Fix file permission brain damage.
[mspang/www.git] / docs / procedure / procedure.tex
1 % This is a latex document.  It can be processed using straight latex.
2 \documentclass[11pt]{article}
3 \pagestyle{headings}
4 \newcommand{\squeezeitems}{\setlength{\itemsep}{0pt}}
5 % \input{psfig}
6 \usepackage{latexsym}
7 \begin{document}
8
9 \newcommand{\mathNEWS}{\textsl{math\/}\textsf{NEWS}}
10
11 %decomment the below to leave out the beginning CSC logo (forms a box instead)
12 %\psdraft
13
14 \begin{titlepage}
15 \vspace*{72pt}
16
17 \begin{center}
18 % \ \psfig{figure=pm.ps,height=1.5in}
19
20 \Huge
21 \vspace*{5pt}
22 \textbf{Computer Science Club \\ 
23        Procedures Manual \\ }
24 \LARGE
25 \vspace*{96pt}
26 Kevin Smith  \textit{v1.0  Winter 1989} \\
27 Jim Boritz   \textit{v2.0  Winter 1992} \\
28 Shannon Mann \textit{v3.0$\alpha$  Winter 1993} \\
29 Shannon Mann \textit{v4.0$\alpha$  Summer 2003} \\
30 \vspace*{36pt}
31 \today
32 \end{center}
33 \end{titlepage}
34
35 \cleardoublepage
36 \pagenumbering{roman}
37 \tableofcontents
38 \cleardoublepage
39 \section{Introduction}
40 \pagenumbering{arabic}
41
42 The Computer Science Club of The University of Waterloo (CSC) has been in
43 existence since some time in the early 1960's.  When this is compared with
44 the founding dates of the University, the Faculty of Mathematics and the
45 Department of Computer Science, it becomes apparent that the CSC has almost
46 as much history as the University.  
47
48 One of the factors which the CSC has had to deal with is a turnover in its
49 membership.  At the CSC, and the university, people come and go.  It is
50 often the case that when people go, their knowledge of CSC operations goes
51 with them.  Later generations are forced to rediscover, often painfully,
52 how the CSC conducts its business.  Frequently, efforts which could be
53 channeled into productive tasks are devoted to this rediscovery.
54
55 This manual is intented to be a guide and an archive.
56 It's authors and contributors hope
57 to lay down here as much information as they can about the operation of the
58 CSC.  The history of the CSC will also be recorded here.  In part this is
59 because there is no other place, but also because a historical context
60 should make future decisions easier.  It is the hope of
61 everyone involved that this guide will prevent the loss of knowledge
62 associated with the loss of long time CSC members.
63
64 \section{Membership}
65 Membership in the Computer Science Club is open to all students of the
66 University of Waterloo, undergraduate and graduate.  This includes
67 undergraduates and graduates on a work-term and graduates that are
68 registered inactive.
69
70 During the W90 term there was a great deal of discussion about who should 
71 be entitled to a CSC membership beyond students.  The groups whose ability 
72 to obtain a CSC membership came under question are; faculty, staff, 
73 alumni and everyone else.  Prior to W90, anyone that wanted a CSC 
74 membership was allowed to join regardless of what the current constitution 
75 may have said.  Membership was divided into two categories---full and 
76 associate---that differed in the ability to hold an executive position 
77 and vote in CSC elections.  
78
79 In W90 several people felt that the CSC was being taken advantage of, 
80 and many non-students were obtaining memberships in order to get an 
81 account on WatCSC.  The discussion eventually identified a few key 
82 privileges that were felt to be inappropriate for all CSC members.  
83 These privileges are: who can vote; who can hold executive positions; 
84 and who can obtain a WatCSC account.  The single factor that stood out 
85 when trying to allocate these privileges is that the CSC is primarily 
86 an undergraduate student organization, and should remain that way.  
87
88 % Added by James A. Morrison, ja2morri
89 In F02 and S03 this came up again.  At this time WatCSC is no longer around
90 and the CSC has a good collection of machines, 4 in the office, and 1 in the
91 machine room.  So now any member can hold an account.  However, the right
92 to vote and hold an executive position is mostly regulated by Mathsoc since
93 Mathsoc defines these things in their club policies.  In S03 the Mathsoc
94 council changed their policy to state that voting and the ability to hold
95 executive position is available to members of Mathsoc or members of any other
96 society who recognizes the club as a club of that society.  So if engineering
97 gives us money, we can say we are an Engsoc club and allow engineers to vote
98 and hold executive positions.  However, CSC is still primarily and 
99 undergraduate Math/CS student organization, and should remain that way.
100
101 \section{Exec Positions}
102
103 The CSC has four elected positions and one appointed position.  The elected
104 positions are: President, Vice-President, Treasurer, and Secretary.  A
105 SysAdm is chosen by the exec and ratified by the remaining CSC members
106 attending the election meeting.  Each exec position has certain duties 
107 associated with them.  When all is well, each exec works to make certain 
108 that not only their duties and responsibilities are covered, but also 
109 that the other duties of the exec are being met.
110
111 \subsection{President}
112
113 The President is the person responsible.  As ungrammatical as that may seem,
114 it is exactly accurate.  He or she is responsible to make certain that 
115 everything the CSC is involved in gets proper attention.  Specifically, 
116 the President's duties are:
117 \begin{enumerate}
118 \squeezeitems
119 \item to call and preside at all general, special, and executive meetings 
120 of the Club;
121 \item to appoint all committees of the Club and the committee chair
122 of such committees, except the chair of the Programme Committee; and
123 \item to audit, or to appoint a representative to audit,
124 the financial records of
125 the club at the end of each academic term.
126 \end{enumerate}
127 Wherever possible, the President should delegate tasks to others.  Not doing
128 this can overburden the President.
129
130 \subsection{Vice-President}
131
132 The Vice-President arranges the talks, tutorials, and tours.  Specific duties
133 include:
134 \begin{enumerate}
135 \squeezeitems
136 \item to assume the duties of the President
137 in the event of the President's absence;
138 \item to act as chair of the Programme Committee; and
139 \item to assume those duties of the President
140 that are delegated to him by the President.
141 \end{enumerate}
142
143 In general, the Vice-President does as much as possible to take the load from
144 the President.  The Programme Committee is the body of CSC members
145 chaired by the Vice-President.  This committee meets to decide what talks
146 CSC'ers would be interested in hearing.  They also decide what tours are
147 undertaken.  The Vice-President should take care of arranging for rooms,
148 the creation of posters and other advertisements.  These tasks often fall
149 to the Secretary, overburdening an already difficult position.
150 Wherever possible, the Vice-President should introduce the talks, except
151 when the President wishes to do so.  If neither President, nor 
152 Vice-President can attend, someone should be appointed to introduce the
153 speaker and do a Channel 17 Membership Drive.
154
155 \subsubsection{Programme Committee}
156 The Programme Committee meets to discuss and choose which events the CSC
157 will put on each term.  There are certain events the CSC puts on 
158 automatically.  However, most events must be chosen and planned ahead of
159 time.  The Programme Committee gathers suggestions from their members and
160 from the CSC membership regarding what talks and events they would like the
161 CSC to sponsor.  From these suggestions, a wide variety of talks and events
162 are chosen.  The Vice-President takes the list generated from these meetings
163 and organises the events.  To be effective, the Programme Committee should
164 meet soon after elections to make initial plans for the terms events.  Meeting
165 later in the term can be a good way to add to the activities the CSC plans to
166 run.
167
168 \subsection{Treasurer}
169
170 The Treasurer's job seems simplest.  However, trying to keep track of all 
171 the funds that go in and out of the CSC is a somewhat daunting task.
172 For more information, see the sections on financial matters 
173 (p.\ \pageref{MONEY}), specifically the section on the cashbox 
174 (p.\ \pageref{CASHBOX}).
175 The specific duties of the Treasurer are:
176 \begin{enumerate}
177 \squeezeitems
178 \item to collect dues and maintain all financial and membership records;
179 \item to produce a financial or membership statement when requested;
180 \end{enumerate}
181 The Treasurer should make arrangements at the end of the term for signing
182 authority to be passed on to the next terms exec.  A final audit of the
183 terms financial transactions is a great help to the incoming exec, and should
184 be done every term.
