Migrated exec manual to wiki and moved old procedure manual into ~www/misc.
authorDavid Bartley <dtbartle@csclub.uwaterloo.ca>
Thu, 23 Aug 2007 06:40:18 +0000 (02:40 -0400)
committerDavid Bartley <dtbartle@csclub.uwaterloo.ca>
Thu, 23 Aug 2007 06:40:18 +0000 (02:40 -0400)
15 files changed:
docs/Makefile
docs/directory.xml
docs/execmanual.xml [deleted file]
docs/execmanual/Makefile [deleted file]
docs/execmanual/book.xml [deleted file]
docs/execmanual/general.xml [deleted file]
docs/execmanual/president.xml [deleted file]
docs/execmanual/sysadmin.xml [deleted file]
docs/execmanual/vice-president.xml [deleted file]
docs/index.xml
docs/procedure.xml [deleted file]
docs/procedure/.gitignore [deleted file]
docs/procedure/Makefile [deleted file]
docs/procedure/csc.procedure.latex [deleted file]
docs/procedure/procedure.tex [deleted file]

index 84be125..d86b300 100644 (file)
@@ -1,6 +1,5 @@
-SUBDIRS = execmanual procedure
 INPUTS = index.xml constitution.xml official.xml machine_usage.xml \
        machine_usage_summary.xml website.xml constitution-change-20020920.xml \
-       constitution-change-20040205.xml execmanual.xml procedure.xml
+       constitution-change-20040205.xml
 
 include ../default.mk
index 52e6b66..88c2bdc 100644 (file)
@@ -4,5 +4,4 @@
 
 <directory title="Documents">
   <diritem title="Official documents" href="official.html" />
-  <diritem title="Executive manual" href="execmanual.html" />
 </directory>
diff --git a/docs/execmanual.xml b/docs/execmanual.xml
deleted file mode 100644 (file)
index 0a96cff..0000000
+++ /dev/null
@@ -1,20 +0,0 @@
-<?xml version='1.0'?>
-
-<!DOCTYPE cscpage SYSTEM "../csc.dtd">
-
-<cscpage title="Executive manual">
-  <header />
-  <section title="The CSC Executive Manual">
-    <p>The CSC exec manual is intended to provide exec with a wealth of information on
-    useful topics provided by past executives. It should be kept up-to-date every term
-    by the current executives. One chapter is devoted to each executive position, with
-    descriptions of that position's duties and how to carry them out effectively.</p>
-    <p>At this point in time the exec manual is nowhere near complete. If you feel the
-    manual is a good contribution to the club, please bug the exec to put more work
-    into it.</p>
-    <p>The executive manual is written using DocBook and is available
-    <a href="execmanual/book.html">in HTML format</a>.  The 
-    <a href="execmanual/">DocBook source</a> is also on-line.</p>
-  </section>
-  <footer/>
-</cscpage>
diff --git a/docs/execmanual/Makefile b/docs/execmanual/Makefile
deleted file mode 100644 (file)
index 0b6e0c7..0000000
+++ /dev/null
@@ -1,36 +0,0 @@
-STYLESHEET = /usr/share/sgml/docbook/stylesheet/xsl/nwalsh/html/docbook.xsl
-FOSTYLESHEET = /usr/share/sgml/docbook/stylesheet/xsl/nwalsh/fo/docbook.xsl
-XSLTPROC = xsltproc
-XMLS = $(wildcard *.xml)
-HTMLS = $(XMLS:.xml=.html)
-
-#all: book.html book.tex book.pdf
-all: book.html
-
-clean-recurse: clean
-
-clean:
-       rm -f *.html *.fot *.out *.fo *.pdf *.log *.aux *.ps *.dvi *.tex
-
-book.html: $(XMLS)
-
-%.html: %.xml
-       $(XSLTPROC) $(STYLESHEET) $< > $@
-
-%.fo: %.xml
-       $(XSLTPROC) $(FOSTYLESHEET) $< > $@
-
-#%.pdf: %.fo
-#      pdfxmltex $<
-
-%.tex: %.xml
-       openjade -t tex -d /usr/share/sgml/docbook/stylesheet/dsssl/modular/print/docbook.dsl $<
-
-%.dvi: %.tex
-       jadetex $<
-
-%.pdf: %.tex
-       pdfjadetex $<
-
-%.ps: %.dvi
-       dvips -o $@ $<
diff --git a/docs/execmanual/book.xml b/docs/execmanual/book.xml
deleted file mode 100644 (file)
index cffee78..0000000
+++ /dev/null
@@ -1,17 +0,0 @@
-<?xml version="1.0" standalone="no"?>
-<!DOCTYPE book PUBLIC "-//OASIS//DTD DocBook XML V4.1.2//EN"
-"http://www.oasis-open.org/docbook/xml/4.0/docbookx.dtd"
-[
-<!ENTITY prez SYSTEM "president.xml">
-<!ENTITY veep SYSTEM "vice-president.xml">
-<!ENTITY sysadmin SYSTEM "sysadmin.xml">
-<!ENTITY general SYSTEM "general.xml">
-]>
-
-<book><title>Computer Science Club Exec Manual</title>
-&prez;
-&veep;
-&sysadmin;
-&general;
-</book>
-
diff --git a/docs/execmanual/general.xml b/docs/execmanual/general.xml
deleted file mode 100644 (file)
index 770dc8e..0000000
+++ /dev/null
@@ -1,93 +0,0 @@
-<?xml version="1.0" encoding="UTF-8"?>
-<chapter>
-  <title>General Information</title>
-
-  <para>Our mailbox is in the MathSoc office.  It should be checked on a 
-  regular basis.  
-  </para>
-
-  <sect1>
-  <title>Useful Contacts</title>
-  <para>There are several people that many exec will need contact information
-  for.  Their contact info follows and <emphasis> should be updated when 
-  these people change!</emphasis></para>
-
-  <itemizedlist>
-  <listitem>
-  <para>Donna Schell: We use her to book most rooms in the MC or elsewhere on
-  campus.  She can generally book any lecture hall.  If she can't do it, she
-  can tell you who can!  She can be reached at 
-  <email>dschell@uwaterloo.ca</email> or at extension 2207.</para>
-  </listitem>
-  
-  <listitem>
-  <para>Vera Korody: ICR secretary.  Should we wish to use the DC fishbowl for
-  anything we can contact her.  She may require us to get the permission of a 
-  ICR director to use it.  Currently the friendly director is Vic DiCiccio at 
-  <email>vicd@uwaterloo.ca</email>.  I am including the text of an email 
-  I sent and the response from Vic at the end of this segment.  It is easiest 
-  to talk to her directly at the ICR reception area beside the fishbowl in DC, 
-  however she can also be e-mailed at <email>vkorody@uwaterloo.ca</email> or 
-  called at ext. 2042.</para>
-  </listitem>
-  
-  <listitem>
-  <para>MathSoc: It is often smart to have executive in MathSoc who are 
-  friendly with the CSC.  To that end it is helpful to keep up with the 
-  MathSoc exec and attend MathSoc events.  Their office is directly across the
-  always closed door from ours.  The president and VPF are particularily 
-  helpful, in case we go a little over budget for any event they can approve
-  funding up to $100 extra by themselves.  They can be reached at 
-  <email>president@mathsoc.uwaterloo.ca</email> and 
-  <email>VPF@mathsoc.uwaterloo.ca</email>.  They also have a projector that
-  we can borrow from time to time.</para>
-  </listitem>
-
-  <listitem>
-  <para>AV stuff should be handled through AV services at extension
-  3033. Keys for AV stuff can be obtained at E2 1309. Note that they
-  will charge you $80 if you intend to use a projector (and that's
-  non-refundable - apparently bulbs are expensive and need to be
-  replaced often).
-  </para>
-  </listitem>
-  </itemizedlist>
-
-
-  </sect1>
-
-  <para>The E-mail I sent to Vic:</para>
-  <para>Hi,</para>
-  <para>The Computer Science Club is interested in booking DC 1301 (The Fishbowl)
-  for a student-prof mixer on the afternoon Monday, October 17.  We were
-  told that it would require the permission of someone higher up in ICR since
-  we're a student club.  We considered asking our faculty advisor, Prabhakar
-  Ragde, to book it on our behalf, but that would require him to be present
-  for the entire event and we don't want to impose on him to that extent
-  unless we have to.  We are hoping to get your permission to book it since
-  our primary purpose is to remove alcohol from the picture, to get it away
-  from the "pints" mentallity and focus it more towards the frosh.</para>
-
-  <para>Thanks for your consideration.</para>
-
-  <para>Tim Loach</para>
-  <para>CSC President</para>
-
-  <para> And his Response:</para>
-  <para>Hi Timothy,</para>
-
-  <para>Sure, I would definitely approve this.  Have you been turned down by
-  others?  But you need to email Vera Korody to book the room, because it
-  might be booked, and you need to get her rules about moving chairs,
-  etc.  I'll copy her on this email.</para>
-
-  <para>BTW, does the CSC know that Mike Lazaridis is coming to Fed Hall on Oct
-  3 to explain why RIM is a cool place to work, and that there are still
-  challenges there to interest co-ops and grads.  We could use your help
-  in getting the word out.  You've probably seen the posters.</para>
-
-  <para>Best,</para>
-
-  <para>Vic</para>
-
-</chapter>
diff --git a/docs/execmanual/president.xml b/docs/execmanual/president.xml
deleted file mode 100644 (file)
index 111fb23..0000000
+++ /dev/null
@@ -1,64 +0,0 @@
-<?xml version="1.0" encoding="UTF-8"?>
-<chapter>
-  <title>President</title>
-
-  <para>This chapter covers various useful notes for the CSC president,
-  ranging from who to call for room bookings to when the term should end.
-  I&#39;ll rant some more later.</para>
-
-  <sect1>
-    <title>What to do</title>
-
-    <para>The President is the person responsible. As ungrammatical as that
-    may seem, it is exactly accurate. He or she is responsible to make certain
-    that everything the CSC is involved in gets proper attention. Specifically,
-    the President&#39;s duties are:</para>
-
-    <itemizedlist>
-      <listitem>
-        <para> to call and preside at all general, special, and executive
-        meetings of the Club;</para>
-      </listitem>
-
-      <listitem>
-        <para> to appoint all committees of the Club and the committee chair
-        of such committees, except the chair of the Programme Committee;</para>
-      </listitem>
-
-      <listitem>
-        <para> to audit, or to appoint a representative to audit, the
-        financial records of the club at the end of each academic term.</para>
-      </listitem>
-    </itemizedlist>
-
-    <para>Wherever possible, the President should delegate tasks to others.
-    Not doing this can overburden the President.</para>
-  </sect1>
-
-  <sect1>
-    <title>Explanation</title>
-
-    <para>As listed above the president is responsible for appointing
-    committee chair&#39;s and other positions. So, it is basically up to the
-    president to decide whether or not there is an explicit office staff. How
-    do people become office staff? Must the office close every day? What do
-    the members expect to get out of the club in this term? </para>
-  </sect1>
-
-  <sect1>
-    <title>MathSoc</title>
-
-    <para>The CSC is a MathSoc club as such you should know the <ulink
-    url="http://www.math.uwaterloo.ca/pinkbook.php">MathSoc club policies</ulink>
-    and know that the president is a non-voting member of MathSoc council,
-    like MathSoc directors.</para>
-  </sect1>
-
-  <sect1>
-    <title>Planning events</title>
-
-    <para>Planning events is a useful thing to know, so go read the
-    Vice-President&#39;s section.</para>
-  </sect1>
-
-</chapter>
diff --git a/docs/execmanual/sysadmin.xml b/docs/execmanual/sysadmin.xml
deleted file mode 100644 (file)
index 509e2ba..0000000
+++ /dev/null
@@ -1,135 +0,0 @@
-<?xml version="1.0" encoding="UTF-8"?>
-<chapter>
-  <title>System Administrator</title>
-
-  <para>The systems administrator position is probably the position
-  requiring the largest amount of &quot;ad-hoc&quot; knowledge. In
-  particular, there are many decisions related to how the CSC
-  computers are run which may not be so obvious from looking at the
-  systems themselves.</para>
-
-  <para>For this reason, as sysadmin of the CSC it is of vital
-  importance that you not only read this document, but keep it up to
-  date as well.</para>
-
-  <sect1>
-    <title>Your responsibilities</title>
-
-    <para>According to the constitution, the following are the duties
-    of the sysadmin:</para>
-
-    <itemizedlist>
-      <listitem>
-        <para>to operate any and all equipment in the possession of the Club;</para>
-      </listitem>
-
-      <listitem>
-        <para> to maintain and upgrade the software on equipment that is
-        operated by the Club;</para>
-      </listitem>
-
-      <listitem>
-        <para>to facilitate the use of equipment that is operated by the Club.</para>
-      </listitem>
-    </itemizedlist>
-
-    <para>It has become quite regular for the CSC to get new equipment each
-    term. The sysadmin is responsible for ensuring this gear gets installed
-    and works as intended.</para>
-  </sect1>
-
-  <sect1>
-    <title>Useful contacts</title>
-
-    <itemizedlist>
-      <listitem>
-        <para>You can try getting access to the machine room from MFCF/CSCF.
-        You probably want to talk to Dave Gawley, <email>dlgawley@cs.uwaterloo.ca</email>.
-        He&#39;s been really friendly to the CSC in the past and is a cool guy
-        in general.</para>
-      </listitem>
-    </itemizedlist>
-  </sect1>
-
-  <sect1>
-    <title>Changing Users</title>
-     <para>To alter users and groups please use the cpu command.  cpu is setup
-       to use ldap to change any given user or group.</para>
-     <itemizedlist>
-       <listitem>To change a users group use cpu usermod -G current,groups,new,groups</listitem>
-       <listitem>man cpu-ldap</listitem>
-       <listitem>cpu groupadd cvs-ceo</listitem>
-     </itemizedlist>
-  </sect1>
-  <sect1>
-    <title>Expiring Users</title>
-
-    <para>This procedure is for users that were expired at the end of spring
-    2003.</para>
-
-    <orderedlist>
-      <listitem>
-        <para>login as root on peri (you probably can&#39;t do this, but might
-        have access to someone who can..)</para>
-      </listitem>
-
-      <listitem>
-        <para>Unexpire the account in the ldap database</para>
-
-        <para><prompt>peri# </prompt><userinput>echo username
-        |/root/dead-accounts/unexpire.pl</userinput> If this worked, it should
-        spit back the username.</para>
-      </listitem>
-
-      <listitem>
-        <para>Extract home directory onto peri</para>
-
-        <para>extract home directory onto peri mount &#34;Expired /u&#34; on
-        sugar (or wherever) copy /$mntpoint/username.tar to somewhere
-        accessible to root@peri</para>
-
-        <para>Note: the home directories are not compressed on the CD,
-        remember this when &#39;cp&#39; is telling you &#39;username.tgz: no
-        such file or directory&#39;. tar (below) doesn&#39;t need &#39;z&#39;
-        either. <prompt>peri# </prompt><userinput>tar xf /path/to/username.tar
-        -C /u</userinput></para>
-      </listitem>
-
-      <listitem>
-        <para>Restore mail onto peri </para>
-
-        <para><prompt>peri$ </prompt><userinput>grep username
-        /root/dead-accounts/unreadable-accounts</userinput> if the username is
-        there, the mbox is on &#34;Expired mail 2&#34; otherwise, the mbox is
-        on &#34;Expired mail&#34; mount appropriate CD cd to a temporary
-        directory (*not* /var/mail) extract mbox from archive -- on the
-        &#34;Expired mail&#34;, this will take a while -- just hit ^C after
-        you see the username printed and you&#39;re happy tar has moved on to
-        other files.</para>
-
-        <para>(I say &#39;sugar&#39;, but really any machine with a CD
-        drive...) <prompt>sugar$ </prompt><userinput>tar jxvf
-        /$mntpoint/mail_tar.bz2 username </userinput> (hmm.. I don&#39;t
-        remember what the tarball is called on Expired2, maybe the same thing,
-        maybe different, but I&#39;m pretty sure this is the filename for
-        Expired1. Besides, there&#39;s only one file on the CD, so just
-        tab-complete the damn thing :) (probably scp username root@peri: or
-        something here) restore mail, appending any mail received since backup
-        was made, and preserving permissions on the file. (Note: this
-        doesn&#39;t take into account locks -- i.e., stuff might get screwed
-        if the account receives mail while one of the below cats is running. A
-        message received between the cats simply gets lost.)</para>
-
-        <para> The following commands should also work from another machine if
-        the account was on &#34;Expired mail&#34; (i.e., was not in
-        ``unreadable-accounts&#39;&#39;). But doing it on peri will always</para>
-
-        <para><prompt>peri#</prompt><userinput>cat /var/mail/username
-        &#62;&#62;username</userinput></para>
-
-        <para><prompt>peri#</prompt><userinput>cat username
-        &#62;/var/mail/username</userinput></para>
-      </listitem>
-    </orderedlist>
-  </sect1>
-</chapter>
diff --git a/docs/execmanual/vice-president.xml b/docs/execmanual/vice-president.xml
deleted file mode 100644 (file)
index 4b2282a..0000000
+++ /dev/null
@@ -1,208 +0,0 @@
-<?xml version="1.0" encoding="UTF-8"?>
-<chapter>
-  <title>Vice President</title>
-
-  <para>This chapter covers various useful notes for the CSC vice president,
-  ranging from who to call for room bookings to how to promote your events.</para>
-
-  <sect1>
-    <title>Planning events</title>
-
-    <para>So, you&#39;re the CSC Vice President and you want to (hopefully)
-    have the CSC host some really cool events this term. This chapter should
-    help you get started with that.</para>
-
-    <para>For starters, the most important thing to remember is this:
-    <emphasis>plan your events early!</emphasis>. I recommend about 2 to 3
-    weeks in advance. This rough timeline should help:</para>
-
-    <itemizedlist>
-      <listitem>
-        <para>2-3 weeks in advance: Get a title and abstract for the event
-        from the speaker as well as a date and time.</para>
-      </listitem>
-
-      <listitem>
-        <para>2 weeks in advance: Book the room and any necessary equipment
-        (projectors etc). Make posters for the event. Make initial
-        announcements on Usenet and possibly by e-mail.</para>
-      </listitem>
-
-      <listitem>
-        <para>2 Days in advance: E-mail <email>credmond@uwaterloo.ca</email>
-        to get the event into the Daily Bulletin. Include a short
-        (one-paragraph) description.</para>
-      </listitem>
-
-      <listitem>
-        <para>Day of the event: Try to be at the event, or find someone who
-        will be to make sure things go smoothly. Remember to get the projector
-        if necessary. If there are people in the room you booked, ask them to
-        leave politely. Mention that you have the room booked. Get
-        refreshments to the room as necessary. Introduce the speaker.</para>
-      </listitem>
-
-      <listitem>
-        <para>After the event: Thank the speaker in front of the audience and
-        applaud. Offer to take the speaker out for dinner. Clean up the room
-        and return any loaned equipment. Write him or her a cheque for any
-        expenses if necessary. For out-of-town speakers a small gift might be
-        nice.</para>
-      </listitem>
-    </itemizedlist>
-
-    <para>The rest of this chapter will outline various tips that should be
-    useful when running events and suggest some events that you might want to
-    run.</para>
-
-    <sect2>
-      <title>Getting ideas and speakers for events</title>
-
-      <para>Obviously you will have to start your planning by coming up with
-      an event. Here are some types of events you might want to hold:</para>
-
-      <itemizedlist>
-        <listitem>
-          <para>Talks held by CSC members. Ask around, there are probably a
-          few members who have interesting things to give talks on. In the
-          past CSC members have given talks about programming languages they
-          like, Operating Systems, research projects, etc.</para>
-        </listitem>
-
-        <listitem>
-          <para>Talks held by Faculty: Simply ask your CS profs, or get other
-          exec to ask their profs or interesting faculty. Approaching faculty
-          in person might get you better results than e-mailing, but be sure
-          to follow up with an e-mail so that you have something written to
-          remind them.</para>
-        </listitem>
-
-        <listitem>
-          <para>Out-of-town speakers. The <ulink
-          url="http://www.acm.org/chapters/stu/">ACM student chapter website</ulink>
-          has a section called &#34;Lectureship series&#34; where you can find
-          information on getting an ACM Distinguished Lecturer. You can also
-          simply approach interesting people (in Academia, Industry or the
-          Free Software scene) by e-mail and ask them if they&#39;d like to
-          come and give a talk (or a few talks). Don&#39;t be afraid to ask
-          high-profile people, the worst you can get is a &#34;no.&#34; Be
-          sure to have the treasurer budget money to pay for the guest
-          speaker&#39;s expenses. If you can, try to pay for travel expenses
-          (unless the speaker offers), but at the very least arrange for meals
-          and accomodation as well as transport from the airport or bus/train
-          station if necessary.</para>
-        </listitem>
-
-        <listitem>
-          <para>Special events. In the past we&#39;ve had an event called
-          &#34;Pints with Profs&#34; where we invited the CS faculty (<email>cs-faculty@cs.uwaterloo.ca</email>)
-          and any interested CS students to come out to a pub. The Bomber is a
-          convenient location but we&#39;ve found their catering to be
-          expensive. Weaver&#39;s Arms (in WCRI) might be a good alternative.
