- Put in a whack of events that Simon is going to do. What a sucker!
authorSimon Law <sfllaw@csclub.uwaterloo.ca>
Mon, 20 Jan 2003 06:11:20 +0000 (06:11 +0000)
committerSimon Law <sfllaw@csclub.uwaterloo.ca>
Mon, 20 Jan 2003 06:11:20 +0000 (06:11 +0000)
events.xml

index cb78e58..fc9d0d3 100755 (executable)
@@ -58,6 +58,175 @@ Remember: Monday, January 13, 6:00 PM, MC3001/Comfy Lounge.</p>
     </abstract>
   </eventitem>
 
+  <eventitem date="2003-01-23" time="6:30 PM" room="TBA"
+    title="Regular Expressions">
+    <short>Find your perfect match</short>
+    <abstract>
+
+    <p>Stephen Kleene developed regular expressions to describe what he
+    called <q>the algebra of regular sets.</q>  Since he was a pioneering
+    theorist in computer science, Kleene's regular expressions soon made
+    it into searching algorithms and from there to everyday tools.</p>
+
+    <p>Regular expressions can be powerful tools to manipulate text.
+    You will be introduced to them in this talk.  As well, we will go
+    further than the rigid mathematical definition of regular
+    expressions, and delve into POSIX regular expressions which are
+    typically available in most Unix tools.</p>
+
+    </abstract>
+  </eventitem>
+
+  <eventitem date="2003-01-30" time="6:30 PM" room="TBA"
+    title="sed &amp; awk">
+    <short>Unix text editing</short>
+    <abstract>
+
+    <p><i>sed</i> is the Unix stream editor.  A powerful way to
+    automatically edit a large batch of text.  <i>awk</i> is a
+    programming language that allows you to manipulate structured data
+    into formatted reports.</p>
+
+    <p>Both of these tools come from early Unix, and both are still
+    useful today.  Although modern programming languages such as SNOBOL,
+    Perl and Python have largely replaced the humble <i>sed</i> and
+    <i>awk</i>, they still have their place in every Unix user's
+    toolkit.</p>
+
+    </abstract>
+  </eventitem>
+
+  <eventitem date="2003-02-06" time="6:30 PM" room="TBA"
+    title="LaTeX: A Document Processor">
+    <short>Typesetting beautiful text</short>
+    <abstract>
+
+    <p>Unix was one of the first electronic typesetting platforms.  The
+    innovative AT&amp;T <i>troff</i> system allowed researches at Bell
+    Labs to generate high quality camera-ready proofs for their papers.
+    Later, Donald Knuth invented a typesetting system called
+    T<small>E</small>X, which was far superior to other typesetting
+    systems in the 1980s.  However, it was still a typesetting language,
+    where one had to specify exactly how text was to be set.</p>
+
+    <p>L<sup><small>A</small></sup>T<small>E</small>X is a macro package
+    for the T<small>E</small>X system that allows an author to describe
+    his document's function, thereby typesetting the text in an
+    attractive and correct way.  In addition, one can define semantic
+    tags to a document, in order to describe the meaning of the
+    document; rather than the layout.</p>
+
+    </abstract>
+  </eventitem>
+
+  <eventitem date="2003-02-20" time="6:30 PM" room="TBA"
+    title="LaTeX: Beautiful Mathematics">
+    <short>LaTeX =&gt; fun</short>
+    <abstract>
+
+    <p>It is widely acknowledged that the best system by which to
+    typeset beautiful mathematics is through the T<small>E</small>
+    typesetting system, written by Donald Knuth in the early 1980s.</p>
+
+    <p>In this talk, I will demonstrate
+    L<sup><small>A</small></sup>T<small>E</small>X and how to typeset
+    elegant mathematical expressions.</p>
+
+    </abstract>
+  </eventitem>
+
+  <eventitem date="2003-02-27" time="6:30 PM" room="TBA"
+    title="The GNU General Public License">
+    <short>The teeth of Free Software</short>
+    <abstract>
+
+    <div style="font-style: italic"><blockquote>
+      The licenses for most software are designed to take away your
+      freedom to share and change it. By contrast, the GNU General
+      Public License is intended to guarantee your freedom to share and
+      change free software---to make sure the software is free for all
+      its users.
+      <br />
+      <div style="text-align:right">--- Excerpt from the GNU GPL</div>
+    </blockquote></div>
+    
+    <p> The GNU General Public License is one of the most influencial
+    software licenses in this day.  Written by Richard Stallman for the
+    GNU Project, it is used by software developers around the world to
+    protect their work.</p>
+
+    <p>Unfortunately, software developers do not read licenses
+    thoroughly, nor well.  In this talk, we will read the entire GNU GPL
+    and explain the implications of its passages.  Along the way, we
+    will debunk some myths and clarify common misunderstandings.</p>
+
+    <p>After this session, you ought to understand what the GNU GPL
+    means, how to use it, and when you cannot use it.  This session
+    should also give you some insight into the social implications of
+    this work.</p>
+
+    </abstract>
+  </eventitem>
+
+  <eventitem date="2003-03-13" time="6:30 PM" room="TBA"
+    title="XML">
+    <short>Give your documents more markup</short>
+    <abstract>
+
+    <p>XML is the <q>eXtensible Markup Language,</q> a standard
+    maintained by the World Wide Web Consortium.  A descendant of IBM's
+    SGML.  It is a metalanguage which can be used to define markup
+    languages for semantically describing a document.</p>
+
+    <p>This talk will describe how to generate correct XML documents,
+    and auxillary technologies that work with XML.</p>
+
+    </abstract>
+  </eventitem>
+
+  <eventitem date="2003-03-20" time="6:30 PM" room="TBA"
+    title="XSLT">
+    <short>Transforming your documents</short>
+    <abstract>
+
+    <p>XSLT is the <q>eXtended Stylesheet Language Transformations,</q>
+    a language for transforming XML documents into other XML
+    documents.</p>
+
+    <p>XSLT is used to manipulate XML documents into other forms: a sort
+    of glue between data formats.  It can turn an XML document into an
+    XHTML document, or even an HTML document.  With a little bit of
+    hackery, it can even be convinced to spit out non-XML conforming
+    documents.</p>
+
+    </abstract>
+  </eventitem>
+
+  <eventitem date="2003-03-27" time="6:30 PM" room="TBA"
+    title="SSH and Networks">
+    <short>Once more into the breach</short>
+    <abstract>
+
+    <p>The Secure Shell (SSH) has now replaced traditional remote login
+    tools such as <i>rsh</i>, <i>rlogin</i>, <i>rexec</i> and
+    <i>telnet</i>.  It is used to provide secure, authenticated,
+    encrypted communications between remote systems.  However, the SSH
+    protocol provides for much more than this.</p>
+
+    <p>In this talk, we will discuss using SSH to its full extent.  Topics
+    to be covered include:</p>
+    <ul>
+      <li>Remote logins</li>
+      <li>Remote execution</li>
+      <li>Password-free authentication</li>
+      <li>X11 forwarding</li>
+      <li>TCP forwarding</li>
+      <li>SOCKS tunnelling</li>
+    </ul>
+
+    </abstract>
+  </eventitem>
+
   <!-- Fall 1994 -->
        <eventitem
         date="1994-09-13" time="9:00 PM"