185
186 \subsection{Secretary}
187
188 The Secretary's position is perhaps the hardest of all, especially if the
189 support people under the Secretary do not work, or worse, are never chosen.  
190 The creation of many of the people in support roles (See Alternate Positions,
191 below) are for the most to reduce the sometimes herculean amount of work 
192 that is dumped upon the shoulders of the Secretary.  The Secretary's duties
193 are:
194 \begin{enumerate}
195 \squeezeitems
196 \item to keep minutes of all Club meetings;
197 \item to prepare the annual Club report for
198 approval by exec council;
199 \item to care for all Club correspondence;
200 \end{enumerate}
201 Often in the past, the Secretary has become the target of ``dumping'' of
202 just about all tasks.  This should be discouraged at all costs.  The
203 Secretary has specific duties and responsibilites.  As it is, those
204 duties can already be taxing.  The CSC Flasher, the Office Manager, and
205 the Librarian report to the Secretary.
206
207 \subsection{SysAdmin}
208
209 The SysAdmin position was added to the exec when the CSC acquired a 
210 computer system of their own.  
211 The SysAdmins duties are:
212 \begin{enumerate}
213 \squeezeitems
214 \item to operate any and all equipment in the possession of the Club.
215 \item to maintain and upgrade the software on equipment that is operated by
216 the Club.
217 \item to facilitate the use of equipment that is operated by the Club.
218 \end{enumerate}
219 It has become the continuing policy to have the SysAdmin attempt to get 
220 the CSC computer equipment.  See the section on WatCSC (p.\ \pageref{WATCSC}).
221
222 \subsection{Alternate Positions}
223
224 Several ad hoc positions are also important for the effective running of 
225 the CSC.  Often these positions are never filled, requiring one of the exec
226 to fill in.  Most of these positions fall under the direct control of the 
227 Secretary (though this can expand the Secretaries' duties to an unmanageable
228 level).
229
230 \subsubsection{Office Manager}
231
232 The Office Manager runs the CSC office, making sure the place is tidy, 
233 that our recycling gets done, that the office staff is doing what it should
234 be doing (kicking people out when there are no office staff present, etc).
235
236 The Office Manager reports to the Secretary.
237
238 \subsubsection{Office Staff \label{OFFICESTAFF}}
239
240 Office Staff are that motley group of people that keep the CSC open all those
241 wonderful hours.  In general, they are a group of \textsl{trusted\/}
242 individuals chosen by the exec to fulfill this duty.  Office Staff are
243 expected to be helpful to people who come to the CSC for assistance.  They
244 are expected to assist in keeping the CSC tidy, help sign out books, taking
245 money for new memberships, and in general be helpful.  Some Office Staff will
246 be accorded the honour of being a key-holding Office Staffer.  See the
247 section on keys (p.\ \pageref{KEYS}) for more information.
248
249 Office Staff report to the Office Manager.
250
251 \subsubsection{Librarian}
252
253 The Librarian is the person responsible for keeping the CSC's large library
254 of reference material in order.  The Librarian is responsible for culling
255 out dated/ruined books and for suggesting the purchase of new books, as well
256 as the actual purchasing.  See the section on the library (p.\
257 \pageref{LIBRARY}) for more information.
258
259 The Librarian reports to the Secretary.
260
261 \subsubsection{Poster Person}
262
263 One of the most important positions, as the Poster Person is responsible
264 for making posters, and getting them distributed.  Often the distribution
265 is divided amongst several people.  If this position is not filled, these
266 duties should fall to the Vice-President, though it often falls to the
267 Secretary.
268
269 The Poster Person usually reports to the Vice-President.
270
271 \subsubsection{CSC Flasher}
272
273 The CSC Flasher is the person who writes the CSC Flash, a short 
274 description of what the CSC is doing, published in each bi-weekly
275 issue of \mathNEWS.
276 Also, it is recurring policy to prepare a short ``Hacker Quiz'' to be
277 included at the end of the Flash (the hacker quiz often never happens).
278
279 The Flasher usually reports to the Secretary, and should attend all
280 Exec and Programme Committee meetings whenever possible.
281
282 \subsubsection{Oracle}
283
284 This is a position that, of recent, has been left unfilled (mainly due
285 to the fact that the club is without a machine at the time of writing).
286 The Oracle is a facility by which anyone in the world can send a question 
287 to \textsl{oracle@watcsc}, replies are posted on the newsgroup 
288 \textsl{uw.csc}.  Be sure to get some good humour-writers for this position 
289 (FASS is a good place to look).
290
291 Perhaps in the future, a mail alias could be added to undergrad.math
292 to allow this service to continue.
293
294 The Oracle reports to no-one.
295
296 \section{Events}
297
298 The CSC puts on several events each term, usually in the form of speakers,
299 but including SIGGRAPH video night, and 3B Info Night.  These events provide 
300 both an opportunity for CSC members to experience new and interesting
301 aspects of CS and to generate interest in CS within the University Community.
302 The SIGGRAPH video night attracts students, faculty and staff, seeming 
303 universally interesting to all people.
304
305 \subsection{Speakers}
306
307 The CSC has speakers every term, speaking on a wide range of issues relating
308 to computers.  We have had many distinguished speakers pulled from the ranks
309 of U(W) faculty, grad students and even undergrad students.  As well, the 
310 CSC has managed to bring very distinguished speakers from off campus.  The 
311 likes of Bill Gates (W89), John McCarthy (W91), Brian Kernighan, and
312 A.K.~Dewdney, just to name a few have honoured us with their wit and wisdom.
313
314 The CSC normally takes the speaker out to dinner as a gift of the CSC to
315 the speaker.  The dinner also affords an opportunity for a few members to
316 hobknob with the speaker, often having discussion that is more interesting
317 than the talk that was given.
318
319 \subsubsection{Internal}
320
321 Internal speakers are the easiest to arrange.  These speakers can be pulled
322 from the faculty and students, on a variety of topics.  To arrange one,
323 contact the person whom you are interested in having speak.  Once you have
324 their interest, choose a date that is agreeable to both you and the speaker
325 (by necessity, the speaker gets far more to say :-)  With a date in hand,
326 estimate how many people will attend.  For most talks, we can have anywhere
327 from 10 to 80 people attending.  Choose an appropriate room and book it for
328 that date.  A few days before the talk, order an appropriate number of
329 doughnaughts.  When the time comes, have an appropriate person introduce
330 the speaker.  After the talk, thank the speaker, and offer doughnaughts and
331 tea to all the attendee's.
332
333 \subsubsection{External}
334
335 External speakers, for the most, are much harder to arrange.  Not only must
336 you arrange for all the normal amenities, but also for accommodations for 
337 the speaker for atleast one night (if coming from out of town), travel costs
338 and an honorarium.  Most of the arrangements can be made by contacting the
339 CS Dept.~Secretary (S'03 it was Ursula Theone).  She can make all the 
340 %%NAME
341 necessary arrangements.  For funding, you can speak to the Faculty of Math, 
342 the CS Dept., the ICR, and even Engineering for those speakers who will have
343 some interest there.  In W91, John McCarthy visited us, giving two talks, one
344 on Elephant, a project of his, the other on NetNews and his experiences with
345 attempted censorship at his home campus, Stanford University.  We sold his
346 coming here to ICR and others through the talk about Elephant.  Our reason
347 for bringing him here was for the NetNews talk, as U(W) was censoring the
348 alt branch of NetNews.  Funding was obtained from the Math Faculty for the
349 travel costs, from the CS Dept.~for lodging and from ICR for the \$1000
350 honorarium. 
351
352 Once you have all the difficult things arranged, set the date and time of
353 the talk(s) and book the rooms.  If you manage to get an external speaker
354 from any real distance, you can pretty much bank on s/he pulling a large
355 crowd to the talks.
356
357 \subsection{Tutorials}
358
359 In keeping with the CSC's purposes of generating interest in computer science
360 and its applications, the CSC has held tutorials on UNIX and X-window System.  
361 These
362 tutorials are introductory in level and cover a limited number of topics.
363 Ideally, the group size will not exceed ten or so, though we have had
364 X-windows talks of up to thirty.  Book one of the X-term labs a week or
365 %%NAME
366 more earlier with Lori Suess, Administrative Assistant to the Director
367 of CFCF.  Although your group may be small, keeping extra people out of the
368 room during these events can be beneficial (keeps distracting noise out).
