finished lecture 20 notes
authorKyle Spaans <kspaans@student.math.uwaterloo.ca>
Fri, 19 Jun 2009 19:17:54 +0000 (15:17 -0400)
committerKyle Spaans <kspaans@student.math.uwaterloo.ca>
Fri, 19 Jun 2009 19:17:54 +0000 (15:17 -0400)
lec20-0619.tex

index 2b361b9..ab13541 100644 (file)
@@ -30,9 +30,17 @@ algorithm.
 \[ \nabla f = (f_x, f_y) = (4y - 2x - 6, 4x - 2y) = \vec{0} \]
 And we can easily substitute $y = 2x$ into $f_x$ to find $x=1, y=2$ as a
 critical point. Next, we examine each of the boundaries, considering them as
-lines. Sub in $(x,0)$ ...
+lines. Sub in $(x,0), (2,y), y=3x$ into $f$. This will give us two more
+critical points in $S$: $(2,4), (\frac{3}{2}, \frac{9}{2})$. And finally check
+the endpoints $(2,4), (2,0), (0,0)$. This lets us find the max 0 at $(0,0)$ and
+min -16 at $(2,0)$.
 
 \subsection*{Optimization with Contraints}
-Find the maximum and/or minimum of $f(\vec{x})$ subject to contraint
-$g(\vec{x}) = k$ (with $k$ constant)...
+Find the maximum and/or minimum of $f(\vec{x})$ subject to constraint
+$g(\vec{x}) = k$ (with $k$ constant). The constraint function gives us a curve
+of points where the inputs $(x,y)$ give us output $k$. We assume there exists
+a parameterization of $g(\vec{x})$: $x(t), y(t)$. Which gives us a nice
+equation to try and optimize $f(x(t), y(t))$, finding critical points is as
+simple as
+\[ \frac{d}{dt} f(x(t), y(t)) = \vec{0} \]
 \end{document}