added movie night event
[www/www.git] / events.xml
1 <?xml version='1.0'?>
2
3 <!DOCTYPE eventdefs SYSTEM "csc.dtd" [<!ENTITY mdash "&#x2014;">]>
4 <eventdefs>
5
6 <!-- Winter 2016 -->
7 <eventitem date="2016-02-10" time="6:30 pm" room="MC Comfy"
8            title="Movie Night: Big Hero 6">
9   <short>
10     <p>
11         Movie Night! Come watch "Big Hero 6" with the CSC!
12         </p>
13   </short>
14   <abstract>
15     <p>
16
17 Come watch "Big Hero 6" with the Computer Science Club this wednesday the 10th at 6:30 PM in the MC Comfy Lounge.
18 Why "Big Hero 6"? It's an award-winning animated Disney movie involving an inflatable robot fighting evil in "San Frasokyo". Enough said.
19
20         </p>
21   </abstract>
22 </eventitem>
23
24 <eventitem date="2016-02-04" time="6:00 pm" room="STC 0010"
25            title="Code Party">
26   <short>
27     <p>
28         The CS Club is having its termly code party! Come out and work on projects, assignments, and more. Food is provided!
29         </p>
30   </short>
31   <abstract>
32     <p>
33         Want help installing Linux? Bring a USB, we'll help you.
34         Want to work on a project, CS homework, or an IRC bot? Come over, we'll have food.
35         Want to see what it's like to be in the new STC? Plugs at every desk, I'm telling you.
36         (This term it's going to be in the new STC not in the comfy. We're going for some adventure this term.)
37
38
39         </p>
40     <p>
41 Be there, we'll have dinner!
42     </p>
43   </abstract>
44 </eventitem>
45
46 <eventitem date="2016-01-28" time="6:00 pm" room="MC 3003"
47            title="Unix 101">
48   <short>
49     <p>
50       Interested in Linux, but don't know where to start? Come learn some
51       basic topics with us including interaction with the shell, motivation
52       for using it, some simple commands, and more! (Cookies after)
53     </p>
54   </short>
55   <abstract>
56     <p>
57       New to the Linux computing environment? If you seek an introduction,
58       look no further (you can if you want we're not the police). Topics that
59       will be covered include basic interaction with the shell and the
60       motivations behind using it, and an introduction to compilation. You'll
61       have to learn this stuff in CS 246 anyways, so why not get a head start!
62     </p>
63     <p>
64       If you're interested in attending, make sure you can log into the Macs
65       on the third floor, or show up to the CSC office (MC 3036) 20 minutes
66       early for some help. If you're already familiar with these topics, don't
67       hesitate to come to Unix 102, planned to be held after Reading Week.
68     </p>
69   </abstract>
70 </eventitem>
71
72 <eventitem date="2016-01-23" time="11:00 AM" room="TBA"
73            title="Eth1: Jane Street Competition">
74   <short>
75     <p>
76         eth1: a day-long programming contest. Form teams and hack
77         together a trading bot to compete against others and the markets.
78     </p>
79   </short>
80   <abstract>
81     <p>
82       eth1: a day-long programming contest. Form teams and hack together a trading bot to compete against others and the markets.
83     </p>
84     <p>
85         Brought to you by: CSC and Jane Street.
86     </p>
87     <p>
88         Each member of the winning team will receive $1000 USD.
89     </p>
90     <p>
91         There'll be lots of (free) food and drink available.
92     </p>
93     <p>
94         Absolutely no special math, OCaml, or finance knowledge is required; you can use any language you like. The contest is entirely technical in nature and you won't need any visual design skills.
95     </p>
96     <p>
97         The exact details of the hackathon aren't released until the competition begins. The one thing you can do ahead of time to prepare is familiarize yourself with the libraries for writing TCP clients in your programming language of choice.
98     </p>
99     <p>
100         <a href="https://docs.google.com/a/janestreet.com/forms/d/1I7UukJDH9ZAVWpLl-2vwmvPWzbWBFjj8g973hidn8eE/viewform">Sign up!</a>
101     </p>
102     <p>
103         The contest will be on Saturday, January 23rd, from 11:00AM - 11:00PM. Signups will close on Monday, January 18th at 11:59PM, and we'll send out confirmations to participants on the 20th.
104     </p>
105     <p>
106         For any other queries, email: eth1-waterloo@janestreet.com
107     </p>
108     <p>
109         Further details will be announced closer to the event. Teams of up to three will be accepted, but you don't have to have a team to sign up — feel free to turn up as a singleton and we'll form teams on the fly.
110     </p>
111   </abstract>
112 </eventitem>
113
114
115
116 <!-- Fall 2015 -->
117
118 <eventitem date="2015-11-27" time="7:30 PM" room="MC Comfy"
119            title="WiCS and CSC watch War Games!">
120   <short>
121     <p>
122       WiCS and CSC are watching War Games in the Comfy lounge.
123     </p>
124   </short>
125   <abstract>
126     <p>
127       WiCS and CSC are watching War Games in the Comfy lounge.
128     </p>
129     <p>
130       War Games is this movie where these kids phone a computer and then the computer wants to nuke things.
131       Cold war stuff. Nowadays computers won't let you do that, you have to SSH in instead.
132     </p>
133     <p>
134       We're bringing food. Gluten-free, vegetarian options available. Sandwiches, drinks, and popcorn!
135     </p>
136     <p>
137       Everyone welcome! Stop by!
138     </p>
139   </abstract>
140 </eventitem>
141
142 <eventitem date="2015-11-26" time="5:00-7:00 PM" room="MC 4063"
143            title="An Introduction to Google's FOAM Framework">
144   <short>
145     <p>
146       An introduction to Google's FOAM framework, an open-source modeling
147       framework written in Javascript, by Google's Kevin Greer.
148     </p>
149   </short>
150   <abstract>
151     <p>
152       FOAM is an open-source modeling framework written in Javascript. With FOAM,
153       you can create Domain Specific Languages (DSLs), which are high-level
154       models that can be interpreted or compiled to different languages or
155       environments (Java/Android, Swift/iOS, and JS/Web). Currently, it supports
156       DSLs for entities/classes, parsers, animations, database queries,
157       interactive documents, and, most importantly, new DSLs.
158     </p>
159     <p>
160       FOAM supports building text, HTML, and graphical views for DSLs using a
161       small Model View Controller (MVC) library, which is itself modeled with
162       FOAM. This library can also be used by modeled Javascript applications.
163     </p>
164     <p>
165       FOAM increases developer productivity by allowing them to express
166       solutions at a higher, more succinct level. The MVC library also
167       increases application performance through its efficient data-binding,
168       caching, and query-optimization mechanisms.
169     </p>
170     <p>
171       Learn more at http://foamdev.com
172     </p>
173     <p>
174       You can get in contact with Kevin Greer on twitter,
175       <a href="https://twitter.com/kgrgreer">@kgrgreer</a>.
176     </p>
177   </abstract>
178 </eventitem>
179
180 <eventitem date="2015-11-23" time="6:00 PM" room="MC 4041"
181            title="'Static Analysis and Program Optimization Using Dataflow Analysis'">
182   <short>
183     <p>
184       An introduction to some basic issues with optimization of imperative
185       programs, by Sean Harrap
186     </p>
187   </short>
188   <abstract>
189     <p>
190       An introduction to some basic issues with optimization of imperative
191       programs by Sean Harrap, beginning with traditional methods such as tree
192       traversals.
193     </p>
194     <p>
195       This will be followed by a more powerful solution to these problems,
196       providing an overview of its mathematical foundations, and then
197       describing how it can be used to express optimizations simply and elegantly.
198     </p>
199     <p>
200       Some familiarity with the second year CS core (CS245, CS241, MATH239)
201       will be assumed.
202     </p>
203   </abstract>
204 </eventitem>
205
206 <eventitem date="2015-11-19" time="7:00-8:00 PM" room="MC 4020"
207            title="'Git 101'">
208   <short>
209     <p>
210       Learn how to use Git properly in an exciting talk by Charlie Wang!
211     </p>
212   </short>
213   <abstract>
214     <p>
215       git init, git add, git commit, git 'er done!
216     </p>
217     <p>
218       In Git 101, Charlie Wang will convince you to use Git for your projects and
219       show you a high level overview of how to use it properly.
220     </p>
221     <p>
222       This talk is recommended for CS 246 students.
223     </p>
224     <p>
225       Come for the tutorial, stay for the bad jokes.
226     </p>
227   </abstract>
228 </eventitem>
229
230 <eventitem date="2015-10-16" time="7:00 PM" room="ML Theatre of the Arts"
231            title="Cory Doctorow - The War on General Purpose Computing">
232   <short>
233     Between walled gardens, surveillance agencies, and political opponents,
234     no matter who's winning the war on general purpose computing you're
235     losing. The Computer Science Club will be hosting Cory Doctorow's talk
236     in the Theatre of the Arts on October 16.
237   </short>
238   <abstract>
239     <p>
240       No Matter Who's Winning the  War on General Purpose Computing, You're Losing
241     </p>
242     <p>
243       If cyberwar were a hockey game, it'd be the end of the first period and
244       the score would be tied 500-500. All offense, no defense.
245     </p>
246     <p>
247       Meanwhile, a horrible convergence has occurred as everyone from car
248       manufacturers to insulin pump makers have adopted the inkjet printer
249       business model, insisting that only their authorized partners can make
250       consumables, software and replacement parts -- with the side-effect of
251       making it a felony to report showstopper, potentially fatal bugs in
252       technology that we live and die by.
253     </p>
254     <p>
255       And then there's the FBI and the UK's David Cameron, who've joined in
256       with the NSA and GCHQ in insisting that everyone must be vulnerable to
257       Chinese spies and identity thieves and pervert voyeurs so that the spy
258       agencies will always be able to spy on everyone and everything, everywhere.
259     </p>
260     <p>
261       It's been fifteen years since the copyright wars kicked off, and we're
262       still treating the Internet as a glorified video-on-demand service --
263       when we're not treating it as a more perfect pornography distribution
264       system, or a jihadi recruitment tool.
265     </p>
266     <p>
267       It's all of those -- and more. Because it's the nervous system of the
268       21st century. We've got to stop treating it like a political football.
269     </p>
270     <p>
271       Cory Doctorow will be talking on Friday October 16, 7pm in
272       the Theatre of the Arts. Admission is free, and
273       the talk will be open to the public. Doors open
274       at 6:30pm. Headsets will be provided for the hard of hearing,
275       email Patrick at pj2melan@uwaterloo.ca . The theatre is wheelchair accessible.
276     </p>
277     <p>
278       The following books written by Cory will be sold at the event:
279       <ul>
280         <li>Little Brother</li>
281         <li>Homeland</li>
282         <li>For the Win</li>
283         <li>Makers</li>
284         <li>Pirate Cinema</li>
285         <li>Information Doesn't want to be free</li>
286         <li>In Real Life</li>
287       </ul>
288     </p>
289   </abstract>
290 </eventitem>
291
292 <eventitem date="2015-10-07" time="5:30 PM" room="MC 4061"
293     title="Starting an VN Indie Game Company as a UW Student">
294   <short>
295
296     <p>Come out to a talk by Alfe Clemencio!</p>
297     <p> Many people want to make games as signified by all the game development
298         schools that are appearing everywhere. But how would you do it as a UW
299         student? This talk shares the experiences of how making Sakura River
300         Interactive was founded without any Angel/VC investment.
301     </p>
302   </short>
303   <abstract>
304     <p>Come out to a talk by Alfe Clemencio!</p>
305     <p> Many people want to make games as signified by all the game development
306         schools that are appearing everywhere. But how would you do it as a UW
307         student? This talk shares the experiences of how making Sakura River
308         Interactive was founded without any Angel/VC investment.
309     </p>
310     <p> The talk will start off with inspiration drawn of Co-op Japan, to it's
311         beginnings at Velocity. Then a reflection of how various game
312         development and business skills was obtained in the unexpected ways at
313         UW will follow. How the application of probabilities, theory of
314         computation, physical/psychological attraction theories was used in the
315         development of the company's first game. Finally how various Computer
316         Science theories helped evaluate feasibility of several potential
317         incoming business deals.
318     </p>
319     <a href="http://www.sakurariver.ca/">From Sakura River interactive</a>
320   </abstract>
321 </eventitem>
322
323 <eventitem date="2015-10-02" time="7:30 PM" room="MC 4040"
324            title="'Why Am I Studying This?'">
325   <short>
326     <p>
327       Big-O, the Halting Problem, Finite State Machines, and more are concepts that get
328       even more interesting in the real world. Come and hear Tom Rathborne talk about how theory
329       hits reality (often with a bang!) at Booking.com.
330     </p>
331   </short>
332   <abstract>
333     <ul>
334       <li>Data Structures</li>
335       <li>Finite State Machines</li>
336       <li>big-O</li>
337       <li>Queuing theory</li>
338       <li>Race conditions</li>
339       <li>Compilers</li>
340       <li>The Halting Problem</li>
341       <li>etc.</li>
342     </ul>
343     <p>
344       These things get even more interesting in the real world.
345       Come and hear Tom Rathborne talk about how theory hits reality (often with a bang!) at
346       Booking.com, the biggest not-a-technology-company on the Internet.
347     </p>
348     <p>
349       Food and drinks will be provided!
350     </p>
351   </abstract>
352 </eventitem>
353
354 <eventitem date="2015-09-30" time="5:00 PM" room="DC 1304"
355            title="Back to Back Talks: Culture Turnaround and Software Defined Networks">
356   <short>
357     <p>
358       Back to back talks from John Stix and Francisco Dominguez on turning
359       a company's culture around and on Software Defined Networks!
360     </p>
361   </short>
362   <abstract>
363     <p>
364       Back to back talks from John Stix and Francisco Dominguez on turning
365       a company's culture around and on Software Defined Networks!
366     </p>
367     <p>
368       John Stix will be talking about how he turned around the corporate culture at Fibernetics Corporation.
369     </p>
370     <p>
371       Francisco Dominguez will be talking about Software Defined Networks, which
372       for example can turn multiple flakey internet connections into one reliable
373       one.
374     </p>
375     <p>
376       The speakers are:
377       <ul>
378         <li>John Stix - President, Fibernetics</li>
379         <li>Francisco Dominguez - CTO, Fibernetics</li>
380       </ul>
381     </p>
382     <p>
383       Food and drinks will be provided!
384     </p>
385   </abstract>
386 </eventitem>
387
388 <eventitem date="2015-09-24" time="4:30 PM" room="EIT 3142"
389            title="CSC and WiCS Career Panel">
390   <short>
391     <p>
392       The CSC is joining WiCS to host a career panel! Come hear from Waterloo
393       alumni as they speak about their time at Waterloo, experience with coop,
394       and life beyond the university. Please register at http://bit.ly/1OyJP6D
395     </p>
396   </short>
397   <abstract>
398     <p>
399       The CSC is joining WiCS to host a career panel! Come hear from Waterloo
400       alumni as they speak about their time at Waterloo, experience with coop,
401       and life beyond the university. A great chance to network and seek
402       advice!
403     </p>
404     <p>
405       The panelists are:
406       <ul>
407         <li>Joanne Mckinley - Software Engineer, Google</li>
408         <li>Carol Kilner - COO, BanaLogic Corporation</li>
409         <li>Harshal Jethwa - Consultant, Infusion</li>
410         <li>Dan Collens - CTO, Big Roads</li>
411       </ul>
412     </p>
413     <p>
414       Food and drinks will be provided! Please register
415       <a href="https://docs.google.com/forms/d/1G-8LFLgxQUkahXvODpS2cVSvceNibTt18Uc8TnhlKI8/viewform?usp=send_form">here</a>
416     </p>
417   </abstract>
418 </eventitem>
419
420 <eventitem date="2015-09-22" time="9 PM" room="MC 3001"
421            title="Results of Fall 2015 Elections">
422   <short>
423     <p>
424       The Computer Science Club has elected its executive for the term, and a new Office Manager and System Administrator have been appointed.
425     </p>
426     <p>
427       See inside for results.
428     </p>
429   </short>
430   <abstract>
431     <p>
432       The Computer Science Club has elected its executive for the term, and a new Office Manager and System Administrator have been appointed.
433       The quorum for elections had been reached, and voting members of the CSC voted for their President, Vice President, Treasurer, and Secretary from among many qualified candidates.
434       The new elected executive then proceeded to appoint a System Administrator (who became part of the executive <i>ex officio</i>) and an Office Manager.
435
436       The appointment of a Librarian was delayed because no suitable and willing candidate was found.
437     </p>
438     <p>
439        The results of the elections are:
440       <ul>
441         <li>Simone Hu - President</li>
442         <li>Theo Belaire - Vice President</li>
443         <li>Jordan Upiter - Treasurer</li>
444         <li>Daniel Marin - Secretary</li>
445         <li>Jordan Pryde - System Administrator</li>
446         <li>Office Manager - Ilia Chtcherbakov</li>
447       </ul>
448     </p>
449   </abstract>
450 </eventitem>
451
452
453 <eventitem date="2015-09-22" time="7 PM" room="MC 3001"
454            title="Fall 2015 Elections">
455   <short>
456     <p>
457       The Computer Science Club will be holding elections for the Fall 2015
458       term on Tuesday, September 22nd in MC Comfy (MC 3001) at 19:00. During
459       the meeting, the president, vice-president, treasurer and secretary will
460       be elected, the sysadmin will be ratified, and the librarian and office
461       manager will be appointed.
462     </p>
463     <p>
464       See inside for nominations.
465     </p>
466   </short>
467   <abstract>
468     <p>
469       The Computer Science Club will be holding elections for the Fall 2015
470       term on Tuesday, September 22nd in MC Comfy (MC 3001) at 19:00. During
471       the meeting, the president, vice-president, treasurer and secretary will
472       be elected, the sysadmin will be ratified, and the librarian and office
473       manager will be appointed.
474     </p>
475     <p>
476       If you'd like to run for any of these positions or nominate someone, you
477       can write your name on the board in the CSC office (MC 3036/3037) or
478       send me (Charlie) an email at cro@csclub.uwaterloo.ca. You can also
479       deposit nominations in the CSC mailbox in MathSoc or present them to me
480       in person. Nominations will close at 18:00 on Monday, September  21st.
481       All members are welcome to run! First-years are especially encouraged to
482       run for secretary, office manager, and librarian, but they are not
483       limited to those positions.
484     </p>
485   </abstract>
486 </eventitem>
487
488 <eventitem date="2015-09-17" time="6 PM" room="MC 2065"
489            title="Google Cardboard">
490   <short>
491     <p>
492       Come for a talk from Rob Suderman on Cardboard, Google's recent
493       exploration in affordable, cereal box based Virtual Reality.
494     </p>
495   </short>
496   <abstract>
497     <p>
498       Come for a talk from Rob Suderman on Cardboard, Google's recent
499       exploration in affordable, cereal box based Virtual Reality.
500     </p>
501     <p>
502       Learn about the tools available to make your own application, some of
503       the pitfalls to avoid, and an overview of rendering virtual reality
504       content with some tips and tricks on high performance rendering. The
505       talk will contain content for everyone interested!