369 A tutorial usually runs for an hour.
370
371 \subsection{Tours}
372
373 Another favourite CSC event is to arrange for a group to tour one of the
374 computer labs.  The DCS mainroom, the CGL lab and the PAMI lab have all 
375 been the sites of interesting tours.  To arrange for a tour, it is best to
376 contact someone who works there.
377
378 \subsection{SIGGRAPH}
379 A recurring CSC event is to show the SIGGRAPH video that contains the 
380 highlights from the most recent Film \& Video Show.  Since many people are
381 co-op, it is possible to show the tape at least twice and possibly three 
382 times during the year.  SIGGRAPH video night is always a very popular event.
383
384 There are a few constraints that must be kept in mind when trying to organize
385 this event.  First, while the SIGGRAPH conference occurs in early August, 
386 the video is not available until November or December.  Second, the CSC
387 borrows the tape from CGL, thus making us reliant upon CGL to actually
388 have the tape.  From time to time there is a lapse in CGL's subscription 
389 to the SIGGRAPH Video Review which results in the unavailability of the
390 recent tapes.
391
392 To borrow the videos from CGL either get a CSC member that is working there
393 to borrow them, or contact the Lab Administrative Assistant (Elise Devitt
394 as of F90)
395 %%NAME
396
397 A good place for showing SIGGRAPH videos are the ICR lecture halls in the 
398 Davis Centre (DC 1302 \& DC 1304).  The advantage of using these rooms is the
399 ability to do the projection on your own.  While DC 1350 and DC 1351 are
400 bigger and have more sophisticated equipment, they also require an expensive
401 university supplied AV technician (see below).
402 As mentioned elsewhere ICR rooms must be booked with the ICR secretary.  
403
404 If for some reason it is desireable to use DC 1350 or DC 1351, the
405 larger lecture halls, the following procedure should be used. First book
406 the room with Bookings (discussed earlier). In order to interface to the
407 Electrohome RGB projector on the ceiling the CSC must arrange to have a
408 video technician present during the meeting.  For this to happen,
409 %%NAME
410 Georgina Coutinho x4070 must be informed of the meeting time, date, and
411 place.  Unfortunately, this technician (who must be present) charges
412 \$25 per hour; there doesn't seem to be a way to get around this.  The
413 total charge for the technician should be \$75.
414
415 The SIGGRAPH tape shown in W89 was in VHS format, which is good, since
416 there is a VHS machine inside the DC 1350/1351 projection rooms.  If the
417 tape is in 3/4'' format, then be sure to borrow a 3/4'' player from CGL
418 and warn the technician that he will have to interface a 3/4'' player to
419 the video console.
420
421 The SIGGRAPH tape is usually about 2 hours long.  There are two tables
422 of contents included in the tape, it is a good idea not to make the
423 audience sit through these boring parts. Fast forward past the first
424 one, and call an intermission during the second.  After the intermission
425 is a good time to do the Channel 17 Membership Drive!
426
427 %%NAME
428 It is also a good idea to talk to John Hillhirst x3258.  He is the head
429 technician (and not a bureaucrat).  Ask him any technical questions that
430 you may have.
431
432 Typically around 100-150 people show up for SIGGRAPH, so order around 12
433 dozen doughnaughts.
434
435 In W89 we had considerable problems switching the lights out in DC 1350.
436 Try to make sure that the lights work before starting the show in the future.
437
438 \subsection{3B Info Night}
439 3B Info Night is a special information session held to help 3B CS
440 students select from the vast number of courses offered in fourth year. 
441 There should be a 3B Info Night every term that normally has 3B students
442 (currently fall and winter).  At some point in the past (F86?) the
443 department neglected to have a 3B info night.  This got many students
444 upset and caused the CSC to assume a co-sponsorship role for this
445 event.  
446
447 As long as the department remembers to hold 3B Info Night there should
448 not be much of a problem.  The Associate Chairman for Undergraduate
449 Studies will arrange for professors to come and speak about the courses.
450 The CS department secretary will arrange a location, and produce
451 posters.  In this situation the CSC is responsible for; ordering
452 refreshments, attempting to get additional faculty members to make an
453 appearance, and trying to find some students that can tell what fourth 
454 year is really like.  In addition, the CSC President usually attends,
455 thanks everyone for showing up, and mentions that there are some real 
456 fourth year students to answer questions.
457
458 On occasion the department may forget or be hesitant to hold 3B Info night.
459 If this situation should ever arise the CSC should, attempt to convince 
460 the current Associate Chairman that a 3B Info Night should be held.  
461 Failing this the CSC should make arrangements on its own to hold a 
462 3B Info Night.  This means booking a room, contacting professors, 
463 getting refreshments and everything else that is required.
464
465 A typical refreshment order would involve
466 \begin{itemize}
467 \squeezeitems
468 \item 12 dozen doughnaughts
469 \item 72 cans of pop
470 \item 1 tea urn  coffee urn
471 \item 75 tea bags
472 \item 1 package of napkins
473 \item 2 large milks
474 \item 75 sugars
475 \item 75 small cups
476 \end{itemize}
477
478 The cost of this order has been almost exactly \$100.  The CS
479 department will pay half when presented with the invoice
480 from the math C\&D.  Send the invoice to Jane Prime.
481 %%NAME
482
483 \subsubsection{Ordering Refreshments}
484 Most if not all CSC meetings serve tea and doughnaughts to those that 
485 attend.  Everything that is required is ordered from the math C\&D if at all
486 possible.  The math C\&D has reasonable rates, they are close by, and they
487 are very helpful.  
488
489 To make an order the person running the event, or someone they have
490 delegated the task to, should contact the C\&D manager (currently Brenda)
491 %%NAME
492 about three to four days in advance.  She must have advance notice for
493 large orders as she has to order the doughnaughts from her supplier.  If an
494 emergency, such as someone forgetting to order, arises you can
495 usually get about two dozen doughnaughts the same day.  If the order is larger,
496 use common sense and go to any of the doughnaught shops off campus.  The other
497 items are usually stocked in sufficient quantity for there not to be a
498 problem.
499
500 A typical order consists of:
501
502 \begin{itemize}
503 \squeezeitems
504 \item 5 +/- 1 dozen doughnaughts 
505 \item 1 tea urn
506 \item 40 tea bags
507 \item 50 cups
508 \item 1 half pint milk
509 \end{itemize}
510
511 If the supply in the office runs out, the following may also need to be
512 ordered:
513
514 \begin{itemize}
515 \squeezeitems
516 \item stir stix
517 \item napkins
518 \end{itemize}
519
520 \subsection{Contests}
521
522 The CSC holds contests from time to time.  These contests always test the 
523 programming skill of the contestants.  The Othello and Arbitrary Game 
524 Contest test the skill of the programmers by asking them to program a
525 game which will compete against other programs like it.  The ACM Programming
526 Contest and our local versions test the programming skill of the programmers
527 by asking them to solve several programming problems under a time limit.
528
529 \subsubsection{Othello Tournament}
530 The Othello Tournament occurs once a year in October or November.  Several
531 weeks before the chosen date, an announcement is made on internet and
532 elsewhere requesting  (UNFINISHED)
533 \subsubsection{Arbitrary Game Contest}
534 (WAY UNFINISHED)
535 \subsubsection{ACM Scholastic Programming Contest}
536 (WAY UNFINISHED)
537 \subsubsection{Mini-Contests}
538 (WAY UNFINISHED)
539
540
541 \section{Room Bookings}
542
543 Booking a room made simple:
544 \begin{enumerate}
545 \squeezeitems
546 \item Decide how big the meeting will be.
547 \item Decide when the meeting will be.
548 \item Decide what kind of venue you will be requiring.
549 \item Contact the appropriate Donna Schell, x2207, dschell@uwateoloo.ca for
550 any room that isn't a computer lab or an ICR room.
551 \end{enumerate}
552 The parties involved will make the booking and usually contact you with
553 a confirmation.  If confirmation does not come within a couple of days,
554 call them back to get a confirmation.