-          Be sure to budget this with Mathsoc, so you can pay for free food.
-          Try to get both meat and vegetarian alternatives (e.g. Wings and
-          Veggie Platters). Make sure you publicise this event very well, and
-          don&#39;t hesitate to ask the profs to announce it in class (giving
-          them overheads might be a good idea). This is definitely an event
-          you should try to hold. If you can think of any other special
-          events, go right ahead, be creative! Be sure to add them here.</para>
-        </listitem>
-
-        <listitem>
-          <para>Tutorials. Usually we hold a few UNIX tutorials at the
-          beginning of the term. These are quite popular and you can get
-          Faculty (especiall the first and second-year CS profs) to announce
-          them in class. Be sure to book a lab. If there are more than one or
-          two other people in the lab, politely ask them to leave - in our
-          experience, asking such groups to be quiet doesn&#39;t usually work
-          very well. Aside from UNIX you could have tutorials for LaTeX, some
-          programming language, some programming problem (e.g. &#34;Writing a
-          raytracer&#34;) or anything you think would be useful for people to
-          learn. </para>
-        </listitem>
-
-        <listitem>
-          <para>Contests. Programming contests can be a lot of fun and will
-          certainly raise interest in the club. Try to get nice prizes so that
-          you can attract a large group of contestants. Be sure to have the
-          rules and the environment set up early on. Game solving contests are
-          a good idea (this can range from writing programs to play
-          rock-paper-scissors to having programs compete at playing chess),
-          demo programming contests can also be fun or you might go for
-          something more useful. It&#39;s up to you - be creative!</para>
-        </listitem>
-
-        <listitem>
-          <para>Anything else you can think of. Be imaginative and ask for
-          suggestions. The ACM website also has some good suggestions for
-          events. Don&#39;t limit yourself to computer-related events - a
-          volleyball match against the Pure Math Club might be fun.</para>
-        </listitem>
-      </itemizedlist>
-    </sect2>
-
-    <sect2>
-      <title>Announcing the event: Posters and Posts</title>
-
-      <para>Once you have the abstract and the room booked you should get the
-      word out. For starters you should send an announcement to the uw.csc
-      newsgroup and possibly to the members by e-mail (try to reserve the
-      latter for special events, although an update with upcoming events every
-      now and then might be a good idea).</para>
-
-      <para>You&#39;ll also want to make printed posters. Simon Law made a
-      <filename>cscposter.cls</filename> file for LaTeX which can be used to
-      generate nice-looking posters in letter format. Try to not have too much
-      text on the posters so that they grab more attention. Getting posters
-      out earlier rather than later is definitely beneficial. To actually
-      distribute posters you should use several methods:</para>
-
-      <itemizedlist>
-        <listitem>
-          <para>Put up the posters on the CSC boards. There are 3 boards: a
-          small one right by the door of MC3036, a large one in the 3rd floor
-          hallway of the MC and another large one on the second floor of the
-          MC (directly below the third floor hallway).</para>
-        </listitem>
-
-        <listitem>
-          <para>Give 6 posters to Mathsoc. Just drop by 6 posters in the
-          Mathsoc office and they&#39;ll put them up around the MC and DC.</para>
-        </listitem>
-
-        <listitem>
-          <para>Make use of the FEDS poster run. FEDS offers a (reasonably
-          cheap) poster run where they will distribute many posters around
-          campus. Check the <ulink
-          url="http://www.feds.uwaterloo.ca/services/marketing.html">FEDS
-          marketing website</ulink> for pricing and information on how to use
-          it. While we aren&#39;t a FEDS club, we are part of MathSoc, so try
-          to get the &#34;student society&#34; price. Also, make sure you
-          budget for this from Mathsoc, you can probably get funds from them
-          to use this.</para>
-        </listitem>
-      </itemizedlist>
-
-      <para>There are other ways to get people to know about the event. If the
-      event is relevant to classes, try to convince profs to announce it in
-      class (giving them an overhead with the details is a good idea). Also,
-      have the event announced in the Daily Bulletin (a daily update on the UW
-      website about what&#39;s happening on campus). To do so, e-mail Chris
-      Redmond (<email>credmond@uwaterloo.ca</email>).</para>
-
-      <para>Word of mouth is another important channel. Tell others in the CSC
-      (both executives and members) to tell their friends about events. Tell
-      your own friends and classmates about events that they might find
-      interesting. Word of mouth is often how events get most of their
-      publicity.</para>
-
-      <para>Lastly, you&#39;ll want to add the event to the website. Contact
-      the CSC webmaster (or if there is none, the sysadmin) to have him or her
-      do that for you, or find out how to do it yourself. This way others can
-      check for events on the website, and you can also conveniently point
-      people there if they ask, &#34;What events is the CSC offering this
-      term?&#34;</para>
-    </sect2>
-  </sect1>
-
-</chapter>
\ No newline at end of file
index c35a465..c120a81 100644 (file)
@@ -11,9 +11,6 @@
   </p>
     <ul>
       <li><a href="official.html">Official documents</a></li>
-      <li><a href="execmanual.html">Manual for new executives</a></li>
-      <li><a href="procedure.html">Old CSC Procedures manual</a>, to
-      be integrated into the new exec manual</li>
       <li><a href="mathsoc.club.pdf">Mathsoc Clubs manual</a></li>
     </ul>
  </section>
diff --git a/docs/procedure.xml b/docs/procedure.xml
deleted file mode 100644 (file)
index 4c22299..0000000
+++ /dev/null
@@ -1,16 +0,0 @@
-<?xml version='1.0'?>
-
-<!DOCTYPE cscpage SYSTEM "../csc.dtd">
-
-<cscpage title="Old CSC Procedures manual">
-  <header />
-  <section title="The old CSC Procedures Manual">
-    <p>This is an outdated procedures manual written by previous
-    exec. Useful information from this should get moved into the <a
-    href="execmanual.html">new exec manual</a>.</p>
-    <p>The procedures manual is written using LaTeX and is available
-    <a href="procedure/procedure.pdf">in PDF format</a>. The
-    <a href="procedure/procedure.tex">LaTeX source</a> is also on-line.</p>
-  </section>
-  <footer/>
-</cscpage>
diff --git a/docs/procedure/.gitignore b/docs/procedure/.gitignore
deleted file mode 100644 (file)
index 4d0a5fc..0000000
+++ /dev/null
@@ -1,10 +0,0 @@
-*.html
-*.fot
-*.out
-*.fo
-*.pdf
-*.log
-*.aux
-*.ps
-*.dvi
-*.toc
diff --git a/docs/procedure/Makefile b/docs/procedure/Makefile
deleted file mode 100644 (file)
index 97dc693..0000000
+++ /dev/null
@@ -1,36 +0,0 @@
-STYLESHEET = /usr/share/sgml/docbook/stylesheet/xsl/nwalsh/html/docbook.xsl
-FOSTYLESHEET = /usr/share/sgml/docbook/stylesheet/xsl/nwalsh/fo/docbook.xsl
-XSLTPROC = xsltproc
-XMLS = $(wildcard *.xml)
-HTMLS = $(XMLS:.xml=.html)
-
-#all: book.html book.tex book.pdf
-all: procedure.pdf
-
-%.pdf: %.tex
-       pdflatex $<
-
-clean-recurse: clean
-
-clean:
-       rm -f *.html *.fot *.out *.fo *.pdf *.log *.aux *.ps *.dvi *.toc
-
-#book.html: $(XMLS)
-
-#%.html: %.xml
-#      $(XSLTPROC) $(STYLESHEET) $< > $@
-
-#%.fo: %.xml
-#      $(XSLTPROC) $(FOSTYLESHEET) $< > $@
-
-#%.tex: %.xml
-#      openjade -t tex -d /usr/share/sgml/docbook/stylesheet/dsssl/modular/print/docbook.dsl $<
-
-#%.dvi: %.tex
-#      jadetex $<
-
-#%.pdf: %.tex
-#      pdfjadetex $<
-
-#%.ps: %.dvi
-#      dvips -o $@ $<
diff --git a/docs/procedure/csc.procedure.latex b/docs/procedure/csc.procedure.latex
deleted file mode 100644 (file)
index d192c9c..0000000
+++ /dev/null
@@ -1,1377 +0,0 @@
-% This is a latex document.  It can be processed using straight latex.
-\documentclass[11pt]{article}
-\pagestyle{headings}
-\newcommand{\squeezeitems}{\setlength{\itemsep}{0pt}}
-% \input{psfig}
-\usepackage{latexsym}
-\begin{document}
-
-\newcommand{\mathNEWS}{\textsl{math\/}\textsf{NEWS}}
-
-%decomment the below to leave out the beginning CSC logo (forms a box instead)
-%\psdraft
-
-\begin{titlepage}
-\vspace*{72pt}
-
-\begin{center}
-% \ \psfig{figure=pm.ps,height=1.5in}
-
-\Huge
-\vspace*{5pt}
-\textbf{Computer Science Club \\ 
-       Procedures Manual \\ }
-\LARGE
-\vspace*{96pt}
-Kevin Smith  \textit{v1.0  Winter 1989} \\
-Jim Boritz   \textit{v2.0  Winter 1992} \\
-Shannon Mann \textit{v3.0$\alpha$  Winter 1993} \\
-Shannon Mann \textit{v4.0$\alpha$  Summer 2003} \\
-\vspace*{36pt}
-\today
-\end{center}
-\end{titlepage}
-
-\cleardoublepage
-\pagenumbering{roman}
-\tableofcontents
-\cleardoublepage
-\section{Introduction}
-\pagenumbering{arabic}
-
-The Computer Science Club of The University of Waterloo (CSC) has been in
-existence since some time in the early 1960's.  When this is compared with
-the founding dates of the University, the Faculty of Mathematics and the
-Department of Computer Science, it becomes apparent that the CSC has almost
-as much history as the University.  
-
-One of the factors which the CSC has had to deal with is a turnover in its
-membership.  At the CSC, and the university, people come and go.  It is
-often the case that when people go, their knowledge of CSC operations goes
-with them.  Later generations are forced to rediscover, often painfully,
-how the CSC conducts its business.  Frequently, efforts which could be
-channeled into productive tasks are devoted to this rediscovery.
-
-This manual is intented to be a guide and an archive.
-It's authors and contributors hope
-to lay down here as much information as they can about the operation of the
-CSC.  The history of the CSC will also be recorded here.  In part this is
-because there is no other place, but also because a historical context
-should make future decisions easier.  It is the hope of
-everyone involved that this guide will prevent the loss of knowledge
-associated with the loss of long time CSC members.
-
-\section{Membership}
-Membership in the Computer Science Club is open to all students of the
-University of Waterloo, undergraduate and graduate.  This includes
-undergraduates and graduates on a work-term and graduates that are
-registered inactive.
-
-During the W90 term there was a great deal of discussion about who should 
-be entitled to a CSC membership beyond students.  The groups whose ability 
-to obtain a CSC membership came under question are; faculty, staff, 
-alumni and everyone else.  Prior to W90, anyone that wanted a CSC 
-membership was allowed to join regardless of what the current constitution 
-may have said.  Membership was divided into two categories---full and 
-associate---that differed in the ability to hold an executive position 
-and vote in CSC elections.  
-
-In W90 several people felt that the CSC was being taken advantage of, 
-and many non-students were obtaining memberships in order to get an 
-account on WatCSC.  The discussion eventually identified a few key 
-privileges that were felt to be inappropriate for all CSC members.  
-These privileges are: who can vote; who can hold executive positions; 
-and who can obtain a WatCSC account.  The single factor that stood out 
-when trying to allocate these privileges is that the CSC is primarily 
-an undergraduate student organization, and should remain that way.  
-
-% Added by James A. Morrison, ja2morri
-In F02 and S03 this came up again.  At this time WatCSC is no longer around
-and the CSC has a good collection of machines, 4 in the office, and 1 in the
-machine room.  So now any member can hold an account.  However, the right
-to vote and hold an executive position is mostly regulated by Mathsoc since
-Mathsoc defines these things in their club policies.  In S03 the Mathsoc
-council changed their policy to state that voting and the ability to hold
-executive position is available to members of Mathsoc or members of any other
-society who recognizes the club as a club of that society.  So if engineering
-gives us money, we can say we are an Engsoc club and allow engineers to vote
-and hold executive positions.  However, CSC is still primarily and 
-undergraduate Math/CS student organization, and should remain that way.
-
-\section{Exec Positions}
-
-The CSC has four elected positions and one appointed position.  The elected
-positions are: President, Vice-President, Treasurer, and Secretary.  A
-SysAdm is chosen by the exec and ratified by the remaining CSC members
-attending the election meeting.  Each exec position has certain duties 
-associated with them.  When all is well, each exec works to make certain 
-that not only their duties and responsibilities are covered, but also 
-that the other duties of the exec are being met.
-
-\subsection{President}
-
-The President is the person responsible.  As ungrammatical as that may seem,
-it is exactly accurate.  He or she is responsible to make certain that 
-everything the CSC is involved in gets proper attention.  Specifically, 
-the President's duties are:
-\begin{enumerate}
-\squeezeitems
-\item to call and preside at all general, special, and executive meetings 
-of the Club;
-\item to appoint all committees of the Club and the committee chair
-of such committees, except the chair of the Programme Committee; and
-\item to audit, or to appoint a representative to audit,
-the financial records of
-the club at the end of each academic term.
-\end{enumerate}
-Wherever possible, the President should delegate tasks to others.  Not doing
-this can overburden the President.
-
-\subsection{Vice-President}
-
-The Vice-President arranges the talks, tutorials, and tours.  Specific duties
-include:
-\begin{enumerate}
-\squeezeitems
-\item to assume the duties of the President
-in the event of the President's absence;
-\item to act as chair of the Programme Committee; and
-\item to assume those duties of the President
-that are delegated to him by the President.
-\end{enumerate}
-
-In general, the Vice-President does as much as possible to take the load from
-the President.  The Programme Committee is the body of CSC members
-chaired by the Vice-President.  This committee meets to decide what talks
-CSC'ers would be interested in hearing.  They also decide what tours are
-undertaken.  The Vice-President should take care of arranging for rooms,
-the creation of posters and other advertisements.  These tasks often fall
-to the Secretary, overburdening an already difficult position.
-Wherever possible, the Vice-President should introduce the talks, except
-when the President wishes to do so.  If neither President, nor 
-Vice-President can attend, someone should be appointed to introduce the
-speaker and do a Channel 17 Membership Drive.
-
-\subsubsection{Programme Committee}
-The Programme Committee meets to discuss and choose which events the CSC
-will put on each term.  There are certain events the CSC puts on 
-automatically.  However, most events must be chosen and planned ahead of
-time.  The Programme Committee gathers suggestions from their members and
-from the CSC membership regarding what talks and events they would like the
-CSC to sponsor.  From these suggestions, a wide variety of talks and events
-are chosen.  The Vice-President takes the list generated from these meetings
-and organises the events.  To be effective, the Programme Committee should
-meet soon after elections to make initial plans for the terms events.  Meeting
-later in the term can be a good way to add to the activities the CSC plans to
-run.
-
-\subsection{Treasurer}
-
-The Treasurer's job seems simplest.  However, trying to keep track of all 
-the funds that go in and out of the CSC is a somewhat daunting task.
-For more information, see the sections on financial matters 
-(p.\ \pageref{MONEY}), specifically the section on the cashbox 
-(p.\ \pageref{CASHBOX}).
-The specific duties of the Treasurer are:
-\begin{enumerate}
-\squeezeitems
-\item to collect dues and maintain all financial and membership records;
-\item to produce a financial or membership statement when requested;
-\end{enumerate}
-The Treasurer should make arrangements at the end of the term for signing
-authority to be passed on to the next terms exec.  A final audit of the
-terms financial transactions is a great help to the incoming exec, and should
-be done every term.
-
-\subsection{Secretary}
-
-The Secretary's position is perhaps the hardest of all, especially if the
-support people under the Secretary do not work, or worse, are never chosen.  
-The creation of many of the people in support roles (See Alternate Positions,
-below) are for the most to reduce the sometimes herculean amount of work 
-that is dumped upon the shoulders of the Secretary.  The Secretary's duties
-are:
-\begin{enumerate}
-\squeezeitems
-\item to keep minutes of all Club meetings;
-\item to prepare the annual Club report for
-approval by exec council;
-\item to care for all Club correspondence;
-\end{enumerate}
-Often in the past, the Secretary has become the target of ``dumping'' of
-just about all tasks.  This should be discouraged at all costs.  The
-Secretary has specific duties and responsibilites.  As it is, those
-duties can already be taxing.  The CSC Flasher, the Office Manager, and
-the Librarian report to the Secretary.