506     </p>
507   </abstract>
508 </eventitem>
509
510 <!-- Spring 2015 -->
511
512 <eventitem date="2015-07-16" time="6 PM" room="MC 4064"
513            title="Algorithms for Shortest Paths">
514   <short>
515     <p>
516       Come to this exciting talk about path-finding algorithms which
517       is being presented by Professor Anna Lubiw.
518     </p>
519   </short>
520   <abstract>
521     <p>
522       Finding shortest paths is a problem that comes up in many applications:
523       Google maps, network routing, motion planning, connectivity in social
524       networks, and etc.
525       The domain may be a graph, either explicitly or implicitly represented,
526       or a geometric space.
527     </p>
528     <p>
529       Professor Lubiw will survey the field, from Dijkstra's foundational algorithm to
530       current results and open problems.
531       There will be lots of pictures and lots of ideas.
532     </p>
533     <p>
534       <a href="http://mirror.csclub.uwaterloo.ca/csclub/shortest-paths-CSclub.pdf">Click here to see the slides from the talk.</a>
535     </p>
536     <p>
537       <a href="/media/Algorithms%20for%20Shortest%20Paths">Click here for the recorded talk.</a>
538     </p>
539     </abstract>
540 </eventitem>
541
542 <eventitem date="2015-07-08" time="6 PM" room="MC 4060"
543            title="Infrasound is all around us">
544   <short>
545     <p>
546       Ambient infra sound surrounds us. Richard Mann presents his current
547       research and equipment on measuring infra sound, and samples of recorded
548       infra sound.
549     </p>
550   </short>
551   <abstract>
552     <p>
553       Infra sound refers to sound waves below the range of human hearing.
554       Infra sound comes from a number of natural phenomena including weather
555       changes, thunder, and ocean waves.  Common man made sources include
556       heating and ventilation systems, industrial machinery, moving vehicle
557       cabins (air, trains, cars), and energy generation (wind turbines, gas
558       plants).
559       <br></br>
560       In this talk Richard Mann will present equipment he has built to measure infra sound, and
561       analyse some of the infra sound he has recorded.
562       <br></br>
563       Note: In Winter 2016 Richard Mann will be offering a new course, in Computer Sound.  The
564       course will appear as CS489/CS689 ("Topics in Computer Science").  This
565       is a project-based course (60% assignments, 40% project, no final).
566       Details at his web page,
567       <a href="http://www.cs.uwaterloo.ca/~mannr">~mannr</a>.
568     </p>
569     </abstract>
570 </eventitem>
571
572 <eventitem date="2015-06-26" time="7:00 PM" room="Laurel Creek Firepit"
573            title="WiCS and CSC Go Outside">
574   <short>
575     <p>Come hang out with the Women in Computer Science and the Computer Science Club! There will be s'mores and frozen yogurt. Also fire. And a creek. Let's enjoy the outdoors!</p>
576   </short>
577   <abstract>
578     <p>Come hang out with the Women in Computer Science and the Computer Science Club! There will be s'mores and frozen yogurt. Also fire. And a creek. Let's enjoy the outdoors!</p>
579   </abstract>
580 </eventitem>
581
582 <eventitem date="2015-06-19" time="6:00 PM" room="MC 3003"
583            title="UNIX 102">
584   <short>
585     <p>n things SCS hasn't told you about the shell</p>
586   </short>
587   <abstract>
588     <p>
589       This is a continuation of the Unix10X series of seminars that cover the use
590       of *nix environments, largely through interacting with a command line shell. In
591       this instalment we will be covering some of what the School of Computer
592       Science has left out of their introduction to the Command Line / Bash (from
593       cs246), as well as a brief introduction to having a useful prompt.
594       <br></br>
595       Topics to be discussed include:
596       <ul>
597         <li>Lost Bash: fancy expansion, arrays, and shopt</li>
598         <li>The File System is scary: your file names contain white space and newlines</li>
599         <li>Where Am I: A brief introduction to prompt customization</li>
600       </ul>
601     </p>
602   </abstract>
603 </eventitem>
604
605 <eventitem date="2015-05-22" time="4:00 PM" room="MC 3001 (Coomfy)"
606            title="By-Elections">
607   <short>
608     <p>
609       As there are vacancies in the executive council, there will be
610       by-election on May 22nd. The following positions are open for election:
611       <ul>
612         <li>Treasurer</li>
613         <li>Secretary</li>
614       </ul>
615     </p>
616     <p>
617       The executive are also looking for people who may be interested in the
618       following positions:
619       <ul>
620         <li>Systems Administrator</li>
621         <li>Office Manager</li>
622         <li>Librarian</li>
623       </ul>
624     </p>
625   </short>
626 </eventitem>
627
628 <!-- Winter 2015 -->
629
630 <eventitem date="2015-04-02" time="5:30 PM" room="MC 4020"
631            title="Describing and Synthesizing Microfluidics">
632   <short>
633     <p>
634       Derek Rayside presents current research on the field of microfluidics.
635       Microfluidics are currently developed mainly by trial and error. How can
636       this be improved?
637     </p>
638   </short>
639   <abstract>
640     <p>
641       Microfluidics is an exciting new area concerned with designing devices
642       that perform some medical diagnoses and chemical synthesis tasks orders
643       of magnitude faster and less expensively than traditional techniques.
644       However, microfluidic device design is currently a black art, akin to
645       how digital circuits were designed before 1980.
646       <br></br>
647       We have developed a
648       hardware description language that is appropriate for the description
649       and synthesis of both single-phase and multi-phase microfluidic devices.
650       These are new results that have not yet been published. This is
651       collaborative work with other research groups in Mechanical Engineering,
652       Chemical Engineering, and Electrical Engineering.
653     </p>
654     </abstract>
655 </eventitem>
656
657 <eventitem date="2015-03-27" time="6:00 PM" room="EIT 1015"
658            title="Constitutional GM and Code Party 1">
659   <short>
660     <p>
661       GM for the W2015 term, two main amendments to be discussed: Requiring
662       elections to be held within two weeks of the beginning of term and
663       adopting a club-wide code of conduct.
664       <br></br>
665       Code Party 1 follows, we're doing timed code golf problems, T-shirts might
666       find themselves on people who do well on code golf.
667     </p>
668   </short>
669   <abstract>
670     <p>
671       GM for the W2015 term, two main amendments to be discussed: Requiring
672       elections to be held within two weeks of the beginning of term and
673       adopting a club-wide code of conduct.
674       <br></br>
675       Code Party 1 follows, we're doing timed code golf problems, T-shirts might
676       find themselves on people who do well on code golf.
677     </p>
678     </abstract>
679 </eventitem>
680
681 <eventitem date="2015-03-10" time="6:00 PM" room="MC 4040"
682            title="Runtime Type Inference in Dynamic Languages - Day 2">
683   <short>
684     <p>
685       Day 2 of Runtime Type Inference in Dynamic Languages with Kannan Vijayan
686     </p>
687   </short>
688   <abstract>
689     <p>
690       Day 2 of Runtime Type Inference in Dynamic Languages with Kannan Vijayan
691     </p>
692     </abstract>
693 </eventitem>
694
695 <eventitem date="2015-03-09" time="6:00 PM" room="MC 4040"
696            title="Runtime Type Inference in Dynamic Languages - Day 1">
697   <short>
698     <p>
699       Javascript is fast. In some cases, very close to compiled-language fast.
700       How is this even possible? How do we know what types our variables have?
701       How can we optimize it well? Kannan Vijayan will be talking about the
702       historical advances in JIT-compilation of dynamically typed programs over
703       two days. Of course, both of those talks will have free food.
704     </p>
705   </short>
706   <abstract>
707     <p>
708       How do we make dynamic languages fast? Today, modern Javascript engines
709       have demonstrated that programs written in dynamically typed scripting lan-
710       guages can be executed close to the speed of programs written in languages
711       with static types. So how did we get here? How do we extract precious type
712       information from programs at runtime? If any variable can hold a value of any
713       type, then how can we optimize well?
714       <br></br>
715       This talk covers a bit of the history of the techniques used in this space, and
716       tries to summarize, in broad strokes, how those techniques come together to
717       enable efficient jit-compilation of dynamically typed programs.
718       To do the topic justice, Kannan Vijayan will be talking the Monday and
719       Tuesday March 9th and 10th.
720       <br></br>
721       Does that mean two consecutive days of free food? Yes it does.
722     </p>
723   </abstract>
724 </eventitem>
725
726 <eventitem date="2015-03-03" time="6:00 PM" room="MC 2038"
727            title="SAT and SMT solvers">
728   <short>
729     <p>
730       Murphy Berzish explains how to programmatically determine if a program is satisfiable,
731       and how to find a concrete counterexample if it is unsatisfiable. At the core
732       are SAT/SMT solvers. SAT theory deals with Boolean Satisfiability solvers,
733       while SMT theory--Satisfiability Modulo a Theory--allows SMT to be extended
734       to common data structures. Free food!
735     </p>
736   </short>
737   <abstract>
738     <p>
739       Does your program have an overflow error? Will it work with all inputs? How
740       do you know for sure? Test cases are the bread and butter of resilient design,
741       but bugs still sneak into software. What if we could prove our programs are
742       error-free?
743       <br></br>
744       Boolean Satisfiability (SAT) solvers determine the ‘satisfiability’ of boolean
745       set of equations for a set of inputs. An SMT solver (Satisfiability Modulo
746       a Theory) applies SMT to bit-vectors, strings, arrays, and more. Together,
747       we can reduce a program and prove it is satisfiable, or provide a concrete
748       counter-example. The implications of this are computer-aided reasoning tools
749       for error-checking in addition to much more robust programs.
750       <br></br>
751       In this talk Murphy Berzish will give an overview of SAT/SMT theory and
752       some real-world solution methods. He will also demonstrate applications of
753       SAT/SMT solvers in theorem proving, model checking, and program verification.
754       <br></br>
755       What else? Oh yes, refreshments and drinks will be served. Come out!
756     </p>
757   </abstract>
758 </eventitem>
759
760 <eventitem date="2015-02-27" time="6:00 PM" room="EV3 1408"
761            title="Code Party 0">
762   <short>
763     <p>
764       The first code party of Winter 2015, and we have something a litle different
765       this time. We're running a Code Retreat (coderetreat.org) with Boltmade.
766       The result of this is that you will be able to do a coding challenge, wherein
767       you implement Rule 110 (like the Game of Life). Of course, if you want to
768       work on whatever you can do that as well. Delicious free food, but RSVP!
769       <a href="https://bit.ly/code-party-0">bit.ly/code-party-0</a>
770     </p>
771   </short>
772   <abstract>
773     <p>
774       The first code party of Winter 2015, and we have something a litle different
775       this time. We're running a Code Retreat (coderetreat.org) with Boltmade.
776       The result of this is that you will be able to do a coding challenge, wherein
777       you implement Rule 110 (like the Game of Life). Of course, if you want to
778       work on whatever you can do that as well. Delicious free food, but RSVP!
779       <a href="https://bit.ly/code-party-0">bit.ly/code-party-0</a>
780     </p>
781   </abstract>
782 </eventitem>
783
784 <eventitem date="2015-02-05" time="3:30 PM" room="DC 1302"
785            title="Making Robots Behave">
786   <short>
787     <p>
788       Part of the Cheriton School of CS' Distinguished Lecture Series, MIT's Leslie Kaelbling will
789       discuss robotic AI applied to the messy real world. We make a number of
790       approximations during planning but regain robustness and effectiveness
791       through a continuous state estimation and replanning process. This allows
792       us to solve problems that would otherwise be intractable to solve optimally.
793     </p>
794   </short>
795   <abstract>
796     <p>
797       The fields of AI and robotics have made great improvements in many
798       individual subfields, including in motion planning, symbolic planning,
799       probabilistic reasoning, perception, and learning.  Our goal is to
800       develop an integrated approach to solving very large problems that are
801       hopelessly intractable to solve optimally.  We make a number of
802       approximations during planning, including serializing subtasks,
803       factoring distributions, and determinizing stochastic dynamics, but
804       regain robustness and effectiveness through a continuous state
805       estimation and replanning process.  This approach is demonstrated in
806       three robotic domains, each of which integrates perception, estimation,
807       planning, and manipulation.
808     </p>
809   </abstract>
810 </eventitem>
811
812 <eventitem date="2015-02-02" time="6:00 PM" room="MC 4063"
813            title="Racket's Magical match">
814   <short>
815     <p>
816       Theo Belaire, a fourth-year CS student, will be talking about Racket's
817       match' function. Bug resistant, legible, and super powerful! Especially
818       useful for CS 241 in writing compilers, but all-round a joy to write.
819     </p>
820   </short>
821   <abstract>
822     <p>
823       Come learn how to use the power of the Racket match construct to make your
824       code easier to read, less bug-prone and overall more awesome!
825     </p>
826     <p>
827       Theo Belaire,
828       a fourth-year CS student, will show you the basics of how this amazing
829       function works, and help you get your feet wet with some code examples and
830       advanced use cases.
831     </p>
832     <p>
833       If you're interested in knowing about the more
834       powerful features of Racket, then this is the talk for you! The material
835       covered is especially useful for students in CS 241 who are writing their
836       compiler in Racket, or are just curious about what that might look like.
837     </p>
838   </abstract>
839 </eventitem>
840
841 <eventitem date="2015-01-21" time="6:00 PM" room="MC 2017"
842            title="Alumni Tech Talk">
843   <short>
844     <p> Alex Tsay from AeroFS will talk about the high availability distributed
845        file systems they develop.
846     </p>
847     <p>The CAP Theorem outlined the fundamental limitations of a distributed system.
848     When designing a distributed system, one has to constantly be aware of the
849     trade-off between consistency and availability.
850
851     Most distributed systems are designed with consistency in mind. However, AeroFS
852     has decided to build a high-availability file system instead.
853
854     In this tech talk, I'll be presenting an overview of AeroFS file system,
855     advantages and challenges of a high-availability file system, and examine the
856     inner workings of AeroFS's core syncing algorithm.
857     </p>
858   </short>
859   <abstract>
860     <p> Alex Tsay from AeroFS will talk about the high availability distributed
861        file systems they develop.
862     </p>
863     <p>The CAP Theorem outlined the fundamental limitations of a distributed system.
864     When designing a distributed system, one has to constantly be aware of the
865     trade-off between consistency and availability.
866
867     Most distributed systems are designed with consistency in mind. However, AeroFS
868     has decided to build a high-availability file system instead.
869
870     In this tech talk, I'll be presenting an overview of AeroFS file system,
871     advantages and challenges of a high-availability file system, and examine the
872     inner workings of AeroFS's core syncing algorithm.
873     </p>
874   </abstract>
875 </eventitem>
876
877 <eventitem date="2015-01-15" time="7:00 PM" room="Comfy Lounge"
878            title="Winter 2015 Elections">
879   <short>
880     <p>Elections for Winter 2015 are being held! Submit a nomination and join
881        your fellow members in choosing this term's CSC executive. (Please note
882        the time change to 7PM.)
883     </p>
884   </short>
885   <abstract>
886     <p>The Computer Science Club will be holding its termly elections this
887        upcoming Thursday, Jan. 15 at 6PM in the Comfy Lounge (MC 3001). During
888        the election, the president, vice-president, treasurer and secretary will
889        be elected, the sysadmin will be ratified, and the librarian and office
890        manager will be appointed.
891     </p>
892     <p>Nominations are now closed. The candidates are:</p>
893     <ul>
894       <li>President:<ul>
895         <li>Luke Franceschini (<tt>l3france</tt>)</li>
896         <li>Gianni Gambetti (<tt>glgambet</tt>)</li>
897         <li>Ford Peprah (<tt>hkpeprah</tt>)</li>
898         <li>Khashayar Pourdeilami (<tt>kpourdei</tt>)</li>
899       </ul></li>
900       <li>Vice-President:<ul>
901         <li>Luke Franceschini (<tt>l3france</tt>)</li>
902         <li>Gianni Gambetti (<tt>glgambet</tt>)</li>
903         <li>Patrick Melanson (<tt>pj2melan</tt>)</li>
904         <li>Ford Peprah (<tt>hkpeprah</tt>)</li>
905         <li>Khashayar Pourdeilami (<tt>kpourdei</tt>)</li>
906       </ul></li>
907       <li>Treasurer:<ul>
908         <li>Weitian Ding (<tt>wt2ding</tt>)</li>
909         <li>Aishwarya Gupta (<tt>a72gupta</tt>)</li>
910         <li>Edward Lee (<tt>e45lee</tt>)</li>
911       </ul></li>
912       <li>Secretary:<ul>
913         <li>Ilia "itchy" Chtcherbakov (<tt>ischtche</tt>)</li>
914         <li>Luke Franceschini (<tt>l3france</tt>)</li>
915         <li>Patrick Melanson (<tt>pj2melan</tt>)</li>
916         <li>Ford Peprah (<tt>hkpeprah</tt>)</li>
917         <li>Khashayar Pourdeilami (<tt>kpourdei</tt>)</li>
918       </ul></li>
919     </ul>
920     <p>Voting will be heads-down, hands-up, restricted to MathSoc social
921        members. If you'd like to review the elections procedure, you can visit
922        our <a href="http://csclub.uwaterloo.ca/about/constitution#officers">Constitution</a>
923        page.
924     </p>
925   </abstract>
926 </eventitem>
927
928 <eventitem date="2015-01-15" time="6:00 PM" room="MC 2065"
929            title="Tech Talk: Google Fiber Internet: The Messy Bits">
930   <short>
931     <p>
932         Our speaker, Avery Pennarun, will share some not-very-secret secrets from
933         the team creating GFiber's open source router firmware, including some
934         discussion of wifi, marketing truthiness, the laws of physics, something
935         about coaxial cables, embedded ARM processors, queuing theory, signal
936         processing, hardware design, and kernel driver optimization. If you're lucky,
937         he may also rant about poor garbage collector implementations. Also, there
938         will be at least one slide containing one of those swooshy circle-and-arrow
939         lifecycle diagrams, we promise.
940     </p>
941     <p>
942         Please RSVP here: http://bit.ly/GoogleFiberTalk.
943     </p>
944   </short>
945   <abstract>
946     <p>
947         Google Fiber's Internet service offers 1000 Mbps internet to a few cities:
948         that's 100x faster than a typical home connection. The problem with going
949         so fast is it moves the bottleneck around: for the first time, your Internet
950         link may be faster than your computer, your wifi, or even your home LAN.
951     </p>
952     <p>
953         Our speaker, Avery Pennarun, will share some not-very-secret secrets from
954         the team creating GFiber's open source router firmware, including some
955         discussion of wifi, marketing truthiness, the laws of physics, something
956         about coaxial cables, embedded ARM processors, queuing theory, signal
957         processing, hardware design, and kernel driver optimization. If you're lucky,
958         he may also rant about poor garbage collector implementations. Also, there
959         will be at least one slide containing one of those swooshy circle-and-arrow
960         lifecycle diagrams, we promise.
961     </p>
962     <p>
963         About Avery Pennarun:
964         Avery graduated from the University of Waterloo in Computer Engineering,
965         started some startups and some open source projects, and now works at Google
966         Fiber on a small team building super fast wifi routers, TV settop boxes, and
967         the firmware that runs on them. He lives in New York.