555
556 \begin{table}[b]
557 \begin{center}
558 \caption[Bookings Table]{Quick Reference for Bookings}
559 \vspace*{2pt}
560 \begin{tabular}{c c c c} \hline
561 Which Room & Seats & Type of Meeting & Page \\ \hline \hline
562 Classrooms & 10--50 & Talks and Informal Meetings & \pageref{CLASSROOMS} \\
563 ICR Rooms & 30--120 & Formal Talks & \pageref{ICRROOMS} \\
564 Colloquium Room (MC 5158) & 50--100 & Formal Talks and Debates & \pageref{COLLOQUIUMROOM} \\
565 Theatres & 150+ & Very Large Talks & \pageref{THEATRES} \\ \hline
566 \end{tabular}
567 \end{center}
568 \end{table}
569
570 \subsection{Classrooms \label{CLASSROOMS}}
571 There are many rooms around campus in which CSC meetings can be held.  Most
572 rooms which fall under the general category of classrooms are controlled by
573 one of two agencies on campus, ``Scheduling'' or ``Bookings''.  
574
575 Officially, Bookings is responsible for reserving rooms for non-course
576 events, and Scheduling is sort of responsible for course events.  In the
577 past the most efficient method for booking a room was to call scheduling.
578 This resulted in a room being booked in about an hour.  Unfortunately in
579 recent times Scheduling has refused to book rooms for clubs, requiring us to
580 call Bookings.  Bookings uses a very capricious method for booking rooms
581 and tends to require a day or two for confirmation.
582
583 %%NAME
584 Bookings are made by telephone (Zehl Wittington x2207 is the person to
585 talk to).  And when the room is confirmed Zehl will send a yellow slip
586 to the CSC mailbox in the CS department's mail room.  There is no charge
587 for room booking.
588
589 \subsection{Davis Centre ICR Rooms \label{ICRROOMS}}
590 DC 1302, DC 1304 and DC Lounge are located on the ground floor of the Davis
591 Centre.  These are the rooms that are used for ICR Talks, CS Department
592 talks etc.  These rooms are controlled by the ICR and can be used by others
593 when there are no ICR events taking place.  In order to book one of these
594 rooms, arrangements should be made with the ICR at x2042.  No confirmation
595 is provided, and someone will have to pick up the key from the ICR
596 secretary on the day of the talk.  As of W93, ICR stopped booking these rooms
597 for clubs.  See the faculty advisor, or the CS Dept.~secretary to book.
598
599 \subsection{Math Colloquium Room (MC 5158) \label{COLLOQUIUMROOM}}
600 The Math Colloquium Room (MC 5158) is a mid-size room that can comfortably
601 hold about 50 people.  It has lovely wooden walls, and gentle lighting.
602 This is where most Math Faculty talks asides from CS are given.  The room
603 has comfortable chairs which can be rearranged into any desired formation
604 which makes it suitable for meetings such as debates.  To book the room,
605 contact the secretary of the Executive Assistant to the Dean at x2592.  
606 No confirmation is provided, but security is responsible for unlocking 
607 the room.  It may be worthwhile to make sure that security knows this.
608
609 \subsection{Theatres \label{THEATRES}}
610 Large events require large theatres.  There are two large theatres on
611 campus; ``Theatre of the Arts'' in Modern Languages and Humanities Theatre
612 in Hagey Hall.  Both of these must be booked through the Theatre Centre
613 (x2126).  In all likelihood this will lead to the Theatre Manager, Peter
614 Houston (x6570) getting in touch with you to make the arrangements.
615 %%NAME
616 Since the theatres are in heavy demand it is wise to book them WELL IN
617 ADVANCE. Most people that use the theatres book about a YEAR in advance.
618
619 Campus organizations are not charged a fee for the use of the theatres,
620 but there is a charge for ushers and technicians.  Ushers and
621 technicians are not a choice but a must, they come with the theatre. The
622 number of ushers present is dependent upon the predicted size of the
623 crowd.  The technician is required to ``configure'' the room prior to the
624 event.  Any special equipment required for the event (e.g. slide
625 projector), should be arranged with the technician a few weeks in
626 advance.
627
628 The biggest problem for the CSC is that we are not a Fed club and thus
629 have to rely upon someone else to recognize us.  In the dark ages the 
630 CSC was able to go through MathSoc to book the theatres.  Unfortunately
631 this didn't work out the time the CSC used the theatre for Bill Gates' 
632 talk.  Eventually the Faculty of Math indicated that they `recognized'
633 us as an official club.  At the time recognition was done by Lyn Williams
634 who was Executive Assistant to the Dean of Math.  
635 %%NAME
636
637 \section{Financial Matters \label{MONEY}}
638 The CSC currently receives funding from
639 \begin{itemize}
640 \squeezeitems
641 \item MathSoc
642 \item Engsoc
643 \item Membership fees
644 \item Computer Science Department
645 \end{itemize}
646
647 At the beginning of each term the executive, past executive, or some
648 experienced nominees must compose a budget.  The budget should be a good
649 estimate of how much money the CSC expects to spend during the term. In
650 order to pay for its activities the CSC will rely on the sources of
651 funding listed above.   Past budgets make for good reference material
652 when creating the new budget.
653
654 \subsection{MathSoc}
655 The CSC budget must be prepared in time to be presented to the
656 MathSoc treasurer in advance of the MathSoc budget meeting.  This way
657 the MathSoc treasurer can discuss the budget with the CSC prior to the
658 meeting, thus avoiding the possibility of open conflict.
659
660 During the S89 term MathSoc made some revisions to its constitution that 
661 describe the procedure that clubs must follow in order to obtain funding.
662 It is the responsibility of the CSC budget committee and especially the
663 Treasurer to be aware of MathSoc's requirements for funding.
664
665 \subsection{EngSoc}
666 EngSoc typically gives some money to clubs that have engineering students 
667 as members.  The amount that EngSoc donates has varied wildly from term to
668 term, but seems to have settled out at about \$100 (F90).  To get money 
669 from EngSoc, the CSC should submit a request to the EngSoc Treasurer along
670 with the CSC's proposed budget.  The CSC Treasurer should be present at the
671 EngSoc meeting where the budget is discussed in case any questions arise. 
672
673 \subsection{Bank Account}
674 The CSC has a chequing account at the Campus Centre CIBC.  After the executive
675 is elected each term, signing authority must be obtained for the new
676 president and treasurer.  The bank has a special form for transferring 
677 signing authority. It requires that either a previous holder of signing 
678 authority or the faculty advisor for the club approve the transfer of signing
679 authority to the new president and treasurer.
680
681 \subsection{University Billing Code}
682 The CSC has a university billing code to which almost any university provided
683 service can be charged.  The list of services include: Audio Visual, Graphics 
684 Services, and the Book Store.  
685
686 The CSC's billing code is 901-1179-03.  The CSC's billing code happens to
687 be a `power' billing code in that it can have funds transferred into it as
688 well as having charges made against it.
689
690 \subsection{Cashbox Procedures \label{CASHBOX}}
691 The CSC has a cashbox that serves as the collection point for membership
692 fees and the disbursement point for petty cash.  The cashbox has two keys.
693 One key remains in the possession of the current treasurer and the second key
694 is part of the `talisman of power' that is held by the office staffer
695 currently in charge of the office.  The cashbox should remain locked at all
696 times except when money is being deposited or withdrawn.  More information
697 can be found in the section on office staffers.
698
699 Prior to the current procedure governing access to the cashbox the CSC
700 made several attempts to regulate the flow of money through the cashbox.
701 The earliest method was to have the person signing up new members to deposit
702 the membership fee in the cashbox.  Since there are only two keys the cashbox
703 remained unlocked most of the time.  Whenever funds were needed to pay the
704 C\&D bill, pay for posters, or other miscellaneous expenses money would be
705 withdrawn from the cashbox.   It was hoped that the person making the 
706 withdrawl would leave a note in the cashbox indicating how much had been 
707 withdrawn and for what purpose.  This method never worked because
708 people were did not indicate how much had been withdrawn.
709 When the cashbox is unregulated, money flows in and out of the cashbox
710 and for some reason it is impossible to get people to accurately record
711 how much money is being withdrawn for various and sundry expenses
712 (mostly posters and C\&D charges).