-
-\subsection{SysAdmin}
-
-The SysAdmin position was added to the exec when the CSC acquired a 
-computer system of their own.  
-The SysAdmins duties are:
-\begin{enumerate}
-\squeezeitems
-\item to operate any and all equipment in the possession of the Club.
-\item to maintain and upgrade the software on equipment that is operated by
-the Club.
-\item to facilitate the use of equipment that is operated by the Club.
-\end{enumerate}
-It has become the continuing policy to have the SysAdmin attempt to get 
-the CSC computer equipment.  See the section on WatCSC (p.\ \pageref{WATCSC}).
-
-\subsection{Alternate Positions}
-
-Several ad hoc positions are also important for the effective running of 
-the CSC.  Often these positions are never filled, requiring one of the exec
-to fill in.  Most of these positions fall under the direct control of the 
-Secretary (though this can expand the Secretaries' duties to an unmanageable
-level).
-
-\subsubsection{Office Manager}
-
-The Office Manager runs the CSC office, making sure the place is tidy, 
-that our recycling gets done, that the office staff is doing what it should
-be doing (kicking people out when there are no office staff present, etc).
-
-The Office Manager reports to the Secretary.
-
-\subsubsection{Office Staff \label{OFFICESTAFF}}
-
-Office Staff are that motley group of people that keep the CSC open all those
-wonderful hours.  In general, they are a group of \textsl{trusted\/}
-individuals chosen by the exec to fulfill this duty.  Office Staff are
-expected to be helpful to people who come to the CSC for assistance.  They
-are expected to assist in keeping the CSC tidy, help sign out books, taking
-money for new memberships, and in general be helpful.  Some Office Staff will
-be accorded the honour of being a key-holding Office Staffer.  See the
-section on keys (p.\ \pageref{KEYS}) for more information.
-
-Office Staff report to the Office Manager.
-
-\subsubsection{Librarian}
-
-The Librarian is the person responsible for keeping the CSC's large library
-of reference material in order.  The Librarian is responsible for culling
-out dated/ruined books and for suggesting the purchase of new books, as well
-as the actual purchasing.  See the section on the library (p.\
-\pageref{LIBRARY}) for more information.
-
-The Librarian reports to the Secretary.
-
-\subsubsection{Poster Person}
-
-One of the most important positions, as the Poster Person is responsible
-for making posters, and getting them distributed.  Often the distribution
-is divided amongst several people.  If this position is not filled, these
-duties should fall to the Vice-President, though it often falls to the
-Secretary.
-
-The Poster Person usually reports to the Vice-President.
-
-\subsubsection{CSC Flasher}
-
-The CSC Flasher is the person who writes the CSC Flash, a short 
-description of what the CSC is doing, published in each bi-weekly
-issue of \mathNEWS.
-Also, it is recurring policy to prepare a short ``Hacker Quiz'' to be
-included at the end of the Flash (the hacker quiz often never happens).
-
-The Flasher usually reports to the Secretary, and should attend all
-Exec and Programme Committee meetings whenever possible.
-
-\subsubsection{Oracle}
-
-This is a position that, of recent, has been left unfilled (mainly due
-to the fact that the club is without a machine at the time of writing).
-The Oracle is a facility by which anyone in the world can send a question 
-to \textsl{oracle@watcsc}, replies are posted on the newsgroup 
-\textsl{uw.csc}.  Be sure to get some good humour-writers for this position 
-(FASS is a good place to look).
-
-Perhaps in the future, a mail alias could be added to undergrad.math
-to allow this service to continue.
-
-The Oracle reports to no-one.
-
-\section{Events}
-
-The CSC puts on several events each term, usually in the form of speakers,
-but including SIGGRAPH video night, and 3B Info Night.  These events provide 
-both an opportunity for CSC members to experience new and interesting
-aspects of CS and to generate interest in CS within the University Community.
-The SIGGRAPH video night attracts students, faculty and staff, seeming 
-universally interesting to all people.
-
-\subsection{Speakers}
-
-The CSC has speakers every term, speaking on a wide range of issues relating
-to computers.  We have had many distinguished speakers pulled from the ranks
-of U(W) faculty, grad students and even undergrad students.  As well, the 
-CSC has managed to bring very distinguished speakers from off campus.  The 
-likes of Bill Gates (W89), John McCarthy (W91), Brian Kernighan, and
-A.K.~Dewdney, just to name a few have honoured us with their wit and wisdom.
-
-The CSC normally takes the speaker out to dinner as a gift of the CSC to
-the speaker.  The dinner also affords an opportunity for a few members to
-hobknob with the speaker, often having discussion that is more interesting
-than the talk that was given.
-
-\subsubsection{Internal}
-
-Internal speakers are the easiest to arrange.  These speakers can be pulled
-from the faculty and students, on a variety of topics.  To arrange one,
-contact the person whom you are interested in having speak.  Once you have
-their interest, choose a date that is agreeable to both you and the speaker
-(by necessity, the speaker gets far more to say :-)  With a date in hand,
-estimate how many people will attend.  For most talks, we can have anywhere
-from 10 to 80 people attending.  Choose an appropriate room and book it for
-that date.  A few days before the talk, order an appropriate number of
-doughnaughts.  When the time comes, have an appropriate person introduce
-the speaker.  After the talk, thank the speaker, and offer doughnaughts and
-tea to all the attendee's.
-
-\subsubsection{External}
-
-External speakers, for the most, are much harder to arrange.  Not only must
-you arrange for all the normal amenities, but also for accommodations for 
-the speaker for atleast one night (if coming from out of town), travel costs
-and an honorarium.  Most of the arrangements can be made by contacting the
-CS Dept.~Secretary (S'03 it was Ursula Theone).  She can make all the 
-%%NAME
-necessary arrangements.  For funding, you can speak to the Faculty of Math, 
-the CS Dept., the ICR, and even Engineering for those speakers who will have
-some interest there.  In W91, John McCarthy visited us, giving two talks, one
-on Elephant, a project of his, the other on NetNews and his experiences with
-attempted censorship at his home campus, Stanford University.  We sold his
-coming here to ICR and others through the talk about Elephant.  Our reason
-for bringing him here was for the NetNews talk, as U(W) was censoring the
-alt branch of NetNews.  Funding was obtained from the Math Faculty for the
-travel costs, from the CS Dept.~for lodging and from ICR for the \$1000
-honorarium. 
-
-Once you have all the difficult things arranged, set the date and time of
-the talk(s) and book the rooms.  If you manage to get an external speaker
-from any real distance, you can pretty much bank on s/he pulling a large
-crowd to the talks.
-
-\subsection{Tutorials}
-
-In keeping with the CSC's purposes of generating interest in computer science
-and its applications, the CSC has held tutorials on UNIX and X-windows.  These
-tutorials are introductory in level and cover a limited number of topics.
-Ideally, the group size will not exceed ten or so, though we have had
-X-windows talks of up to thirty.  Book one of the Descartes labs a week or
-%%NAME
-more earlier with Christy Gillian, Administrative Assistant to the Director
-of MFCF.  Although your group may be small, keeping extra people out of the
-room during these events can be beneficial (keeps distracting noise out).
-A tutorial usually runs for an hour.
-
-\subsection{Tours}
-
-Another favourite CSC event is to arrange for a group to tour one of the
-computer labs.  The DCS mainroom, the CGL lab and the PAMI lab have all 
-been the sites of interesting tours.  To arrange for a tour, it is best to
-contact someone who works there.
-
-\subsection{SIGGRAPH}
-A recurring CSC event is to show the SIGGRAPH video that contains the 
-highlights from the most recent Film \& Video Show.  Since many people are
-co-op, it is possible to show the tape at least twice and possibly three 
-times during the year.  SIGGRAPH video night is always a very popular event.
-
-There are a few constraints that must be kept in mind when trying to organize
-this event.  First, while the SIGGRAPH conference occurs in early August, 
-the video is not available until November or December.  Second, the CSC
-borrows the tape from CGL, thus making us reliant upon CGL to actually
-have the tape.  From time to time there is a lapse in CGL's subscription 
-to the SIGGRAPH Video Review which results in the unavailability of the
-recent tapes.
-
-To borrow the videos from CGL either get a CSC member that is working there
-to borrow them, or contact the Lab Administrative Assistant (Elise Devitt
-as of F90)
-%%NAME
-
-A good place for showing SIGGRAPH videos are the ICR lecture halls in the 
-Davis Centre (DC 1302 \& DC 1304).  The advantage of using these rooms is the
-ability to do the projection on your own.  While DC 1350 and DC 1351 are
-bigger and have more sophisticated equipment, they also require an expensive
-university supplied AV technician (see below).
-As mentioned elsewhere ICR rooms must be booked with the ICR secretary.  
-
-If for some reason it is desireable to use DC 1350 or DC 1351, the
-larger lecture halls, the following procedure should be used. First book
-the room with Bookings (discussed earlier). In order to interface to the
-Electrohome RGB projector on the ceiling the CSC must arrange to have a
-video technician present during the meeting.  For this to happen,
-%%NAME
-Georgina Coutinho x4070 must be informed of the meeting time, date, and
-place.  Unfortunately, this technician (who must be present) charges
-\$25 per hour; there doesn't seem to be a way to get around this.  The
-total charge for the technician should be \$75.
-
-The SIGGRAPH tape shown in W89 was in VHS format, which is good, since
-there is a VHS machine inside the DC 1350/1351 projection rooms.  If the
-tape is in 3/4'' format, then be sure to borrow a 3/4'' player from CGL
-and warn the technician that he will have to interface a 3/4'' player to
-the video console.
-
-The SIGGRAPH tape is usually about 2 hours long.  There are two tables
-of contents included in the tape, it is a good idea not to make the
-audience sit through these boring parts. Fast forward past the first
-one, and call an intermission during the second.  After the intermission
-is a good time to do the Channel 17 Membership Drive!
-
-%%NAME
-It is also a good idea to talk to John Hillhirst x3258.  He is the head
-technician (and not a bureaucrat).  Ask him any technical questions that
-you may have.
-
-Typically around 100-150 people show up for SIGGRAPH, so order around 12
-dozen doughnaughts.
-
-In W89 we had considerable problems switching the lights out in DC 1350.
-Try to make sure that the lights work before starting the show in the future.
-
-\subsection{3B Info Night}
-3B Info Night is a special information session held to help 3B CS
-students select from the vast number of courses offered in fourth year. 
-There should be a 3B Info Night every term that normally has 3B students
-(currently fall and winter).  At some point in the past (F86?) the
-department neglected to have a 3B info night.  This got many students
-upset and caused the CSC to assume a co-sponsorship role for this
-event.  
-
-As long as the department remembers to hold 3B Info Night there should
-not be much of a problem.  The Associate Chairman for Undergraduate
-Studies will arrange for professors to come and speak about the courses.
-The CS department secretary will arrange a location, and produce
-posters.  In this situation the CSC is responsible for; ordering
-refreshments, attempting to get additional faculty members to make an
-appearance, and trying to find some students that can tell what fourth 
-year is really like.  In addition, the CSC President usually attends,
-thanks everyone for showing up, and mentions that there are some real 
-fourth year students to answer questions.
-
-On occasion the department may forget or be hesitant to hold 3B Info night.
-If this situation should ever arise the CSC should, attempt to convince 
-the current Associate Chairman that a 3B Info Night should be held.  
-Failing this the CSC should make arrangements on its own to hold a 
-3B Info Night.  This means booking a room, contacting professors, 
-getting refreshments and everything else that is required.
-
-A typical refreshment order would involve
-\begin{itemize}
-\squeezeitems
-\item 12 dozen doughnaughts
-\item 72 cans of pop
-\item 1 tea urn  coffee urn
-\item 75 tea bags
-\item 1 package of napkins
-\item 2 large milks
-\item 75 sugars
-\item 75 small cups
-\end{itemize}
-
-The cost of this order has been almost exactly \$100.  The CS
-department will pay half when presented with the invoice
-from the math C\&D.  Send the invoice to Jane Prime.
-%%NAME
-
-\subsubsection{Ordering Refreshments}
-Most if not all CSC meetings serve tea and doughnaughts to those that 
-attend.  Everything that is required is ordered from the math C\&D if at all
-possible.  The math C\&D has reasonable rates, they are close by, and they
-are very helpful.  
-
-To make an order the person running the event, or someone they have
-delegated the task to, should contact the C\&D manager (currently Brenda)
-%%NAME
-about three to four days in advance.  She must have advance notice for
-large orders as she has to order the doughnaughts from her supplier.  If an
-emergency, such as someone forgetting to order, arises you can
-usually get about two dozen doughnaughts the same day.  If the order is larger,
-use common sense and go to any of the doughnaught shops off campus.  The other
-items are usually stocked in sufficient quantity for there not to be a
-problem.
-
-A typical order consists of:
-
-\begin{itemize}
-\squeezeitems
-\item 5 +/- 1 dozen doughnaughts 
-\item 1 tea urn
-\item 40 tea bags
-\item 50 cups
-\item 1 half pint milk
-\end{itemize}
-
-If the supply in the office runs out, the following may also need to be
-ordered:
-
-\begin{itemize}
-\squeezeitems
-\item stir stix
-\item napkins
-\end{itemize}
-
-\subsection{Contests}
-
-The CSC holds contests from time to time.  These contests always test the 
-programming skill of the contestants.  The Othello and Arbitrary Game 
-Contest test the skill of the programmers by asking them to program a
-game which will compete against other programs like it.  The ACM Programming
-Contest and our local versions test the programming skill of the programmers
-by asking them to solve several programming problems under a time limit.
-
-\subsubsection{Othello Tournament}
-The Othello Tournament occurs once a year in October or November.  Several
-weeks before the chosen date, an announcement is made on internet and
-elsewhere requesting  (UNFINISHED)
-\subsubsection{Arbitrary Game Contest}
-(WAY UNFINISHED)
-\subsubsection{ACM Scholastic Programming Contest}
-(WAY UNFINISHED)
-\subsubsection{Mini-Contests}
-(WAY UNFINISHED)
-
-
-\section{Room Bookings}
-
-Booking a room made simple:
-\begin{enumerate}
-\squeezeitems
-\item Decide how big the meeting will be.
-\item Decide when the meeting will be.
-\item Decide what kind of venue you will be requiring.
-\item Contact the appropriate individuals with your request.
-\end{enumerate}
-The parties involved will make the booking and usually contact you with
-a confirmation.  If confirmation does not come within a couple of days,
-call them back to get a confirmation.
-
-\begin{table}[b]
-\begin{center}
-\caption[Bookings Table]{Quick Reference for Bookings}
-\vspace*{2pt}
-\begin{tabular}{c c c c} \hline
-Which Room & Seats & Type of Meeting & Page \\ \hline \hline
-Classrooms & 10--50 & Talks and Informal Meetings & \pageref{CLASSROOMS} \\
-ICR Rooms & 30--120 & Formal Talks & \pageref{ICRROOMS} \\
-Colloquium Room (MC 5158) & 50--100 & Formal Talks and Debates & \pageref{COLLOQUIUMROOM} \\
-Theatres & 150+ & Very Large Talks & \pageref{THEATRES} \\ \hline
-\end{tabular}
-\end{center}
-\end{table}
-
-\subsection{Classrooms \label{CLASSROOMS}}
-There are many rooms around campus in which CSC meetings can be held.  Most
-rooms which fall under the general category of classrooms are controlled by
-one of two agencies on campus, ``Scheduling'' or ``Bookings''.  
-
-Officially, Bookings is responsible for reserving rooms for non-course
-events, and Scheduling is sort of responsible for course events.  In the
-past the most efficient method for booking a room was to call scheduling.
-This resulted in a room being booked in about an hour.  Unfortunately in
-recent times Scheduling has refused to book rooms for clubs, requiring us to
-call Bookings.  Bookings uses a very capricious method for booking rooms
-and tends to require a day or two for confirmation.
-
-%%NAME
-Bookings are made by telephone (Zehl Wittington x2207 is the person to
-talk to).  And when the room is confirmed Zehl will send a yellow slip
-to the CSC mailbox in the CS department's mail room.  There is no charge
-for room booking.
-
-\subsection{Davis Centre ICR Rooms \label{ICRROOMS}}
-DC 1302, DC 1304 and DC Lounge are located on the ground floor of the Davis
-Centre.  These are the rooms that are used for ICR Talks, CS Department
-talks etc.  These rooms are controlled by the ICR and can be used by others
-when there are no ICR events taking place.  In order to book one of these
-rooms, arrangements should be made with the ICR at x2042.  No confirmation
-is provided, and someone will have to pick up the key from the ICR
-secretary on the day of the talk.  As of W93, ICR stopped booking these rooms
-for clubs.  See the faculty advisor, or the CS Dept.~secretary to book.
-
-\subsection{Math Colloquium Room (MC 5158) \label{COLLOQUIUMROOM}}
-The Math Colloquium Room (MC 5158) is a mid-size room that can comfortably
-hold about 50 people.  It has lovely wooden walls, and gentle lighting.
-This is where most Math Faculty talks asides from CS are given.  The room
-has comfortable chairs which can be rearranged into any desired formation
-which makes it suitable for meetings such as debates.  To book the room,
-contact the secretary of the Executive Assistant to the Dean at x2592.  
-No confirmation is provided, but security is responsible for unlocking 
-the room.  It may be worthwhile to make sure that security knows this.
-
-\subsection{Theatres \label{THEATRES}}
-Large events require large theatres.  There are two large theatres on
-campus; ``Theatre of the Arts'' in Modern Languages and Humanities Theatre
-in Hagey Hall.  Both of these must be booked through the Theatre Centre
-(x2126).  In all likelihood this will lead to the Theatre Manager, Peter
-Houston (x6570) getting in touch with you to make the arrangements.
-%%NAME
-Since the theatres are in heavy demand it is wise to book them WELL IN
-ADVANCE. Most people that use the theatres book about a YEAR in advance.
-
-Campus organizations are not charged a fee for the use of the theatres,
-but there is a charge for ushers and technicians.  Ushers and
-technicians are not a choice but a must, they come with the theatre. The
-number of ushers present is dependent upon the predicted size of the
-crowd.  The technician is required to ``configure'' the room prior to the
-event.  Any special equipment required for the event (e.g. slide
-projector), should be arranged with the technician a few weeks in
-advance.
-
-The biggest problem for the CSC is that we are not a Fed club and thus
-have to rely upon someone else to recognize us.  In the dark ages the 
-CSC was able to go through MathSoc to book the theatres.  Unfortunately
-this didn't work out the time the CSC used the theatre for Bill Gates' 
-talk.  Eventually the Faculty of Math indicated that they `recognized'
-us as an official club.  At the time recognition was done by Lyn Williams
-who was Executive Assistant to the Dean of Math.  