968     </p>
969     <p>
970         Please RSVP here: http://bit.ly/GoogleFiberTalk.
971     </p>
972   </abstract>
973 </eventitem>
974
975 <!-- Fall 2014 -->
976
977 <eventitem date="2014-11-27" time="6:00 PM" room="MC 4020" title="Talk: Heroic Android HTTP">
978   <short>
979     <p>
980       The network is unreliable. 3G networking is slow. Using WiFi drains your battery.
981       The NSA is spying on you. Different versions of HttpURLConnection have different bugs.
982     </p>
983     <p>
984       Jesse Wilson, a software developer at Square, will be talking about OkHttp,
985       a library that he maintains, and how to use it to make your app's networking work even
986       when conditions aren't ideal. He will talk about how to configure caching to improve behavior
987       and save resources. He will talk about crypto, and he will give advice on which libraries
988       to use to make good networking easy.
989     </p>
990     <p>
991       Please RSVP here: https://www.ticketfi.com/event/77/heroic-android-http.
992     </p>
993   </short>
994 </eventitem>
995
996 <eventitem date="2014-11-25" time="5:30 PM" room="MC 4041" title="Talk: C++ ABI">
997     <short>
998         <p> C++ is an interesting study because it supports a large number of
999             powerful, abstract concepts, yet it operates very close to the
1000             hardware compared to many modern programming languages. There are
1001             also many implementations of C++ which must be made interoperable.
1002             I will discuss some aspects of the Itanium 64 Application Binary
1003             Interface (ABI) for C++, which is now the de facto standard across
1004             Unix-like platforms of all architectures. In particular, I will
1005             cover a number of aspects of the class system fundamental to C++:
1006             data layout, polymorphic types, construction and destruction, and
1007             dynamic casting.
1008         </p>
1009     </short>
1010 </eventitem>
1011
1012 <eventitem date="2014-11-21" time="6:00 PM" room="M3 1006"
1013     title="Code Party 1/SE Hack Day #13">
1014   <short>
1015     <p>
1016        Why sleep when you could be hacking on $SIDE_PROJECT, or working on
1017        $THE_NEXT_BIG_THING with some cool CSC/SE people?
1018        Come when you want, hack on something cool, demo before you leave.
1019     </p>
1020     <p>
1021        If you don't have a project, don't worry - we have a list of ideas,
1022        and a lot of people will be looking for an extra helping hand on
1023        their projects.
1024     </p>
1025     <p>
1026        NOTE: Dinner and snacks will only be served to those working on
1027        projects during the event.
1028     </p>
1029   </short>
1030 </eventitem>
1031
1032 <eventitem date="2014-11-17" time="6:00 PM" room="QNC 1502"
1033     title="Talk: Why Pattern Recognition is Hard, and Why Deep Neural Networks Help">
1034   <short>
1035     <p>
1036        In the last few years, there has been breakthrough progress in pattern
1037        recognition -- problems like computer vision and voice recognition.
1038        This sudden progress has come from a powerful class of models called
1039        deep neural networks.
1040     </p>
1041     <p>
1042        This talk will explore what it means to do pattern recognition, why it
1043        is a hard problem, and why deep neural networks are so effective. We
1044        will also look at exciting and strange recent results, such as state
1045        of the art object recognition in images, neural nets playing video
1046        games, neural nets proving theorems, and neural nets learning to run
1047        python programs!
1048     </p>
1049     <p>
1050        Our speaker, Christopher Olah, is a math-obsessed and Haskell-loving
1051        research intern from Google's Deep Learning group. He has a blog about
1052        his research here: http://colah.github.io/.
1053     </p>
1054   </short>
1055 </eventitem>
1056
1057 <eventitem date="2014-11-12" time="5:30 PM" room="EIT 1015"
1058     title="Talk: Machine Learning at Bloomberg">
1059   <short>
1060     <p>
1061         Kang, our guest speaker from Bloomberg, will illustrate some examples and
1062         difficulties associated with working on some of the most fascinating technical
1063         challenges in business and finance.
1064         He will also show some of the machine learning applications at Bloomberg that are
1065         useful in this environment.
1066         Please show up early to ensure a spot (and dinner).
1067     </p>
1068   </short>
1069 </eventitem>
1070
1071 <eventitem date="2014-11-10" time="5:30" room="RCH 205" title="Talk: From Zero to Kernel">
1072   <short>
1073     <p>
1074         From the massive supercomputer, to your laptop, to a Raspberry Pi: all
1075         computing systems run on an operating system powered by a kernel. The kernel is
1076         the most fundamental software running on your computer, enabling developers and
1077         users to interact with its hardware at a higher level.
1078     </p>
1079     <p>
1080         This talk will explore the process of writing a minimal kernel from
1081         scratch, common kernel responsibilities, and explore of the challenges of
1082         kernel development.
1083     </p>
1084   </short>
1085 </eventitem>
1086
1087 <eventitem date="2014-11-07" time="7:00 PM" room="MC Comfy" title="'Hackers' Screening">
1088   <short>
1089     <p>
1090       Women in Computer Science (WiCS) and the Computer Science Club (CSC) will
1091       meet up in the Comfy Lounge to watch a favourite cult classic: Hackers.
1092       Join us as we relive our 90s teenage hacking fantasies and stuff our faces
1093       with popcorn and junk food.
1094     </p>
1095     <p>
1096       Hackers of the world, unite!
1097     </p>
1098   </short>
1099 </eventitem>
1100
1101 <eventitem date="2014-10-24" time="5:00 PM" room="MC 3003"
1102            title="Unix 101">
1103   <short>
1104     <p>
1105       Interested in Unix, but don't know where to start? Then Come learn some
1106       basic topics with us including interaction with the shell, motivation
1107       for using it, some simple commands, and more.
1108     </p>
1109   </short>
1110 </eventitem>
1111
1112 <eventitem date="2014-10-24" time="6:00 PM" room="MC Comfy"
1113            title="Code Party 0">
1114   <short>
1115     <p>
1116         Immediately after UNIX 101, we will be having our first annual code party.
1117         Enjoy a free dinner, relax, and share ideas with your friends about
1118         your favourite topics in computer science.  Feel free to show up
1119         with or without personal projects to work on, we've got lots of ideas
1120         to get started with.
1121     </p>
1122   </short>
1123 </eventitem>
1124
1125 <eventitem date="2014-10-22" time="5:00 PM" room="MC 4041"
1126            title="Talk: In Pursuit of the Travelling Salesman">
1127   <short>
1128     <p>
1129         The Travelling Salesman Problem is easy to state: given a number of
1130 cities along with the cost of travel between each pair, find the cheapest way
1131 to visit all of the cities and return to your starting point.  However, TSP is very  difficult to solve.
1132 In this talk, Professor Bill Cook will  discuss the history, applications, and computation of this
1133 fascinating problem.
1134     </p>
1135   </short>
1136   <abstract>
1137     <p>
1138         The Travelling Salesman Problem is easy to state: given a
1139         number of cities along with the cost of travel between each
1140         pair of them, find the cheapest way to visit them all and
1141         return to your starting point.  Easy to state, but
1142         difficult to solve.  Despite decades of research, in
1143         general it is not known how to significantly improve upon
1144         simple brute-force checking.  It is a real possibility that
1145         there may never exist an efficient method that is
1146         guaranteed to solve every instance of the problem.  This
1147         is a deep mathematical question: Is there an efficient
1148         solution method or not?  The topic goes to the core of
1149         complexity theory concerning the limits of feasible
1150         computation and we may be far from seeing its
1151         resolution. This is not to say, however, that the
1152         research community has thus far come away
1153         empty-handed.  Indeed, the problem has led to a large
1154         number of results and conjectures that are both
1155         beautiful and deep, and on the practical side solution
1156         methods are used to compute optimal or near-optimal tours
1157         for a host of applied problems on a daily basis, from
1158         genome sequencing to arranging music on iPods.  In this
1159         talk we discuss the history, applications, and
1160         computation of this fascinating problem.
1161     </p>
1162   </abstract>
1163
1164 </eventitem>
1165
1166 <eventitem date="2014-09-18" time="6:00 PM" room="MC 4021"
1167            title="Talk: Building a Mobile Platform for Android and iOS">
1168   <short>
1169     <p>
1170       Come listen to a Google software engineer give a talk on building a
1171       mobile platform for Android and iOS!
1172       Wesley Tarle has been leading development at Google in Kitchener and
1173       Mountain View, and building stuff for third-party developers on
1174       Android and iOS. He's contributed to Google Play services since its
1175       inception and continues to produce APIs and SDKs focused on mobile
1176       startups.
1177       RSVP at http://goo.gl/Pwc3m4.
1178     </p>
1179   </short>
1180 </eventitem>
1181
1182
1183 <!-- Spring 2014 -->
1184
1185 <eventitem date="2014-07-25" time="7:30 PM" room="Laurel Creek Fire Pit"
1186            title="CSC Goes Outside...Again!">
1187   <short>
1188     <p>
1189       Do you like going outside? Are you vitamin-D deficient from being in the
1190       MC too long? Do you think s'mores and bonfire are a delicious
1191       combination? If so, you should join us as the CSC is going outside again!
1192       Around 7:30PM, we're going to Laurel Creek Fire Pit for some outdoor fun.
1193       Come throw frisbees, relax and eat snacks in good company - even if you
1194       aren't a fan of the outside or vitamin-D deficient! We'll also have
1195       some sort of real food - probably pizza.
1196     </p>
1197   </short>
1198 </eventitem>
1199
1200
1201 <eventitem date="2014-07-22" time="6:00 PM" room="MC 4020"
1202            title="The Most Important Parts of School (from a CS dropout)">
1203   <short>
1204     <p>
1205       Learn about the real reasons you should be in school from David Wolever,
1206       CTO of akindi and a director of PyCon Canada.
1207     </p>
1208   </short>
1209   <abstract>
1210     <p>
1211       Hindsight is 20/20, and since leaving university I’ve had five years and three
1212       startups to reflect on the most valuable things I have (and haven’t) taken away
1213       from my time in school.
1214       David studied computer science for three years at the University of Toronto
1215       before leaving to be employee zero at a Waterloo-based startup. Since then
1216       he has been a founder of two more startups, started PyCon Canada, and has
1217       written hundreds of thousands of lines of code. He is currently CTO of Akindi, a
1218       Toronto-based startup trying to make multiple choice testing a bit less terrible.
1219       He’s best found on Twitter at http://twitter.com/wolever
1220     </p>
1221   </abstract>
1222 </eventitem>
1223
1224 <eventitem date="2014-07-11" time="5:00 PM" room="MC 3003, M3 1006"
1225            title="Unix 102, Code Party 1">
1226   <short>
1227     <p>
1228       Learn how to host a website and spend the night hacking!
1229     </p>
1230   </short>
1231   <abstract>
1232     <p>
1233       Did you know that by becoming a CSC member, you get 4GB of free webspace?
1234       Join us in MC 3003 on Friday July 11 to learn how to use that space and
1235       host content for the world to see!
1236
1237       Afterwards we will be moving over to M3 1006 for a night of hacking and
1238       snacking! Work on a personal project, open source software, or anything
1239       you wish. Food will be provided for your hacking pleasure.
1240
1241       Come join us for an evening of fun, learning, and food!
1242     </p>
1243   </abstract>
1244 </eventitem>
1245
1246 <eventitem date="2014-06-25" time="6:00 PM" room="MC 2035" title="Battle Decks">
1247   <short>
1248     <p>
1249       Five slides. Five minutes. Pure fun.
1250     </p>
1251   </short>
1252   <abstract>
1253     <p>
1254       Create an entertaining slideshow and present someone else's on the spot!
1255       Join us in MC 2035 on Wednesday June 25 at 18:00 for a fun evening of
1256       quick presentations of random slide decks. An example from last semester
1257       can be found at tinyurl.com/battle-decks-example. Please e-mail your
1258       battle deck to l3france@csclub.uwaterloo.ca. Snacks will be provided to
1259       fuel your battle hunger!
1260     </p>
1261   </abstract>
1262 </eventitem>
1263
1264 <eventitem date="2014-06-19" time="5:30 PM" room="MC 4064"
1265            title="Bloomberg Technical Talk">
1266   <short>
1267     <p>
1268       Learn how functional programming is used in the real world, while
1269       enjoying free dinner, and free swag.
1270     </p>
1271   </short>
1272   <abstract>
1273     <p>
1274       Enjoy a free dinner while Max Ransan, a lead developer at Bloomberg,
1275       talks about the use of functional programming within a recently developed
1276       product from Bloomberg. This includes UI generation, domain-specific
1277       languages, and more! Free swag will also be provided.
1278     </p>
1279   </abstract>
1280 </eventitem>
1281
1282 <eventitem date="2014-06-13" time="7:30 PM" room="Laurel Creek Fire Pit"
1283            title="CSC Goes Outside">
1284   <short>
1285     <p>
1286       Come throw a frisbee, hang around a bonfire, and roast marshmellows!
1287       This is a social event just for fun, so come relax and eat snacks in
1288       good company!
1289     </p>
1290   </short>
1291   <abstract>
1292     <p>
1293       Meet at the Laurel Creek Fire Pit (the one across Ring Road from EV3)
1294       at 7:30 for a fun night of hanging out with friends. If you aren't sure
1295       where it is, meet at the office ten minutes before hand, and we will
1296       walk over together. We'll start the evening off with throwing around
1297       a frisbee or two, and as the night goes on we'll light up the fire and
1298       get some s'mores cooking!
1299     </p>
1300   </abstract>
1301 </eventitem>
1302
1303 <eventitem date="2014-05-30" time="5:30 PM" room="MC 3003, Comfy Lounge"
1304            title="Unix 101/Code Party 0">
1305   <short>
1306     <p>
1307       Interested in Unix, but don't know where to start? Then Come learn some
1308       basic topics with us including interaction with the shell, motivation
1309       for using it, some simple commands, and more.
1310     </p>
1311     <p>
1312       Afterwards we will be moving over to the MC Comfy Lounge for a
1313       fun night of hacking! The sysadmin position will also be ratified
1314       during a general meeting of the membership at this time. Come join us
1315       for an evening of fun, learning, and food!
1316     </p>
1317   </short>
1318   <abstract>
1319     <p>
1320       Interested in Unix, but don't know where to start? Then start
1321       in MC 3003 on Friday May 30 with basic topics including
1322       interaction with the shell, motivation for using it, some simple
1323       commands, and more.
1324     </p>
1325     <p>
1326       Afterwards we will be moving over to the MC Comfy Lounge for a
1327       fun night of hacking! Work on a personal project, open source
1328       software, or anything you wish. Food will be available for your
1329       hacking pleasure. The Sysadmin position will also be ratified
1330       during a general meeting at this time. Come join us for an
1331       evening of fun, learning, and food!
1332     </p>
1333   </abstract>
1334 </eventitem>
1335
1336 <eventitem date="2014-05-15" time="6:00 PM" room="Comfy Lounge"
1337            title="Spring 2014 Elections">
1338   <short>
1339     <p>The Computer Science Club will soon be holding elections for this term's
1340     executive. The president, vice president, treasurer, and secretary for the
1341     spring 2014 term will be elected. The system administrator, office manager,
1342     and librarian are also typically appointed here.
1343     </p>
1344   </short>
1345   <abstract>
1346     <p>Nominations are now closed. The candidates are:</p>
1347     <ul>
1348       <li>President:<ul>
1349         <li>Jinny Kim (<tt>yj7kim</tt>)</li>
1350         <li>Matthew Thiffault (<tt>mthiffau</tt>)</li>
1351         <li>Shane Creighton-Young (<tt>srcreigh</tt>)</li>
1352         <li>Hayford Peprah (<tt>hkpeprah</tt>)</li>
1353       </ul></li>
1354       <li>Vice-President:<ul>
1355         <li>Luke Franceschini (<tt>l3france</tt>)</li>
1356         <li>Jinny Kim (<tt>yj7kim</tt>)</li>
1357         <li>Shane Creighton-Young (<tt>srcreigh</tt>)</li>
1358         <li>Hayford Peprah (<tt>hkpeprah</tt>)</li>
1359       </ul></li>
1360       <li>Treasurer:<ul>
1361         <li>Luke Franceschini (<tt>l3france</tt>)</li>
1362         <li>Matthew Thiffault (<tt>mthiffau</tt>)</li>
1363         <li>Catherine Mercer (<tt>ccmercer</tt>)</li>
1364         <li>Joseph Chouinard (<tt>jchouina</tt>)</li>
1365       </ul></li>
1366       <li>Secretary:<ul>
1367         <li>Luke Franceschini (<tt>l3france</tt>)</li>
1368         <li>Catherine Mercer (<tt>ccmercer</tt>)</li>
1369         <li>Joseph Chouinard (<tt>jchouina</tt>)</li>
1370         <li>Ifaz Kabir (<tt>ikabir</tt>)</li>
1371       </ul></li>
1372     </ul>
1373   </abstract>
1374 </eventitem>
1375
1376
1377
1378 <!-- Winter 2014 -->
1379
1380
1381 <eventitem date="2014-03-28" time="7:00 PM" room="CPH 1346" title="HackWaterloo">
1382     <short>
1383         <p>Work on a software project for 24 hours in teams of up to 4 members. Swag will be provided
1384     by Facebook and Google. A Microsoft Surface Tablet will be awarded to the winning team.
1385     Register and find out more at <a href="http://hack-waterloo.com">http://hack-waterloo.com</a>.</p>
1386     </short>
1387     <abstract>
1388         <p>Work on a software project for 24 hours in teams of up to 4 members. Swag will be provided
1389     by Facebook and Google. A Microsoft Surface Tablet will be awarded to the winning team.
1390     Register and find out more at <a href="http://hack-waterloo.com">http://hack-waterloo.com</a>.</p>
1391     </abstract>
1392 </eventitem>
1393
1394 <eventitem date="2014-03-18" time="7:00 PM" room="MC 4041" title="Battle Decks">
1395     <short>
1396         <p>Create a 5-slide PowerPoint presentation about a specific topic. Bring it with
1397             you to the event (on a flash drive). Submit it into the lottery. Select a random
1398             PowerPoint presentation from the lottery and talk about it on the spot.
1399         </p>
1400     </short>
1401     <abstract>
1402         <p>Create a 5-slide PowerPoint presentation about a specific topic. Bring it with
1403             you to the event (on a flash drive). Submit it into the lottery. Select a random
1404             PowerPoint presentation from the lottery and talk about it on the spot.
1405         </p>
1406     </abstract>
1407 </eventitem>
1408
1409 <eventitem date="2014-03-14" time="7:00 PM" room="Comfy Lounge" title="Code Party 1">
1410     <short>
1411         <p>We will be having our 2nd code party this term. Enjoy a free dinner, relax, and
1412            share ideas with your friends about your favourite topics in computer science.
1413         </p>
1414     </short>
1415     <abstract>
1416         <p>We will be having our 2nd code party this term. Enjoy a free dinner, relax, and
1417            share ideas with your friends about your favourite topics in computer science.
1418         </p>
1419     </abstract>
1420 </eventitem>
1421
1422 <eventitem date="2014-02-13" time="5:30 PM" room="MC 3003" title="UNIX 101">
1423     <short><p>Learn the basics of using tools found commonly on UNIX-like operating systems.
1424     For students new to this topic, knowledge gained from UNIX 101 would be useful in coursework.</p>
1425     </short>
1426     <abstract><p>Learn the basics of using tools found commonly on UNIX-like operating systems.
