finished lecture 1 notes
authorKyle Spaans <kspaans@student.math.uwaterloo.ca>
Tue, 5 May 2009 02:14:19 +0000 (22:14 -0400)
committerKyle Spaans <kspaans@student.math.uwaterloo.ca>
Tue, 5 May 2009 02:14:19 +0000 (22:14 -0400)
lec01-0504.tex

index ad1dc91..e0d9541 100644 (file)
@@ -24,6 +24,19 @@ draw a function:
       and plot those functions. \label{draw2}
 \end{enumerate}
 Consider $x^2 + y^2 = z^2$. Following \ref{draw1}, we let
-$z = c \Rightarrow x^2 + y^2 = c^2$.
+$z = c \Rightarrow x^2 + y^2 = c^2$. This is essentially a circle, having
+different radii for different values of $c$. We can draw this in 2D, with x-
+and y-axes, and different ``lines'' (called ``level curves'') for each value of
+$c$. Consider that when $c = 0$, the graph collapses to a point at the origin.
+Continuing with step \ref{draw2} we let $y = 0 \Rightarrow x^2 = x^2$, which
+implies that $z = x$ and $z = -x$. This gives us a graph with the z- and x-axes
+called the ''cross-section''. Repeating for $x$, let
+$x = 0 \Rightarrow y^2 = z^2$, which in this case gives us a similar graph for
+the z- and y-axes.
+
+Combining all of this, we see a cone in our 3D plot. What if we let $y = k$?
+This gives us $x^2 + k^2 = z^2$, which is the equation for a hyperbola
+($\frac{x^2}{k^2} - \frac{z^2}{k^2} = 1$). For next lecture, make sure you've
+refreshed your memory about hyperbolas and their equations.
 
 \end{document}