-%%NAME
-
-\section{Financial Matters \label{MONEY}}
-The CSC currently receives funding from
-\begin{itemize}
-\squeezeitems
-\item MathSoc
-\item Engsoc
-\item Membership fees
-\item Computer Science Department
-\end{itemize}
-
-At the beginning of each term the executive, past executive, or some
-experienced nominees must compose a budget.  The budget should be a good
-estimate of how much money the CSC expects to spend during the term. In
-order to pay for its activities the CSC will rely on the sources of
-funding listed above.   Past budgets make for good reference material
-when creating the new budget.
-
-\subsection{MathSoc}
-The CSC budget must be prepared in time to be presented to the
-MathSoc treasurer in advance of the MathSoc budget meeting.  This way
-the MathSoc treasurer can discuss the budget with the CSC prior to the
-meeting, thus avoiding the possibility of open conflict.
-
-During the S89 term MathSoc made some revisions to its constitution that 
-describe the procedure that clubs must follow in order to obtain funding.
-It is the responsibility of the CSC budget committee and especially the
-Treasurer to be aware of MathSoc's requirements for funding.
-
-\subsection{EngSoc}
-EngSoc typically gives some money to clubs that have engineering students 
-as members.  The amount that EngSoc donates has varied wildly from term to
-term, but seems to have settled out at about \$100 (F90).  To get money 
-from EngSoc, the CSC should submit a request to the EngSoc Treasurer along
-with the CSC's proposed budget.  The CSC Treasurer should be present at the
-EngSoc meeting where the budget is discussed in case any questions arise. 
-
-\subsection{Bank Account}
-The CSC has a chequing account at the Campus Centre CIBC.  After the executive
-is elected each term, signing authority must be obtained for the new
-president and treasurer.  The bank has a special form for transferring 
-signing authority. It requires that either a previous holder of signing 
-authority or the faculty advisor for the club approve the transfer of signing
-authority to the new president and treasurer.
-
-\subsection{University Billing Code}
-The CSC has a university billing code to which almost any university provided
-service can be charged.  The list of services include: Audio Visual, Graphics 
-Services, and the Book Store.  
-
-The CSC's billing code is 901-1179-03.  The CSC's billing code happens to
-be a `power' billing code in that it can have funds transferred into it as
-well as having charges made against it.
-
-\subsection{Cashbox Procedures \label{CASHBOX}}
-The CSC has a cashbox that serves as the collection point for membership
-fees and the disbursement point for petty cash.  The cashbox has two keys.
-One key remains in the possession of the current treasurer and the second key
-is part of the `talisman of power' that is held by the office staffer
-currently in charge of the office.  The cashbox should remain locked at all
-times except when money is being deposited or withdrawn.  More information
-can be found in the section on office staffers.
-
-Prior to the current procedure governing access to the cashbox the CSC
-made several attempts to regulate the flow of money through the cashbox.
-The earliest method was to have the person signing up new members to deposit
-the membership fee in the cashbox.  Since there are only two keys the cashbox
-remained unlocked most of the time.  Whenever funds were needed to pay the
-C\&D bill, pay for posters, or other miscellaneous expenses money would be
-withdrawn from the cashbox.   It was hoped that the person making the 
-withdrawl would leave a note in the cashbox indicating how much had been 
-withdrawn and for what purpose.  This method never worked because
-people were did not indicate how much had been withdrawn.
-When the cashbox is unregulated, money flows in and out of the cashbox
-and for some reason it is impossible to get people to accurately record
-how much money is being withdrawn for various and sundry expenses
-(mostly posters and C\&D charges).
-
-Several attempts have been made to regulate and control the cash flow.  Chris 
-Browne a one time treasurer and accounting student suggested that nothing
-be paid out in cash by the CSC.  Instead, all disbursements would be made
-by cheque regardless of the amount because it would be a small price to pay
-for the improved record keeping that the CSC would gain.  He also intended to 
-implement some sort of petty cash procedure but ran out of time.  Given the
-attitudes of the average CSC member it is unlikely that a typical petty cash
-mechanism would have worked anyhow.
-
-During the W90 term the CSC was prey to a low-life that saw fit to steal over
-\$200 in membership fees from the cashbox.  The result was that some strict 
-procedures were put in place to more carefully control access to the cashbox.
-
-For more details see the section on Office Staff (p.\ \pageref{OFFICESTAFF}).
-
-\section{Resources}
-
-\subsection{Audio Visual Equipment}
-Anything aside from chalk and a blackboard that is required for a
-presentation, should be obtained from the University's Audio Visual
-Department.
-
-Audio Visual needs to have someone to bill in the case of damages to 
-equipment.  Fortunately the CSC does have a university billing code.  
-Unfortunately Audio Visual is a puppet bureaucracy, and they don't trust
-students.  Some person in the administration such as the CSC's Faculty 
-Advisor, or the EADM does the recognition thing for us.
-
-In general copyright laws prohibit the screening of films to more than ten
-people without permission from the copyright holder.  What this means is
-that most movies rented at the local rental shop can not be screened
-publicly.  Audio Visual follows the law and thus does not provide equipment
-for such screenings.
-
-\subsubsection{Showing movies}
-Rent from the Fed record store, Becker's, or Bandito.
-Or better yet, borrow a movie from a club member!
-In order to rent a VCR from the Feds you must present
-both a driver's license and a VISA card.
-
-Audio Visual considers it illegal to show a VCR tape to a large
-group of people such as a CSC meeting.  Realistically, this is
-true.  So, to show rented movies at a club meeting, the CSC
-must obtain equipment elsewhere.
-
-One option is to book the DCS course room (MC 2009), since
-Audio Visual does not control DCS.  Talk to Bob Hicks x2194
-%% NAME
-to book this room; if Bob is on vacation, try Carol Vogt,
-she usually knows what is going on in DCS.
-There is an overhead Electrohome RGB projector
-that can be used to hook up a VCR or a computer.  This room has a VHS VCR
-and stereo sound, as well visual hookups to do online demonstrations to
-a group of people.
-
-Another option is to borrow equipment from the nice folks at CGL.
-CGL has 2 26'' televisions, two 3/4'' VCRs, a VHS VCR,
-and a 37'' monitor.  
-
-\subsubsection{Showing Movies the legal way}
-As mentioned elsewhere, it is illegal to show a movie that you rent from a
-video store to a crowd of more than ten people.  In order to show a movie to
-a crowd, the right permissions must first be obtained from whomever holds
-the copyright.  For these reasons the university maintains a film library
-full of films for which permission has been obtained.  The film library
-spans a wide variety of topics and has a few good films which can be shown at
-the beginning of term.
-
-To arrange for these films it is best to talk to the film librarian in E2
-1309.  His name is (    ) he is very helpful and knows the content of an
-incredible number of films.  Some films are stored locally and can be
-obtained within 24 hours.  Other films are held by individual departments,
-or by other universities.  Depending on the situation, upto a weeks notice
-may be required.
-
-Once the film(s) has been arranged AV will be very co-operative. 
-Depending on the format (film or video), a projectionist and the
-equipment can be booked.  As a campus organization, the CSC can obtain
-equipment at no charge.  The remaining issue of concern is who will pay
-for damages.  Luckily enough this issue has been settled.  Howie has
-signed some form indicating that the CS department recognizes us.  It
-also has our university billing number just in case.  Just remember that
-the CSC is not a FED club.  I believe that the FEDS cover damages
-incurred by their clubs and this is why AV is continually asking about
-this. 
-
-For video AV will provide a TV and play the tape from their central
-facility.  Someone should make sure that the TV gets to the room on time
-and is hooked up.  Since the projectionist has very little to do the
-cost is the minimum for using a projectionist, about \$10.  If the format
-is film arrangements must be made for a screen and a projector.  Since
-the projectionist is devoted to us for the evening the cost is slightly
-higher.  No figures are available on this though as it has never been
-done. 
-
-\subsubsection{Bureaucracy}
-
-Audio Visual Services is an incredible bureaucracy, tread
-carefully.  Harry, x3257, who is responsible for actually giving
-out equipment, requires two things:  a letter of recognition
-%%NAME
-for the CSC (I obtained one from Lyn Williams -- Administrative
-Assistant to the Dean's Office, and a GOD to the CSC).  Basically
-this letter from Lyn would read ``The CSC is a bona-fide CS
-department-sponsored club with billing code 901-1179-03, the
-current president is $<$name$>$''.  Hopefully this won't be
-necessary.  All Harry usually requires is a letter from the
-CSC saying who the current executive is; no formal signatures
-are required for this.  The letter from Lyn will only be necessary
-if Harry says ``I've never heard of the CSC'' (he has a very
-short memory).
-
-Remember: The CSC is not a fed club.
-
-Rule of Thumb: avoid using AV equipment.  We can use the
-ICR lecture halls or the DCS course room for movie nights (or borrow TVs 
-from CGL), and get a technician for SIGGRAPH through Georgina x4070.
-
-
-\subsection{Library \label{LIBRARY}}
-The CSC library is a facility that almost everyone considers to be important
-and useful.  The CSC library can never hope to compete with the 
-University Library in terms of quantity.  Nonetheless, the CSC library can 
-provide a qualitatively different resource of value.  This tends to be done
-by selecting extremely current books and books considered classics for the
-library.  The library is not meant to be everything to everyone.  It is 
-intended to be representative of the library of a computer scientist.
-
-Every term a sizeable portion of the CSC budget is allocated to library 
-acquisitions.  Most of this money is used to purchase ``new'' books.  
-Unfortunately, the CSC library like every other library suffers from the 
-theft and loss  of its books.  Thus some portion of the library budget will 
-be used to replace books that have disappeared from the collection.  The 
-fact that library books will disappear should be accepted.
-
-The process for purchasing new books is fairly simple.  First, the CSC
-librarian solicits and gathers suggestions for books that would be 
-appropriate for the library.  Once funds become available for the book
-purchase to be made, the library committee ranks the suggestions that
-have been received to date.  Based upon these rankings books are purchased 
-until the book budget has been spent.
-
-\subsection{Office Space}
-The CSC was one of the first clubs to have space allocated to it by the Math
-Faculty.  It was a long time ago (mid 70s) and the details are lost in the 
-mists of time.  The initial CSC office was a small cubicle that housed the 
-library, a sofa a desk and eventually the core of WatCSC when it was still
-an HP9000.  Due to the increase in CSC activity in F87 and W88 the CSC 
-managed to convince the Dean's Office to allocate it some additional space.
-Thus when new space became available on the 3rd floor of the MC building
-\mathNEWS moved and dividing wall that used to separate the two 
-offices was removed, effectively doubling the size of the office.
-It turned the CSC office space into some of the prime office space on
-the third floor.
-
-It is very important to remember that the CSC space is provided 
-directly by the Faculty of Mathematics.  MathSoc has no official
-control over the space allotted to the CSC.  
-
-From time to time MathSoc, having nothing better to do, considers 
-rearranging the offices in the third floor Pink Tie Zone.  This is usually
-done with the idea of getting more space and exposure for the main MathSoc
-office.  Due to the relative desireability of the CSC space, the CSC 
-typically becomes an unwilling (and often unknowing) participant in 
-the MathSoc grand plan.  
-
-The greatest danger lies in MathSoc doing something before the CSC 
-is aware of the plans and can voice an opinion to the Dean's Office.
-Ultimately it is the Dean's office that is responsible for any 
-allocation of office space (including MathSoc's).  MathSoc can 
-not unilaterally deprive the CSC of its office space.  However, it 
-can ask the Dean's Office to reallocate space or make other changes.  
-Typically the Dean's Office does not question MathSoc proposals 
-believing them to have been previously discussed by all groups 
-concerned.  Thus the importance of making the CSC opinion known.  
-As long as the CSC gets a say in the process there is very little 
-to worry about.  
-
-In the past MathSoc plans have have been stalled once the CSC
-discovered them and voiced its disapproval to the Dean's Office.  This
-is because the Dean's Office upon sensing a lack of consensus among
-student groups tends to be reluctant to proceed.  In addition, the lack
-of continuity within the MathSoc executive means that plans formulated
-within a term must usually be completed during the same term.  Usually
-space reallocation plans come along late enough in a term that stalling
-them for a couple of weeks effectively kills them.
-
-If MathSoc were ever to make a determined effort to see the floor space
-rearranged it would very likely happen.  Fortunately this has not yet been 
-the case.  The best the CSC could do in the face of a concerted effort
-is insure that it is being treated equitably. In the past the CSC has 
-been perfectly willing to trade its location for an increase in space. 
-
-The CSC has been given assurances from the Executive Assistant to the 
-Dean that if there are any space changes, the CSC will get at least 
-an equivalent space if not more.
-
-\subsubsection{Keys \label{KEYS}}
-
-For much of the CSC's days of having office space there existed a few keys 
-that only exec members had.  The exec was primarily responsible for opening
-the CSC in the morning.  In F90, the exec arranged for keys from Key Control
-to be released to certain members of the office staff.  This made keeping the
-office open so much easier.  
-
-A great deal of trouble arose when MathSoc got involved;  First, it was 
-demanded that we take a \$20 deposit for the keys, to ensure that the
-keys be returned.  We acceded this demand, arranging with the Assistant
-to the Dean for key permits.  Slowly, over several terms, MathSoc took more
-and more control over the signing of the key permits, until by S92, they had
-complete control over signing.  Further, to complicate things, each new term
-a new policy and procedure for doing key permits was put into place.  In F92,
-the exec finally took steps to eliminate the need for keys altogether.  Under
-the current policy, there is little or no need for us to request keys from 
-MathSoc.  Please see a past exec member for the grimy details.
-
-\subsection{Locker}
-In order to provide some remote storage of magnetic media, the CSC has
-obtained a locker from MathSoc.  MathSoc has agreed to provide the CSC with
-locker \#7 each and every term, on the condition that someone on the CSC
-executive signs for the locker.  This provision is documented by MathSoc in
-their locker distribution procedures.  Any failure to have locker \#7 set
-aside for the CSC represents a failure on MathSoc's part.  In F90, members
-of the CSC kindly wrote a program to generate a nice listing of all 
-locker numbers.  In this list, locker \#7 is permanently listed as the CSC's.
-In F92, this program had been forgotten, forcing locker \#7 to be given
-out to some student.  Given MathSoc's propensity for screwing up this simple
-procedure, someone should check early each term that MathSoc is indeed using
-the list generated from the CSC's program.  If it isn't, they should pencil
-the CSC into locker \#7.
-
-\subsection{Computer Accounts}
-Several nice people in High Places have donated a free computer account to 
-the CSC; \textsl{csc@watmath\/}.  Supervision of this account is 
-responsibility of the entire executive.  This point is clearly mentioned 
-in the CSC constitution.
-
-\subsubsection{MFCF accounts}
-\textsl{csc@watmath\/} is provided to the CSC by MFCF.  Since billing on 
-all MFCF UNIX machines is fairly relaxed, there are few restrictions on the 
-use of this account.  Any member of the current term's executive is free to 
-use the account for whatever they please.  In addition, people who need access
-to the CSC account for CSC purposes is also free to use the account.  The
-only restriction is that the account should not become a facility for giving
-others access to a UNIX account.  Lastly, the account is provided with free
-laser printing.  This privilege should not be abused as this could result
-in its withdrawl.
-
-\subsubsection{Exec Accounts on Undergrad.math}
-In F91, the CSC attempted to get a CSC account created on the undergrad
-network.  Ostensively, this was to give the CSC access to the X-window
-terminals for creation of posters and CSC documents.  Due to a change
-in ONet policy, MFCF was disallowed giving out accounts that more than
-one person would have access to.  MFCF compromised by giving any exec 
-member a personal account on the undergrad system, if they did not already
-have one.  As all undergrad math students already have an account, this works
-out to giving non-math exec members accounts on undergrad.math. 
-
-\subsection{Computer Equipment on Loan}
-
-The CSC has managed to borrow a large supply of equipment from various 
-groups.  It is important to note that the CSC is responsible for 
-maintaining this equipment, and replacing it if it is stolen.  A 
-separate policy for the use and administration of this equipment 
-was created during the S89 term.
-
-Most of the hardware that the CSC has, was obtained on an indefinite loan
-basis.  This means that the equipment does not really belong to the CSC, it
-belongs to the group that lent us the equipment.  On the other hand, the
-fact that we have the equipment means that it is of no use to anyone else.
-
-\subsubsection{Math Faculty Computing Facility}
-Sometime about the summer of 1987 MFCF and the Faculty decided that certain
-services would no longer be provided to undergraduates.  One was 50 pages
-of free laser printing.  Another was the ability to ask the operators to
-archive a students files to tape.  So as to not completely eliminate the 
-ability to archive ones files, the Faculty instructed MFCF to provide
-MathSoc with a microcomputer which could be used for file archival.  
-
-Eventually students wanted to archive their files and the CSC began to
-investigate.  It was discovered that MathSoc had not bothered to go pick up
-the PC from MFCF.  The MathSoc Treasurer at the time was Joel Crocker.  He
-instructed Jim Boritz to feel free to pursue the matter.  When Jim managed
-to get the PC, Joel suggested that the CSC could operate the PC since it was
-unlikely that anyone in MathSoc would know exactly what to do.
-
-From time to time MathSoc remembers that the PC actually belongs to them
-and they become concerned about its use.  About a day later they come to 
-the conclusion that its doing fine in the CSC since we have the expertise
-and we tend to be open at lot more than the MathSoc office.
-
-In F89 MathSoc managed to buy a computer of their own.  Since that time
-most MathSoc people have become much less concerned about how the PC is used.
-A few months later the CSC obtained complete control over the PC from MathSoc
-council.  In the months following, the PC gradually fell apart.  After DCS 
-installed an FTP terminal server in the IO Room (MC1063), the need for the
-PC had dropped to nil.  Hardware errors on the hard drive finally convinced 
-the exec of S91 that the machine was past its useful lifetime.  The machine
-was taken out of service and surplussed.
-
-The CSC also has two terminals that it has obtained from MFCF.  The CSC
-should always have at least one terminal.  It the terminal dies, talk to
-the Executive Assistant to the Dean of Math.  
-
-\begin{itemize}
-\squeezeitems
-\item 1 Wyse 75 terminal
-\item 1 VC 404 terminal
-\end{itemize}
-
-The VC 404 terminal was in continual disrepair and was traded to a fellow 
-member of the CSC on workterm on campus for the Ann Arbor Ambassador in his
-office (He was not using the terminal and sought some advantage for the 
-CSC).  This terminal in turn died of keyboard flakiness.  In W92, the CSC
-borrowed a Wy75 terminal from \mathNEWS.  To date, \mathNEWS knows that 
-we have their terminal, but, has not requested its return.  As they had 
-just received a new Wy99GT terminal, \mathNEWS staff seem unconcerned 
-about the old terminal.