713
714 Several attempts have been made to regulate and control the cash flow.  Chris 
715 Browne a one time treasurer and accounting student suggested that nothing
716 be paid out in cash by the CSC.  Instead, all disbursements would be made
717 by cheque regardless of the amount because it would be a small price to pay
718 for the improved record keeping that the CSC would gain.  He also intended to 
719 implement some sort of petty cash procedure but ran out of time.  Given the
720 attitudes of the average CSC member it is unlikely that a typical petty cash
721 mechanism would have worked anyhow.
722
723 During the W90 term the CSC was prey to a low-life that saw fit to steal over
724 \$200 in membership fees from the cashbox.  The result was that some strict 
725 procedures were put in place to more carefully control access to the cashbox.
726
727 For more details see the section on Office Staff (p.\ \pageref{OFFICESTAFF}).
728
729 \section{Resources}
730
731 \subsection{Audio Visual Equipment}
732 Anything aside from chalk and a blackboard that is required for a
733 presentation, should be obtained from the University's Audio Visual
734 Department.
735
736 Audio Visual needs to have someone to bill in the case of damages to 
737 equipment.  Fortunately the CSC does have a university billing code.  
738 Unfortunately Audio Visual is a puppet bureaucracy, and they don't trust
739 students.  Some person in the administration such as the CSC's Faculty 
740 Advisor, or the EADM does the recognition thing for us.
741
742 In general copyright laws prohibit the screening of films to more than ten
743 people without permission from the copyright holder.  What this means is
744 that most movies rented at the local rental shop can not be screened
745 publicly.  Audio Visual follows the law and thus does not provide equipment
746 for such screenings.
747
748 \subsubsection{Showing movies}
749 Rent from the Fed record store, Becker's, or Bandito.
750 Or better yet, borrow a movie from a club member!
751 In order to rent a VCR from the Feds you must present
752 both a driver's license and a VISA card.
753
754 Audio Visual considers it illegal to show a VCR tape to a large
755 group of people such as a CSC meeting.  Realistically, this is
756 true.  So, to show rented movies at a club meeting, the CSC
757 must obtain equipment elsewhere.
758
759 One option is to book the DCS course room (MC 2009), since
760 Audio Visual does not control DCS.  Talk to Bob Hicks x2194
761 %% NAME
762 to book this room; if Bob is on vacation, try Carol Vogt,
763 she usually knows what is going on in DCS.
764 There is an overhead Electrohome RGB projector
765 that can be used to hook up a VCR or a computer.  This room has a VHS VCR
766 and stereo sound, as well visual hookups to do online demonstrations to
767 a group of people.
768
769 Another option is to borrow equipment from the nice folks at CGL.
770 CGL has 2 26'' televisions, two 3/4'' VCRs, a VHS VCR,
771 and a 37'' monitor.  
772
773 \subsubsection{Showing Movies the legal way}
774 As mentioned elsewhere, it is illegal to show a movie that you rent from a
775 video store to a crowd of more than ten people.  In order to show a movie to
776 a crowd, the right permissions must first be obtained from whomever holds
777 the copyright.  For these reasons the university maintains a film library
778 full of films for which permission has been obtained.  The film library
779 spans a wide variety of topics and has a few good films which can be shown at
780 the beginning of term.
781
782 To arrange for these films it is best to talk to the film librarian in E2
783 1309.  His name is (    ) he is very helpful and knows the content of an
784 incredible number of films.  Some films are stored locally and can be
785 obtained within 24 hours.  Other films are held by individual departments,
786 or by other universities.  Depending on the situation, upto a weeks notice
787 may be required.
788
789 Once the film(s) has been arranged AV will be very co-operative. 
790 Depending on the format (film or video), a projectionist and the
791 equipment can be booked.  As a campus organization, the CSC can obtain
792 equipment at no charge.  The remaining issue of concern is who will pay
793 for damages.  Luckily enough this issue has been settled.  Howie has
794 signed some form indicating that the CS department recognizes us.  It
795 also has our university billing number just in case.  Just remember that
796 the CSC is not a FED club.  I believe that the FEDS cover damages
797 incurred by their clubs and this is why AV is continually asking about
798 this. 
799
800 For video AV will provide a TV and play the tape from their central
801 facility.  Someone should make sure that the TV gets to the room on time
802 and is hooked up.  Since the projectionist has very little to do the
803 cost is the minimum for using a projectionist, about \$10.  If the format
804 is film arrangements must be made for a screen and a projector.  Since
805 the projectionist is devoted to us for the evening the cost is slightly
806 higher.  No figures are available on this though as it has never been
807 done. 
808
809 \subsubsection{Bureaucracy}
810
811 Audio Visual Services is an incredible bureaucracy, tread
812 carefully.  Harry, x3257, who is responsible for actually giving
813 out equipment, requires two things:  a letter of recognition
814 %%NAME
815 for the CSC (I obtained one from Lyn Williams -- Administrative
816 Assistant to the Dean's Office, and a GOD to the CSC).  Basically
817 this letter from Lyn would read ``The CSC is a bona-fide CS
818 department-sponsored club with billing code 901-1179-03, the
819 current president is $<$name$>$''.  Hopefully this won't be
820 necessary.  All Harry usually requires is a letter from the
821 CSC saying who the current executive is; no formal signatures
822 are required for this.  The letter from Lyn will only be necessary
823 if Harry says ``I've never heard of the CSC'' (he has a very
824 short memory).
825
826 Remember: The CSC is not a fed club.
827
828 Rule of Thumb: avoid using AV equipment.  We can use the
829 ICR lecture halls or the DCS course room for movie nights (or borrow TVs 
830 from CGL), and get a technician for SIGGRAPH through Georgina x4070.
831
832
833 \subsection{Library \label{LIBRARY}}
834 The CSC library is a facility that almost everyone considers to be important
835 and useful.  The CSC library can never hope to compete with the 
836 University Library in terms of quantity.  Nonetheless, the CSC library can 
837 provide a qualitatively different resource of value.  This tends to be done
838 by selecting extremely current books and books considered classics for the
839 library.  The library is not meant to be everything to everyone.  It is 
840 intended to be representative of the library of a computer scientist.
841
842 Every term a sizeable portion of the CSC budget is allocated to library 
843 acquisitions.  Most of this money is used to purchase ``new'' books.  
844 Unfortunately, the CSC library like every other library suffers from the 
845 theft and loss  of its books.  Thus some portion of the library budget will 
846 be used to replace books that have disappeared from the collection.  The 
847 fact that library books will disappear should be accepted.
848
849 The process for purchasing new books is fairly simple.  First, the CSC
850 librarian solicits and gathers suggestions for books that would be 
851 appropriate for the library.  Once funds become available for the book
852 purchase to be made, the library committee ranks the suggestions that
853 have been received to date.  Based upon these rankings books are purchased 
854 until the book budget has been spent.
855
856 \subsection{Office Space}
857 The CSC was one of the first clubs to have space allocated to it by the Math
858 Faculty.  It was a long time ago (mid 70s) and the details are lost in the 
859 mists of time.  The initial CSC office was a small cubicle that housed the 
860 library, a sofa a desk and eventually the core of WatCSC when it was still
861 an HP9000.  Due to the increase in CSC activity in F87 and W88 the CSC 
862 managed to convince the Dean's Office to allocate it some additional space.
863 Thus when new space became available on the 3rd floor of the MC building
864 \mathNEWS moved and dividing wall that used to separate the two 
865 offices was removed, effectively doubling the size of the office.
866 It turned the CSC office space into some of the prime office space on
867 the third floor.
868
869 It is very important to remember that the CSC space is provided 
870 directly by the Faculty of Mathematics.  MathSoc has no official
871 control over the space allotted to the CSC.  
872
873 From time to time MathSoc, having nothing better to do, considers 
874 rearranging the offices in the third floor Pink Tie Zone.  This is usually
875 done with the idea of getting more space and exposure for the main MathSoc
876 office.  Due to the relative desireability of the CSC space, the CSC 
877 typically becomes an unwilling (and often unknowing) participant in 
878 the MathSoc grand plan.  
879
880 The greatest danger lies in MathSoc doing something before the CSC 
881 is aware of the plans and can voice an opinion to the Dean's Office.