1427     For students new to this topic, knowledge gained from UNIX 101 would be useful in coursework.</p>
1428     </abstract>
1429 </eventitem>
1430
1431 <eventitem date="2014-02-13" time="6:30 PM" room="Comfy Lounge" title="Code Party 0">
1432     <short><p>Immediately after UNIX 101, we will be having our first annual code party.
1433             Enjoy a free dinner, relax, and share ideas with your friends about
1434             your favourite topics in computer science.</p>
1435     </short>
1436     <abstract><p>Immediately after UNIX 101, we will be having our first annual code party.
1437             Enjoy a free dinner, relax, and share ideas with your friends about
1438            your favourite topics in computer science.</p>
1439     </abstract>
1440 </eventitem>
1441
1442
1443 <eventitem date="2014-02-04" time="5:30 PM" room="MC 4058" title="Bloomberg Talk">
1444   <short><p>
1445           Bloomberg's Alex Scotti will be presenting a talk this Tuesday on concurrency control
1446           implementations in relational databases. Free swag and dinner will be provided.
1447   </p></short>
1448   <abstract>
1449       <p>Join Alex Scotti of Bloomberg LP for a discussion of concurrency control
1450           implementation in relational database systems. Focus will be placed on the
1451           optimistic techniques as employed and developed inside Combdb2, Bloomberg's
1452           database system.</p>
1453       <p>Food will be served by Kismet!</p>
1454   </abstract>
1455 </eventitem>
1456
1457
1458 <eventitem date="2014-01-16" time="5:30 PM" room="Comfy Lounge" title="Winter 2014 Elections">
1459   <short><p>
1460      Elections for Winter 2014 are being held! The Executive will be elected,
1461      and the Office Manager and Librarian will be appointed by the new
1462      executive.
1463   </p></short>
1464   <abstract>
1465     <p>It's elections time again! On Thursday, January 16 at 5:30PM, come to the Comfy Lounge
1466     on the 3rd floor of the MC to vote in this term's President, Vice-President, Treasurer
1467     and Secretary. The Sysadmin, Librarian, and Office Manager will also be chosen at this time.</p>
1468
1469     <p>Nominations are open until 4:30PM on Wednesday, January 15, and can be written
1470     on the CSC office whiteboard (yes, you can nominate yourself). Full CSC
1471     members can vote and are invited to drop by. You may also send nominations to
1472     the <a href="mailto:cro@csclub.uwaterloo.ca">Chief Returning Officer</a> by email.</p>
1473
1474     <p>Nominations are now closed. The candidates are:</p>
1475     <ul>
1476       <li>President:<ul>
1477         <li>Jonathan Bailey (<tt>jj2baile</tt>)</li>
1478         <li>Nicholas Black (<tt>nablack</tt>)</li>
1479         <li>Bryan Coutts (<tt>b2coutts</tt>)</li>
1480         <li>Annamaria Dosseva (<tt>mdosseva</tt>)</li>
1481         <li>Youn Jin Kim (<tt>yj7kim</tt>)</li>
1482         <li>Visha Vijayanand (<tt>vvijayan</tt>)</li>
1483       </ul></li>
1484       <li>Vice-President:<ul>
1485         <li>Nicholas Black (<tt>nablack</tt>)</li>
1486         <li>Bryan Coutts (<tt>b2coutts</tt>)</li>
1487         <li>Visha Vijayanand (<tt>vvijayan</tt>)</li>
1488       </ul></li>
1489       <li>Treasurer:<ul>
1490         <li>Jonathan Bailey (<tt>jj2baile</tt>)</li>
1491         <li>Nicholas Black (<tt>nablack</tt>)</li>
1492         <li>Marc Burns (<tt>m4burns</tt>)</li>
1493         <li>Bryan Coutts (<tt>b2coutts</tt>)</li>
1494       </ul></li>
1495       <li>Secretary:<ul>
1496         <li>Jonathan Bailey (<tt>jj2baile</tt>)</li>
1497         <li>Bryan Coutts (<tt>b2coutts</tt>)</li>
1498         <li>Mark Farrell (<tt>m4farrel</tt>)</li>
1499       </ul></li>
1500     </ul>
1501   </abstract>
1502 </eventitem>
1503
1504
1505 <!-- Fall 2013 -->
1506 <eventitem date="2013-11-23" time="TBD" room="Toronto, ON"
1507            title="CSC Goes to Toronto Erlang Factory Lite 2013">
1508   <short><p>
1509     The CSC has been invited to attend this Erlang conference in Toronto. If
1510     you are interested in attending, please sign up on our <a
1511     href="http://goo.gl/8XOELB">web form</a>. We have submitted a MEF proposal
1512     to cover the transportation fees of up to 25 math undergraduates.
1513   </p></short>
1514   <abstract><p>
1515     The CSC has been invited to attend this Erlang conference in Toronto. If you
1516     are interested in attending, please sign up on our <a
1517     href="http://goo.gl/8XOELB">web form</a>, so we can coordinate the group.
1518     We have submitted a MEF proposal to cover the transportation fees of up to
1519     25 math undergraduates to attend. You will be responsible for your
1520     conference fee and transportation, and if the MEF proposal is granted, you
1521     can submit your bus tickets/mileage record and conference badge to MEF for
1522     a reimbursement. From the <a
1523     href="https://www.erlang-factory.com/conference/Toronto2013">conference
1524     website</a>:</p>
1525
1526     <p>"Our first ever Toronto Erlang Factory Lite has been confirmed. Join us
1527     on 23 November for a full day debate on Erlang as a powerful tool for
1528     building innovative, scalable and fault tolerant applications. Our speakers
1529     will showcase examples from their work experience and their personal success
1530     stories, thus presenting how Erlang solves the problems related to
1531     scalability and performance. At this event we will focus on what Erlang
1532     brings to the table in the multicore era."
1533   </p></abstract>
1534 </eventitem>
1535
1536 <eventitem date="2013-11-22" time="6:30PM" room="MC 3001 (Comfy)"
1537            title="Hackathon-Code Party!!">
1538   <short><p>
1539     Join us for a night of code, food, and caffeine! There will be plenty of
1540     edibles and hacking for your enjoyment. If you are interested in getting
1541     involved in Open Source, there will be mentors on hand to get you started.
1542     Hope to see you there&mdash;bring your friends!
1543   </p></short>
1544  <abstract><p>
1545     Join us for a night of code, food, and caffeine! There will be plenty of
1546     edibles and hacking for your enjoyment, including a full catered dinner
1547     courtesy of the Mathematics Society.</p>
1548
1549     <p>There will be two Open Source projects featured at tonight's code
1550     party, with mentors on hand for each. Here is a quick summary of each of
1551     the projects available:</p>
1552
1553     <p><b><a href="http://openhatch.org">OpenHatch</a>:</b> Not sure where to
1554     start? Not to fear! OpenHatch is a project that seeks to introduce people
1555     to Open Source for the first time and help you get involved. There will be
1556     a presentation with an introduction to the tools and information you will
1557     need, and mentors present to help you get set up to fix your first
1558     bug.</p>
1559
1560     <p><b><a
1561 href="http://uwaterloo.ca/games-institute/events/social-innovation-simulation-design-jam-day-1">Social
1562     Innovation Simulation Design Jam</a>:</b> The UWaterloo Games Institute and
1563     SiG@Waterloo will be partnering with us tonight to kick off their weekend
1564     hackathon Design Jam. They seek coders, artists, writers, database and
1565     graphics people to help them out with their project.
1566   </p></abstract>
1567 </eventitem>
1568
1569 <eventitem date="2013-11-26" time="5:00PM" room="MC 2038" title="Disk Encryption">
1570   <short><p>
1571     The last lecture of our security and privacy series. By MMath alumnus
1572     Zak Blacher.
1573   </p></short>
1574   <abstract><p>
1575     In Zak's talk, "Disk Encryption: Digital Forensic Analysis &amp; Full
1576     Volume Encryption", he aims to cover filesystem forensic analysis
1577     and counter forensics by addressing the entire design stack; starting with
1578     filesystem construction, design, and theory, and drilling down to the inner
1579     workings of hard drives (modern platter hdds, as well as mlc-ssds). This
1580     talk leads in to a discussion on full volume encryption, and how this helps
1581     to protect one's data.</p>
1582
1583     <p>The sixth and final lecture of our security and privacy series.
1584   </p></abstract>
1585 </eventitem>
1586
1587 <eventitem date="2013-11-12" time="5:00PM" room="MC 4060" title="Trust in ISPs">
1588   <short><p>
1589     This is the fifth lecture of six in the Security and Privacy Lecture
1590     Series. By founding member of the Canadian Cybersecurity Institute and
1591     employee of local ISP Sentex Sean Howard.
1592   </p></short>
1593   <abstract><p>
1594     Bell's recent announcement of their use of Deep Packet Inspection (DPI)
1595     brings to light a long-standing issue: your internet service provider (ISP)
1596     pwns you. They control your IP allocation, your DNS, your ARP, the AS paths.
1597     The question has never been about ability&mdash;it's about trust. Whether
1598     Rogers, AT&amp;T, Virgin, Telus, Vodafone or Wind, your onramp to the
1599     internet is your first and most potent point of security failure.</p>
1600
1601     <p>Founding member of the Canadian Cybersecurity Institute and employee of
1602     local ISP Sentex Sean Howard will vividly demo the reasons you need to be
1603     ble to trust your internet provider. Come for the talk, stay for the
1604     pizza!</p>
1605
1606     <p>This is the fifth lecture of six in the Security and Privacy Lecture
1607     Series.
1608   </p></abstract>
1609 </eventitem>
1610
1611
1612 <eventitem date="2013-11-05" time="6:00PM" room="MC 3001 (Comfy)"
1613            title="Hands On Seminar on Public Key Cryptography">
1614   <short><p>
1615     The fourth event in our security and privacy series. By undergraduate
1616     students Murphy Berzish and Nick Guenther.
1617   </p></short>
1618   <abstract><p>
1619 Nick Guenther and Murphy Berzish will be holding a hands-on seminar in the
1620 Comfy to introduce you to public-private key crypto and how you can practically
1621 use it, so bring your laptops! You will learn about PGP, an encryption protocol
1622 that provides confidentiality and authenticity. At the seminar, you will learn
1623 how to use PGP to send encrypted email and files, provably identify yourself to
1624 others, and verify data. Bring a laptop so we can help help you generate your
1625 first keypair and give you the chance to form a Web of Trust with your
1626 peers.</p>
1627
1628 <p>A GSIntroducer from <a href="www.GSWoT.org">www.GSWoT.org</a> will be on
1629 hand. If you are interested in obtaining an elevated level of trust, bring
1630 government-issued photo-ID.</p>
1631
1632 <p>There will also be balloons and cake.
1633   </p></abstract>
1634 </eventitem>
1635
1636
1637 <eventitem date="2013-10-24" time="6:30PM" room="DC 1302"
1638            title="Practical Tor Usage">
1639   <short><p>
1640     The third lecture of our security and privacy series. By undergraduate
1641     student Simon Gladstone.
1642   </p></short>
1643   <abstract><p>
1644     An introduction to and overview of how to use the Tor Browser Bundle to
1645     browse the "Deep Web" and increase security while browsing the Internet. Tor
1646     is not the be all end all of Internet security, but it is definitely a step
1647     up from using the more popular browsers such as Chrome, Firefox, or
1648     Safari.</p>
1649
1650     <p>The third lecture of our security and privacy series. By undergraduate
1651     student Simon Gladstone.
1652   </p></abstract>
1653 </eventitem>
1654
1655
1656 <eventitem date="2013-10-15" time="5:00PM" room="MC 4060"
1657            title="Tunnels and Censorship">
1658   <short><p>
1659     The second lecture of our security and privacy series. By undergraduate student
1660     Eric Dong.
1661   </p></short>
1662   <abstract><p>
1663     In this talk, I will discuss censorship firewalls used in countries such as
1664     China and Iran, and how to counteract them. The focus is on advanced
1665     application-layer and Deep Packet Inspection firewalls, and unexpected hurdles
1666     in overcoming censorship by these firewalls due to the need for very
1667     unconventional adversary models. Approaches of the privacy tool Tor, popular
1668     proprietary freeware Ultrasurf and Freegate, payware VPNs, and my own
1669     experimental Kirisurf project are examined, where strengths and difficulties
1670     with each system are noted.</p>
1671
1672     <p>The second lecture of our security and privacy series. By undergraduate
1673     student Eric Dong.
1674   </p></abstract>
1675 </eventitem>
1676
1677
1678 <eventitem date="2013-10-08" time="5:00PM" room="MC 4041"
1679            title="Why Should You Care About Security and Privacy">
1680   <short><p>
1681     The first lecture of our security and privacy series. By PhD student Sarah
1682     Harvey.
1683   </p></short>
1684   <abstract><p>
1685     Recent media coverage has brought to light the presence of various government
1686     agencies' surveillance programs, along with the possible interference of
1687     governments in the establishment and development of standards and software.
1688     This brings to question of just how much we need to be concerned about the
1689     security and privacy of our information.</p>
1690
1691     <p>In this talk we will discuss what all this means in technological and social
1692     contexts, examine the status quo, and consider the long-standing implications.
1693     This talk assumes no background knowledge of security or privacy, nor any
1694     specific technical background. All students are welcome and encouraged to
1695     attend.</p>
1696
1697     <p>The first lecture of our security and privacy series. By PhD student
1698     Sarah Harvey.
1699   </p></abstract>
1700 </eventitem>
1701
1702
1703 <eventitem date="2013-10-03" time="6:30PM" room="PHY 150"
1704            title="C++ GoingNative Lectures">
1705   <short><p>
1706     We will be showing GoingNative
1707     lectures from some of the top individuals working on C++
1708     approximately biweekly on Thursdays at 6:30PM in the PHY 150 theatre. Every
1709     lecture will be accompanied with free pizza and drinks! Dates are Oct. 3, 17,
1710     31 and Nov. 7 and 21. Please view this event in detail for more information.
1711   </p></short>
1712   <abstract><p>
1713     If you're not familiar with the C++ GoingNative series, you can check them
1714     out on the <a
1715     href="http://channel9.msdn.com/Events/GoingNative/2013">GoingNative
1716     website</a>.</p>
1717
1718     <p>We will be showing lectures from some of the top individuals working on C++
1719     approximately biweekly on Thursdays in the PHY 150 theatre. Every lecture will
1720     be accompanied with free pizza and drinks! Here is our schedule and the planned
1721     showings:</p>
1722
1723     <ul>
1724       <li>Thu. Oct. 3,  6:30PM: Stroustrup - The Essence of C++</li>
1725       <li>Thu. Oct. 17, 6:30PM: Lavavej - Don't Help The Compiler</li>
1726       <li>Thu. Oct. 31, 6:30PM: Meyers - An Effective C++ Sampler</li>
1727       <li>Thu. Nov. 7,  6:30PM: Alexandrescu - Writing Quick C++ Code, Quickly</li>
1728       <li>Thu. Nov. 21, 6:30PM: Parent - C++ Seasoning</li>
1729     </ul>
1730   </abstract>
1731 </eventitem>
1732
1733 <eventitem date="2013-10-17" time="6:30PM" room="PHY 150"
1734            title="C++ Night 0x02 - Don't Help The Compiler">
1735   <short><p>
1736     The second in a series of recorded talks from GoingNative 2013. Featuring
1737 Stephan T. Lavavej.
1738   </p></short>
1739   <abstract><p>
1740     The second in a series of recorded talks from GoingNative 2013. Featuring
1741 Stephan T. Lavavej.
1742   </p><p>
1743     C++ has powerful rules for dealing with low-level program structure.
1744 Before a program is ever executed, the compiler determines valuable information
1745 about every expression in the source code.  The compiler understands exactly
1746 how long each object's resources will be needed (lifetime), whether each
1747 expression refers to an object that the program has no other way of accessing
1748 (rvalueness), and what operations can be performed on each object (type).
1749 Using examples from C++98 through C++14, this presentation will demonstrate how
1750 to write code that works with the compiler's knowledge to increase robustness,
1751 efficiency, and clarity.  This presentation will also demonstrate the horrible
1752 things that happen when programmers think they can do tasks that are better
1753 left to compilers.
1754   </p></abstract>
1755 </eventitem>
1756
1757
1758 <eventitem date="2013-10-31" time="6:30PM" room="PHY 150"
1759            title="C++ Night 0x03 - An Effective C++11/14 Sampler">
1760   <short><p>
1761     The third in a series of recorded talks from GoingNative 2013. Featuring
1762 Scott Meyers.
1763   </p></short>
1764   <abstract><p>
1765     The third in a series of recorded talks from GoingNative 2013. Featuring
1766 Scott Meyers.
1767   </p><p>
1768     After years of intensive study (first of C++0x, then of C++11, and most
1769 recently of C++14), Scott thinks he finally has a clue. About the effective use
1770 of C++11, that is (including C++14 revisions). At last year’s Going Native,
1771 Herb Sutter predicted that Scott would produce a new version of Effective C++
1772 in the 2013-14 time frame, and Scott’s working on proving him almost right.
1773 Rather than revise Effective C++, Scott decided to write a new book that
1774 focuses exclusively on C++11/14: on the things the experts almost always do (or
1775 almost always avoid doing) to produce clear, efficient, effective code. In this
1776 presentation, Scott will present a taste of the Items he expects to include in
1777 Effective C++11/14.
1778   </p></abstract>
1779 </eventitem>
1780
1781
1782 <eventitem date="2013-11-07" time="6:30PM" room="PHY 150"
1783            title="C++ Night 0x04 - Writing Quick Code in C++, Quickly">
1784   <short><p>
1785     The fourth in a series of recorded talks from GoingNative 2013. Featuring
1786 Andrei Alexandrescu.
1787   </p></short>
1788   <abstract><p>
1789     The fourth in a series of recorded talks from GoingNative 2013. Featuring
1790 Andrei Alexandrescu.
1791   </p><p>
1792     Contemporary computer architectures make it possible for slow code to work
1793 reasonably well. They also make it difficult to write really fast code that
1794 exploits the CPU amenities to their fullest. And the smart money is on fast
1795 code—we’re running out of cool things to do with slow code, and the battle will
1796 be on doing really interesting and challenging things at the envelope of what
1797 the computing fabric endures.
1798   </p><p>
1799     So how to write quick code, quickly? Turns out it’s quite difficult because
1800 today’s complex architectures defy simple rules to be applied everywhere. It is
1801 not uncommon that innocuous high-level artifacts have a surprisingly high
1802 impact on the bottom line of an application’s run time (and power consumed).
1803   </p><p>
1804     This talk is an attempt to set forth a few pieces of tactical advice for
1805 writing quick code in C++. Applying these is not guaranteed to produce optimal
1806 code, but is likely to put it reasonably within the ballpark.  </p><p>
1807     These tips are based on practical experience but also motivated by the
1808 inner workings of modern CPUs.
1809   </p></abstract>
1810 </eventitem>
1811
1812
1813 <eventitem date="2013-11-21" time="6:30PM" room="PHY 150"
1814            title="C++ Night 0x05 - C++ Seasoning">
1815   <short><p>
1816     The fifth in a series of recorded talks from GoingNative 2013. Featuring
1817 Sean Parent.
1818   </p></short>
1819   <abstract><p>
1820     The fifth in a series of recorded talks from GoingNative 2013. Featuring
1821 Sean Parent.
1822   </p><p>
1823     A look at many of the new features in C++ and a couple of old features you
1824 may not have known about. With the goal of correctness in mind, we’ll see how
1825 to utilize these features to create simple, clear, and beautiful code. Just a
1826 little pinch can really spice things up.