-
-Terminals currently in the CSC's hands:
-\begin{itemize}
-\squeezeitems
-\item 1 Wyse 75 terminal (owned by MFCF)
-\item 1 Wyse 75 terminal (owned by \mathNEWS)
-\item 1 Ann Arbor Ambassador (owned by MFCF --- broken keyboard)
-\end{itemize}
-
-\subsubsection{Department of Computing Services}
-All networks on campus fall under the control of DCS.  Any problems should
-be directed to them.  As of the W90 term the CSC has the following 
-connections:
-
-\begin{itemize}
-\squeezeitems
-\item 1 serial connection through the Sytek network
-\item 1 serial connection through the Gandalf network
-\item 1 direct serial connection to Maytag
-\end{itemize}
-
-\subsection{WatCSC \label{WATCSC}}
-In the F87 term the executive felt that a computer science club, should
-have computing facilities which went beyond a single terminal.  This was
-due in part to an MFCF decision earlier in the year to no longer
-allow undergraduates to send mail, or post news to machines outside the
-University.  The CSC attempted to have these privileges restored. At
-the same time the CSC investigated means by which it could provide mail and
-news services to undergraduates.  
-
-The executive was told of a short lived organization
-named the Open Computer Group that in 1985 had obtained free of charge four
-PDP 11/70 computers that had been retired by the University.
-Unfortunately the Open Computer Group was unable to generate sufficient
-interest and activity.  The group folded after a few months and the
-machines were eventually surplused by the University.  
-In 1986 the Symbolic Computation Group offered the CSC some 
-equipment that was no longer being used.  The executive at the time 
-turned down the offer because they felt the hardware was too noisy and bulky.  
-
-In response to this new direction, the executive investigated what happened
-to the above hardware.  It was discovered that the PDP 11's had been sold.
-Luckily, the equipment that SCG offered was still available.  Within a
-matter of days the CSC had obtained from SCG a few pieces of
-Hewlett-Packard hardware that would eventually become the heart of WatCSC.   
-
-Some investigation revealed that Hewlett-Packard donated four systems to
-the university some time in 1984.  When donated these machines included
-a maintenance coverage for a year.  After the initial project for the 
-machines died they were dispersed to various people around the Computer
-Science department.  Two went to the Symbolic Computation Group, one went
-to the Computer Systems group and the fourth went to J.D. Lawson a former
-professor.  When Prof. Lawson left the university the CSC acquired the 
-serial card and some manuals from his machine, the rest of the equipment
-eventually ended up with the Office Automation Group.
-
-As demand for disk storage, memory and other assorted peripherals grew 
-the CSC began to acquire these other systems.  In early 1989 the CSC 
-finally got hold of the last HP system that had gone to the Office Automation
-Group.  
-
-\section{The ACM \label{ACM}}
-
-The CSC is associated with another lesser known club by the name of
-``University of Waterloo Student Chapter of the ACM ''.  In order to be a
-member of the ACM student chapter, one must be a member of the ACM as
-well.  This restriction is in conflict with the idea that anyone should
-be able to be a member of the CSC.  The result is that the ACM student
-chapter has no real members.  
-
-Even though the ACM student chapter has no official members, the CSC desires
-to keep the student chapter operational.  This has resulted in the
-creation of the fictional person known as Calum T. Dalek.  Calum is a
-full member of the ACM and serves as the chair of the student chapter
-of the ACM.
-
-\subsection{ACM Requirements}
-In order to maintain our status as a student chapter of the ACM we must
-fulfil two requirements.
-
-\begin{enumerate}
-\squeezeitems
-\item Each term a chapter activity report must be filled out and mailed 
-to the ACM Student Chapter Chairperson, and the ACM Student Chapter
-liaison.  
-
-\item Once a year a financial statement must be mailed to the ACM.
-\end{enumerate}
-
-\subsubsection{Activity Report}
-
-The student chapter activity report is a single sheet of paper
-on which we list the members of the executive for the ACM
-student chapter along with a list of our activities.  Since only
-Calum is a real member of the ACM, his is the only name that
-appears on the activity report with an ACM membership number.  
-Fictional names are created for the other executive members of
-the student chapter of the ACM.  The membership number is left
-blank or has a ``?'' inserted.  The final requirement is a faculty
-sponsor.  Our current faculty sponsor is Howie Pell, however, he
-is also not a member of the ACM.
-
-If the ACM does not receive a single activity report over the
-course of a year they will place the student chapter on
-probation.  To extricate ourselves from this situation we need
-to mail activity reports and make sure they are received.
-
-\subsubsection{Financial Statement}
-
-For some strange and mysterious reason the ACM continues to send
-us an annual request for financial information.  Apparently in
-the U.S. the ACM can derive some sort of tax benefit from its
-student chapters.  Since we are a Canadian chapter this is not
-the case. This makes filling out the financial form is very easy.
-Just write ``Not Applicable --- Canadian Chapter'', across the top of
-the form.
-
-\subsubsection{Calum's Membership}
-
-Calum T. Dalek is a student member of the ACM.  Membership fees
-are currently in the neighbourhood of US\$ 90 and are due
-sometime before March each year.  Little attempt is made to 
-distribute the cost over all three terms.  Through Calum's
-membership the CSC receives the following ACM publications.  
-
-\begin{itemize}
-\squeezeitems
-\item Communications of the ACM
-\item Transactions on Graphics
-\item Transactions on Programming Languages and Systems
-\item SIGGRAPH conference proceedings
-\item Oopsla conference proceedings
-\item Asplos conference proceedings
-\item Sigplan notices
-\item Computer Graphics
-\end{itemize}
-
-\section{Relations with other Groups}
-Getting anything done on campus requires communication with several other
-groups.  The section is meant to provide some perspective on the relations
-which the CSC has had with a few of the more important campus
-organizations.
-
-\subsection{Math Faculty}
-
-%%NAME
-The Computer Science Club enjoys a fairly good relationship with the
-Math Faculty.  Most of the CSC's contact with the faculty is through Lyn
-Williams, Executive Assistant to the Dean of Math.  Lyn has been very
-helpful to the CSC by vouching for us in our relations with other
-departments.  
-
-On occasion, when the political climate requires it, the CSC has
-communicated its needs directly to the Dean of Math.
-
-\subsection{Computer Science Department}
-
-The CSC also enjoys a good relationship with the CS department.  A
-current CSC objective is to get the CS department to provide some
-funding for bringing in speakers.
-
-\subsection{Federation of Students}
-The CSC is not a FED club.  This is sometimes important for billing things
-like theatres and audio visual equipment.  Most of the rest of the time
-this is not important.  
-
-Folk lore has it that the CSC does not want to become a FED club.  This is
-because the FEDS have some strange requirements of their clubs which do not
-mesh well the type of members the CSC wants.  We seem do do fine with the
-situation as it exists, but this does not mean that some accurate
-information should be obtained in the future.
-
-\subsection{Mathematics Society}
-The CSC's relationship with MathSoc is somewhat of a never-ending
-saga.  This is mostly due to the fluctuation of the MathSoc executive,
-especially the treasurer.  For the most part, relations tend to be
-pretty good.  The letdown usually comes at the beginning of the term
-when MathSoc has its budget meeting.  Most people on MathSoc council are
-indifferent to the CSC.  However, once a single dissenting opinion
-is expressed, there tends to be a cavalcade of discussion.   At this
-time (S89) MathSoc is preparing a ``Club Policy'' which should eliminate a
-great deal of the capriciousness involved.
-
-\subsection{Engineering Society}
-
-\subsection{Science Society}
-The CSC has a few members which come from science.  This has caused us to
-seek funding from the SciSoc in the same manner as EngSoc.  Unfortunately,
-SciSoc exists for the most part to orient students and run the Science
-C\&D.  Beyond that they are fragmented into other groups based on the major
-departments within the faculty.  The result is that SciSoc really doesn't
-have much extra money and has been unwilling to send some our way.
-
-\section{Consulting}
-The CSC operates a ``Friendly Consulting Service'' designed to provide 
-assistance to computer users at all levels.  The CSC has provided this 
-service for as long as anyone can remember.  Some of the reasons that the
-CSC promotes itself in this manner are; hours of availability far in excess
-of both DCS and MFCF consultants, ability to provide expert support at 
-almost any skill level, and a desire to promote computer awareness in 
-general.
-
-Although the Friendly Consulting Service tends to maintain a high profile
-within the CSC it consumes almost no resources.  This is achieved by running
-the service in an ad hoc volunteer manner.  Essentially anyone present in 
-the CSC office qualified to answer questions is automatically a part of the
-consulting service.  As confused people wander into the CSC office, they
-should be offered assistance by the ``qualified'' people.
-
-\section{The Authors}
-This document has been compiled, edited, revised, mangled and had other
-unsightly things done to by several people of the course of its development.
-This section is meant to record their contribution and 
-provide them with some recognition for their efforts.
-
-Version 1.0 of the procedures manual was written by Kevin Smith based
-on his experiences as CSC president during W89.  It was originally intended
-as a ``President's Survival Guide'', but has subsequently been expanded into
-a compendium of procedures to assist and guide the CSC's operations.
-
-In the second author's words:
-\begin{quotation}
-Version 2.0 of the procedures manual was written by me (Jim Boritz) long after
-I had been president of the CSC in F87 and W88.  At the time that the 
-Version 2.0 undertaking began in W90, I was desperately seeking a way 
-of avoiding my Master's essay and so devoted a fair amount of effort 
-and roughly quadrupled the size of the original V1.0 manual.  I also 
-added \LaTeX\ formatting because I was keen on \TeX\ at the time and was
-considering using it for my essay.  In general, I would have preferred to 
-format the document using bare \TeX\ along with the macros that I had 
-developed.  However, knowing the CSC, I decided not to rely upon them 
-keeping the macros around with the document and opted for the standard
-\LaTeX\ macros (which really are ok once you get over the NIH syndrome).
-After I graduated I asked for some time in which to add even more 
-material to this already enormous document.  I did manage to make a few 
-additions and passed the manual back to the CSC for use and comment.  
-Foolishly, I thought there would be even further additions forthcoming.
-It is now a little over a year later (Feb. 21, 1992) and more than a 
-year and a half since I have been active in CSC affairs.  I managed to 
-finally add one last section (Office Space).  If pressed I could probably
-describe some of the other items in historical context (I love historical
-contexts), but it is time for the sections that have already been 
-written to be brought up to date by someone else.
-\end{quotation}
-
-In the words of the third author:
-\begin{quotation}
-I (Shannon Mann) took over the authorship of the procedure's manual in W92.
-I broke it down into sections, distributed it across several files and
-eventually threw out all the work I had done on it, as I felt it would
-never survive in so many chunks.  In W93, my position of computer operator
-with DCS was ``declared redundant'', leaving me with plenty of time on my
-hands to do all the updating I had planned.  Since then, I have added a
-titlepage, a table of contents, several sections and tables and even a few
-appendices.  In my updating of this document, I have removed a good 7 pages,
-mostly dealing with surplussed computer equipment.  To the remaining I have
-added 12+ pages, bringing the final count to almost 40.  Added are the
-sections on the exec positions, events, and contests, and expanded are the 
-sections on computer equipment and WatCSC.  The document has undergone a
-dramatic restructuring, pulling similar information themes together and
-amongst one-another.  
-It is my hope that this document will continue to be updated and expanded,
-and that I will only be the third of many authors.
-\end{quotation}
-
-\appendix
-
-\newpage
-\begin{center}
-\large\bf Appendices \\
-\end{center}
-
-\section{CSC How-To}
-
-This section contains brief notes explaining how to do common CSC tasks.
-
-\subsection{Starting a Term}
-
-Every term starts with an election.  A past exec member or an involved
-member should find someone to act as CRO in the first few days of the
-term.  The election should be held no later than the third thursday of the
-term.  Due to all that is done in the CSC in the fall term, the election
-should be held earlier if at all possible.  See `Holding an Election' below 
-for more details.  Very soon after the election, the President and Treasurer
-with help from past exec, should prepare a budget to be submitted to the 
-treasurer of MathSoc.  Visiting the MathSoc Treasurer earlier than the 
-meeting which okays budgets has proven profitable, allowing CSC budgets to
-be passed without much fuss.  A budget with a request should be sent to 
-EngSoc, as we often can manage a small request from them (about \$50 per
-term).
-
-\subsection{Running a Contest}
-
-\newpage
-\section{Term Event Summaries}
-
-This section contains brief summaries of events that the CSC does on an 
-on-going basis.  These timelines should be used as a reference, to make
-sure main CSC events are accomplished.
-
-\begin{table}[hb]
-\begin{tabular}{@{$\Box$} l p{3in}}
-Event & Details \\ \hline \hline
-Elections & Held as soon as possible, no later than the third thursday of the
-month \\ \hline
-Budgets & Directly after elections to be turned in to MathSoc and \mbox{EngSoc}
-with a request for funding \\ \hline
-Programme Committee & Meets as soon as possible after elections to gather
-ideas for talks, tours and other events for the term \\ \hline
-\end{tabular}
-\caption{Start Term Checklist}
-\end{table}
-
-\subsection{Fall Term}
-
-\begin{tabular}{p{1.2in} p{1.4in} p{2in}}
-Date & Event Name & Details \\ \hline \hline
-Earliest Possible & Start Term Checklist & See above \\ \hline
-Last Weekend in Sept & Local ACM Contest & Selects teams to go to the
-regionals --- prefer earlier if possible\\ \hline
-First Friday in Oct & ACM Registration & Register teams selected with the
-contest \\ \hline
-First Weekend in Nov & ACM Regionals & Kick major ass :-) \\ \hline
-Oct or Nov & Othello Tournament & Announce four weeks early \\ \hline
-Mid-Nov & 3B Info Night & \\ \hline
-Week before Finals & Ctrl-D Dinner & Dine with friends --- end of term send-off \\ \hline
-\end{tabular}
-
-\subsection{Winter Term}
-
-\begin{tabular}{p{1.2in} p{1.4in} p{2in}}
-Date & Event Name & Details \\ \hline \hline
-Earliest Possible & Start Term Checklist & See above \\ \hline
-Mid-Mar & 3B Info Night & \\ \hline
-March & Calum's ACM Membership Due & \\ \hline
-Week before Finals & Ctrl-D Dinner & Dine with friends --- end of term send-off \\ \hline
-\end{tabular}
-
-\subsection{Spring Term}
-
-\begin{tabular}{p{1.2in} p{1.4in} p{2in}}
-Date & Event Name & Details \\ \hline \hline
-Earliest Possible & Start Term Checklist & See above \\ \hline
-Before Term Ends & ACM Registration & A fuzzy warm feeling for the ACM --- See section on ACM p.\ \pageref{ACM} for more details \\ \hline
-Week before Finals & Ctrl-D Dinner & Dine with friends --- end of term send-off \\ \hline
-\end{tabular}
-
-\end{document}
diff --git a/docs/procedure/procedure.tex b/docs/procedure/procedure.tex
deleted file mode 100644 (file)
index e2c684f..0000000
+++ /dev/null
@@ -1,1379 +0,0 @@
-% This is a latex document.  It can be processed using straight latex.
-\documentclass[11pt]{article}
-\pagestyle{headings}
-\newcommand{\squeezeitems}{\setlength{\itemsep}{0pt}}
-% \input{psfig}
-\usepackage{latexsym}
-\begin{document}
-
-\newcommand{\mathNEWS}{\textsl{math\/}\textsf{NEWS}}
-
-%decomment the below to leave out the beginning CSC logo (forms a box instead)
-%\psdraft
-
-\begin{titlepage}
-\vspace*{72pt}
-
-\begin{center}
-% \ \psfig{figure=pm.ps,height=1.5in}
-
-\Huge
-\vspace*{5pt}
-\textbf{Computer Science Club \\ 
-       Procedures Manual \\ }
-\LARGE
-\vspace*{96pt}
-Kevin Smith  \textit{v1.0  Winter 1989} \\
-Jim Boritz   \textit{v2.0  Winter 1992} \\
-Shannon Mann \textit{v3.0$\alpha$  Winter 1993} \\
-Shannon Mann \textit{v4.0$\alpha$  Summer 2003} \\
-\vspace*{36pt}
-\today
-\end{center}
-\end{titlepage}
-
-\cleardoublepage
-\pagenumbering{roman}
-\tableofcontents
-\cleardoublepage
-\section{Introduction}
-\pagenumbering{arabic}
-
-The Computer Science Club of The University of Waterloo (CSC) has been in
-existence since some time in the early 1960's.  When this is compared with
-the founding dates of the University, the Faculty of Mathematics and the
-Department of Computer Science, it becomes apparent that the CSC has almost
-as much history as the University.  
-
-One of the factors which the CSC has had to deal with is a turnover in its
-membership.  At the CSC, and the university, people come and go.  It is
-often the case that when people go, their knowledge of CSC operations goes
-with them.  Later generations are forced to rediscover, often painfully,
-how the CSC conducts its business.  Frequently, efforts which could be
-channeled into productive tasks are devoted to this rediscovery.
-
-This manual is intented to be a guide and an archive.
-It's authors and contributors hope
-to lay down here as much information as they can about the operation of the
-CSC.  The history of the CSC will also be recorded here.  In part this is
-because there is no other place, but also because a historical context
-should make future decisions easier.  It is the hope of
-everyone involved that this guide will prevent the loss of knowledge
-associated with the loss of long time CSC members.
-
-\section{Membership}
-Membership in the Computer Science Club is open to all students of the
-University of Waterloo, undergraduate and graduate.  This includes
-undergraduates and graduates on a work-term and graduates that are
-registered inactive.
-
-During the W90 term there was a great deal of discussion about who should 
-be entitled to a CSC membership beyond students.  The groups whose ability 
-to obtain a CSC membership came under question are; faculty, staff, 
-alumni and everyone else.  Prior to W90, anyone that wanted a CSC 
-membership was allowed to join regardless of what the current constitution 
-may have said.  Membership was divided into two categories---full and 
-associate---that differed in the ability to hold an executive position 
-and vote in CSC elections.  
-
-In W90 several people felt that the CSC was being taken advantage of, 
-and many non-students were obtaining memberships in order to get an 
-account on WatCSC.  The discussion eventually identified a few key 
-privileges that were felt to be inappropriate for all CSC members.  
-These privileges are: who can vote; who can hold executive positions; 
-and who can obtain a WatCSC account.  The single factor that stood out 
-when trying to allocate these privileges is that the CSC is primarily 
-an undergraduate student organization, and should remain that way.  
-
-% Added by James A. Morrison, ja2morri
-In F02 and S03 this came up again.  At this time WatCSC is no longer around
-and the CSC has a good collection of machines, 4 in the office, and 1 in the
-machine room.  So now any member can hold an account.  However, the right
-to vote and hold an executive position is mostly regulated by Mathsoc since
-Mathsoc defines these things in their club policies.  In S03 the Mathsoc
-council changed their policy to state that voting and the ability to hold
-executive position is available to members of Mathsoc or members of any other
-society who recognizes the club as a club of that society.  So if engineering
-gives us money, we can say we are an Engsoc club and allow engineers to vote
-and hold executive positions.  However, CSC is still primarily and 
-undergraduate Math/CS student organization, and should remain that way.