882 Ultimately it is the Dean's office that is responsible for any 
883 allocation of office space (including MathSoc's).  MathSoc can 
884 not unilaterally deprive the CSC of its office space.  However, it 
885 can ask the Dean's Office to reallocate space or make other changes.  
886 Typically the Dean's Office does not question MathSoc proposals 
887 believing them to have been previously discussed by all groups 
888 concerned.  Thus the importance of making the CSC opinion known.  
889 As long as the CSC gets a say in the process there is very little 
890 to worry about.  
891
892 In the past MathSoc plans have have been stalled once the CSC
893 discovered them and voiced its disapproval to the Dean's Office.  This
894 is because the Dean's Office upon sensing a lack of consensus among
895 student groups tends to be reluctant to proceed.  In addition, the lack
896 of continuity within the MathSoc executive means that plans formulated
897 within a term must usually be completed during the same term.  Usually
898 space reallocation plans come along late enough in a term that stalling
899 them for a couple of weeks effectively kills them.
900
901 If MathSoc were ever to make a determined effort to see the floor space
902 rearranged it would very likely happen.  Fortunately this has not yet been 
903 the case.  The best the CSC could do in the face of a concerted effort
904 is insure that it is being treated equitably. In the past the CSC has 
905 been perfectly willing to trade its location for an increase in space. 
906
907 The CSC has been given assurances from the Executive Assistant to the 
908 Dean that if there are any space changes, the CSC will get at least 
909 an equivalent space if not more.
910
911 \subsubsection{Keys \label{KEYS}}
912
913 For much of the CSC's days of having office space there existed a few keys 
914 that only exec members had.  The exec was primarily responsible for opening
915 the CSC in the morning.  In F90, the exec arranged for keys from Key Control
916 to be released to certain members of the office staff.  This made keeping the
917 office open so much easier.  
918
919 A great deal of trouble arose when MathSoc got involved;  First, it was 
920 demanded that we take a \$20 deposit for the keys, to ensure that the
921 keys be returned.  We acceded this demand, arranging with the Assistant
922 to the Dean for key permits.  Slowly, over several terms, MathSoc took more
923 and more control over the signing of the key permits, until by S92, they had
924 complete control over signing.  Further, to complicate things, each new term
925 a new policy and procedure for doing key permits was put into place.  In F92,
926 the exec finally took steps to eliminate the need for keys altogether.  Under
927 the current policy, there is little or no need for us to request keys from 
928 MathSoc.  Please see a past exec member for the grimy details.
929
930 \subsection{Locker}
931 In order to provide some remote storage of magnetic media, the CSC has
932 obtained a locker from MathSoc.  MathSoc has agreed to provide the CSC with
933 locker \#7 each and every term, on the condition that someone on the CSC
934 executive signs for the locker.  This provision is documented by MathSoc in
935 their locker distribution procedures.  Any failure to have locker \#7 set
936 aside for the CSC represents a failure on MathSoc's part.  In F90, members
937 of the CSC kindly wrote a program to generate a nice listing of all 
938 locker numbers.  In this list, locker \#7 is permanently listed as the CSC's.
939 In F92, this program had been forgotten, forcing locker \#7 to be given
940 out to some student.  Given MathSoc's propensity for screwing up this simple
941 procedure, someone should check early each term that MathSoc is indeed using
942 the list generated from the CSC's program.  If it isn't, they should pencil
943 the CSC into locker \#7.
944
945 \subsection{Computer Accounts}
946 Several nice people in High Places have donated a free computer account to 
947 the CSC; \textsl{csc@watmath\/}.  Supervision of this account is 
948 responsibility of the entire executive.  This point is clearly mentioned 
949 in the CSC constitution.
950
951 \subsubsection{MFCF accounts}
952 \textsl{csc@watmath\/} is provided to the CSC by MFCF.  Since billing on 
953 all MFCF UNIX machines is fairly relaxed, there are few restrictions on the 
954 use of this account.  Any member of the current term's executive is free to 
955 use the account for whatever they please.  In addition, people who need access
956 to the CSC account for CSC purposes is also free to use the account.  The
957 only restriction is that the account should not become a facility for giving
958 others access to a UNIX account.  Lastly, the account is provided with free
959 laser printing.  This privilege should not be abused as this could result
960 in its withdrawl.
961
962 \subsubsection{Exec Accounts on Undergrad.math}
963 In F91, the CSC attempted to get a CSC account created on the undergrad
964 network.  Ostensively, this was to give the CSC access to the X-window
965 terminals for creation of posters and CSC documents.  Due to a change
966 in ONet policy, MFCF was disallowed giving out accounts that more than
967 one person would have access to.  MFCF compromised by giving any exec 
968 member a personal account on the undergrad system, if they did not already
969 have one.  As all undergrad math students already have an account, this works
970 out to giving non-math exec members accounts on undergrad.math. 
971
972 \subsection{Computer Equipment on Loan}
973
974 The CSC has managed to borrow a large supply of equipment from various 
975 groups.  It is important to note that the CSC is responsible for 
976 maintaining this equipment, and replacing it if it is stolen.  A 
977 separate policy for the use and administration of this equipment 
978 was created during the S89 term.
979
980 Most of the hardware that the CSC has, was obtained on an indefinite loan
981 basis.  This means that the equipment does not really belong to the CSC, it
982 belongs to the group that lent us the equipment.  On the other hand, the
983 fact that we have the equipment means that it is of no use to anyone else.
984
985 \subsubsection{Math Faculty Computing Facility}
986 Sometime about the summer of 1987 MFCF and the Faculty decided that certain
987 services would no longer be provided to undergraduates.  One was 50 pages
988 of free laser printing.  Another was the ability to ask the operators to
989 archive a students files to tape.  So as to not completely eliminate the 
990 ability to archive ones files, the Faculty instructed MFCF to provide
991 MathSoc with a microcomputer which could be used for file archival.  
992
993 Eventually students wanted to archive their files and the CSC began to
994 investigate.  It was discovered that MathSoc had not bothered to go pick up
995 the PC from MFCF.  The MathSoc Treasurer at the time was Joel Crocker.  He
996 instructed Jim Boritz to feel free to pursue the matter.  When Jim managed
997 to get the PC, Joel suggested that the CSC could operate the PC since it was
998 unlikely that anyone in MathSoc would know exactly what to do.
999
1000 From time to time MathSoc remembers that the PC actually belongs to them
1001 and they become concerned about its use.  About a day later they come to 
1002 the conclusion that its doing fine in the CSC since we have the expertise
1003 and we tend to be open at lot more than the MathSoc office.
1004
1005 In F89 MathSoc managed to buy a computer of their own.  Since that time
1006 most MathSoc people have become much less concerned about how the PC is used.
1007 A few months later the CSC obtained complete control over the PC from MathSoc
1008 council.  In the months following, the PC gradually fell apart.  After DCS 
1009 installed an FTP terminal server in the IO Room (MC1063), the need for the
1010 PC had dropped to nil.  Hardware errors on the hard drive finally convinced 
1011 the exec of S91 that the machine was past its useful lifetime.  The machine
1012 was taken out of service and surplussed.
1013
1014 The CSC also has two terminals that it has obtained from MFCF.  The CSC
1015 should always have at least one terminal.  It the terminal dies, talk to
1016 the Executive Assistant to the Dean of Math.  
1017
1018 \begin{itemize}
1019 \squeezeitems
1020 \item 1 Wyse 75 terminal
1021 \item 1 VC 404 terminal
1022 \end{itemize}
1023
1024 The VC 404 terminal was in continual disrepair and was traded to a fellow 
1025 member of the CSC on workterm on campus for the Ann Arbor Ambassador in his
1026 office (He was not using the terminal and sought some advantage for the 
1027 CSC).  This terminal in turn died of keyboard flakiness.  In W92, the CSC
1028 borrowed a Wy75 terminal from \mathNEWS.  To date, \mathNEWS knows that 
1029 we have their terminal, but, has not requested its return.  As they had 
1030 just received a new Wy99GT terminal, \mathNEWS staff seem unconcerned 
1031 about the old terminal.