1827   </p></abstract>
1828 </eventitem>
1829
1830
1831 <eventitem date="2013-10-30" time="6:00PM" room="Bingemans"
1832            title="CSC Goes Bowling">
1833   <short><p>
1834     All CSC members and their guests are invited for a night of free bowling at
1835     Bingemans! Transportation will be provided. If you are interested in attending,
1836     please RSVP using the online form by Oct. 18. You can find it by viewing this
1837     event in detail.
1838   </p></short>
1839   <abstract><p>
1840     We are pleased to kick off the term with free bowling for all interested
1841     members at Bingemans! Transportation will be provided. If you are interested in
1842     attending, please RSVP using <a href="http://goo.gl/FsZIfK">this online
1843     form</a> by Oct. 18.</p>
1844
1845     <p>Please note the event date change (Oct. 23 to Oct. 30).
1846     The bus will be leaving from the Davis Center at 6:00PM sharp on the 30th.
1847   </p></abstract>
1848 </eventitem>
1849
1850
1851 <eventitem date="2013-09-17" time="4:30 PM" room="Comfy Lounge"
1852            title="Fall 2013 Elections">
1853   <short><p>
1854      Elections for Fall 2013 are being held! The Executive will be elected,
1855      and the Office Manager and Librarian will be appointed by the new
1856      executive.
1857   </p></short>
1858   <abstract>
1859     <p>It's elections time again! On Tuesday, Sept 17 at 4:30PM, come to the Comfy Lounge
1860     on the 3rd floor of the MC to vote in this term's President, Vice-President, Treasurer
1861     and Secretary. The Sysadmin, Librarian, and Office Manager will also be chosen at this time.</p>
1862
1863     <p>Nominations are open until 4:30PM on Monday, Sept 16, and can be written
1864     on the CSC office whiteboard (yes, you can nominate yourself). Full CSC
1865     members can vote and are invited to drop by. You may also send nominations to
1866     the <a href="mailto:cro@csclub.uwaterloo.ca"> Chief Returning Officer</a>. A
1867     full list of candidates will be posted when nominations close.</p>
1868
1869     <p>Nominations are now closed. The candidates are:</p>
1870     <ul>
1871       <li>President:<ul>
1872         <li>Dominik Ch&#0322;obowski (<tt>dchlobow</tt>)</li>
1873         <li>Elana Hashman (<tt>ehashman</tt>)</li>
1874         <li>Sean Hunt (<tt>scshunt</tt>)</li>
1875         <li>Marc Burns (<tt>m4burns</tt>)</li>
1876         <li>Matt Thiffault (<tt>mthiffau</tt>)</li>
1877       </ul></li>
1878       <li>Vice-President:<ul>
1879         <li>Dmitri Tkatch (<tt>dtkatch</tt>)</li>
1880         <li>Marc Burns (<tt>m4burns</tt>)</li>
1881         <li>Sean Hunt (<tt>scshunt</tt>)</li>
1882         <li>Visha Vijayanand (<tt>vvijayan</tt>)</li>
1883       </ul></li>
1884       <li>Treasurer:<ul>
1885         <li>Bernice Herghiligiu (<tt>baherghi</tt>)</li>
1886         <li>Dominik Ch&#0322;obowski (<tt>dchlobow</tt>)</li>
1887         <li>Jonathan Bailey (<tt>jj2baile</tt>)</li>
1888         <li>Marc Burns (<tt>m4burns</tt>)</li>
1889       </ul></li>
1890       <li>Secretary:<ul>
1891         <li>Dominik Ch&#0322;obowski (<tt>dchlobow</tt>)</li>
1892         <li>Edward Lee (<tt>e45lee</tt>)</li>
1893         <li>Marc Burns (<tt>m4burns</tt>)</li>
1894       </ul></li>
1895     </ul>
1896   </abstract>
1897 </eventitem>
1898
1899 <!-- Spring 2013 -->
1900 <eventitem date="2013-07-26" time="7:00PM" room="Comfy Lounge" title="Code Party 1">
1901   <short><p>
1902     Come out to the Code Party happening in the Comfy Lounge on July 26 at 7:00 PM!
1903     Why sleep when you could be hacking on $your_favourite_project or doing
1904     $something_classy in great company? Join us for a night of coding, snacks,
1905     and camaraderie!
1906   </p></short>
1907   <abstract><p>
1908     Come out to the Code Party happening in the Comfy Lounge on July 26 at 7:00 PM!
1909     Why sleep when you could be hacking on $your_favourite_project or doing
1910     $something_classy in great company? Join us for a night of coding, snacks,
1911     and camaraderie!
1912   </p></abstract>
1913 </eventitem>
1914
1915 <eventitem date="2013-07-22" time="5:00PM" room="MC 4020"
1916 title="The Future of 3D Graphics is in Software!">
1917   <short><p>
1918     Convergence between CPU and GPU approaches to processing sets the stage for an
1919     exciting transition to 3D rendering that takes place entirely in software.
1920     TransGaming's Nicolas Capens and Gavriel State will speak about this convergence
1921     and how it will influence the future of graphics.
1922   </p></short>
1923   <abstract><p>
1924     For some time now, it has been clear that there is strong momentum for convergence
1925     between CPU and GPU technologies. Initially, each technology used radically different
1926     approaches to processing, but over time GPUs have evolved to support more general
1927     purpose use while CPUs have evolved to include advanced vector processing and multiple
1928     execution cores. At TransGaming, we believe that this convergence will continue to the
1929     point where typical systems have only one type of processing unit, with large numbers
1930     of cores and very wide vector execution units available for high performance parallel
1931     execution. In this kind of environment, all graphics processing will ultimately take
1932     place in software.
1933   </p><p>
1934     In this talk, we will explore the converging nature of CPU and GPU approaches to
1935     processing, how dynamic specialization allows CPUs to efficiently perform tasks usually
1936     done by GPUs, and why we believe that the increased flexibility of more programmable
1937     architectures will ultimately win out over fixed function hardware, even in areas such
1938     as texture sampling.
1939   </p><p>
1940     <strong>TransGaming Inc.</strong> works at the cutting edge of 3D graphics, building
1941     technologies that bridge the gap between platform boundaries to allow games to be played
1942     on a variety of devices and operating systems. TransGaming works with other industry
1943     leaders to update established APIs such as OpenGL, while also breaking new ground in
1944     software rendering technology, which we believe will become increasingly important as
1945     CPU and GPU technologies converge.
1946   </p><p>
1947     <strong>Nicolas Capens</strong> is the architect of SwiftShader, TransGaming's high
1948     performance software renderer, and is also deeply involved in the ANGLE project, which
1949     provides efficient translation from OpenGL ES to Direct3D APIs for implementing WebGL
1950     on Windows. Nicolas received his MSci.Eng. degree in computer science from Ghent
1951     University in 2007.
1952   </p><p>
1953     <strong>Gavriel State (Gav)</strong> is TransGaming's Founder and CTO, and has worked in
1954     graphics and portability for over 20 years on dozens of platforms and APIs. Gav wrote
1955     his first software renderer when taking CS488 at UW, where he later graduated with a
1956     B.A.Sc. in Systems Design Engineering.
1957   </p></abstract>
1958 </eventitem>
1959
1960 <eventitem date="2013-07-19" time="7:00PM" room="EV3 Fire Pit" title="CSC Goes Outside!">
1961   <short><p>
1962     Do you love the combination of s'mores, burgers, and fire? Are you brave enough to
1963     face the newly-grown geese? Do you want to play some Frisbee while listening to some
1964     chill tunes? If so, come hang out with the CSC at the EV3 Fire Pit this Friday!
1965     All are welcome for some outdoor food, games, and music.
1966   </p></short>
1967   <abstract><p>
1968     Do you love the combination of s'mores, burgers, and fire? Are you brave enough to
1969     face the newly-grown geese? Do you want to play some Frisbee while listening to some
1970     chill tunes? If so, come hang out with the CSC at the EV3 Fire Pit this Friday!
1971     All are welcome for some outdoor food, games, and music.
1972   </p></abstract>
1973 </eventitem>
1974
1975 <eventitem date="2013-07-18" time="5:00PM" room="MC 4041" title="Path Tracing">
1976   <short><p>
1977     As a follow on to last term's tutorial on building a ray-tracer from scratch,
1978     this talk will be presenting the basic mechanics of how a bidirectional path-tracer
1979     creates a globally illuminated scene, advantages and limitations of this approach over
1980     other offline global illumination techniques along with a simple example path-tracer
1981     written in C++, and opportunities for hardware acceleration on GPUs, time permitting.
1982   </p></short>
1983   <abstract><p>
1984     As a follow on to last term's tutorial on building a ray-tracer from scratch,
1985     this talk will be presenting the basic mechanics of how a bidirectional path-tracer
1986     creates a globally illuminated scene, advantages and limitations of this approach over
1987     other offline global illumination techniques along with a simple example path-tracer
1988     written in C++, and opportunities for hardware acceleration on GPUs, time permitting.
1989   </p></abstract>
1990 </eventitem>
1991
1992 <eventitem date="2013-07-11" time="5:00PM" room="MC 4041" title="3D Movies and Computer Science">
1993   <short><p>
1994     While humans started making 3D motion pictures in the 1800's, several technical and
1995     artistic challenges prevented widespread interest in the medium.  By investing heavily
1996     in a computerized production pipeline, James Cameron's 2009 release of Avatar ushered
1997     in an era of mainstream interest in 3D film.  However, many technical and artistic
1998     problems still find their way into otherwise-modern 3D movies.  The talk explores some
1999     of these problems while introducing the fundamentals of 3D film-making from a CS
2000     perspective.
2001   </p></short>
2002   <abstract><p>
2003     While humans started making 3D motion pictures in the 1800's, several technical and
2004     artistic challenges prevented widespread interest in the medium.  By investing heavily
2005     in a computerized production pipeline, James Cameron's 2009 release of Avatar ushered
2006     in an era of mainstream interest in 3D film.  However, many technical and artistic
2007     problems still find their way into otherwise-modern 3D movies.  The talk explores some
2008     of these problems while introducing the fundamentals of 3D film-making from a CS
2009     perspective.
2010   </p></abstract>
2011 </eventitem>
2012
2013 <!-- <eventitem date="2013-07-05" time="7:00PM" room="EV3 Fire Pit" title="CSC Goes Outside">
2014   <short><p>
2015     Come hang out with the CSC for s'mores, burgers, Frisbees, and fire this Friday!
2016     We will be hanging out at the EV3 Fire Pit starting at 7:00PM. All are welcome to
2017     partake in the food, games, and music. See you there!
2018   </p></short>
2019   <abstract><p>
2020     Do you love the combination of s'mores, burgers, and fire? Are you brave enough to face
2021     the newly-grown geese? Do you want to play some Frisbee? If so, come hang out with the CSC
2022     at the EV3 Fire Pit this Friday!
2023     All are welcome for some outdoor fun, food, games, and music.
2024   </p>
2025   <p>
2026     If you have any questions or concerns, please contact exec@csclub.uwaterloo.ca.
2027   </p></abstract>
2028 </eventitem> -->
2029
2030 <eventitem date="2013-06-07" time="6:00 PM, 8:00PM" room="Comfy Lounge" title="Unix 101/ Code Party 0">
2031   <short><p>
2032     We are offering a Unix tutorial on Friday, June 7th, 2013! Following the tutorial a code party will take place.
2033     Bring your laptops and chargers for an awesome night of coding, hacking and learning.
2034     All are welcome to join in the comfy lounge!
2035   </p></short>
2036   <abstract>
2037     <p>We are offering a Unix tutorial on Friday, June 7th, 2013 at 6:00pm! Following the tutorial a code party will take place.
2038     Bring your laptops and chargers for an awesome night of coding, hacking and learning.
2039     All are welcome to join in the comfy lounge!</p>
2040
2041     <p>If you have any questions about Unix101/ Code Party 0 please contact exec@csclub.uwaterloo.ca. </p>
2042
2043     <p>Hope to see you there!</p>
2044   </abstract>
2045 </eventitem>
2046
2047 <eventitem date="2013-05-15" time="6:00 PM" room="Comfy Lounge" title="Spring 2013 Elections">
2048   <short><p>
2049      Elections for Spring 2013 are being held! The Executive will be elected,
2050      and the Office Manager and Librarian will be appointed by the new
2051      executive.
2052   </p></short>
2053   <abstract>
2054     <p>It's elections time again! On Wednesday, May 15 at 6:00PM, come to the Comfy Lounge
2055     on the 3rd floor of the MC to vote in this term's President, Vice-President, Treasurer
2056     and Secretary. The Sysadmin, Librarian, and Office Manager will also be chosen at this time.</p>
2057
2058     <p>Nominations are open until 4:30PM on Tuesday, May 14, and can be written
2059     on the CSC office whiteboard (yes, you can nominate yourself). Full CSC
2060     members can vote and are invited to drop by. You may also send nominations to
2061     the <a href="mailto:cro@csclub.uwaterloo.ca"> Chief Returning Officer</a>. A
2062     full list of candidates will be posted when nominations close, along with
2063     instructions for voting remotely.</p>
2064
2065     <p>Good luck to our candidates!</p>
2066   </abstract>
2067 </eventitem>
2068
2069 <!-- Winter 2013 -->
2070 <eventitem date="2013-04-01" time="7:00 PM" room="Comfy Lounge" title="Code Party 1">
2071         <short>
2072 <p>The Computer Science Club is running the second code party of the term! Come join us and hack on open source software, your own projects, or whatever comes up. Everyone is welcome; please bring your friends. There will be foodstuffs and sugary drinks available for your hacking pleasure.</p>
2073         </short>
2074         <abstract>
2075 <p>The Computer Science Club is running the second code party of the term! Come join us and hack on open source software, your own projects, or whatever comes up. Everyone is welcome; please bring your friends. There will be foodstuffs and sugary drinks available for your hacking pleasure.</p>
2076         </abstract>
2077 </eventitem>
2078
2079 <eventitem date="2013-04-01" time="6:00 PM" room="MC 3003" title="Unix 101">
2080         <short>
2081 <p><i>by Calum T. Dalek</i>. New to the Unix computing environment? If you seek an introduction, look no further. We will be holding a tutorial on using Unix this upcoming Monday. Topics that will be covered include basic interaction with the shell and use of myriad powerful tools.</p>
2082         </short>
2083         <abstract>
2084 <p>New to the Unix computing environment? If you seek an introduction, look no further. We will be holding a tutorial on using Unix this upcoming Monday. Topics that will be covered include basic interaction with the shell and use of myriad powerful tools.</p>
2085 <p>If you're interested in attending, make sure you can log into the Macs on the third floor, or show up to the CSC office (MC 3036) 20 minutes early for some help.</p>
2086         </abstract>
2087 </eventitem>
2088
2089 <eventitem date="2013-03-21" time="4:30 PM" room="MC 4020" title="Using Computers to Find Evidence in Litigation">
2090     <short>
2091 <p>Professor Gordon Cormack will be presenting a talk on using machine-learning based spam filters to accurately locate relevent electronic documents - a process which has typically been very manual, and very expensive.</p>
2092     </short>
2093     <abstract>
2094 <p>In a lawsuit, each party is typically entitled to Discovery, in which the
2095 other party is compelled to produce any "documents" in its possession that
2096 may be pertinent to the case.   Documents include not only traditional
2097 paper documents, but email messages, text messages, computer files, and
2098 other electronically stored information, or ESI.  Suppose you were
2099 compelled to produce every document in your possession pertaining to
2100 software downloads or purchases?  How would you do it?   If you were a
2101 large corporation, you would probably hire an army of lawyers to read all
2102 your email, plus your assignments, and any other files on your UW account,
2103 your laptop, your phone, and your tablet, at a cost of one dollar or more
2104 per file.  As a CSC member, you know there must be a better way.  But what
2105 is that better way, and how do you convince the court to let you use it?</p>
2106 <p>It turns out that spam filters that employ machine learning can do this job
2107 well -- better than that army of lawyers.  But lawyers aren't happy about
2108 this.  This talk will outline how the technology works and how to prove
2109 that it works, so as to convince scientists, lawyers, and judges.</p>
2110     </abstract>
2111 </eventitem>
2112
2113 <eventitem date="2013-02-28" time="4:30 PM" room="DC 1302" title="Machine Architecture, Performance, and Scalability: Things Your Programming Language Never Told You">
2114     <short>
2115     <p>"Herb Sutter is a leading authority on software development. He is the best selling author of several books including Exceptional C++ and C++ Coding Standards, as well as hundreds of technical papers and articles [and] has served for a decade as chair of the ISO C++ standards committee." - http://herbsutter.com/about</p>
2116     </short>
2117     <abstract>
2118 <p>High-level languages insulate the programmer from the machine. That's a
2119 wonderful thing -- except when it obscures the answers to the fundamental
2120 questions of "What does the program do?" and "How much does it cost?"</p>
2121 <p>The C++ and C# programmer is less insulated than most, and still we find
2122 that programmers are consistently surprised at what simple code actually
2123 does and how expensive it can be -- not because of any complexity of a
2124 language, but because of being unaware of the complexity of the machine on
2125 which the program actually runs.</p>
2126 <p>This talk examines the "real meanings" and "true costs" of the code we
2127 write and run especially on commodity and server systems, by delving into
2128 the performance effects of bandwidth vs. latency limitations, the
2129 ever-deepening memory hierarchy, the changing costs arising from the
2130 hardware concurrency explosion, memory model effects all the way from the
2131 compiler to the CPU to the chipset to the cache, and more -- and what you
2132 can do about them.</p>
2133     </abstract>
2134 </eventitem>
2135
2136 <eventitem date="2013-01-16" time="4:00 PM" room="Comfy Lounge" title="Elections">
2137     <short>
2138     <p>CSC Elections have begun for the Winter 2013 term, nominations are open!</p>
2139     </short>
2140     <abstract>
2141 <p>It's elections time again! On Wednesday January 16th at 4:00PM, come to the Comfy Lounge
2142 on the 3rd floor of the MC to vote in this term's President, Vice-President, Treasurer
2143 and Secretary. The sysadmin, librarian, and office manager will also be chosen at this time.</p>
2144
2145 <p>Nominations are open until 4:00PM on Tuesday January 15th, and can be
2146 written on the CSC office whiteboard (yes, you can nominate yourself). All CSC members
2147 can vote and are invited to drop by. You may also send nominations to the
2148 <a href="mailto:cro@csclub.uwaterloo.ca">
2149    Chief Returning Officer</a>. A full list of candidates will be posted
2150    when nominations close.</p>
2151
2152     <p>Good luck to our candidates!</p>
2153     </abstract>
2154 </eventitem>
2155
2156 <!-- Fall 2012 -->
2157
2158 <eventitem date="2012-11-23" time="19:00" room="MC 3001" title="Code Party 3">
2159         <short>
2160                 <p>The Computer Science Club is running our third, and last, code party of the term! Whether you're a hacking guru or a newbie to computer science, you're welcome to attend; there will be activities for all. Syed Albiz will be presenting a tutorial on implementing a <a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ray-tracing">ray-tracer</a> in C and Scheme.</p>
2161         </short>
2162         <abstract>
2163                 <p>The Computer Science Club is running our third, and last, code party of the term! Whether you're a hacking guru or a newbie to computer science, you're welcome to attend; there will be activities for all. Syed Albiz will be presenting a tutorial on implementing a <a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ray-tracing">ray-tracer</a> in C and Scheme. Everyone is welcome, so please bring your friends. There will be foodstuffs and sugary drinks available for your hacking pleasure.</p>
2164         </abstract>
2165 </eventitem>
2166
2167 <eventitem date="2012-11-21" time="4:30 PM" room="MC 5136B" title="SASMS">
2168    <short>
2169       <p><i>by PMC.</i>The Pure Mathematics, Applied Mathematics, Combinatorics &amp; Optimization Club is hosting the Fall 2012 Short Attention Span Math Seminars (SASMS).</p>
2170    </short>
2171    <abstract>
2172       <p>The Pure Mathematics, Applied Mathematics, Combinatorics &amp; Optimization Club is hosting the Fall 2012 Short Attention Span Math Seminars (SASMS).</p>