-
-\section{Exec Positions}
-
-The CSC has four elected positions and one appointed position.  The elected
-positions are: President, Vice-President, Treasurer, and Secretary.  A
-SysAdm is chosen by the exec and ratified by the remaining CSC members
-attending the election meeting.  Each exec position has certain duties 
-associated with them.  When all is well, each exec works to make certain 
-that not only their duties and responsibilities are covered, but also 
-that the other duties of the exec are being met.
-
-\subsection{President}
-
-The President is the person responsible.  As ungrammatical as that may seem,
-it is exactly accurate.  He or she is responsible to make certain that 
-everything the CSC is involved in gets proper attention.  Specifically, 
-the President's duties are:
-\begin{enumerate}
-\squeezeitems
-\item to call and preside at all general, special, and executive meetings 
-of the Club;
-\item to appoint all committees of the Club and the committee chair
-of such committees, except the chair of the Programme Committee; and
-\item to audit, or to appoint a representative to audit,
-the financial records of
-the club at the end of each academic term.
-\end{enumerate}
-Wherever possible, the President should delegate tasks to others.  Not doing
-this can overburden the President.
-
-\subsection{Vice-President}
-
-The Vice-President arranges the talks, tutorials, and tours.  Specific duties
-include:
-\begin{enumerate}
-\squeezeitems
-\item to assume the duties of the President
-in the event of the President's absence;
-\item to act as chair of the Programme Committee; and
-\item to assume those duties of the President
-that are delegated to him by the President.
-\end{enumerate}
-
-In general, the Vice-President does as much as possible to take the load from
-the President.  The Programme Committee is the body of CSC members
-chaired by the Vice-President.  This committee meets to decide what talks
-CSC'ers would be interested in hearing.  They also decide what tours are
-undertaken.  The Vice-President should take care of arranging for rooms,
-the creation of posters and other advertisements.  These tasks often fall
-to the Secretary, overburdening an already difficult position.
-Wherever possible, the Vice-President should introduce the talks, except
-when the President wishes to do so.  If neither President, nor 
-Vice-President can attend, someone should be appointed to introduce the
-speaker and do a Channel 17 Membership Drive.
-
-\subsubsection{Programme Committee}
-The Programme Committee meets to discuss and choose which events the CSC
-will put on each term.  There are certain events the CSC puts on 
-automatically.  However, most events must be chosen and planned ahead of
-time.  The Programme Committee gathers suggestions from their members and
-from the CSC membership regarding what talks and events they would like the
-CSC to sponsor.  From these suggestions, a wide variety of talks and events
-are chosen.  The Vice-President takes the list generated from these meetings
-and organises the events.  To be effective, the Programme Committee should
-meet soon after elections to make initial plans for the terms events.  Meeting
-later in the term can be a good way to add to the activities the CSC plans to
-run.
-
-\subsection{Treasurer}
-
-The Treasurer's job seems simplest.  However, trying to keep track of all 
-the funds that go in and out of the CSC is a somewhat daunting task.
-For more information, see the sections on financial matters 
-(p.\ \pageref{MONEY}), specifically the section on the cashbox 
-(p.\ \pageref{CASHBOX}).
-The specific duties of the Treasurer are:
-\begin{enumerate}
-\squeezeitems
-\item to collect dues and maintain all financial and membership records;
-\item to produce a financial or membership statement when requested;
-\end{enumerate}
-The Treasurer should make arrangements at the end of the term for signing
-authority to be passed on to the next terms exec.  A final audit of the
-terms financial transactions is a great help to the incoming exec, and should
-be done every term.
-
-\subsection{Secretary}
-
-The Secretary's position is perhaps the hardest of all, especially if the
-support people under the Secretary do not work, or worse, are never chosen.  
-The creation of many of the people in support roles (See Alternate Positions,
-below) are for the most to reduce the sometimes herculean amount of work 
-that is dumped upon the shoulders of the Secretary.  The Secretary's duties
-are:
-\begin{enumerate}
-\squeezeitems
-\item to keep minutes of all Club meetings;
-\item to prepare the annual Club report for
-approval by exec council;
-\item to care for all Club correspondence;
-\end{enumerate}
-Often in the past, the Secretary has become the target of ``dumping'' of
-just about all tasks.  This should be discouraged at all costs.  The
-Secretary has specific duties and responsibilites.  As it is, those
-duties can already be taxing.  The CSC Flasher, the Office Manager, and
-the Librarian report to the Secretary.
-
-\subsection{SysAdmin}
-
-The SysAdmin position was added to the exec when the CSC acquired a 
-computer system of their own.  
-The SysAdmins duties are:
-\begin{enumerate}
-\squeezeitems
-\item to operate any and all equipment in the possession of the Club.
-\item to maintain and upgrade the software on equipment that is operated by
-the Club.
-\item to facilitate the use of equipment that is operated by the Club.
-\end{enumerate}
-It has become the continuing policy to have the SysAdmin attempt to get 
-the CSC computer equipment.  See the section on WatCSC (p.\ \pageref{WATCSC}).
-
-\subsection{Alternate Positions}
-
-Several ad hoc positions are also important for the effective running of 
-the CSC.  Often these positions are never filled, requiring one of the exec
-to fill in.  Most of these positions fall under the direct control of the 
-Secretary (though this can expand the Secretaries' duties to an unmanageable
-level).
-
-\subsubsection{Office Manager}
-
-The Office Manager runs the CSC office, making sure the place is tidy, 
-that our recycling gets done, that the office staff is doing what it should
-be doing (kicking people out when there are no office staff present, etc).
-
-The Office Manager reports to the Secretary.
-
-\subsubsection{Office Staff \label{OFFICESTAFF}}
-
-Office Staff are that motley group of people that keep the CSC open all those
-wonderful hours.  In general, they are a group of \textsl{trusted\/}
-individuals chosen by the exec to fulfill this duty.  Office Staff are
-expected to be helpful to people who come to the CSC for assistance.  They
-are expected to assist in keeping the CSC tidy, help sign out books, taking
-money for new memberships, and in general be helpful.  Some Office Staff will
-be accorded the honour of being a key-holding Office Staffer.  See the
-section on keys (p.\ \pageref{KEYS}) for more information.
-
-Office Staff report to the Office Manager.
-
-\subsubsection{Librarian}
-
-The Librarian is the person responsible for keeping the CSC's large library
-of reference material in order.  The Librarian is responsible for culling
-out dated/ruined books and for suggesting the purchase of new books, as well
-as the actual purchasing.  See the section on the library (p.\
-\pageref{LIBRARY}) for more information.
-
-The Librarian reports to the Secretary.
-
-\subsubsection{Poster Person}
-
-One of the most important positions, as the Poster Person is responsible
-for making posters, and getting them distributed.  Often the distribution
-is divided amongst several people.  If this position is not filled, these
-duties should fall to the Vice-President, though it often falls to the
-Secretary.
-
-The Poster Person usually reports to the Vice-President.
-
-\subsubsection{CSC Flasher}
-
-The CSC Flasher is the person who writes the CSC Flash, a short 
-description of what the CSC is doing, published in each bi-weekly
-issue of \mathNEWS.
-Also, it is recurring policy to prepare a short ``Hacker Quiz'' to be
-included at the end of the Flash (the hacker quiz often never happens).
-
-The Flasher usually reports to the Secretary, and should attend all
-Exec and Programme Committee meetings whenever possible.
-
-\subsubsection{Oracle}
-
-This is a position that, of recent, has been left unfilled (mainly due
-to the fact that the club is without a machine at the time of writing).
-The Oracle is a facility by which anyone in the world can send a question 
-to \textsl{oracle@watcsc}, replies are posted on the newsgroup 
-\textsl{uw.csc}.  Be sure to get some good humour-writers for this position 
-(FASS is a good place to look).
-
-Perhaps in the future, a mail alias could be added to undergrad.math
-to allow this service to continue.
-
-The Oracle reports to no-one.
-
-\section{Events}
-
-The CSC puts on several events each term, usually in the form of speakers,
-but including SIGGRAPH video night, and 3B Info Night.  These events provide 
-both an opportunity for CSC members to experience new and interesting
-aspects of CS and to generate interest in CS within the University Community.
-The SIGGRAPH video night attracts students, faculty and staff, seeming 
-universally interesting to all people.
-
-\subsection{Speakers}
-
-The CSC has speakers every term, speaking on a wide range of issues relating
-to computers.  We have had many distinguished speakers pulled from the ranks
-of U(W) faculty, grad students and even undergrad students.  As well, the 
-CSC has managed to bring very distinguished speakers from off campus.  The 
-likes of Bill Gates (W89), John McCarthy (W91), Brian Kernighan, and
-A.K.~Dewdney, just to name a few have honoured us with their wit and wisdom.
-
-The CSC normally takes the speaker out to dinner as a gift of the CSC to
-the speaker.  The dinner also affords an opportunity for a few members to
-hobknob with the speaker, often having discussion that is more interesting
-than the talk that was given.
-
-\subsubsection{Internal}
-
-Internal speakers are the easiest to arrange.  These speakers can be pulled
-from the faculty and students, on a variety of topics.  To arrange one,
-contact the person whom you are interested in having speak.  Once you have
-their interest, choose a date that is agreeable to both you and the speaker
-(by necessity, the speaker gets far more to say :-)  With a date in hand,
-estimate how many people will attend.  For most talks, we can have anywhere
-from 10 to 80 people attending.  Choose an appropriate room and book it for
-that date.  A few days before the talk, order an appropriate number of
-doughnaughts.  When the time comes, have an appropriate person introduce
-the speaker.  After the talk, thank the speaker, and offer doughnaughts and
-tea to all the attendee's.
-
-\subsubsection{External}
-
-External speakers, for the most, are much harder to arrange.  Not only must
-you arrange for all the normal amenities, but also for accommodations for 
-the speaker for atleast one night (if coming from out of town), travel costs
-and an honorarium.  Most of the arrangements can be made by contacting the
-CS Dept.~Secretary (S'03 it was Ursula Theone).  She can make all the 
-%%NAME
-necessary arrangements.  For funding, you can speak to the Faculty of Math, 
-the CS Dept., the ICR, and even Engineering for those speakers who will have
-some interest there.  In W91, John McCarthy visited us, giving two talks, one
-on Elephant, a project of his, the other on NetNews and his experiences with
-attempted censorship at his home campus, Stanford University.  We sold his
-coming here to ICR and others through the talk about Elephant.  Our reason
-for bringing him here was for the NetNews talk, as U(W) was censoring the
-alt branch of NetNews.  Funding was obtained from the Math Faculty for the
-travel costs, from the CS Dept.~for lodging and from ICR for the \$1000
-honorarium. 
-
-Once you have all the difficult things arranged, set the date and time of
-the talk(s) and book the rooms.  If you manage to get an external speaker
-from any real distance, you can pretty much bank on s/he pulling a large
-crowd to the talks.
-
-\subsection{Tutorials}
-
-In keeping with the CSC's purposes of generating interest in computer science
-and its applications, the CSC has held tutorials on UNIX and X-window System.  
-These
-tutorials are introductory in level and cover a limited number of topics.
-Ideally, the group size will not exceed ten or so, though we have had
-X-windows talks of up to thirty.  Book one of the X-term labs a week or
-%%NAME
-more earlier with Lori Suess, Administrative Assistant to the Director
-of CFCF.  Although your group may be small, keeping extra people out of the
-room during these events can be beneficial (keeps distracting noise out).
-A tutorial usually runs for an hour.
-
-\subsection{Tours}
-
-Another favourite CSC event is to arrange for a group to tour one of the
-computer labs.  The DCS mainroom, the CGL lab and the PAMI lab have all 
-been the sites of interesting tours.  To arrange for a tour, it is best to
-contact someone who works there.
-
-\subsection{SIGGRAPH}
-A recurring CSC event is to show the SIGGRAPH video that contains the 
-highlights from the most recent Film \& Video Show.  Since many people are
-co-op, it is possible to show the tape at least twice and possibly three 
-times during the year.  SIGGRAPH video night is always a very popular event.
-
-There are a few constraints that must be kept in mind when trying to organize
-this event.  First, while the SIGGRAPH conference occurs in early August, 
-the video is not available until November or December.  Second, the CSC
-borrows the tape from CGL, thus making us reliant upon CGL to actually
-have the tape.  From time to time there is a lapse in CGL's subscription 
-to the SIGGRAPH Video Review which results in the unavailability of the
-recent tapes.
-
-To borrow the videos from CGL either get a CSC member that is working there
-to borrow them, or contact the Lab Administrative Assistant (Elise Devitt
-as of F90)
-%%NAME
-
-A good place for showing SIGGRAPH videos are the ICR lecture halls in the 
-Davis Centre (DC 1302 \& DC 1304).  The advantage of using these rooms is the
-ability to do the projection on your own.  While DC 1350 and DC 1351 are
-bigger and have more sophisticated equipment, they also require an expensive
-university supplied AV technician (see below).
-As mentioned elsewhere ICR rooms must be booked with the ICR secretary.  
-
-If for some reason it is desireable to use DC 1350 or DC 1351, the
-larger lecture halls, the following procedure should be used. First book
-the room with Bookings (discussed earlier). In order to interface to the
-Electrohome RGB projector on the ceiling the CSC must arrange to have a
-video technician present during the meeting.  For this to happen,
-%%NAME
-Georgina Coutinho x4070 must be informed of the meeting time, date, and
-place.  Unfortunately, this technician (who must be present) charges
-\$25 per hour; there doesn't seem to be a way to get around this.  The
-total charge for the technician should be \$75.
-
-The SIGGRAPH tape shown in W89 was in VHS format, which is good, since
-there is a VHS machine inside the DC 1350/1351 projection rooms.  If the
-tape is in 3/4'' format, then be sure to borrow a 3/4'' player from CGL
-and warn the technician that he will have to interface a 3/4'' player to
-the video console.
-
-The SIGGRAPH tape is usually about 2 hours long.  There are two tables
-of contents included in the tape, it is a good idea not to make the
-audience sit through these boring parts. Fast forward past the first
-one, and call an intermission during the second.  After the intermission
-is a good time to do the Channel 17 Membership Drive!
-
-%%NAME
-It is also a good idea to talk to John Hillhirst x3258.  He is the head
-technician (and not a bureaucrat).  Ask him any technical questions that
-you may have.
-
-Typically around 100-150 people show up for SIGGRAPH, so order around 12
-dozen doughnaughts.
-
-In W89 we had considerable problems switching the lights out in DC 1350.
-Try to make sure that the lights work before starting the show in the future.
-
-\subsection{3B Info Night}
-3B Info Night is a special information session held to help 3B CS
-students select from the vast number of courses offered in fourth year. 
-There should be a 3B Info Night every term that normally has 3B students
-(currently fall and winter).  At some point in the past (F86?) the
-department neglected to have a 3B info night.  This got many students
-upset and caused the CSC to assume a co-sponsorship role for this
-event.  
-
-As long as the department remembers to hold 3B Info Night there should
-not be much of a problem.  The Associate Chairman for Undergraduate
-Studies will arrange for professors to come and speak about the courses.
-The CS department secretary will arrange a location, and produce
-posters.  In this situation the CSC is responsible for; ordering
-refreshments, attempting to get additional faculty members to make an
-appearance, and trying to find some students that can tell what fourth 
-year is really like.  In addition, the CSC President usually attends,
-thanks everyone for showing up, and mentions that there are some real 
-fourth year students to answer questions.
-
-On occasion the department may forget or be hesitant to hold 3B Info night.
-If this situation should ever arise the CSC should, attempt to convince 
-the current Associate Chairman that a 3B Info Night should be held.  
-Failing this the CSC should make arrangements on its own to hold a 
-3B Info Night.  This means booking a room, contacting professors, 
-getting refreshments and everything else that is required.
-
-A typical refreshment order would involve
-\begin{itemize}
-\squeezeitems
-\item 12 dozen doughnaughts
-\item 72 cans of pop
-\item 1 tea urn  coffee urn
-\item 75 tea bags
-\item 1 package of napkins
-\item 2 large milks
-\item 75 sugars
-\item 75 small cups
-\end{itemize}
-
-The cost of this order has been almost exactly \$100.  The CS
-department will pay half when presented with the invoice
-from the math C\&D.  Send the invoice to Jane Prime.
-%%NAME
-
-\subsubsection{Ordering Refreshments}
-Most if not all CSC meetings serve tea and doughnaughts to those that 
-attend.  Everything that is required is ordered from the math C\&D if at all
-possible.  The math C\&D has reasonable rates, they are close by, and they
-are very helpful.  
-
-To make an order the person running the event, or someone they have
-delegated the task to, should contact the C\&D manager (currently Brenda)
-%%NAME
-about three to four days in advance.  She must have advance notice for
-large orders as she has to order the doughnaughts from her supplier.  If an
-emergency, such as someone forgetting to order, arises you can
-usually get about two dozen doughnaughts the same day.  If the order is larger,
-use common sense and go to any of the doughnaught shops off campus.  The other
-items are usually stocked in sufficient quantity for there not to be a
-problem.
-
-A typical order consists of:
-
-\begin{itemize}
-\squeezeitems
-\item 5 +/- 1 dozen doughnaughts 
-\item 1 tea urn
-\item 40 tea bags
-\item 50 cups
-\item 1 half pint milk
-\end{itemize}
-
-If the supply in the office runs out, the following may also need to be
-ordered:
-
-\begin{itemize}
-\squeezeitems
-\item stir stix
-\item napkins
-\end{itemize}
-
-\subsection{Contests}
-
-The CSC holds contests from time to time.  These contests always test the 
-programming skill of the contestants.  The Othello and Arbitrary Game 
-Contest test the skill of the programmers by asking them to program a
-game which will compete against other programs like it.  The ACM Programming
-Contest and our local versions test the programming skill of the programmers
-by asking them to solve several programming problems under a time limit.
-
-\subsubsection{Othello Tournament}
-The Othello Tournament occurs once a year in October or November.  Several
-weeks before the chosen date, an announcement is made on internet and
-elsewhere requesting  (UNFINISHED)
-\subsubsection{Arbitrary Game Contest}
-(WAY UNFINISHED)
-\subsubsection{ACM Scholastic Programming Contest}
-(WAY UNFINISHED)
-\subsubsection{Mini-Contests}
-(WAY UNFINISHED)
-
-
-\section{Room Bookings}
-
-Booking a room made simple:
-\begin{enumerate}
-\squeezeitems
-\item Decide how big the meeting will be.
-\item Decide when the meeting will be.
-\item Decide what kind of venue you will be requiring.
-\item Contact the appropriate Donna Schell, x2207, dschell@uwateoloo.ca for
-any room that isn't a computer lab or an ICR room.
-\end{enumerate}
-The parties involved will make the booking and usually contact you with
-a confirmation.  If confirmation does not come within a couple of days,
-call them back to get a confirmation.
