Adding the LaTeX section.
authorMatt Lawrence <m3lawren@uwaterloo.ca>
Mon, 29 Sep 2008 05:28:27 +0000 (01:28 -0400)
committerMatt Lawrence <m3lawren@uwaterloo.ca>
Mon, 29 Sep 2008 05:28:27 +0000 (01:28 -0400)
Signed-off-by: Matt Lawrence <m3lawren@uwaterloo.ca>
demotemplate.tex [new file with mode: 0644]
documents-editing-etc.pod
documents-editing-etc.preamble.tex [new file with mode: 0644]

diff --git a/demotemplate.tex b/demotemplate.tex
new file mode 100644 (file)
index 0000000..90dc4f8
--- /dev/null
@@ -0,0 +1,25 @@
+\documentclass[letterpaper,10pt]{article}
+
+\usepackage{fullpage}
+\usepackage{amsmath}
+\usepackage{amssymb}
+\usepackage{amsthm}
+\usepackage{enumerate}
+
+\usepackage{epsfig}
+
+%% Change the following lines to be appropriate
+\title{MATH 135 Assignment 1}
+\author{Calum T. Dalek\\
+        31415926}
+\date{December 21, 1963}
+
+\begin{document}
+\maketitle
+
+%% Your assignment goes here!
+\begin{enumerate}[1.]
+\item
+\end{enumerate}
+
+\end{document}
index 52abaaf..a0ea42f 100644 (file)
@@ -33,11 +33,182 @@ From there, make your choice and we'll continue on with the tutorial.
 
 =head2 Latex section
 
-=for commentary
+Chances are that when you've needed to write up assignments previously, you've
+used a tool such as I<Microsoft Word> or I<OpenOffice Writer> to do them.
+However, should you decide to start doing assignments for your math courses in a
+normal word processor, it likely won't take you long to realize that they aren't
+very well-suited to representing mathematical equations. Many folks before you
+have encountered this issue, and a good number of them discovered I<LaTeX> as the
+solution to their problem. 
 
-Imma get me a m3lawren to write this -- ebering
+LaTeX is a popular typesetting language, many of your profs actually use it
+when they write out assignments or exams. It makes it quite easy to typeset math
+in a nice and pretty way. You can download a sample LaTeX template from L<???>
+to use as a basis for assignments. For the most part you don't need to worry
+about what the existing code in there does. The various C<\usepackage> commands
+provide functionality that'll come in handy during your assignments, and you'll
+need to update the C<\title>, C<\author> and C<\date> commands with the
+appropriate information for your assignment.
 