2173       <p>All talks will be 25 minutes long, and everyone is welcome to give a talk. Applications for speaking are open until the day of the event. For event details, see <a href="http://pmclub.uwaterloo.ca/?q=content/sasms-fall-2012">the PMC event page.</a></p>
2174    </abstract>
2175 </eventitem>
2176
2177 <eventitem date="2012-11-19" time="3:30 PM" room="MC 3003" title="UNIX 101">
2178   <short><p><i>by Calum T. Dalek</i>. New to the Unix computing environment? If you seek an introduction, look no further. We will be holding a series of tutorials on using Unix, beginning with Unix 101 this upcoming Monday. Topics that will be covered include basic interaction with the shell and use of myriad powerful tools. </p></short>
2179   <abstract><p>New to the Unix computing environment? If you seek an introduction, look no further. We will be holding a series of tutorials on using Unix, beginning with Unix 101 this upcoming Monday. Topics that will be covered include basic interaction with the shell and use of myriad powerful tools. </p>
2180 <p>If you're interested in attending, make sure you can log into the Macs on the third floor, or show up to the CSC office (MC 3036) 20 minutes early for some help. If you're already familiar with these topics, don't hesitate to come to Unix 102, which will be held the week of the 26th.</p>
2181 </abstract>
2182 </eventitem>
2183
2184 <eventitem date="2012-11-15" time="7:00 PM" room="DC 1302" title="KW Perlmongers Talk">
2185    <short>
2186       <p><i>by Justin Wheeler.</i>In his own words, this talk will cover the virtues
2187       of Perl: CPAN, Moose, CPAN, Catalyst, CPAN, DBIx::Class, CPAN,
2188       TMTOWTDI, and did I mention CPAN?</p>
2189    </short>
2190    <abstract>
2191       <p>In his own words, this talk will cover the virtues
2192       of Perl: CPAN, Moose, CPAN, Catalyst, CPAN, DBIx::Class, CPAN,
2193       TMTOWTDI, and did I mention CPAN?</p>
2194       <p>If you've never used Perl before, don't be scared away by the
2195       jargon&mdash;the talk should be accessible to all CS students, and even if
2196       you find it hard to follow, we will be serving pizza!      </p>
2197    </abstract>
2198 </eventitem>
2199
2200 <eventitem date="2012-10-26" time="7:00 PM" room="MC 3001" title="CSC Code
2201 Party 2">
2202    <short>
2203       <p>We will be holding our second code party of the term. Watch for
2204          further details, as we plan on working with some robots and Scala,
2205          git, and Haskell.</p>
2206    </short>
2207    <abstract>
2208       <p>We will be holding our second code party of the term. Watch for
2209          further details, as we plan on working with some robots and Scala,
2210          git, and Haskell.</p>
2211    </abstract>
2212 </eventitem>
2213
2214 <eventitem date="2012-10-18" time="4:00 PM" room="MC 2034" title="The
2215 Cryptographic and Game-Theoretical Fundamentals behind Bitcoin">
2216    <short>
2217       <p><i>by Vitalik Buterin.</i> In this talk, we will cover the
2218          cryptographic and game-theory principles behind the currency, including
2219          how the issues of double-spending, the "51% attack," and "mining" are
2220          addressed, the game-theory incentives to use Bitcoins honestly, and
2221          other issues being faced today in practice, such as implementation,
2222          attacks, and future scalability.</p>
2223         </short>
2224         <abstract>
2225                 <p><i>by Vitalik Buterin.</i> Interested in learning more about Bitcoin,
2226          the independent digital cryptographic cash? Then this is the talk for
2227          you!</p>
2228
2229       <p>In his talk, Vitalik will cover the cryptographic and game-theory
2230          principles behind the currency, including how the issues of
2231          double-spending, the "51% attack," and "mining" are addressed, the
2232          game-theory incentives to use Bitcoins honestly, and other issues being
2233          faced today in practice, such as implementation, attacks, and future
2234          scalability.</p>
2235
2236       <p>Refreshments will be provided.</p>
2237         </abstract>
2238 </eventitem>
2239
2240 <eventitem date="2012-09-28" time="7:00 PM" room="PHY 150" title="Tron Screening: Frosh-A-Tron">
2241         <short>
2242                 <p>ehashman's lousy frosh event naming scheme continues as we prepare for this week's movie night---a screening of the original TRON in PHY 150. Come watch the groundbreaking film that defined the role of computer graphics and the quality of special effects in modern cinema. And bring your friends!</p>
2243         </short>
2244         <abstract>
2245                 <p>ehashman's lousy frosh event naming scheme continues as we prepare for this week's movie night---a screening of the original TRON in PHY 150. Come watch the groundbreaking film that defined the role of computer graphics and the quality of special effects in modern cinema. And bring your friends!</p>
2246         </abstract>
2247 </eventitem>
2248
2249 <eventitem date="2012-09-14" time="19:00" room="MC 3001" title="Code Party 1: FROSH-A-THON">
2250         <short>
2251                 <p>The Computer Science Club is running our first "welcome back" code party of the term! Whether you're a hacking guru or a newbie to computer science, you're welcome to attend; there will be activities for all! Our party is loosely themed as a Linux installfest, where we will have a team of members dedicated to helping individuals install and learn to use one of many flavours of Linux.</p>
2252         </short>
2253         <abstract>
2254                 <p>The Computer Science Club is running our first "welcome back" code party of the term! Whether you're a hacking guru or a newbie to computer science, you're welcome to attend; there will be activities for all! Our party is loosely themed as a Linux installfest, where we will have a team of members dedicated to helping individuals install and learn to use one of many flavours of Linux. Everyone is welcome, so please bring your friends. There will be foodstuffs and sugary drinks available for your hacking pleasure.</p>
2255         </abstract>
2256 </eventitem>
2257
2258 <eventitem date="2012-09-18" time="4:00 PM" room="Comfy Lounge" title="Elections">
2259     <short>
2260     <p>CSC Elections have begun for the Fall 2012 term, nominations are open!</p>
2261     </short>
2262     <abstract>
2263 <p>It's elections time again! On Tuesday September 18th at 4:00PM, come to the Comfy Lounge
2264 on the 3rd floor of the MC to vote in this term's President, Vice-President, Treasurer
2265 and Secretary. The sysadmin, librarian, and office manager will also be chosen at this time.</p>
2266
2267 <p>Nominations are open until 4:00PM on Monday September 17th, and can be
2268 written on the CSC office whiteboard (yes, you can nominate yourself). All CSC members
2269 can vote and are invited to drop by. You may also send nominations to the
2270 <a href="mailto:cro@csclub.uwaterloo.ca">
2271    Chief Returning Officer</a>. A full list of candidates will be posted
2272    when nominations close.</p>
2273
2274     <p>Good luck to our candidates!</p>
2275     </abstract>
2276 </eventitem>
2277
2278 <eventitem date="2012-09-06" time="17:00" room="Math 3 Atrium" title="SCS First-year Welcome Dinner">
2279         <short>
2280                 <p>The School of Computer Science is hosting a dinner event for incoming first-year students. You'll get to meet us, some of the faculty, and other new undergraduates. Food will be provided.</p>
2281         </short>
2282         <abstract>
2283                 <p>The School of Computer Science is hosting a dinner event for incoming first-year students. You'll get to meet us, some of the faculty, and other new undergraduates. Food will be provided.</p>
2284         </abstract>
2285 </eventitem>
2286
2287 <!-- Spring 2012 -->
2288
2289 <eventitem date="2012-06-08" time="19:00:00" room="MC 3001" title="Code Party 1">
2290         <short>
2291                 <p>The Computer Science Club is running the first code party of the term! Come join us and hack on open source software, your own projects, or whatever comes up. Everyone is welcome; please bring your friends. There will be foodstuffs and sugary drinks available for your hacking pleasure.</p>
2292         </short>
2293         <abstract>
2294                 <p>             </p>
2295                 <p>The Computer Science Club is running the first code party of the term! Come join us and hack on open source software, your own projects, or whatever comes up. Everyone is welcome; please bring your friends. There will be foodstuffs and sugary drinks available for your hacking pleasure.</p>
2296         </abstract>
2297 </eventitem>
2298
2299 <eventitem date="2012-05-10" time="4:30 PM" room="Comfy Lounge" title="Elections">
2300     <short>
2301     <p>CSC Elections have begun for the Spring 2012 term, nominations are open!</p>
2302     </short>
2303     <abstract>
2304 <p>It's elections time again! On Thursday May 10th at 4:30PM, come to the Comfy Lounge
2305 on the 3rd floor of the MC to vote in this term's President, Vice-President, Treasurer
2306 and Secretary. The sysadmin, librarian, and office manager will also be chosen at this time.</p>
2307
2308 <p>Nominations are open until 4:30PM on Wednesday May 9th, and can be
2309 written on the CSC office whiteboard (yes, you can nominate yourself). All CSC members
2310 who have paid their Mathsoc fee can vote and are invited to drop by.
2311 You may also send nominations to the <a href="mailto:cro@csclub.uwaterloo.ca">
2312    Chief Returning Officer</a>. A full list of candidates will be posted
2313    when nominations close.</p>
2314
2315     <p>Good luck to our candidates!</p>
2316     </abstract>
2317 </eventitem>
2318
2319 <eventitem date="2012-05-07" time="6:00 PM" room="DC 1302" title="mmap and the Mortgage Crisis">
2320     <short>
2321     <p>Palantir is a Palo Alto-based intelligence analysis software company that has partnered with the CSC to put on a tech talk and social. There will be free food, free drinks, and for one lucky winner, a free iPad, so why not come on out?</p>
2322     </short>
2323     <abstract>
2324 <p>In the aftermath of the 2008 economic crisis, large banks have been saddled with the prospect of foreclosing on millions of distressed mortgages, at a financial cost of billions of dollars and an incalculable social cost.  Crucial to solving this problem is the ability to model and analyze these millions of loans in real time, enabling lenders to price homes so that they can find effective and mutually beneficial alternatives to foreclosure.</p>
2325
2326 <p>In this talk, we'll describe how engineers at Palantir are working on a calculation engine that supports such analyses. We'll outline our design goals of constructing a platform that supports queries against large sets of data at interactive speeds and exposes a high-level object-oriented interface that enables analysts to construct models intuitively without having to worry about the underlying implementation details. We'll describe the different architectures we explored in prototyping the system, demo how to use our product to analyze massive datasets, and discuss how we've ultimately deployed it in the field.</p>
2327     </abstract>
2328 </eventitem>
2329
2330
2331 <!-- Winter 2012 -->
2332
2333 <eventitem date="2012-03-22" time="4:30 PM" room="MC 4021" title="Multi-processor Real-time Systems">
2334   <short>
2335     <p><i>by Bill Cowan</i>. Programming systems that obey hard real-time constraints is difficult. So is programming multiple CPUs that interact to solve a single problem. This talk will describe the nature of computation typical of real-time systems, architectural solutions currently employed in CS 452, and possible architectures for multi-CPU systems.</p>
2336   </short>
2337   <abstract>
2338     <p>
2339       Programming systems that obey hard real-time constraints is difficult. So is programming multiple CPUs that interact to solve a single problem.
2340     </p>
2341     <p>
2342       On rare occasions it is possible to mix two difficult problems to create one easy problem and multi-CPU real-time is, on the face of it, just such an occasion. Give each deadline its own CPU and it will never be missed. This intuition is, unfortunately, incorrect, which does not, however, prevent it being tried in many real-time systems.
2343     </p>
2344     <p>
2345       For three decades, fourth year students have been exploring this problem in CS452, using multiple tasks (virtual CPUs) running on a single CPU. It is now time to consider whether modern developments in CPU architecture make it possible to use multiple CPUs in CS452 given the practical constraint of a twelve week semester.
2346     </p>
2347     <p>
2348       This talk will describe the nature of computation typical of real-time systems, architectural solutions currently employed in the course, and possible architectures for multi-CPU systems.
2349     </p>
2350   </abstract>
2351 </eventitem>
2352
2353 <eventitem date="2012-03-08" time="5:30 PM" room="MC 3003" title="UNIX 102">
2354   <short>
2355     <p><i>by Calum T. Dalek</i>. The Computer Science Club will be running the
2356 second installment of our introductory UNIX tutorials for the term. We
2357 will be covering topics intended to show off the development-friendliness of
2358 the UNIX computing environment: "real" document editors, development tools,
2359 bash scripting, and version control.
2360     </p>
2361   </short>
2362   <abstract>
2363     <p>New to the UNIX computing environment? If you seek an introduction, look
2364 no further. We will be covering more advanced topics in the second installment
2365 of our introductory tutorials, that will help you become a more effective
2366 developer.
2367     </p>
2368     <p>We will be introducing "real" document editors, bash scripting, and
2369 version control. We'll prove to you how much more efficient you can develop
2370 with these tools and teach you how to do it for yourself. It will save you hours
2371 of work!
2372     </p>
2373   </abstract>
2374 </eventitem>
2375
2376 <eventitem date="2012-03-02" time="7:00 PM" room="MC 3001" title="OpenCL Code Party">
2377   <short>
2378     <p><i>by Calum T. Dalek</i>. The University of Waterloo Computer Science Club and AMD's OpenCL programming competition comes to a close, as the contest ends at midnight and prizes are awarded! Open submissions will be judged, so make sure to come out and watch.
2379     </p>
2380   </short>
2381   <abstract>
2382     <p>The University of Waterloo Computer Science Club and AMD's <a href="http://csclub.uwaterloo.ca/opencl">OpenCL programming competition</a> comes to a close, as the contest ends at midnight and prizes are awarded! Open submissions will be judged, so make sure to come out and watch.
2383     </p>
2384   </abstract>
2385 </eventitem>
2386
2387 <eventitem date="2012-03-07" time="5:30 PM" room="PHY 150" title="Feynman Messenger Lecture Series">
2388   <short>
2389     <p><i>by Calum T. Dalek</i>. Join the Computer Science Club and PhysClub every Wednesday evening for the rest of the term for our five screenings of the classic 1964 Messenger Lecture Series by Richard Feynman in PHY 150. Dinner provided!
2390     </p>
2391   </short>
2392   <abstract>
2393     <p>The Physics Club and the Computer Science Club are proud to present the 1964 Feynman Messenger Lecture Series in PHY 150 on Wednesday evenings at 5:30 PM. The screenings will be taking place as follows (please note times and dates):</p>
2394     <ul>
2395       <li><b>Feb. 29, 5:30-6:30 PM:</b> <i>Law of Gravitation: An Example of Physical Law</i></li>
2396       <li><b>Mar. 7, 5:30-7:30 PM:</b> <i>The Relation of Mathematics and Physics</i> and <i>The Great Conservation Principles</i> (double feature)</li>
2397       <li><b>Mar. 14, 5:30-6:30 PM:</b> <i>Symmetry in Physical Law</i></li>
2398       <li><b>Mar. 21, 5:30-7:30 PM:</b> <i>The Distinction of Past and Future</i> and <i>Probability and Uncertainty: The Quantum Mechanical View</i> (double feature)</li>
2399       <li><b>Mar. 28, 5:30-6:30 PM:</b> <i>Seeking New Laws</i></li>
2400     </ul>
2401     <p>Dinner will be provided, so come on out, relax in the comfy PHY 150 theatre, and enjoy. Hope to see you there!</p>
2402   </abstract>
2403 </eventitem>
2404
2405 <eventitem date="2012-02-16" time="7:00 PM" room="MC 3001" title="OpenCL Introduction">
2406   <short><p><i>by Calum T. Dalek</i>. The University of Waterloo Computer Science Club and AMD are running an OpenCL programming competition. If you're interested in writing massively parallel software on the OpenCL platform, come out and join us for our introductory code party!</p></short>
2407   <abstract><p>The University of Waterloo Computer Science Club and AMD are running an <a href="http://csclub.uwaterloo.ca/opencl">OpenCL programming competition.</a> If you're interested in writing massively parallel software on the OpenCL platform, come out and join us for our introductory code party!</p>
2408 <p></p>
2409 </abstract>
2410 </eventitem>
2411
2412 <eventitem date="2012-02-09" time="5:00 PM" room="MC 3003" title="UNIX 101">
2413   <short><p><i>by Calum T. Dalek</i>. New to the Unix computing environment? If you seek an introduction, look no further. We will be holding a series of tutorials on using Unix, beginning with Unix 101 this upcoming Thursday. Topics that will be covered include basic interaction with the shell and the motivations behind using it, and an introduction to compilation. You'll have to learn this stuff in CS 246 anyways, so why not get a head start!</p></short>
2414   <abstract><p>New to the Unix computing environment? If you seek an introduction, look no further. We will be holding a series of tutorials on using Unix, beginning with Unix 101 this upcoming Thursday. Topics that will be covered include basic interaction with the shell and the motivations behind using it, and an introduction to compilation. You'll have to learn this stuff in CS 246 anyways, so why not get a head start!</p>
2415 <p>If you're interested in attending, make sure you can log into the Macs on the third floor, or show up to the CSC office (MC 3036) 20 minutes early for some help. If you're already familiar with these topics, don't hesitate to come to Unix 102, planned to be held after Reading Week.</p>
2416 </abstract>
2417 </eventitem>
2418
2419 <eventitem date="2012-02-07" time="6:00 PM" room="MC 4045" title="Algorithms Talk">
2420   <short><p><i>by Victor Fan</i>. Join Victor Fan for his talk, intended for all second-year math students with a solid first-year background. Even if you are a first-year or a seasoned veteran, you will probably still take home something new, so please come out to enjoy the talk! Refreshments will be served.</p></short>
2421   <abstract><p>Are you interested in algorithms? What is an algorithm anyway? We will discuss two or three neat problems with very elegant answers. Some of these answers are actually fast, and some will result in a proof that the problem is NP-complete. (What does that mean?) We will also discuss the motivating thoughts that led us to the solutions.</p>
2422
2423 <p>Join Victor Fan for his talk, intended for all second-year math students with a solid first-year background. Even if you are a first-year or a seasoned veteran, you will probably still take home something new, so please come out to enjoy the talk! Refreshments will be served.</p></abstract>
2424 </eventitem>
2425
2426 <eventitem date="2012-01-27" time="6:30 PM" room="Math CnD" title="Code Party 0">
2427   <short><p><i>by Calum T. Dalek</i>. The Computer Science Club is running the first code party of the term! Come join us and hack on open source software, your own projects, or whatever comes up. Everyone is welcome; please bring your friends. There will be foodstuffs and sugary drinks available for your hacking pleasure.</p></short>
2428   <abstract><p>The Computer Science Club is running the first code party of the term! Come join us and hack on open source software, your own projects, or whatever comes up. Everyone is welcome; please bring your friends. There will be foodstuffs and sugary drinks available for your hacking pleasure.</p></abstract>
2429 </eventitem>
2430
2431 <eventitem date="2012-01-12" time="4:30 PM" room="Comfy Lounge" title="Elections">
2432     <short>
2433     <p>CSC Elections have begun for the Winter 2012 term, nominations are open!</p>
2434     </short>
2435     <abstract>
2436 <p>It's elections time again! On Thursday January 12th at 4:30PM, come to the Comfy Lounge
2437 on the 3rd floor of the MC to vote in this term's President, Vice-President, Treasurer
2438 and Secretary. The sysadmin, librarian and office manager will also be chosen at this time.</p>
2439
2440 <p>Nominations are open until 4:30PM on Wednesday January 11th, and can be
2441 written on the CSC office whiteboard (yes, you can nominate yourself). All CSC members
2442 who have paid their Mathsoc fee can vote and are invited to drop by.