-
-\begin{table}[b]
-\begin{center}
-\caption[Bookings Table]{Quick Reference for Bookings}
-\vspace*{2pt}
-\begin{tabular}{c c c c} \hline
-Which Room & Seats & Type of Meeting & Page \\ \hline \hline
-Classrooms & 10--50 & Talks and Informal Meetings & \pageref{CLASSROOMS} \\
-ICR Rooms & 30--120 & Formal Talks & \pageref{ICRROOMS} \\
-Colloquium Room (MC 5158) & 50--100 & Formal Talks and Debates & \pageref{COLLOQUIUMROOM} \\
-Theatres & 150+ & Very Large Talks & \pageref{THEATRES} \\ \hline
-\end{tabular}
-\end{center}
-\end{table}
-
-\subsection{Classrooms \label{CLASSROOMS}}
-There are many rooms around campus in which CSC meetings can be held.  Most
-rooms which fall under the general category of classrooms are controlled by
-one of two agencies on campus, ``Scheduling'' or ``Bookings''.  
-
-Officially, Bookings is responsible for reserving rooms for non-course
-events, and Scheduling is sort of responsible for course events.  In the
-past the most efficient method for booking a room was to call scheduling.
-This resulted in a room being booked in about an hour.  Unfortunately in
-recent times Scheduling has refused to book rooms for clubs, requiring us to
-call Bookings.  Bookings uses a very capricious method for booking rooms
-and tends to require a day or two for confirmation.
-
-%%NAME
-Bookings are made by telephone (Zehl Wittington x2207 is the person to
-talk to).  And when the room is confirmed Zehl will send a yellow slip
-to the CSC mailbox in the CS department's mail room.  There is no charge
-for room booking.
-
-\subsection{Davis Centre ICR Rooms \label{ICRROOMS}}
-DC 1302, DC 1304 and DC Lounge are located on the ground floor of the Davis
-Centre.  These are the rooms that are used for ICR Talks, CS Department
-talks etc.  These rooms are controlled by the ICR and can be used by others
-when there are no ICR events taking place.  In order to book one of these
-rooms, arrangements should be made with the ICR at x2042.  No confirmation
-is provided, and someone will have to pick up the key from the ICR
-secretary on the day of the talk.  As of W93, ICR stopped booking these rooms
-for clubs.  See the faculty advisor, or the CS Dept.~secretary to book.
-
-\subsection{Math Colloquium Room (MC 5158) \label{COLLOQUIUMROOM}}
-The Math Colloquium Room (MC 5158) is a mid-size room that can comfortably
-hold about 50 people.  It has lovely wooden walls, and gentle lighting.
-This is where most Math Faculty talks asides from CS are given.  The room
-has comfortable chairs which can be rearranged into any desired formation
-which makes it suitable for meetings such as debates.  To book the room,
-contact the secretary of the Executive Assistant to the Dean at x2592.  
-No confirmation is provided, but security is responsible for unlocking 
-the room.  It may be worthwhile to make sure that security knows this.
-
-\subsection{Theatres \label{THEATRES}}
-Large events require large theatres.  There are two large theatres on
-campus; ``Theatre of the Arts'' in Modern Languages and Humanities Theatre
-in Hagey Hall.  Both of these must be booked through the Theatre Centre
-(x2126).  In all likelihood this will lead to the Theatre Manager, Peter
-Houston (x6570) getting in touch with you to make the arrangements.
-%%NAME
-Since the theatres are in heavy demand it is wise to book them WELL IN
-ADVANCE. Most people that use the theatres book about a YEAR in advance.
-
-Campus organizations are not charged a fee for the use of the theatres,
-but there is a charge for ushers and technicians.  Ushers and
-technicians are not a choice but a must, they come with the theatre. The
-number of ushers present is dependent upon the predicted size of the
-crowd.  The technician is required to ``configure'' the room prior to the
-event.  Any special equipment required for the event (e.g. slide
-projector), should be arranged with the technician a few weeks in
-advance.
-
-The biggest problem for the CSC is that we are not a Fed club and thus
-have to rely upon someone else to recognize us.  In the dark ages the 
-CSC was able to go through MathSoc to book the theatres.  Unfortunately
-this didn't work out the time the CSC used the theatre for Bill Gates' 
-talk.  Eventually the Faculty of Math indicated that they `recognized'
-us as an official club.  At the time recognition was done by Lyn Williams
-who was Executive Assistant to the Dean of Math.  
-%%NAME
-
-\section{Financial Matters \label{MONEY}}
-The CSC currently receives funding from
-\begin{itemize}
-\squeezeitems
-\item MathSoc
-\item Engsoc
-\item Membership fees
-\item Computer Science Department
-\end{itemize}
-
-At the beginning of each term the executive, past executive, or some
-experienced nominees must compose a budget.  The budget should be a good
-estimate of how much money the CSC expects to spend during the term. In
-order to pay for its activities the CSC will rely on the sources of
-funding listed above.   Past budgets make for good reference material
-when creating the new budget.
-
-\subsection{MathSoc}
-The CSC budget must be prepared in time to be presented to the
-MathSoc treasurer in advance of the MathSoc budget meeting.  This way
-the MathSoc treasurer can discuss the budget with the CSC prior to the
-meeting, thus avoiding the possibility of open conflict.
-
-During the S89 term MathSoc made some revisions to its constitution that 
-describe the procedure that clubs must follow in order to obtain funding.
-It is the responsibility of the CSC budget committee and especially the
-Treasurer to be aware of MathSoc's requirements for funding.
-
-\subsection{EngSoc}
-EngSoc typically gives some money to clubs that have engineering students 
-as members.  The amount that EngSoc donates has varied wildly from term to
-term, but seems to have settled out at about \$100 (F90).  To get money 
-from EngSoc, the CSC should submit a request to the EngSoc Treasurer along
-with the CSC's proposed budget.  The CSC Treasurer should be present at the
-EngSoc meeting where the budget is discussed in case any questions arise. 
-
-\subsection{Bank Account}
-The CSC has a chequing account at the Campus Centre CIBC.  After the executive
-is elected each term, signing authority must be obtained for the new
-president and treasurer.  The bank has a special form for transferring 
-signing authority. It requires that either a previous holder of signing 
-authority or the faculty advisor for the club approve the transfer of signing
-authority to the new president and treasurer.
-
-\subsection{University Billing Code}
-The CSC has a university billing code to which almost any university provided
-service can be charged.  The list of services include: Audio Visual, Graphics 
-Services, and the Book Store.  
-
-The CSC's billing code is 901-1179-03.  The CSC's billing code happens to
-be a `power' billing code in that it can have funds transferred into it as
-well as having charges made against it.
-
-\subsection{Cashbox Procedures \label{CASHBOX}}
-The CSC has a cashbox that serves as the collection point for membership
-fees and the disbursement point for petty cash.  The cashbox has two keys.
-One key remains in the possession of the current treasurer and the second key
-is part of the `talisman of power' that is held by the office staffer
-currently in charge of the office.  The cashbox should remain locked at all
-times except when money is being deposited or withdrawn.  More information
-can be found in the section on office staffers.
-
-Prior to the current procedure governing access to the cashbox the CSC
-made several attempts to regulate the flow of money through the cashbox.
-The earliest method was to have the person signing up new members to deposit
-the membership fee in the cashbox.  Since there are only two keys the cashbox
-remained unlocked most of the time.  Whenever funds were needed to pay the
-C\&D bill, pay for posters, or other miscellaneous expenses money would be
-withdrawn from the cashbox.   It was hoped that the person making the 
-withdrawl would leave a note in the cashbox indicating how much had been 
-withdrawn and for what purpose.  This method never worked because
-people were did not indicate how much had been withdrawn.
-When the cashbox is unregulated, money flows in and out of the cashbox
-and for some reason it is impossible to get people to accurately record
-how much money is being withdrawn for various and sundry expenses
-(mostly posters and C\&D charges).
-
-Several attempts have been made to regulate and control the cash flow.  Chris 
-Browne a one time treasurer and accounting student suggested that nothing
-be paid out in cash by the CSC.  Instead, all disbursements would be made
-by cheque regardless of the amount because it would be a small price to pay
-for the improved record keeping that the CSC would gain.  He also intended to 
-implement some sort of petty cash procedure but ran out of time.  Given the
-attitudes of the average CSC member it is unlikely that a typical petty cash
-mechanism would have worked anyhow.
-
-During the W90 term the CSC was prey to a low-life that saw fit to steal over
-\$200 in membership fees from the cashbox.  The result was that some strict 
-procedures were put in place to more carefully control access to the cashbox.
-
-For more details see the section on Office Staff (p.\ \pageref{OFFICESTAFF}).
-
-\section{Resources}
-
-\subsection{Audio Visual Equipment}
-Anything aside from chalk and a blackboard that is required for a
-presentation, should be obtained from the University's Audio Visual
-Department.
-
-Audio Visual needs to have someone to bill in the case of damages to 
-equipment.  Fortunately the CSC does have a university billing code.  
-Unfortunately Audio Visual is a puppet bureaucracy, and they don't trust
-students.  Some person in the administration such as the CSC's Faculty 
-Advisor, or the EADM does the recognition thing for us.
-
-In general copyright laws prohibit the screening of films to more than ten
-people without permission from the copyright holder.  What this means is
-that most movies rented at the local rental shop can not be screened
-publicly.  Audio Visual follows the law and thus does not provide equipment
-for such screenings.
-
-\subsubsection{Showing movies}
-Rent from the Fed record store, Becker's, or Bandito.
-Or better yet, borrow a movie from a club member!
-In order to rent a VCR from the Feds you must present
-both a driver's license and a VISA card.
-
-Audio Visual considers it illegal to show a VCR tape to a large
-group of people such as a CSC meeting.  Realistically, this is
-true.  So, to show rented movies at a club meeting, the CSC
-must obtain equipment elsewhere.
-
-One option is to book the DCS course room (MC 2009), since
-Audio Visual does not control DCS.  Talk to Bob Hicks x2194
-%% NAME
-to book this room; if Bob is on vacation, try Carol Vogt,
-she usually knows what is going on in DCS.
-There is an overhead Electrohome RGB projector
-that can be used to hook up a VCR or a computer.  This room has a VHS VCR
-and stereo sound, as well visual hookups to do online demonstrations to
-a group of people.
-
-Another option is to borrow equipment from the nice folks at CGL.
-CGL has 2 26'' televisions, two 3/4'' VCRs, a VHS VCR,
-and a 37'' monitor.  
-
-\subsubsection{Showing Movies the legal way}
-As mentioned elsewhere, it is illegal to show a movie that you rent from a
-video store to a crowd of more than ten people.  In order to show a movie to
-a crowd, the right permissions must first be obtained from whomever holds
-the copyright.  For these reasons the university maintains a film library
-full of films for which permission has been obtained.  The film library
-spans a wide variety of topics and has a few good films which can be shown at
-the beginning of term.
-
-To arrange for these films it is best to talk to the film librarian in E2
-1309.  His name is (    ) he is very helpful and knows the content of an
-incredible number of films.  Some films are stored locally and can be
-obtained within 24 hours.  Other films are held by individual departments,
-or by other universities.  Depending on the situation, upto a weeks notice
-may be required.
-
-Once the film(s) has been arranged AV will be very co-operative. 
-Depending on the format (film or video), a projectionist and the
-equipment can be booked.  As a campus organization, the CSC can obtain
-equipment at no charge.  The remaining issue of concern is who will pay
-for damages.  Luckily enough this issue has been settled.  Howie has
-signed some form indicating that the CS department recognizes us.  It
-also has our university billing number just in case.  Just remember that
-the CSC is not a FED club.  I believe that the FEDS cover damages
-incurred by their clubs and this is why AV is continually asking about
-this. 
-
-For video AV will provide a TV and play the tape from their central
-facility.  Someone should make sure that the TV gets to the room on time
-and is hooked up.  Since the projectionist has very little to do the
-cost is the minimum for using a projectionist, about \$10.  If the format
-is film arrangements must be made for a screen and a projector.  Since
-the projectionist is devoted to us for the evening the cost is slightly
-higher.  No figures are available on this though as it has never been
-done. 
-
-\subsubsection{Bureaucracy}
-
-Audio Visual Services is an incredible bureaucracy, tread
-carefully.  Harry, x3257, who is responsible for actually giving
-out equipment, requires two things:  a letter of recognition
-%%NAME
-for the CSC (I obtained one from Lyn Williams -- Administrative
-Assistant to the Dean's Office, and a GOD to the CSC).  Basically
-this letter from Lyn would read ``The CSC is a bona-fide CS
-department-sponsored club with billing code 901-1179-03, the
-current president is $<$name$>$''.  Hopefully this won't be
-necessary.  All Harry usually requires is a letter from the
-CSC saying who the current executive is; no formal signatures
-are required for this.  The letter from Lyn will only be necessary
-if Harry says ``I've never heard of the CSC'' (he has a very
-short memory).
-
-Remember: The CSC is not a fed club.
-
-Rule of Thumb: avoid using AV equipment.  We can use the
-ICR lecture halls or the DCS course room for movie nights (or borrow TVs 
-from CGL), and get a technician for SIGGRAPH through Georgina x4070.
-
-
-\subsection{Library \label{LIBRARY}}
-The CSC library is a facility that almost everyone considers to be important
-and useful.  The CSC library can never hope to compete with the 
-University Library in terms of quantity.  Nonetheless, the CSC library can 
-provide a qualitatively different resource of value.  This tends to be done
-by selecting extremely current books and books considered classics for the
-library.  The library is not meant to be everything to everyone.  It is 
-intended to be representative of the library of a computer scientist.
-
-Every term a sizeable portion of the CSC budget is allocated to library 
-acquisitions.  Most of this money is used to purchase ``new'' books.  
-Unfortunately, the CSC library like every other library suffers from the 
-theft and loss  of its books.  Thus some portion of the library budget will 
-be used to replace books that have disappeared from the collection.  The 
-fact that library books will disappear should be accepted.
-
-The process for purchasing new books is fairly simple.  First, the CSC
-librarian solicits and gathers suggestions for books that would be 
-appropriate for the library.  Once funds become available for the book
-purchase to be made, the library committee ranks the suggestions that
-have been received to date.  Based upon these rankings books are purchased 
-until the book budget has been spent.
-
-\subsection{Office Space}
-The CSC was one of the first clubs to have space allocated to it by the Math
-Faculty.  It was a long time ago (mid 70s) and the details are lost in the 
-mists of time.  The initial CSC office was a small cubicle that housed the 
-library, a sofa a desk and eventually the core of WatCSC when it was still
-an HP9000.  Due to the increase in CSC activity in F87 and W88 the CSC 
-managed to convince the Dean's Office to allocate it some additional space.
-Thus when new space became available on the 3rd floor of the MC building
-\mathNEWS moved and dividing wall that used to separate the two 
-offices was removed, effectively doubling the size of the office.
-It turned the CSC office space into some of the prime office space on
-the third floor.
-
-It is very important to remember that the CSC space is provided 
-directly by the Faculty of Mathematics.  MathSoc has no official
-control over the space allotted to the CSC.  
-
-From time to time MathSoc, having nothing better to do, considers 
-rearranging the offices in the third floor Pink Tie Zone.  This is usually
-done with the idea of getting more space and exposure for the main MathSoc
-office.  Due to the relative desireability of the CSC space, the CSC 
-typically becomes an unwilling (and often unknowing) participant in 
-the MathSoc grand plan.  
-
-The greatest danger lies in MathSoc doing something before the CSC 
-is aware of the plans and can voice an opinion to the Dean's Office.
-Ultimately it is the Dean's office that is responsible for any 
-allocation of office space (including MathSoc's).  MathSoc can 
-not unilaterally deprive the CSC of its office space.  However, it 
-can ask the Dean's Office to reallocate space or make other changes.  
-Typically the Dean's Office does not question MathSoc proposals 
-believing them to have been previously discussed by all groups 
-concerned.  Thus the importance of making the CSC opinion known.  
-As long as the CSC gets a say in the process there is very little 
-to worry about.  
-
-In the past MathSoc plans have have been stalled once the CSC
-discovered them and voiced its disapproval to the Dean's Office.  This
-is because the Dean's Office upon sensing a lack of consensus among
-student groups tends to be reluctant to proceed.  In addition, the lack
-of continuity within the MathSoc executive means that plans formulated
-within a term must usually be completed during the same term.  Usually
-space reallocation plans come along late enough in a term that stalling
-them for a couple of weeks effectively kills them.
-
-If MathSoc were ever to make a determined effort to see the floor space
-rearranged it would very likely happen.  Fortunately this has not yet been 
-the case.  The best the CSC could do in the face of a concerted effort
-is insure that it is being treated equitably. In the past the CSC has 
-been perfectly willing to trade its location for an increase in space. 
-
-The CSC has been given assurances from the Executive Assistant to the 
-Dean that if there are any space changes, the CSC will get at least 
-an equivalent space if not more.
-
-\subsubsection{Keys \label{KEYS}}
-
-For much of the CSC's days of having office space there existed a few keys 
-that only exec members had.  The exec was primarily responsible for opening
-the CSC in the morning.  In F90, the exec arranged for keys from Key Control
-to be released to certain members of the office staff.  This made keeping the
-office open so much easier.  
-
-A great deal of trouble arose when MathSoc got involved;  First, it was 
-demanded that we take a \$20 deposit for the keys, to ensure that the
-keys be returned.  We acceded this demand, arranging with the Assistant
-to the Dean for key permits.  Slowly, over several terms, MathSoc took more
-and more control over the signing of the key permits, until by S92, they had
-complete control over signing.  Further, to complicate things, each new term
-a new policy and procedure for doing key permits was put into place.  In F92,
-the exec finally took steps to eliminate the need for keys altogether.  Under
-the current policy, there is little or no need for us to request keys from 
-MathSoc.  Please see a past exec member for the grimy details.
-
-\subsection{Locker}
-In order to provide some remote storage of magnetic media, the CSC has
-obtained a locker from MathSoc.  MathSoc has agreed to provide the CSC with
-locker \#7 each and every term, on the condition that someone on the CSC
-executive signs for the locker.  This provision is documented by MathSoc in
-their locker distribution procedures.  Any failure to have locker \#7 set
-aside for the CSC represents a failure on MathSoc's part.  In F90, members
-of the CSC kindly wrote a program to generate a nice listing of all 
-locker numbers.  In this list, locker \#7 is permanently listed as the CSC's.
-In F92, this program had been forgotten, forcing locker \#7 to be given
-out to some student.  Given MathSoc's propensity for screwing up this simple
-procedure, someone should check early each term that MathSoc is indeed using
-the list generated from the CSC's program.  If it isn't, they should pencil
-the CSC into locker \#7.
-
-\subsection{Computer Accounts}
-Several nice people in High Places have donated a free computer account to 
-the CSC; \textsl{csc@watmath\/}.  Supervision of this account is 
-responsibility of the entire executive.  This point is clearly mentioned 
-in the CSC constitution.