1032
1033 Terminals currently in the CSC's hands:
1034 \begin{itemize}
1035 \squeezeitems
1036 \item 1 Wyse 75 terminal (owned by MFCF)
1037 \item 1 Wyse 75 terminal (owned by \mathNEWS)
1038 \item 1 Ann Arbor Ambassador (owned by MFCF --- broken keyboard)
1039 \end{itemize}
1040
1041 \subsubsection{Department of Computing Services}
1042 All networks on campus fall under the control of DCS.  Any problems should
1043 be directed to them.  As of the W90 term the CSC has the following 
1044 connections:
1045
1046 \begin{itemize}
1047 \squeezeitems
1048 \item 1 serial connection through the Sytek network
1049 \item 1 serial connection through the Gandalf network
1050 \item 1 direct serial connection to Maytag
1051 \end{itemize}
1052
1053 \subsection{WatCSC \label{WATCSC}}
1054 In the F87 term the executive felt that a computer science club, should
1055 have computing facilities which went beyond a single terminal.  This was
1056 due in part to an MFCF decision earlier in the year to no longer
1057 allow undergraduates to send mail, or post news to machines outside the
1058 University.  The CSC attempted to have these privileges restored. At
1059 the same time the CSC investigated means by which it could provide mail and
1060 news services to undergraduates.  
1061
1062 The executive was told of a short lived organization
1063 named the Open Computer Group that in 1985 had obtained free of charge four
1064 PDP 11/70 computers that had been retired by the University.
1065 Unfortunately the Open Computer Group was unable to generate sufficient
1066 interest and activity.  The group folded after a few months and the
1067 machines were eventually surplused by the University.  
1068 In 1986 the Symbolic Computation Group offered the CSC some 
1069 equipment that was no longer being used.  The executive at the time 
1070 turned down the offer because they felt the hardware was too noisy and bulky.  
1071
1072 In response to this new direction, the executive investigated what happened
1073 to the above hardware.  It was discovered that the PDP 11's had been sold.
1074 Luckily, the equipment that SCG offered was still available.  Within a
1075 matter of days the CSC had obtained from SCG a few pieces of
1076 Hewlett-Packard hardware that would eventually become the heart of WatCSC.   
1077
1078 Some investigation revealed that Hewlett-Packard donated four systems to
1079 the university some time in 1984.  When donated these machines included
1080 a maintenance coverage for a year.  After the initial project for the 
1081 machines died they were dispersed to various people around the Computer
1082 Science department.  Two went to the Symbolic Computation Group, one went
1083 to the Computer Systems group and the fourth went to J.D. Lawson a former
1084 professor.  When Prof. Lawson left the university the CSC acquired the 
1085 serial card and some manuals from his machine, the rest of the equipment
1086 eventually ended up with the Office Automation Group.
1087
1088 As demand for disk storage, memory and other assorted peripherals grew 
1089 the CSC began to acquire these other systems.  In early 1989 the CSC 
1090 finally got hold of the last HP system that had gone to the Office Automation
1091 Group.  
1092
1093 \section{The ACM \label{ACM}}
1094
1095 The CSC is associated with another lesser known club by the name of
1096 ``University of Waterloo Student Chapter of the ACM ''.  In order to be a
1097 member of the ACM student chapter, one must be a member of the ACM as
1098 well.  This restriction is in conflict with the idea that anyone should
1099 be able to be a member of the CSC.  The result is that the ACM student
1100 chapter has no real members.  
1101
1102 Even though the ACM student chapter has no official members, the CSC desires
1103 to keep the student chapter operational.  This has resulted in the
1104 creation of the fictional person known as Calum T. Dalek.  Calum is a
1105 full member of the ACM and serves as the chair of the student chapter
1106 of the ACM.
1107
1108 \subsection{ACM Requirements}
1109 In order to maintain our status as a student chapter of the ACM we must
1110 fulfil two requirements.
1111
1112 \begin{enumerate}
1113 \squeezeitems
1114 \item Each term a chapter activity report must be filled out and mailed 
1115 to the ACM Student Chapter Chairperson, and the ACM Student Chapter
1116 liaison.  
1117
1118 \item Once a year a financial statement must be mailed to the ACM.
1119 \end{enumerate}
1120
1121 \subsubsection{Activity Report}
1122
1123 The student chapter activity report is a single sheet of paper
1124 on which we list the members of the executive for the ACM
1125 student chapter along with a list of our activities.  Since only
1126 Calum is a real member of the ACM, his is the only name that
1127 appears on the activity report with an ACM membership number.  
1128 Fictional names are created for the other executive members of
1129 the student chapter of the ACM.  The membership number is left
1130 blank or has a ``?'' inserted.  The final requirement is a faculty
1131 sponsor.  Our current faculty sponsor is Howie Pell, however, he
1132 is also not a member of the ACM.
1133
1134 If the ACM does not receive a single activity report over the
1135 course of a year they will place the student chapter on
1136 probation.  To extricate ourselves from this situation we need
1137 to mail activity reports and make sure they are received.
1138
1139 \subsubsection{Financial Statement}
1140
1141 For some strange and mysterious reason the ACM continues to send
1142 us an annual request for financial information.  Apparently in
1143 the U.S. the ACM can derive some sort of tax benefit from its
1144 student chapters.  Since we are a Canadian chapter this is not
1145 the case. This makes filling out the financial form is very easy.
1146 Just write ``Not Applicable --- Canadian Chapter'', across the top of
1147 the form.
1148
1149 \subsubsection{Calum's Membership}
1150
1151 Calum T. Dalek is a student member of the ACM.  Membership fees
1152 are currently in the neighbourhood of US\$ 90 and are due
1153 sometime before March each year.  Little attempt is made to 
1154 distribute the cost over all three terms.  Through Calum's
1155 membership the CSC receives the following ACM publications.  
1156
1157 \begin{itemize}
1158 \squeezeitems
1159 \item Communications of the ACM
1160 \item Transactions on Graphics
1161 \item Transactions on Programming Languages and Systems
1162 \item SIGGRAPH conference proceedings
1163 \item Oopsla conference proceedings
1164 \item Asplos conference proceedings
1165 \item Sigplan notices
1166 \item Computer Graphics
1167 \end{itemize}
1168
1169 \section{Relations with other Groups}
1170 Getting anything done on campus requires communication with several other
1171 groups.  The section is meant to provide some perspective on the relations
1172 which the CSC has had with a few of the more important campus
1173 organizations.
1174
1175 \subsection{Math Faculty}
1176
1177 %%NAME
1178 The Computer Science Club enjoys a fairly good relationship with the
1179 Math Faculty.  Most of the CSC's contact with the faculty is through Lyn
1180 Williams, Executive Assistant to the Dean of Math.  Lyn has been very
1181 helpful to the CSC by vouching for us in our relations with other
1182 departments.  
1183
1184 On occasion, when the political climate requires it, the CSC has
1185 communicated its needs directly to the Dean of Math.
1186
1187 \subsection{Computer Science Department}
1188
1189 The CSC also enjoys a good relationship with the CS department.  A
1190 current CSC objective is to get the CS department to provide some
1191 funding for bringing in speakers.
1192
1193 \subsection{Federation of Students}
1194 The CSC is not a FED club.  This is sometimes important for billing things
1195 like theatres and audio visual equipment.  Most of the rest of the time
1196 this is not important.  
1197
1198 Folk lore has it that the CSC does not want to become a FED club.  This is
1199 because the FEDS have some strange requirements of their clubs which do not
1200 mesh well the type of members the CSC wants.  We seem do do fine with the
1201 situation as it exists, but this does not mean that some accurate
1202 information should be obtained in the future.
1203
1204 \subsection{Mathematics Society}
1205 The CSC's relationship with MathSoc is somewhat of a never-ending
1206 saga.  This is mostly due to the fluctuation of the MathSoc executive,
1207 especially the treasurer.  For the most part, relations tend to be
1208 pretty good.  The letdown usually comes at the beginning of the term
1209 when MathSoc has its budget meeting.  Most people on MathSoc council are
1210 indifferent to the CSC.  However, once a single dissenting opinion
1211 is expressed, there tends to be a cavalcade of discussion.   At this
1212 time (S89) MathSoc is preparing a ``Club Policy'' which should eliminate a
1213 great deal of the capriciousness involved.
