half-done lec 21 notes - need examples
authorKyle Spaans <kspaans@student.math.uwaterloo.ca>
Mon, 22 Jun 2009 15:17:29 +0000 (11:17 -0400)
committerKyle Spaans <kspaans@student.math.uwaterloo.ca>
Mon, 22 Jun 2009 15:17:29 +0000 (11:17 -0400)
lec21-0622.tex [new file with mode: 0644]

diff --git a/lec21-0622.tex b/lec21-0622.tex
new file mode 100644 (file)
index 0000000..e4ea7c1
--- /dev/null
@@ -0,0 +1,43 @@
+\documentclass{article}
+\usepackage{fullpage}
+\usepackage{amsmath}
+\author{Kyle Spaans}
+\date{June 22, 2009}
+\title{Calculus 3 Lecture Notes}
+\begin{document}
+\maketitle
+
+\section*{Lecture 21 -- Optimizing With Contraints}
+Find the max/min of $f(x)$ given constraint $g(\vec{x}) = k$. Assumed that
+$g(\vec{x}) = k$ can be expressed as $x = x(t)$, $y = y(t)$. Maximum and
+minimum are found by examining $f(x(t), y(t)) = ?$ Look at $\frac{df}{dt} = 
+\vec{0}$. But these parameterizations don't always exist or aren't always easy
+to find.
+
+\subsection*{Method of Lagrange Multipliers}
+Assume $x = x(t)$, $y = y(t)$ exists, but is unknown. At local extrema
+\[ \frac{df}{dt} = 0 \,\, \nabla f \cdot \vec{x}' = \vec{0} \]
+\[ \frac{\delta f}{\delta x} \frac{dx}{dt} + \frac{\delta f}{\delta y} \frac{dy}{dt} = \vec{0} \]
+But $\vec{x}'$ is a tangent vector to $g(x,y) = k$, and we know that $\nabla g
+\cdot \vec{x}' = \vec{0}$. $\nabla f$ and $\nabla g$ must be parallel,
+therefore $\nabla f = \lambda \nabla g$ (where $\lambda$ is some scalar vector
+and this is the method of Lagrange Multipliers).
+
+\subsection*{Algorithm for finding max/min}
+\begin{enumerate}
+\item Solve the system $\nabla f = \lambda \nabla g$, $g(\vec{x}) = k$.
+\item Solve $\nabla g(\vec{x}) = \vec{0}$, $g(\vec{x}) = k$. In case the
+      gradient is zero, we need to add those to the set of critial points.
+\item Add endpoints of $g(\vec{x})$ to the list of critical points.
+\item Evaluate $f(\vec{x})$ at all critical points to find the max/min.
+\end{enumerate}
+
+\paragraph*{Example 1}
+Find the extreme values of $f(x,y) = x^2 + 2y^2$ on the circle $x^2 + y^2 = 1$.
+To solve this, follow the algorithm.
+
+\paragraph*{Example 2}
+Find the extreme values of $f(x,y) = x^2 + 2xy + \frac{5}{2} y^2 = 1$ (an
+ellipse) that are closest to the origin. What are $f$, $g$? We want to minimize
+distance from the curve to the origin...
+\end{document}