Unix 103: more intermediate uses, some git def'ns
authorKyle Spaans <kspaans@student.math.uwaterloo.ca>
Thu, 2 Jul 2009 04:23:31 +0000 (00:23 -0400)
committerKyle Spaans <kspaans@student.math.uwaterloo.ca>
Thu, 2 Jul 2009 04:23:31 +0000 (00:23 -0400)
code-management.pod

index 5bad9ab..b3dccc6 100644 (file)
@@ -92,7 +92,8 @@ The very basics that you would want to do with your tool.
 
 =item 1.
 
-C<git init> to initialize a directory as a git repository
+C<git init> to initialize a directory as a git repository (notice the F<.git>
+directory that has been created)
 
 =item 2.
 
@@ -139,8 +140,52 @@ keep track of metadata for you. This way when you wake up the next morning, you
 can remember why you made those particular changes to that file last night.
 (Assuming you knew what you were doing in the first place!)
 
+=head2 Slightly More Advanced Usage
+
+Making changes to your project and telling git about them is fine, but
+sometimes you want git to tell I<you> things about your project. First, a
+couple of definitions that are specific to git will have to be covered.
+
+=head3 Git Definitions
+
+=over
+
+=item Working Directory
+
+When you make changes to files in your respository, you are editing the
+I<Working Directory>. Any changes will always be relative to your working
+directory, and any playing with branch operations requires a clean working
+directory.
+
+=item Index
+
+When you add files with C<git add>, they get into the I<index>. Only changes
+which have been added to the index will be included in a commit. You can see
+a diff of the changes in the index using the command C<git diff --cached>.
+
+=back
+
+=head3 Get oriented with C<git status>
+
+To find out which files have been changed, which ones have been added, and
+which branch you are on, use the C<git status> command. It's important to note
+that only changes that are explicitly added will be included in a commit.
+C<git status> will show this.
+
+=head3 Compare two files with C<git diff>
+
+Typing C<git diff> at any time will print the difference between the latest
+commit in the repository and what is in the working directory. When changes are
+added to the index, it will show the differences between the working directory
+and the index. To see the differences between the I<index> and the latest
+commit, type C<git diff --cached>.
+
+=head3 Checking out old versions of files with C<git checkout>
+
 =head2 More Advanced Usage
 
+Looking at diffs, More advanced output
+from git log.
 Topic branches, merging, git specifics?
 Looking at old versions of files, see diffs between commits.