-=cut
+To actually convert the LaTeX file to a PDF, you can use the C<pdflatex>
+command. This exists on the undergraduate environment, and can be easily
+installed in most Linux distributions.
+
+ $ pdflatex a1.tex
+ ...
+ $ xpdf a1.pdf
+
+In LaTeX, formatting is grouped into I<environments>. These are normally
+indicated by C<\begin{...}> and C<\end{...}>. An obvious example that can be
+seen is the C<\begin{enumerate}[1.]> command. The I<enumerate> environment lets
+you create a numbered list, which will be useful when you're working on
+assignments. One thing that stands out about this command is the part in square
+brackets after the closing brace. This is an optional parameter which lets you
+specify the numbering format. If you wanted a lettered list, you could use
+C<[a.]>, or if you wanted roman numerals, you could use C<[i.]>. Most
+environments, including enumerate, can be nested within each other. 
+
+In order to print out the actual number within the enumerate environment, you
+can simply use the C<\item> command. 
+
+ \begin{enumerate}[1.]
+ \item foo
+ \item bar
+ \end{enumerate}
+Now then, before we get to the actual math typesetting, let's look at one other
+environment which will be rather handy for your math courses. It's called
+I<proof>. 
+
+ \begin{proof}
+ Let $x = 2$, and $y = x$. Thus, $y = 2$.
+ \end{proof}
+In that last example, you may have noticed the dollar signs around the
+equations. In LaTeX, dollar signs allow you to put math in-line. If you use
+double dollar signs, it will be placed into a new paragraph and centered:
+
+ Let $x = 4$, thus $$x = 2 * 2$$
+
+If you want to write out a number of equations with the equal signs all
+aligned, then you need to use another environment. This is called I<eqnarray*>.
+It provides three columns, which you indicate using ampersands: C<&>. When you
+want to start a new line, you can use a double backslash: C<\\>.
+
+ \begin{eqnarray*}
+ x & = & 2 * 2 \\
+ & = & 4
+ \end{eqnarray*}
+
+All of the prior environments (C<$>, C<$$>, and C<eqnarray*>) put you into math
+mode. This means that all letters are changed to look fancy and math-like.
+There are lots of neat things you can do within this environment with respect
+to formatting:
+
+=over
+
+=item * Symbols
+ \pi \alpha
+
+=item * Fractions
+ \frac{1}{2}
+
+=item * Exponents
+ e^xe^{2x}
+
+=item * Roots
+ \sqrt{2}+\sqrt[3]{5}
+
+=item * Trig
+ \tan{x}+\cos{x}
+
+=item * Integrals
+ \int^5_2{3x}dx
+
+=back
+
+You should be able to combine these basic sequences to represent most equations
+you'll encounter during your various math courses. One thing you may notice is
+that if you put in paretheses, they will stay the same size even if the
+contents grow. For example:
+
+=begin latex
+
+$$(\frac{1}{2}) = \left(\frac{1}{2}\right)$$
+
+=end latex
+
+In order to get paretheses which look like those on the right, you need to put
+C<\left> before the opening parenthesis, and C<\right> before the closing one.
+This works with other types of delimiters as well, such as square brackets and
+braces. Since braces are special characters within LaTeX, you'll need to escape
+them (C<\{>, C<\}>) to use them. Additionally, if you only want a left or right
+bracket to exist on its own, but still need it to scale, you can use a period
+C<.> instead of the normal bracket with the left or right. If you put all of
+these things together, you can get formulae like:
+
+ \begin{enumerate}[a)]
+  \item 
+   $$\int^{35}_{-2}{\frac{\pi^x}{2\sqrt{x} + \frac{3}{\tan{x}}}}dx 
+     - \left.\frac{x}{3}\right|^5_3$$
+  \item
+   \begin{proof}[Proof by obviousness:]
+    Let $x = a^2$, and $a = 2$. Thus,
+    \begin{eqnarray*}
+     x &= &a^2 \\
+       &= &2^2 \\
+           &= &4
+    \end{eqnarray*}
+   \end{proof}
+ \end{enumerate}
+
+=begin latex
+
+\begin{enumerate}[a)]
+\item 
+$$\int^{35}_{-2}{\frac{\pi^x}{2\sqrt{x} + \frac{3}{\tan{x}}}}dx 
+- \left.\frac{x}{3}\right|^5_3$$
+\item
+\begin{proof}[Proof by obviousness:]
+Let $x = a^2$, and $a = 2$. Thus,
+\begin{eqnarray*}
+x &= &a^2 \\
+&= &2^2 \\
+&= &4
+\end{eqnarray*}
+\end{proof}
+\end{enumerate}
+
+=end latex
+
+One last thing you may want to be able to do with LaTeX is matrices. These are
+done using the I<array> environment. Like I<enumerate> earlier, this takes an
+extra parameter, which indicates the number and alignment of columns: C<l> for
+left, C<r> for right, and C<c> for centred. If you want to add a line between
+columns, you simply add a pipe, C<|>, between the letters representing the
+columns. To add a horizontal line, you can use the C<\hline> command. Similarly
+to the I<eqnarray*> environment, you use ampersands and backslashes to break
+columns and lines. For example:
+
+ \begin{array}{rcc|l}
+ 1 & 2 & 3 & 4 \\ \hline
+ 50 & 10 & 30 & 20 \\
+ 3.14 & e & x & i
+ \end{array}
+
+
+=begin latex
+
+$$\begin{array}{rcc|l}
+1 & 2 & 3 & 4 \\ \hline
+50 & 10 & 30 & 20 \\
+3.14 & e & x & i
+\end{array}$$
+
+=end latex
+
+For further reference, you can find a list of LaTeX symbols at
+L<http://www.agu.org/symbols.html>.
 
 =head2 Searching documents 
 
diff --git a/documents-editing-etc.preamble.tex b/documents-editing-etc.preamble.tex
new file mode 100644 (file)
index 0000000..f24f4d4
--- /dev/null
@@ -0,0 +1,16 @@
+\documentclass{article}
+\usepackage[T1]{fontenc}
+\usepackage{textcomp}
+
+\usepackage{amsmath}
+\usepackage{amssymb}
+\usepackage{amsthm}
+\usepackage{enumerate}
+\usepackage{epsfig}
+\usepackage{makeidx}
+\makeindex
+
+
+\begin{document}
+
+\tableofcontents