2443 You may also send nominations to the <a href="mailto:cro@csclub.uwaterloo.ca">
2444    Chief Returning Officer</a>. A full list of candidates will be posted
2445    when nominations close.</p>
2446
2447     <p>Good luck to our candidates!</p>
2448     </abstract>
2449 </eventitem>
2450
2451 <!-- Fall 2011 -->
2452 <eventitem date="2011-11-18" time="7:00 PM" room="Comfy Lounge" title="CSC Open Data Code Party">
2453   <short><p><i>by Calum T. Dalek</i>. The Computer Science Club is teaming up with the UW Open Data Initiative to bring you our third code party of the term! Everyone is welcome; please bring your friends. There will be foodstuffs and sugary drinks available for your hacking pleasure.</p></short>
2454   <abstract><p> We're teaming up with the UW Open Data Initiative to host our next code party on Friday, November 18 at 7PM in the MC Comfy Lounge.</p>
2455
2456     <p>As always, you're welcome to work on your own projects, but we'll be hacking on some open data related projects:
2457       <ol>
2458         <li>Design and build UW APIs.</li>
2459         We're looking for API design experts to bring scalable API designs to the party. At the party, we'll work on implementing these designs. The APIs that you build will be used by everyone to access the university data made available by the Open Data Initiative.
2460         <li>Applications using university data that is currently available.</li>
2461       </ol>
2462      </p>
2463      <p>If you'd like to discuss your ideas for these proposed projects, check out the newsgroup, uw.csc</p></abstract>
2464 </eventitem>
2465
2466 <eventitem date="2011-11-12" time="7:30 AM" room="Davis Centre" title="CSC goes to Design Our Tomorrow">
2467
2468     <short><p><i>by Calum T. Dalek</i>. The Computer Science Club has a limited number of tickets available for the <a href="http://designourtomorrow.com/">Design Our Tomorrow Conference</a> at the University of Toronto on Saturday, November 12, 10:00 - 16:30. See event information for ticket details.</p></short>
2469
2470     <abstract><p>
2471 The Computer Science Club has tickets available for the Design Our Tomorrow Conference at the University of Toronto on Saturday, November 12, 10:00 - 16:30, and would like to invite you to attend. The DOT Conference is a TED-style event geared towards students in high school, undergraduate, and graduate studies. The goal of the event is to inspire young people to create, innovate, better themselves, and in the process, better the world.  The conference is free for students and is valued at $500 a ticket for non-students. For more details about the conference, visit <a href="http://designourtomorrow.com/">http://designourtomorrow.com/</a>.</p>
2472
2473 <p>Tickets have been reserved for the CSC, and transportation to the conference has been funded by the David R. Cheriton School of Computer Science; a $5 deposit is required to secure a seat on the bus, which will be refunded to attendees upon departure. To sign up, visit the CSC office at MC 3036/3037 with exact change. You will need to provide your full name, e-mail, and student ID number. Please note that students who have already registered for the conference *should not* try to register through the CSC. For more details, visit the CSC website at <a href="http://csclub.uwaterloo.ca/">http://csclub.uwaterloo.ca/</a>.</p>
2474
2475 <p>This event is not restricted to CSC members&mdash;any student is free to attend. Tickets are very limited, so please sign up as soon as possible.</p>
2476
2477 <p>On the morning of November 12, attendees should meet in front of the Davis Center at 7:30 am. The bus will be leaving promptly at 8:00 am, so please arrive no later than 7:30 so we can process refunds and depart on time.</p>
2478
2479 <p>We hope that you will join us.
2480 </p></abstract>
2481
2482 </eventitem>
2483 <eventitem date="2011-10-24" time="4:30 PM" room="MC 3003" title="UNIX 102: Tools in the UNIX Environment">
2484
2485     <short><p><i>by Calum T. Dalek</i>. The next installment in the CS Club's popular Unix tutorials UNIX 102 introduces powerful text editing tools for programming and document formatting.
2486 </p></short>
2487
2488     <abstract><p>Unix 102 is a follow up to Unix 101, requiring basic knowledge of the shell. If you missed Unix 101 but still know your way around you should be fine. Topics covered include: "real" editors, text processing, navigating a multiuser Unix environment, standard tools, and more. If you aren't interested or feel comfortable with these tasks, watch out for Unix 103 and 104 to get more depth in power programming tools on Unix.</p></abstract>
2489
2490 </eventitem>
2491 <eventitem date="2011-10-21" time="7 PM" room="Comfy Lounge" title="Code Party 2">
2492         <short>
2493                 <p><i>by Calum T. Dalek</i>. The Computer Science Club is having our second code party of the term! Everyone is welcome; please bring your friends. There will be foodstuffs and sugary drinks available for your hacking pleasure.</p>
2494         </short>
2495         <abstract>
2496                 <p>
2497                  The Computer Science Club is having our second code party of the term! Everyone is welcome; please bring your friends. There will be foodstuffs and sugary drinks available for your hacking pleasure.
2498                 </p>
2499
2500                 <p>
2501                 There will be 3 more code parties this term.
2502                 </p>
2503         </abstract>
2504 </eventitem>
2505 <eventitem date="2011-10-13" time="6:30 PM" room="MC 4020" title="How Browsers Work">
2506         <short>
2507                 <p><i>by Ehsan Akhgari</i>. Veteran Mozilla engineer Ehsan Akhgari will present a talk on the internals of web browsers. The material will range from the fundamentals of content rendering to the latest innovations in browser design. Click on the talk title for a full abstract.</p>
2508         </short>
2509         <abstract>
2510                 <p>
2511 Web browsers have evolved. From their humble beginnings as simple HTML
2512 rendering engines they have grown and evolved into rich application
2513 platforms. This talk will start with the fundamentals: how a browser
2514 creates an on-screen representation of the resources downloaded from
2515 the network. (Boring, right? But we have to start somewhere.) From
2516 there we'll get into the really exciting stuff: the latest innovations
2517 in Web browsers and how those innovations enable — even encourage —
2518 developers to build more complex applications than ever before. You'll
2519 see real-world examples of people building technologies on top of
2520 these "simple rendering engines" that seemed impossible a short time
2521 ago.
2522
2523 Bio of the speaker:
2524 Ehsan Akhgari has contributed to the Mozilla project for more than 5
2525 years.  He has worked on various parts of Firefox, including the user
2526 interface and the rendering engine.  He originally implemented Private
2527 Browsing in Firefox.  Right now he's focusing on the editor component
2528 in the Firefox engine.
2529                 </p>
2530
2531                 <p>
2532                 There will be 4 more code parties this term.
2533                 </p>
2534         </abstract>
2535 </eventitem>
2536 <eventitem date="2011-09-30" time="7 PM" room="Comfy Lounge" title="Code Party 1">
2537         <short>
2538                 <p><i>by Calum T. Dalek</i>. The Computer Science Club is having our first code party of the term! The theme for this code party will be collaborative development. We'll present several ideas of small projects to work on for the unexperienced. Everyone is welcome; please bring your friends! There will be foodstuffs and sugary drinks available for your hacking pleasure.</p>
2539         </short>
2540         <abstract>
2541                 <p>
2542                 The Computer Science Club is having our first code party of the term! The theme for this code party will be collaborative development. We'll present several ideas of small projects to work on for the unexperienced. Everyone is welcome; please bring your friends! There will be foodstuffs and sugary drinks available for your hacking pleasure.
2543                 </p>
2544
2545                 <p>
2546                 There will be 4 more code parties this term.
2547                 </p>
2548         </abstract>
2549 </eventitem>
2550 <eventitem date="2011-09-29" edate="2011-09-29" time="4:00 PM" etime="5:30 PM" room="MC 3004" title="UNIX 101: An Introduction to the Shell">
2551         <short>
2552                 <p><i>by Calum T. Dalek</i>. New to Unix? No problem, we'll teach you to power use circles around your friends!</p>
2553         </short>
2554         <abstract>
2555                 <p>Unix 101 is the first in a series of tutorials on using Unix. This tutorial will present an introduction to the Unix shell environment, both on the student servers and on other Unix environments. Topics covered include: using the shell, both basic interaction and more advanced topics like scripting and job control, the filesystem and manipulating it, and secure shell. If you feel you're already familiar with these topics, don't hesitate to come to Unix 102 to learn about documents, editing, and other related tasks, or watch out for Unix 103, 104, and 201 that get much more in depth with power tools and software authoring on Unix. </p>
2556         </abstract>
2557 </eventitem>
2558 <eventitem date="2011-09-19" edate="2011-09-19" time="4:30 PM" etime="5:30 PM" room="Comfy Lounge" title="Elections">
2559         <short>
2560                 <p>
2561                 Club elections. See related news items for details.
2562                 </p>
2563         </short>
2564         <abstract>
2565                 Club elections. See related news items for details.
2566         </abstract>
2567 </eventitem>
2568
2569 <!-- Spring 2011 -->
2570 <eventitem date="2011-07-29" time="6 PM" room="home of askhader, see abstract" title="CTRL-D">
2571         <short>
2572                 <p>
2573                 The end of another term is here, and so we're having our End-of-Term dinner.
2574
2575                 Everybody's welcome to come to CTRL-D. We are running this like a potluck, so bringing food is suggested.
2576                 </p>
2577         </short>
2578         <abstract>
2579                 <a href="http://csclub.uwaterloo.ca/~askhader/">askhader's</a> house is at: <br/>
2580                 9 Cardill Cresent<br/>
2581                 Waterloo, ON<br/>
2582         </abstract>
2583 </eventitem>
2584 <eventitem date="2011-07-22" time="7 PM" room="Comfy Lounge" title="Code Party 3">
2585         <short>
2586                 <p>
2587                         The final Code Party of the term is here!  Come hack on some code,
2588                         solve some puzzles, and have some fun. The event starts in the evening and will run
2589                         all night.  You can show up for any portion of it.  You should bring a laptop, and
2590                         probably have something in mind to work on, though you're welcome with neither.
2591                 </p>
2592                 <p>
2593                         Snacks will be provided.  Everyone is welcome.
2594                 </p>
2595                 <p>
2596                         Please note this date is postponed from the originally scheduled date due to
2597                         conflicts with <a href="http://www.kitchenerribandbeerfest.com/">Kitchener Ribfest &amp; Craft Beer Show</a>
2598                 </p>
2599         </short>
2600 </eventitem>
2601
2602 <eventitem date="2011-07-20" time="4:30 PM" room="MC 2038" title="An Introduction to Steganography">
2603         <short>
2604                 <p>
2605                         As part of the CSC member talks series, Yomna Nasser will be presenting an introduction to steganography.
2606                         Steganography is the act of hiding information such that it can only be found by its intended recipient.
2607                         It has been practiced since ancient Greece, and is still in use today.
2608                 </p>
2609                 <p>
2610                         This talk will include an introduction to the area, history, and some basic techniques for hiding information
2611                         and detecting hidden data.  There will be an overview of some of the mathematics involved, but nothing too
2612                         rigorous.
2613                 </p>
2614         </short>
2615 </eventitem>
2616
2617 <eventitem date="2011-07-09" time="4 PM to 10PM" room="Columbia Lake Firepit"
2618         title="CSC Goes Outside">
2619         <short> <p> Do you like going outside?  Are you
2620                         vitamin-D deficient from being in the MC too long?  Do you think
2621                         marshmallows, hotdogs, and fire are a delicious combination?  </p>
2622
2623                 <p> If so, you should join us as the CSC is going outside!  </p>
2624
2625                 <p> Around 4PM, we're going to Columbia Lake for some outdoor fun.
2626                         We'll have Frisbees, kites, snacks, and some drinks.  We'll be
2627                         sticking around until dusk, when we're going to have a campfire
2628                         with marshmallows and hotdogs.  We plan to be there until 10PM, but
2629                         of course you're welcome to come for any subinterval.  </p>
2630         </short>
2631 </eventitem>
2632 <eventitem date="2011-07-04" time="1:30 PM" room="MC 5158" title="Our Troubles with Linux and Why You Should Care">
2633         <short>
2634                 <p>
2635                 A joint work between Professors Tim Brecht, Ashif Harji, and
2636                 Peter Buhr, this talk describes experiences using the Linux
2637                 kernel as a platform for conducting performance evaluations.
2638                 </p>
2639         </short>
2640         <abstract>
2641                 <p>
2642                 Linux provides researchers with a full-fledged operating system that is
2643                 widely used and open source. However, due to its complexity and rapid
2644                 development, care should be exercised when using Linux for performance
2645                 experiments, especially in systems research. The size and continual
2646                 evolution of the Linux code-base makes it difficult to understand, and
2647                 as a result, decipher and explain the reasons for performance
2648                 improvements. In addition, the rapid kernel development cycle means
2649                 that experimental results can be viewed as out of date, or meaningless,
2650                 very quickly. We demonstrate that this viewpoint is incorrect because
2651                 kernel changes can and have introduced both bugs and performance
2652                 degradations.
2653                 </p>
2654                 <p>
2655                 This talk describes some of our experiences using the Linux kernel as a
2656                 platform for conducting performance evaluations and some performance
2657                 regressions we have found. Our results show, these performance
2658                 regressions can be serious (e.g., repeating identical experiments
2659                 results in large variability in results) and long lived despite having
2660                 a large negative impact on performance (one problem appears to have
2661                 existed for more than 3 years). Based on these experiences, we argue
2662                 that it is often reasonable to use an older kernel version,
2663                 experimental results need careful analysis to explain why a change in
2664                 performance occurs, and publishing papers that validate prior research
2665                 is essential.
2666                 </p>
2667                 <p>
2668                 This is joint work with Ashif Harji and Peter Buhr.
2669                 </p>
2670                 <p>
2671                 This talk will be about 20-25 minutes long with lots of time for
2672                 questions and discussion afterwards.
2673                 </p>
2674         </abstract>
2675 </eventitem>
2676 <eventitem date="2011-06-24" time="7 PM" room="Comfy Lounge" title="Code Party 2">
2677         <short>
2678                 <p>
2679                         The second Code Party of the term takes place this Friday!  Come hack on some code,
2680                         solve some puzzles, and have some fun. The event starts in the evening and will run
2681                         all night.  You can show up for any portion of it.  You should bring a laptop, and
2682                         probably have something in mind to work on, though you're welcome with neither.
2683                 </p>
2684                 <p>
2685                         Snacks will be provided.
2686                 </p>
2687         </short>
2688 </eventitem>
2689 <eventitem date="2011-06-14" time="4:30 PM" room="MC 2054" title="Taming Software Bloat with AdaptableGIMP">
2690         <short>
2691                 Ever use software with 100s or 1000s of commands? Ever have a hard time
2692                 finding the right commands to perform your task? In this talk, we'll
2693                 present AdaptableGIMP, a new version of GIMP developed at Waterloo to
2694                 help simplify complex user interfaces.
2695         </short>
2696         <abstract>
2697                 <p>
2698                         Ever use software with 100s or 1000s of commands? Ever have a hard time
2699                         finding the right commands to perform your task? We have. And we have
2700                         some new ideas on how to deal with software bloat.
2701                 </p>
2702                 <p>
2703                         In this talk, we'll present AdaptableGIMP, a new version of GIMP
2704                         developed by the HCI Lab here at the University of Watreloo.
2705                         AdaptableGIMP introduces the notion of crowdsourced interface
2706                         customizations: Any user of the application can customize the interface
2707                         for performing a particular task, with that customization instantly
2708                         shared with all other users through a wiki at adaptablegimp.org. In the
2709                         talk, we'll demo this new version of GIMP and show how it can help
2710                         people work faster by simplifying feature-rich, complex user
2711                         interfaces.
2712                 </p>
2713         </abstract>
2714 </eventitem>
2715 <eventitem date="2011-06-09" time="4:30 PM" room="MC 2054"
2716         title="General Purpose Computing on Graphics Cards">
2717         <short>
2718                 In the first of our member talks for the term, Katie Hyatt will give a
2719                 short introduction to General Purpose Graphics Processing Unit
2720                 computing.  This expanding field has many applications. The primary
2721                 focus of this talk will be nVidia's CUDA architecture.
2722         </short>
2723         <abstract>
2724                 <p> This is the first of our member talks for the term, presented by
2725                         CSC member and Waterloo undergraduate student Katie Hyatt
2726                 </p>
2727                 <p>
2728                         GPGPU (general purpose graphics processing unit) computing is an
2729                         expanding area of interest, with applications in physics, chemistry,
2730                         applied math, finance, and other fields. nVidia has created an
2731                         architecture named CUDA to allow programmers to use graphics cards
2732                         without having to write PTX assembly or understand OpenGL. CUDA is
2733                         designed to allow for high-performance parallel computation controlled
2734                         from the CPU while granting the user fine control over the behaviour
2735                         and performance of the device.
2736                 </p>
2737
2738                 <p>
2739                         In this talk, I'll discuss the basics of nVidia's CUDA architecture
2740                         (with most emphasis on the CUDA C extensions), the GPGPU programming
2741                         environment, optimizing code written for the graphics card, algorithms
2742                         with noteworthy performance on GPU, libraries and tools available to
2743                         the GPGPU programmer, and some applications to condensed matter
2744                         physics. No physics background required!
2745                 </p>
2746         </abstract>
2747 </eventitem>
2748 <eventitem date="2011-06-03" time="7 PM" room="Comfy Lounge" title="Code Party 1">
2749         <short>
2750                 The Computer Science Club is having our first code party of the term.
2751                 The theme for this week's code party is personal projects. Come show us
2752                 what you've been working on! Of course, everybody is welcome, even if you
2753                 don't have a project.
2754         </short>
2755         <abstract>
2756                 The Computer Science Club is having our first code party of the term.
2757                 The theme for this week's code party is personal projects. Come show us
2758                 what you've been working on! Of course, everybody is welcome, even if you
2759                 don't have a project.