1214
1215 \subsection{Engineering Society}
1216
1217 \subsection{Science Society}
1218 The CSC has a few members which come from science.  This has caused us to
1219 seek funding from the SciSoc in the same manner as EngSoc.  Unfortunately,
1220 SciSoc exists for the most part to orient students and run the Science
1221 C\&D.  Beyond that they are fragmented into other groups based on the major
1222 departments within the faculty.  The result is that SciSoc really doesn't
1223 have much extra money and has been unwilling to send some our way.
1224
1225 \section{Consulting}
1226 The CSC operates a ``Friendly Consulting Service'' designed to provide 
1227 assistance to computer users at all levels.  The CSC has provided this 
1228 service for as long as anyone can remember.  Some of the reasons that the
1229 CSC promotes itself in this manner are; hours of availability far in excess
1230 of both DCS and MFCF consultants, ability to provide expert support at 
1231 almost any skill level, and a desire to promote computer awareness in 
1232 general.
1233
1234 Although the Friendly Consulting Service tends to maintain a high profile
1235 within the CSC it consumes almost no resources.  This is achieved by running
1236 the service in an ad hoc volunteer manner.  Essentially anyone present in 
1237 the CSC office qualified to answer questions is automatically a part of the
1238 consulting service.  As confused people wander into the CSC office, they
1239 should be offered assistance by the ``qualified'' people.
1240
1241 \section{The Authors}
1242 This document has been compiled, edited, revised, mangled and had other
1243 unsightly things done to by several people of the course of its development.
1244 This section is meant to record their contribution and 
1245 provide them with some recognition for their efforts.
1246
1247 Version 1.0 of the procedures manual was written by Kevin Smith based
1248 on his experiences as CSC president during W89.  It was originally intended
1249 as a ``President's Survival Guide'', but has subsequently been expanded into
1250 a compendium of procedures to assist and guide the CSC's operations.
1251
1252 In the second author's words:
1253 \begin{quotation}
1254 Version 2.0 of the procedures manual was written by me (Jim Boritz) long after
1255 I had been president of the CSC in F87 and W88.  At the time that the 
1256 Version 2.0 undertaking began in W90, I was desperately seeking a way 
1257 of avoiding my Master's essay and so devoted a fair amount of effort 
1258 and roughly quadrupled the size of the original V1.0 manual.  I also 
1259 added \LaTeX\ formatting because I was keen on \TeX\ at the time and was
1260 considering using it for my essay.  In general, I would have preferred to 
1261 format the document using bare \TeX\ along with the macros that I had 
1262 developed.  However, knowing the CSC, I decided not to rely upon them 
1263 keeping the macros around with the document and opted for the standard
1264 \LaTeX\ macros (which really are ok once you get over the NIH syndrome).
1265 After I graduated I asked for some time in which to add even more 
1266 material to this already enormous document.  I did manage to make a few 
1267 additions and passed the manual back to the CSC for use and comment.  
1268 Foolishly, I thought there would be even further additions forthcoming.
1269 It is now a little over a year later (Feb. 21, 1992) and more than a 
1270 year and a half since I have been active in CSC affairs.  I managed to 
1271 finally add one last section (Office Space).  If pressed I could probably
1272 describe some of the other items in historical context (I love historical
1273 contexts), but it is time for the sections that have already been 
1274 written to be brought up to date by someone else.
1275 \end{quotation}
1276
1277 In the words of the third author:
1278 \begin{quotation}
1279 I (Shannon Mann) took over the authorship of the procedure's manual in W92.
1280 I broke it down into sections, distributed it across several files and
1281 eventually threw out all the work I had done on it, as I felt it would
1282 never survive in so many chunks.  In W93, my position of computer operator
1283 with DCS was ``declared redundant'', leaving me with plenty of time on my
1284 hands to do all the updating I had planned.  Since then, I have added a
1285 titlepage, a table of contents, several sections and tables and even a few
1286 appendices.  In my updating of this document, I have removed a good 7 pages,
1287 mostly dealing with surplussed computer equipment.  To the remaining I have
1288 added 12+ pages, bringing the final count to almost 40.  Added are the
1289 sections on the exec positions, events, and contests, and expanded are the 
1290 sections on computer equipment and WatCSC.  The document has undergone a
1291 dramatic restructuring, pulling similar information themes together and
1292 amongst one-another.  
1293 It is my hope that this document will continue to be updated and expanded,
1294 and that I will only be the third of many authors.
1295 \end{quotation}
1296
1297 \appendix
1298
1299 \newpage
1300 \begin{center}
1301 \large\bf Appendices \\
1302 \end{center}
1303
1304 \section{CSC How-To}
1305
1306 This section contains brief notes explaining how to do common CSC tasks.
1307
1308 \subsection{Starting a Term}
1309
1310 Every term starts with an election.  A past exec member or an involved
1311 member should find someone to act as CRO in the first few days of the
1312 term.  The election should be held no later than the third thursday of the
1313 term.  Due to all that is done in the CSC in the fall term, the election
1314 should be held earlier if at all possible.  See `Holding an Election' below 
1315 for more details.  Very soon after the election, the President and Treasurer
1316 with help from past exec, should prepare a budget to be submitted to the 
1317 treasurer of MathSoc.  Visiting the MathSoc Treasurer earlier than the 
1318 meeting which okays budgets has proven profitable, allowing CSC budgets to
1319 be passed without much fuss.  A budget with a request should be sent to 
1320 EngSoc, as we often can manage a small request from them (about \$50 per
1321 term).
1322
1323 \subsection{Running a Contest}
1324
1325 \newpage
1326 \section{Term Event Summaries}
1327
1328 This section contains brief summaries of events that the CSC does on an 
1329 on-going basis.  These timelines should be used as a reference, to make
1330 sure main CSC events are accomplished.
1331
1332 \begin{table}[hb]
1333 \begin{tabular}{@{$\Box$} l p{3in}}
1334 Event & Details \\ \hline \hline
1335 Elections & Held as soon as possible, no later than the third thursday of the
1336 month \\ \hline
1337 Budgets & Directly after elections to be turned in to MathSoc and \mbox{EngSoc}
1338 with a request for funding \\ \hline
1339 Programme Committee & Meets as soon as possible after elections to gather
1340 ideas for talks, tours and other events for the term \\ \hline
1341 \end{tabular}
1342 \caption{Start Term Checklist}
1343 \end{table}
1344
1345 \subsection{Fall Term}
1346
1347 \begin{tabular}{p{1.2in} p{1.4in} p{2in}}
1348 Date & Event Name & Details \\ \hline \hline
1349 Earliest Possible & Start Term Checklist & See above \\ \hline
1350 Last Weekend in Sept & Local ACM Contest & Selects teams to go to the
1351 regionals --- prefer earlier if possible\\ \hline
1352 First Friday in Oct & ACM Registration & Register teams selected with the
1353 contest \\ \hline
1354 First Weekend in Nov & ACM Regionals & Kick major ass :-) \\ \hline
1355 Oct or Nov & Othello Tournament & Announce four weeks early \\ \hline
1356 Mid-Nov & 3B Info Night & \\ \hline
1357 Week before Finals & Ctrl-D Dinner & Dine with friends --- end of term send-off \\ \hline
1358 \end{tabular}
1359
1360 \subsection{Winter Term}
1361
1362 \begin{tabular}{p{1.2in} p{1.4in} p{2in}}
1363 Date & Event Name & Details \\ \hline \hline
1364 Earliest Possible & Start Term Checklist & See above \\ \hline
1365 Mid-Mar & 3B Info Night & \\ \hline
1366 March & Calum's ACM Membership Due & \\ \hline
1367 Week before Finals & Ctrl-D Dinner & Dine with friends --- end of term send-off \\ \hline
1368 \end{tabular}
1369
1370 \subsection{Spring Term}
1371
1372 \begin{tabular}{p{1.2in} p{1.4in} p{2in}}
1373 Date & Event Name & Details \\ \hline \hline
1374 Earliest Possible & Start Term Checklist & See above \\ \hline
1375 Before Term Ends & ACM Registration & A fuzzy warm feeling for the ACM --- See section on ACM p.\ \pageref{ACM} for more details \\ \hline
1376 Week before Finals & Ctrl-D Dinner & Dine with friends --- end of term send-off \\ \hline
1377 \end{tabular}
1378
1379 \end{document}