Initial work on MATH237 course notes
authorKyle Spaans <kspaans@student.math.uwaterloo.ca>
Mon, 4 May 2009 22:12:49 +0000 (18:12 -0400)
committerKyle Spaans <kspaans@student.math.uwaterloo.ca>
Mon, 4 May 2009 22:12:49 +0000 (18:12 -0400)
.gitignore [new file with mode: 0644]
lec01-0504.tex [new file with mode: 0644]

diff --git a/.gitignore b/.gitignore
new file mode 100644 (file)
index 0000000..c2550a4
--- /dev/null
@@ -0,0 +1,3 @@
+# Heh, filenames will be confusing, so just manually add them with
+#  `git add -f ...`
+*
diff --git a/lec01-0504.tex b/lec01-0504.tex
new file mode 100644 (file)
index 0000000..ad1dc91
--- /dev/null
@@ -0,0 +1,29 @@
+\documentclass{article}
+\usepackage{fullpage}
+\usepackage{amsmath}
+\author{Kyle Spaans}
+\date{May 4, 2009}
+\title{Calculus 3 Lecture Notes}
+\begin{document}
+\maketitle
+
+\section*{Lecture 1 -- Functions of Several Variables}
+We will consider functions of the form $z = f(x,y)$ (explicitly defined) and
+$f(x,y,z) = c$ (for a constant $c$, implicitly defined) or we can say
+$f: D \rightarrow R$. These functions will most be ones we've already seen before
+in \emph{Calculus 1} and \emph{Calculus 2}, but the algebra will be different
+since we're working with multiple variables.
+
+How can we visualize these functions? Drawing will become important later, so
+we are going to learn this now. We can follow two simple steps to help us
+draw a function:
+\begin{enumerate}
+\item Fix a single variable (usually $z$) and plot the resulting function for
+      a couple of values. \label{draw1}
+\item Fix each of the other variables in turn (generally by setting them $= 0$)
+      and plot those functions. \label{draw2}
+\end{enumerate}
+Consider $x^2 + y^2 = z^2$. Following \ref{draw1}, we let
+$z = c \Rightarrow x^2 + y^2 = c^2$.
+
+\end{document}