Added some talks.
[mspang/www.git] / events.xml
index 6982b7f..a1c7929 100755 (executable)
@@ -1,9 +1,102 @@
 <eventdefs>
 <!-- Winter 2004 -->
 
+  <eventitem date="2004-03-23" time="6:00 PM"
+   room="MC4058" title="Extending LaTeX with packages">
+   <short>A talk by Simon Law</short>
+   <abstract>
+   <p>
+     LaTeX is a document processing system.  What this means is you describe
+     the structure of your document, and LaTeX typesets it appealingly.
+     However, LaTeX was developed in the late-80s and is now showing its age.
+   </p>
+
+   <p>
+     How does it compete against modern systems?  By being easily extensible,
+     of course.  This talk will describe the fundamentals of typesetting in
+     LaTeX, and will then show you how to extend it with freely available
+     packages.  You will learn how to teach yourself LaTeX and how to find
+     extensions that do what you want.
+   </p>
+
+   <p>
+     As well, there will be a short introduction on creating your own
+     packages, for your own personal use.
+   </p>
+   </abstract>
+  </eventitem>
+
+  <eventitem date="2004-03-16" time="6:00 PM"
+   room="MC4058" title="Distributed programming for CS and Engineering
+   students">
+   <short>A talk by Simon Law</short>
+   <abstract>
+   <p>
+     If you've ever worked with other group members, you know how difficult
+     it is to code simultaneously.  You might be working on one part of your
+     assignment, and you need to send your source code to everyone else.  Or
+     you might be fixing a bug in someone else's part, and need to merge in
+     the change.  What a mess!
+   </p>
+
+   <p>
+     This talk will explain some Best Practices for developing code in a
+     distributed fashion.  Whether you're working side-by-side in the lab, or
+     developing from home, these methods can apply to your team.  You will
+     learn how to apply these techniques in the Unix environment using GNU
+     Make, CVS, GNU diff and patch.
+   </p>
+   </abstract>
+  </eventitem>
+
+  <eventitem date="2004-03-15" time="5:30 PM"
+   room="MC4040" title="SPARC Architecture">
+   <short>A talk by James Morrison</short>
+   <abstract>
+   <p>
+     Making a compiler?  Bored?  Think CISC sucks and RISC rules?
+   </p>
+
+   <p>
+     This talk will run through the SPARC v8, IEEE-P1754, architecture.
+     Including all the fun that can be had with register windows and the
+     SPARC instruction set including the basic instructions, floating
+     point instructions, and vector instructions.
+   </p>
+   </abstract>
+  </eventitem>
+
+  <eventitem date="2004-03-09" time="6:00 PM"
+   room="MC4062" title="Managing your home directory using CVS">
+   <short>A talk by Simon Law</short>
+   <abstract>
+   <p>
+     If you have used Unix for a while, you know that you've created
+     configuration files, or dotfiles.  Each program seems to want its own
+     particular settings, and you want to customize your environment.  In a
+     power-user's directory, you could have hundreds of these files.
+   </p>
+
+   <p>
+     Isn't it annoying to migrate your configuration if you login to another
+     machine?  What if you build a new computer?  Or perhaps you made a
+     mistake to one of your configuration files, and want to undo it?
+   </p>
+
+   <p>
+     In this talk, I will show you how to manage your home directory using
+     CVS, the Concurrent Versions System.  You can manage your files, revert
+     to old versions in the past, and even send them over the network to
+     another machine.  I'll also discuss how to keep your configuration files
+     portable, so they'll work even on different Unices, with different
+     software installed.
+   </p>
+   </abstract>
+  </eventitem>
+
   <eventitem date="2004-03-02" time="6:00 PM"
    room="MC4042" title="Graphing webs-of-trust">
-   <short> A talk by Simon Law </short>
+   <short>A talk by Simon Law</short>
    <abstract>
    <p>
      In today's world, people have hundreds of connexions.  And you can