is equal to 0 will give us the extrema. We
+will solve the rest of this on Friday.
+\end{document}