lec 12 notes half done
authorKyle Spaans <kspaans@student.math.uwaterloo.ca>
Mon, 1 Jun 2009 15:10:11 +0000 (11:10 -0400)
committerKyle Spaans <kspaans@student.math.uwaterloo.ca>
Mon, 1 Jun 2009 15:10:11 +0000 (11:10 -0400)
Oops, really behind!

lec12-0601.tex [new file with mode: 0644]

diff --git a/lec12-0601.tex b/lec12-0601.tex
new file mode 100644 (file)
index 0000000..56c1c39
--- /dev/null
@@ -0,0 +1,29 @@
+\documentclass{article}
+\usepackage{fullpage}
+\usepackage{amsmath}
+\author{Kyle Spaans}
+\date{June 1, 2009}
+\title{Calculus 3 Lecture Notes}
+\begin{document}
+\maketitle
+
+\section*{Lecture 12 -- Directional Derivatives}
+Recalling the definition of a directional derivative, if $f$ has continuous
+partials at $\vec{a}$, then
+\[ D_{\vec{u}}f(\vec{a}) = \nabla f(\vec{a}) \cdot \vec{u} \]
+
+\paragraph*{Example 1}
+Given $f(x,y) = 2x^2 + 3y^2$ calculate the rate of change of $f(x,y)$ at point
+$(2,1)$ in direction of point $(5,5)$. We need the gradient and the direction.
+We can use the formula given above. We can see by inspection that the partials
+are continuous. So we compute the gradient and the direction:
+$\nabla f = (f_x, f_y) = (4x, 6y)$ so $\nalba f(2,1) = (8,6)$. We find the
+direction by finding the vector from the wanted point to the direction point.
+Let $\vec{U} = (3,4) = (5,5) - (2,1)$, $\|\vec{U}\| = 5$ so the unit vector
+$\displaystyle vec{u} = \frac{\vec{U}}{\|\vec{U}\|} = (\frac{3}{5},
+ \frac{4}{5})$
+We can plug these in now to get the answer $\frac{48}{5}$.
+
+We can get the same answer using the earlier equation with limits.
+
+\end{document}