-
-\subsubsection{MFCF accounts}
-\textsl{csc@watmath\/} is provided to the CSC by MFCF.  Since billing on 
-all MFCF UNIX machines is fairly relaxed, there are few restrictions on the 
-use of this account.  Any member of the current term's executive is free to 
-use the account for whatever they please.  In addition, people who need access
-to the CSC account for CSC purposes is also free to use the account.  The
-only restriction is that the account should not become a facility for giving
-others access to a UNIX account.  Lastly, the account is provided with free
-laser printing.  This privilege should not be abused as this could result
-in its withdrawl.
-
-\subsubsection{Exec Accounts on Undergrad.math}
-In F91, the CSC attempted to get a CSC account created on the undergrad
-network.  Ostensively, this was to give the CSC access to the X-window
-terminals for creation of posters and CSC documents.  Due to a change
-in ONet policy, MFCF was disallowed giving out accounts that more than
-one person would have access to.  MFCF compromised by giving any exec 
-member a personal account on the undergrad system, if they did not already
-have one.  As all undergrad math students already have an account, this works
-out to giving non-math exec members accounts on undergrad.math. 
-
-\subsection{Computer Equipment on Loan}
-
-The CSC has managed to borrow a large supply of equipment from various 
-groups.  It is important to note that the CSC is responsible for 
-maintaining this equipment, and replacing it if it is stolen.  A 
-separate policy for the use and administration of this equipment 
-was created during the S89 term.
-
-Most of the hardware that the CSC has, was obtained on an indefinite loan
-basis.  This means that the equipment does not really belong to the CSC, it
-belongs to the group that lent us the equipment.  On the other hand, the
-fact that we have the equipment means that it is of no use to anyone else.
-
-\subsubsection{Math Faculty Computing Facility}
-Sometime about the summer of 1987 MFCF and the Faculty decided that certain
-services would no longer be provided to undergraduates.  One was 50 pages
-of free laser printing.  Another was the ability to ask the operators to
-archive a students files to tape.  So as to not completely eliminate the 
-ability to archive ones files, the Faculty instructed MFCF to provide
-MathSoc with a microcomputer which could be used for file archival.  
-
-Eventually students wanted to archive their files and the CSC began to
-investigate.  It was discovered that MathSoc had not bothered to go pick up
-the PC from MFCF.  The MathSoc Treasurer at the time was Joel Crocker.  He
-instructed Jim Boritz to feel free to pursue the matter.  When Jim managed
-to get the PC, Joel suggested that the CSC could operate the PC since it was
-unlikely that anyone in MathSoc would know exactly what to do.
-
-From time to time MathSoc remembers that the PC actually belongs to them
-and they become concerned about its use.  About a day later they come to 
-the conclusion that its doing fine in the CSC since we have the expertise
-and we tend to be open at lot more than the MathSoc office.
-
-In F89 MathSoc managed to buy a computer of their own.  Since that time
-most MathSoc people have become much less concerned about how the PC is used.
-A few months later the CSC obtained complete control over the PC from MathSoc
-council.  In the months following, the PC gradually fell apart.  After DCS 
-installed an FTP terminal server in the IO Room (MC1063), the need for the
-PC had dropped to nil.  Hardware errors on the hard drive finally convinced 
-the exec of S91 that the machine was past its useful lifetime.  The machine
-was taken out of service and surplussed.
-
-The CSC also has two terminals that it has obtained from MFCF.  The CSC
-should always have at least one terminal.  It the terminal dies, talk to
-the Executive Assistant to the Dean of Math.  
-
-\begin{itemize}
-\squeezeitems
-\item 1 Wyse 75 terminal
-\item 1 VC 404 terminal
-\end{itemize}
-
-The VC 404 terminal was in continual disrepair and was traded to a fellow 
-member of the CSC on workterm on campus for the Ann Arbor Ambassador in his
-office (He was not using the terminal and sought some advantage for the 
-CSC).  This terminal in turn died of keyboard flakiness.  In W92, the CSC
-borrowed a Wy75 terminal from \mathNEWS.  To date, \mathNEWS knows that 
-we have their terminal, but, has not requested its return.  As they had 
-just received a new Wy99GT terminal, \mathNEWS staff seem unconcerned 
-about the old terminal.
-
-Terminals currently in the CSC's hands:
-\begin{itemize}
-\squeezeitems
-\item 1 Wyse 75 terminal (owned by MFCF)
-\item 1 Wyse 75 terminal (owned by \mathNEWS)
-\item 1 Ann Arbor Ambassador (owned by MFCF --- broken keyboard)
-\end{itemize}
-
-\subsubsection{Department of Computing Services}
-All networks on campus fall under the control of DCS.  Any problems should
-be directed to them.  As of the W90 term the CSC has the following 
-connections:
-
-\begin{itemize}
-\squeezeitems
-\item 1 serial connection through the Sytek network
-\item 1 serial connection through the Gandalf network
-\item 1 direct serial connection to Maytag
-\end{itemize}
-
-\subsection{WatCSC \label{WATCSC}}
-In the F87 term the executive felt that a computer science club, should
-have computing facilities which went beyond a single terminal.  This was
-due in part to an MFCF decision earlier in the year to no longer
-allow undergraduates to send mail, or post news to machines outside the
-University.  The CSC attempted to have these privileges restored. At
-the same time the CSC investigated means by which it could provide mail and
-news services to undergraduates.  
-
-The executive was told of a short lived organization
-named the Open Computer Group that in 1985 had obtained free of charge four
-PDP 11/70 computers that had been retired by the University.
-Unfortunately the Open Computer Group was unable to generate sufficient
-interest and activity.  The group folded after a few months and the
-machines were eventually surplused by the University.  
-In 1986 the Symbolic Computation Group offered the CSC some 
-equipment that was no longer being used.  The executive at the time 
-turned down the offer because they felt the hardware was too noisy and bulky.  
-
-In response to this new direction, the executive investigated what happened
-to the above hardware.  It was discovered that the PDP 11's had been sold.
-Luckily, the equipment that SCG offered was still available.  Within a
-matter of days the CSC had obtained from SCG a few pieces of
-Hewlett-Packard hardware that would eventually become the heart of WatCSC.   
-
-Some investigation revealed that Hewlett-Packard donated four systems to
-the university some time in 1984.  When donated these machines included
-a maintenance coverage for a year.  After the initial project for the 
-machines died they were dispersed to various people around the Computer
-Science department.  Two went to the Symbolic Computation Group, one went
-to the Computer Systems group and the fourth went to J.D. Lawson a former
-professor.  When Prof. Lawson left the university the CSC acquired the 
-serial card and some manuals from his machine, the rest of the equipment
-eventually ended up with the Office Automation Group.
-
-As demand for disk storage, memory and other assorted peripherals grew 
-the CSC began to acquire these other systems.  In early 1989 the CSC 
-finally got hold of the last HP system that had gone to the Office Automation
-Group.  
-
-\section{The ACM \label{ACM}}
-
-The CSC is associated with another lesser known club by the name of
-``University of Waterloo Student Chapter of the ACM ''.  In order to be a
-member of the ACM student chapter, one must be a member of the ACM as
-well.  This restriction is in conflict with the idea that anyone should
-be able to be a member of the CSC.  The result is that the ACM student
-chapter has no real members.  
-
-Even though the ACM student chapter has no official members, the CSC desires
-to keep the student chapter operational.  This has resulted in the
-creation of the fictional person known as Calum T. Dalek.  Calum is a
-full member of the ACM and serves as the chair of the student chapter
-of the ACM.
-
-\subsection{ACM Requirements}
-In order to maintain our status as a student chapter of the ACM we must
-fulfil two requirements.
-
-\begin{enumerate}
-\squeezeitems
-\item Each term a chapter activity report must be filled out and mailed 
-to the ACM Student Chapter Chairperson, and the ACM Student Chapter
-liaison.  
-
-\item Once a year a financial statement must be mailed to the ACM.
-\end{enumerate}
-
-\subsubsection{Activity Report}
-
-The student chapter activity report is a single sheet of paper
-on which we list the members of the executive for the ACM
-student chapter along with a list of our activities.  Since only
-Calum is a real member of the ACM, his is the only name that
-appears on the activity report with an ACM membership number.  
-Fictional names are created for the other executive members of
-the student chapter of the ACM.  The membership number is left
-blank or has a ``?'' inserted.  The final requirement is a faculty
-sponsor.  Our current faculty sponsor is Howie Pell, however, he
-is also not a member of the ACM.
-
-If the ACM does not receive a single activity report over the
-course of a year they will place the student chapter on
-probation.  To extricate ourselves from this situation we need
-to mail activity reports and make sure they are received.
-
-\subsubsection{Financial Statement}
-
-For some strange and mysterious reason the ACM continues to send
-us an annual request for financial information.  Apparently in
-the U.S. the ACM can derive some sort of tax benefit from its
-student chapters.  Since we are a Canadian chapter this is not
-the case. This makes filling out the financial form is very easy.
-Just write ``Not Applicable --- Canadian Chapter'', across the top of
-the form.
-
-\subsubsection{Calum's Membership}
-
-Calum T. Dalek is a student member of the ACM.  Membership fees
-are currently in the neighbourhood of US\$ 90 and are due
-sometime before March each year.  Little attempt is made to 
-distribute the cost over all three terms.  Through Calum's
-membership the CSC receives the following ACM publications.  
-
-\begin{itemize}
-\squeezeitems
-\item Communications of the ACM
-\item Transactions on Graphics
-\item Transactions on Programming Languages and Systems
-\item SIGGRAPH conference proceedings
-\item Oopsla conference proceedings
-\item Asplos conference proceedings
-\item Sigplan notices
-\item Computer Graphics
-\end{itemize}
-
-\section{Relations with other Groups}
-Getting anything done on campus requires communication with several other
-groups.  The section is meant to provide some perspective on the relations
-which the CSC has had with a few of the more important campus
-organizations.
-
-\subsection{Math Faculty}
-
-%%NAME
-The Computer Science Club enjoys a fairly good relationship with the
-Math Faculty.  Most of the CSC's contact with the faculty is through Lyn
-Williams, Executive Assistant to the Dean of Math.  Lyn has been very
-helpful to the CSC by vouching for us in our relations with other
-departments.  
-
-On occasion, when the political climate requires it, the CSC has
-communicated its needs directly to the Dean of Math.
-
-\subsection{Computer Science Department}
-
-The CSC also enjoys a good relationship with the CS department.  A
-current CSC objective is to get the CS department to provide some
-funding for bringing in speakers.
-
-\subsection{Federation of Students}
-The CSC is not a FED club.  This is sometimes important for billing things
-like theatres and audio visual equipment.  Most of the rest of the time
-this is not important.  
-
-Folk lore has it that the CSC does not want to become a FED club.  This is
-because the FEDS have some strange requirements of their clubs which do not
-mesh well the type of members the CSC wants.  We seem do do fine with the
-situation as it exists, but this does not mean that some accurate
-information should be obtained in the future.
-
-\subsection{Mathematics Society}
-The CSC's relationship with MathSoc is somewhat of a never-ending
-saga.  This is mostly due to the fluctuation of the MathSoc executive,
-especially the treasurer.  For the most part, relations tend to be
-pretty good.  The letdown usually comes at the beginning of the term
-when MathSoc has its budget meeting.  Most people on MathSoc council are
-indifferent to the CSC.  However, once a single dissenting opinion
-is expressed, there tends to be a cavalcade of discussion.   At this
-time (S89) MathSoc is preparing a ``Club Policy'' which should eliminate a
-great deal of the capriciousness involved.
-
-\subsection{Engineering Society}
-
-\subsection{Science Society}
-The CSC has a few members which come from science.  This has caused us to
-seek funding from the SciSoc in the same manner as EngSoc.  Unfortunately,
-SciSoc exists for the most part to orient students and run the Science
-C\&D.  Beyond that they are fragmented into other groups based on the major
-departments within the faculty.  The result is that SciSoc really doesn't
-have much extra money and has been unwilling to send some our way.
-
-\section{Consulting}
-The CSC operates a ``Friendly Consulting Service'' designed to provide 
-assistance to computer users at all levels.  The CSC has provided this 
-service for as long as anyone can remember.  Some of the reasons that the
-CSC promotes itself in this manner are; hours of availability far in excess
-of both DCS and MFCF consultants, ability to provide expert support at 
-almost any skill level, and a desire to promote computer awareness in 
-general.
-
-Although the Friendly Consulting Service tends to maintain a high profile
-within the CSC it consumes almost no resources.  This is achieved by running
-the service in an ad hoc volunteer manner.  Essentially anyone present in 
-the CSC office qualified to answer questions is automatically a part of the
-consulting service.  As confused people wander into the CSC office, they
-should be offered assistance by the ``qualified'' people.
-
-\section{The Authors}
-This document has been compiled, edited, revised, mangled and had other
-unsightly things done to by several people of the course of its development.
-This section is meant to record their contribution and 
-provide them with some recognition for their efforts.
-
-Version 1.0 of the procedures manual was written by Kevin Smith based
-on his experiences as CSC president during W89.  It was originally intended
-as a ``President's Survival Guide'', but has subsequently been expanded into
-a compendium of procedures to assist and guide the CSC's operations.
-
-In the second author's words:
-\begin{quotation}
-Version 2.0 of the procedures manual was written by me (Jim Boritz) long after
-I had been president of the CSC in F87 and W88.  At the time that the 
-Version 2.0 undertaking began in W90, I was desperately seeking a way 
-of avoiding my Master's essay and so devoted a fair amount of effort 
-and roughly quadrupled the size of the original V1.0 manual.  I also 
-added \LaTeX\ formatting because I was keen on \TeX\ at the time and was
-considering using it for my essay.  In general, I would have preferred to 
-format the document using bare \TeX\ along with the macros that I had 
-developed.  However, knowing the CSC, I decided not to rely upon them 
-keeping the macros around with the document and opted for the standard
-\LaTeX\ macros (which really are ok once you get over the NIH syndrome).
-After I graduated I asked for some time in which to add even more 
-material to this already enormous document.  I did manage to make a few 
-additions and passed the manual back to the CSC for use and comment.  
-Foolishly, I thought there would be even further additions forthcoming.
-It is now a little over a year later (Feb. 21, 1992) and more than a 
-year and a half since I have been active in CSC affairs.  I managed to 
-finally add one last section (Office Space).  If pressed I could probably
-describe some of the other items in historical context (I love historical
-contexts), but it is time for the sections that have already been 
-written to be brought up to date by someone else.
-\end{quotation}
-
-In the words of the third author:
-\begin{quotation}
-I (Shannon Mann) took over the authorship of the procedure's manual in W92.
-I broke it down into sections, distributed it across several files and
-eventually threw out all the work I had done on it, as I felt it would
-never survive in so many chunks.  In W93, my position of computer operator
-with DCS was ``declared redundant'', leaving me with plenty of time on my
-hands to do all the updating I had planned.  Since then, I have added a
-titlepage, a table of contents, several sections and tables and even a few
-appendices.  In my updating of this document, I have removed a good 7 pages,
-mostly dealing with surplussed computer equipment.  To the remaining I have
-added 12+ pages, bringing the final count to almost 40.  Added are the
-sections on the exec positions, events, and contests, and expanded are the 
-sections on computer equipment and WatCSC.  The document has undergone a
-dramatic restructuring, pulling similar information themes together and
-amongst one-another.  
-It is my hope that this document will continue to be updated and expanded,
-and that I will only be the third of many authors.
-\end{quotation}
-
-\appendix
-
-\newpage
-\begin{center}
-\large\bf Appendices \\
-\end{center}
-
-\section{CSC How-To}
-
-This section contains brief notes explaining how to do common CSC tasks.
-
-\subsection{Starting a Term}
-
-Every term starts with an election.  A past exec member or an involved
-member should find someone to act as CRO in the first few days of the
-term.  The election should be held no later than the third thursday of the
-term.  Due to all that is done in the CSC in the fall term, the election
-should be held earlier if at all possible.  See `Holding an Election' below 
-for more details.  Very soon after the election, the President and Treasurer
-with help from past exec, should prepare a budget to be submitted to the 
-treasurer of MathSoc.  Visiting the MathSoc Treasurer earlier than the 
-meeting which okays budgets has proven profitable, allowing CSC budgets to
-be passed without much fuss.  A budget with a request should be sent to 
-EngSoc, as we often can manage a small request from them (about \$50 per
-term).
-
-\subsection{Running a Contest}
-
-\newpage
-\section{Term Event Summaries}
-
-This section contains brief summaries of events that the CSC does on an 
-on-going basis.  These timelines should be used as a reference, to make
-sure main CSC events are accomplished.
-
-\begin{table}[hb]
-\begin{tabular}{@{$\Box$} l p{3in}}
-Event & Details \\ \hline \hline
-Elections & Held as soon as possible, no later than the third thursday of the
-month \\ \hline
-Budgets & Directly after elections to be turned in to MathSoc and \mbox{EngSoc}
-with a request for funding \\ \hline
-Programme Committee & Meets as soon as possible after elections to gather
-ideas for talks, tours and other events for the term \\ \hline
-\end{tabular}
-\caption{Start Term Checklist}
-\end{table}
-
-\subsection{Fall Term}
-
-\begin{tabular}{p{1.2in} p{1.4in} p{2in}}
-Date & Event Name & Details \\ \hline \hline
-Earliest Possible & Start Term Checklist & See above \\ \hline
-Last Weekend in Sept & Local ACM Contest & Selects teams to go to the
-regionals --- prefer earlier if possible\\ \hline
-First Friday in Oct & ACM Registration & Register teams selected with the
-contest \\ \hline
-First Weekend in Nov & ACM Regionals & Kick major ass :-) \\ \hline
-Oct or Nov & Othello Tournament & Announce four weeks early \\ \hline
-Mid-Nov & 3B Info Night & \\ \hline
-Week before Finals & Ctrl-D Dinner & Dine with friends --- end of term send-off \\ \hline
-\end{tabular}
-
-\subsection{Winter Term}
-
-\begin{tabular}{p{1.2in} p{1.4in} p{2in}}
-Date & Event Name & Details \\ \hline \hline
-Earliest Possible & Start Term Checklist & See above \\ \hline
-Mid-Mar & 3B Info Night & \\ \hline
-March & Calum's ACM Membership Due & \\ \hline
-Week before Finals & Ctrl-D Dinner & Dine with friends --- end of term send-off \\ \hline
-\end{tabular}
-
-\subsection{Spring Term}
-
-\begin{tabular}{p{1.2in} p{1.4in} p{2in}}
-Date & Event Name & Details \\ \hline \hline
-Earliest Possible & Start Term Checklist & See above \\ \hline
-Before Term Ends & ACM Registration & A fuzzy warm feeling for the ACM --- See section on ACM p.\ \pageref{ACM} for more details \\ \hline
-Week before Finals & Ctrl-D Dinner & Dine with friends --- end of term send-off \\ \hline
-\end{tabular}
-
-\end{document}