2760
2761                 Personal projects are a great way to flex your CS muscles, and learn interesting
2762                 and new things. Come out and have some fun!
2763
2764                 Two more are scheduled for later in the term.
2765         </abstract>
2766 </eventitem>
2767 <eventitem date="2011-05-09" time="5:31 PM" room="Comfy Lounge" title="Elections Nominees List">
2768     <short>
2769     <p>CSC Elections, final list of nominations for Spring 2011</p>
2770     </short>
2771     <abstract>
2772     <p>The nominations are:
2773     <ul>
2774     <li>President: jdonland, mimcpher, mthiffau</li>
2775     <li>Vice-President: jdonland, mimcpher</li>
2776     <li>Treasurer: akansong, kspaans</li>
2777     <li>Secretary: akansong, jdonland</li>
2778     </ul>
2779     </p>
2780     </abstract>
2781 </eventitem>
2782
2783 <eventitem date="2011-05-09" time="5:30 PM" room="Comfy Lounge" title="Elections">
2784     <short>
2785     <p>CSC Elections have begun for the Spring 2011 term, nominations are open!</p>
2786     </short>
2787     <abstract>
2788     <p>It's time to elect your CSC executive for the Spring 2011 term. The
2789        elections will be held on Monday May 9th at 5:30PM in the Comfy Lounge
2790        on the 3rd floor of the MC. Nominations can be sent to the Chief
2791        Returning Officer, <a href="mailto:cro@csclub.uwaterloo.ca">cro@csclub.uwaterloo.ca</a>.
2792        Nominations will be open until 4:30PM on Monday May 9th. You can also stop by the office in
2793        person to write your nominations on the white board.</p>
2794
2795     <p>The executive positions open for nomination are:
2796     <ul>
2797     <li>President</li>
2798     <li>Vice-President</li>
2799     <li>Treasurer</li>
2800     <li>Secretary</li>
2801     </ul>
2802        There are also numerous positions that will be appointed once the
2803        executive are elected including systems administrator, office manager,
2804        and librarian.</p>
2805
2806     <p>Everyone is encouraged to run if they are interested, regardless of
2807        program of study, age, or experience. If you can't make the election,
2808        that's OK too! You can give the CRO a statement to read on your
2809        behalf. If you can't make it or are out of town, your votes can be
2810        sent to the CRO in advance of the elections. For the list of nominees,
2811        watch the CSC website, or ask the CRO.</p>
2812
2813     <p>Good luck to our candidates!</p>
2814     </abstract>
2815 </eventitem>
2816
2817 <!-- Winter 2011 -->
2818 <eventitem date="2011-03-17" time="04:30 PM" room="MC2034" title="Software Patents">
2819
2820     <short><p><i>by Stanley Khaing</i>. What are the requirements for obtaining a patent? Should software be patentable?</p></short>
2821
2822 <abstract>
2823         <p>Stanley Khaing is a lawyer from Waterloo whose areas of practice are software and high technology. He will be discussing software patents. In particular, he will be addressing the following questions:</p>
2824         <ul>
2825         <li>What are the requirements for obtaining a patent?</li>
2826         <li>Should software be patentable?</li>
2827         </ul>
2828 </abstract>
2829
2830 </eventitem>
2831
2832 <eventitem date="2011-02-17" time="07:00 PM" room="MC2017" title="A Smorgasbord of Perl Talks">
2833
2834     <short><p><i>by KW Perl Mongers</i>. These talks are intended for programmers who are curious about the Swiss Army Chainsaw of languages, Perl.</p></short>
2835
2836 <abstract>
2837         <p>Tyler Slijboom will present:</p>
2838
2839         <ul>
2840         <li>Prototyping in Perl,</li>
2841         <li>Perl Default Variables,</li>
2842         <li>HOWTO on OO Programming, and</li>
2843         <li>HOWTO on Installing and Using Modules from CPAN</li>
2844         </ul>
2845
2846         <p>Daniel Allen will present:</p>
2847
2848         <ul>
2849         <li>Coping with Other Peoples' Code</li>
2850         </ul>
2851
2852         <p>Justin Wheeler will present:</p>
2853
2854         <ul>
2855         <li>Moose: a Modern Perl Framework</li>
2856         </ul>
2857 </abstract>
2858
2859 </eventitem>
2860
2861 <eventitem date="2011-02-09" time="04:30 PM" room="MC3003" title="UNIX 103: Version Control Systems">
2862
2863     <short><p><i>by Calum T. Dalek</i>. In this long-awaited third installment of the popular Unix Tutorials the friendly experts of the CSC will teach you the simple art of version control.
2864 </p></short>
2865
2866     <abstract><p>You will learn the purpose and use of two different Version Control Systems (git and subversion). This tutorial will advise you in the discipline of managing the source code of your projects and enable you to quickly learn new Version Control Systems in the work place -- a skill that is much sought after by employers.</p></abstract>
2867
2868 </eventitem>
2869
2870 <eventitem date="2011-02-04" time="07:00 PM" room="Comfy Lounge" title="Code Party">
2871
2872     <short><p><i>by Calum T. Dalek</i>. Come one, come all to the Code Party happening in the Comfy Lounge this Friday. The event starts at 7:00PM and will run through the night.</p></short>
2873
2874     <abstract><p>Why sleep when you could be hacking on $your_favourite_project or doing $something_classy in great company? Join us for a night of coding and comraderie! Food and caffeine will be provided.</p></abstract>
2875
2876 </eventitem>
2877
2878 <eventitem date="2011-02-02" time="04:30 PM" room="MC3003" title="UNIX 102: Documents and Editing in the Unix environment">
2879
2880     <short><p><i>by Calum T. Dalek</i>. The next installment in the CS Club's popular Unix tutorials UNIX 102 introduces powerful text editing tools for programming and document formatting.
2881 </p></short>
2882
2883     <abstract><p>Unix 102 is a follow up to Unix 101, requiring basic knowledge of the shell. If you missed Unix 101 but still know your way around you should be fine. Topics covered include: "real" editors, document typesetting with LaTeX (great for assignments!), bulk editing, spellchecking, and printing in the student environment and elsewhere. If you aren't interested or feel comfortable with these tasks, watch out for Unix 103 and 104 to get more depth in power programming tools on Unix.</p></abstract>
2884
2885 </eventitem>
2886
2887 <eventitem date="2011-01-26" time="04:30 PM" room="MC3003" title="UNIX 101: An Introduction to the Shell">
2888
2889     <short><p><i>by Calum T. Dalek</i>. New to Unix? No problem, we'll teach you to power use circles around your friends!
2890 </p></short>
2891
2892
2893     <abstract><p>This first tutorial is an introduction to the Unix shell environment, both on the student
2894 servers and on other Unix environments. Topics covered include: using the shell, both basic
2895 interaction and advanced topics like scripting and job control, the filesystem and manipulating
2896 it, and ssh. If you feel you're already familiar with these topics don't hesitate to come
2897 to Unix 102 to learn about documents, editing, and other related tasks, or watch out
2898 for Unix 103 and 104 that get much more in depth into power programming tools on Unix.
2899 </p></abstract>
2900
2901 </eventitem>
2902
2903
2904 <!-- Fall 2010 -->
2905 <eventitem date="2010-11-17" time="04:30 PM" room="MC4061" title="Mathematics and aesthetics in maze design">
2906
2907     <short><p><i>by Dr. Craig S. Kaplan</i>. In this talk, I discuss the role of the computer in the process of designing mazes.  I present some well known algorithms for maze construction, and more recent research that attempts to novel mazes with non-trivial mathematical or aesthetic properties.
2908 </p></short>
2909
2910
2911     <abstract><p>For thousands of years, mazes and labyrinths have played
2912 an important role in human culture and myth.  Today, solving
2913 mazes is a popular pastime, whether with pencil on paper
2914 or by navigating through a cornfield.
2915 </p><p>The construction of compelling mazes encompasses a variety of
2916 challenges in mathematics, algorithm design, and aesthetics.
2917 The maze should be visually attractive, but it should also be
2918 an engaging puzzle.  Master designers balance these two goals
2919 with wonderful results.
2920 </p><p>In this talk, I discuss the role of the computer in the process
2921 of designing mazes.  I present some well known algorithms for
2922 maze construction, and more recent research that attempts to
2923 novel mazes with non-trivial mathematical or aesthetic properties.
2924 </p></abstract>
2925
2926 </eventitem>
2927 <eventitem date="2010-11-13" time="12:00 PM" room="Outside DC" title="CSC Invades Toronto">
2928
2929     <short><p>The CSC is going to Toronto to visit UofT's <a href="http://cssu.cdf.toronto.edu/">CSSU</a>, see what they do, and have beer with them.
2930             If you would like to come along, please come by the office and sign up. The cost for the trip is $2 per member.
2931
2932         The bus will be leaving from the Davis Center (DC) Saturday Nov. 13 at NOON (some people may have been told 1pm, this is an error). Please show up a few minutes early so we may
2933             board.</p></short>
2934
2935 </eventitem>
2936
2937 <eventitem date="2010-11-05" time="07:00 PM" room="CnD Lounge (MC3002)" title="Hackathon">
2938
2939     <short><p>Come join the CSC for a night of code, music with only 8 bits, and comradarie. We will be in the C&amp;D Lounge from 7pm until 7am working on personal projects, open source projects, and whatever else comes to mind. If you're interested in getting involved in free/open source development, some members will be on hand to guide you through the process.
2940 </p></short>
2941
2942
2943     <abstract><p>Come join the CSC for a night of code, music with only 8 bits, and comradarie. We will be
2944 in the C&amp;D Lounge from 7pm until 7am working on personal projects, open source projects, and
2945 whatever else comes to mind. If you're interested in getting involved in free/open source development,
2946 some members will be on hand to guide you through the process.
2947 </p></abstract>
2948
2949 </eventitem>
2950
2951 <eventitem date="2010-10-26" time="04:30 PM" room="MC4040" title="Analysis of randomized algorithms via the probabilistic method">
2952
2953     <short><p>In this talk, we will give a few examples that illustrate the basic method and show  how it can be used to prove the existence of objects with desirable combinatorial  properties as well as produce them in expected polynomial time via randomized  algorithms.  Our main goal will be to present a very slick proof from 1995 due to  Spencer on the performance of a randomized greedy algorithm for a set-packing  problem.  Spencer, for seemingly no reason, introduces a time variable into his  greedy algorithm and treats set-packing as a Poisson process.  Then, like magic,  he is able to show that his greedy algorithm is very likely to produce a good  result using basic properties of expected value.
2954 </p></short>
2955
2956
2957     <abstract><p>The probabilistic method is an extremely powerful tool in combinatorics that can be
2958 used to prove many surprising results.  The idea is the following: to prove that an
2959 object with a certain property exists, we define a distribution of possible objects
2960 and use show that, among objects in the distribution, the property holds with
2961 non-zero probability.  The key is that by using the tools and techniques of
2962 probability theory, we can vastly simplify proofs that would otherwise require very
2963 complicated combinatorial arguments.
2964 </p><p>As a technique, the probabilistic method developed rapidly during the latter half of
2965 the 20th century due to the efforts of mathematicians like Paul Erdős and increasing
2966 interest in the role of randomness in theoretical computer science.  In essence, the
2967 probabilistic method allows us to determine how good a randomized algorithm's output
2968 is likely to be.  Possibly applications range from graph property testing to
2969 computational geometry, circuit complexity theory, game theory, and even statistical
2970 physics.
2971 </p><p>In this talk, we will give a few examples that illustrate the basic method and show
2972 how it can be used to prove the existence of objects with desirable combinatorial
2973 properties as well as produce them in expected polynomial time via randomized
2974 algorithms.  Our main goal will be to present a very slick proof from 1995 due to
2975 Spencer on the performance of a randomized greedy algorithm for a set-packing
2976 problem.  Spencer, for seemingly no reason, introduces a time variable into his
2977 greedy algorithm and treats set-packing as a Poisson process.  Then, like magic,
2978 he is able to show that his greedy algorithm is very likely to produce a good
2979 result using basic properties of expected value.
2980 </p><p>Properties of Poisson and Binomial distributions will be applied, but I'll remind
2981 everyone of the needed background for the benefit of those who might be a bit rusty.
2982 Stat 230 will be more than enough. Big O notation will be used, but not excessively.
2983 </p></abstract>
2984
2985 </eventitem>
2986
2987 <eventitem date="2010-10-19" time="04:30 PM" room="RCH 306" title="Machine learning vs human learning - will scientists become obsolete?">
2988
2989     <short><p><i>by Dr. Shai Ben-David</i>.
2990 </p></short>
2991
2992
2993     <abstract><p>
2994 </p></abstract>
2995
2996 </eventitem>
2997
2998 <eventitem date="2010-10-13" time="04:30 PM" room="MC3003" title="UNIX 102">
2999
3000     <short><p>This installment in the CS Club's popular Unix tutorials UNIX 102 introduces powerful text editing tools for programming and document formatting.
3001 </p></short>
3002
3003
3004     <abstract><p>Unix 102 is a follow up to Unix 101, requiring basic knowledge of the shell.
3005 If you missed Unix101 but still know your way around you should be fine.
3006 Topics covered include: "real" editors, document typesetting with LaTeX
3007 (great for assignments!), bulk editing, spellchecking, and printing in the
3008 student environment and elsewhere.
3009 </p></abstract>
3010
3011 </eventitem>
3012 <eventitem date="2010-10-06" time="04:30 PM" room="MC3003" title="UNIX 103">
3013
3014     <short><p>Unix 103 will cover version control systems and how to use them to manage your projects. Unix 101 would be helpful, but all that is needed is basic  knowledge of the Unix command line (how to enter commands).
3015 </p></short>
3016
3017
3018     <abstract><p>Unix 103 will cover version control systems and how to use them to manage
3019 your projects. Unix 101 would be helpful, but all that is needed is basic
3020 knowledge of the Unix command line (how to enter commands).
3021 </p></abstract>
3022
3023 </eventitem>
3024
3025 <eventitem date="2010-10-12" time="04:30 PM" room="MC4061" title="How to build a brain: From single neurons to cognition">
3026
3027     <short><p><i>By Dr. Chris Eliasmith</i>. Theoretical neuroscience is a new discipline focused on constructing mathematical models of brain function.  It has made significant headway in understanding aspects of the neural code.  However, past work has largely focused on small numbers of neurons, and so the underlying representations are often simple. In this talk I demonstrate how the ideas underlying these simple forms of representation can underwrite a representational hierarchy that scales to support sophisticated, structure-sensitive representations.
3028 </p></short>
3029
3030
3031     <abstract><p><i>By Dr. Chris Eliasmith</i>. Theoretical neuroscience is a new discipline focused on constructing
3032 mathematical models of brain function.  It has made significant
3033 headway in understanding aspects of the neural code.  However,
3034 past work has largely focused on small numbers of neurons, and
3035 so the underlying representations are often simple. In this
3036 talk I demonstrate how the ideas underlying these simple forms of
3037 representation can underwrite a representational hierarchy that
3038 scales to support sophisticated, structure-sensitive
3039 representations.  I will present a general architecture, the semantic
3040 pointer architecture (SPA), which is built on this hierarchy
3041 and allows the manipulation, processing, and learning of structured
3042 representations in neurally realistic models.  I demonstrate the
3043 architecture on Progressive Raven's Matrices (RPM), a test of
3044 general fluid intelligence.
3045 </p></abstract>
3046
3047 </eventitem>
3048
3049 <eventitem date="2010-10-04" time="04:30 PM" room="MC4021" title="BareMetal OS">
3050
3051     <short><p><i>By Ian Seyler, Return to Infinity</i>. BareMetal is a new 64-bit OS for x86-64 based computers. The OS is written entirely in Assembly,  while applications can be written in Assembly or C/C++.  High Performance Computing is the main target application.
3052 </p></short>
3053
3054
3055     <abstract><p><i>By Ian Seyler, Return to Infinity</i>. BareMetal is a new 64-bit OS for x86-64 based computers. The OS is written entirely in Assembly,
3056 while applications can be written in Assembly or C/C++.
3057 High Performance Computing is the main target application.
3058 </p></abstract>
3059
3060 </eventitem>
3061
3062 <eventitem date="2010-09-28" time="04:30 PM" room="MC4061" title="A Brief Introduction to Video Encoding">
3063
3064     <short><p><i>By Peter Barfuss</i>. In this talk, I will go over the concepts used in video encoding (such as motion estimation/compensation, inter- and intra- frame prediction, quantization and entropy encoding), and then demonstrate these concepts and algorithms in use in the MPEG-2 and the H.264 video codecs. In addition, some clever optimization tricks using SIMD/vectorization will be covered, assuming sufficient time to cover these topics.
3065 </p></short>
3066
3067
3068     <abstract><p><i>By Peter Barfuss</i>. With the recent introduction of digital TV and the widespread success
3069 of video sharing websites such as youtube, it is clear that the task
3070 of lossily compressing video with good quality has become important.
3071 Similarly, the complex algorithms involved require high amounts of
3072 optimization in order to run fast, another important requirement for
3073 any video codec that aims to be widely used/adopted.
3074 </p><p>In this talk, I
3075 will go over the concepts used in video encoding (such as motion
3076 estimation/compensation, inter- and intra- frame prediction,
3077 quantization and entropy encoding), and then demonstrate these
3078 concepts and algorithms in use in the MPEG-2 and the H.264 video
3079 codecs. In addition, some clever optimization tricks using
3080 SIMD/vectorization will be covered, assuming sufficient time to cover
3081 these topics.
3082 </p></abstract>
3083
3084 </eventitem>
3085
3086 <eventitem date="2010-09-23" time="04:30 PM" room="DC1301 (The Fishbowl)" title="Calling all CS Frosh">
3087
3088     <short><p>Come meet and greet your professors, advisors, and the heads of the school. Talk to the CSC executive and other upper year students about CS at Waterloo. Free food and beverages will also be available, so there is really no excuse to miss this.
3089 </p></short>
3090
3091
3092     <abstract><p>Come meet and greet your professors, advisors, and the heads of the school.
3093 Talk to the CSC executive and other upper year students about CS at Waterloo.
3094 Free food and beverages will also be available, so there is really no excuse
3095 to miss this.
3096 </p></abstract>
3097
3098 </eventitem>
3099 <eventitem date="2010-09-29" time="04:30 PM" room="MC3003" title="Unix 101">
3100
3101     <short><p>Need to use the Unix environment for a course, want to overcome your fears of the command line, or just curious? Attend the first installment in the CSC's popular series of Unix tutorials to learn the basics of the shell and how to navigate the unix environment. By the end of the hands on workshop you will be able to work efficiently from the command line and power-use circles around your friends.
3102 </p></short>
3103
3104
3105     <abstract><p>Need to use the Unix environment for a course, want to overcome your fears of
3106 the command line, or just curious? Attend the first installment in the CSC's
3107 popular series of Unix tutorails to learn the basics of the shell and how to
3108 navigate the unix environment. By the end of the hands on workshop you will
3109 be able to work efficiently from the command line and power-use circles around
3110 your friends.
3111 </p></abstract>
3112
3113 </eventitem>
3114
3115 <eventitem date="2010-09-22" time="06:00 PM" room="MC4045" title="Cooking for Geeks">
3116
3117     <short><p>The CSC is happy to be hosting Jeff Potter, author of "Cooking for Geeks" for a presentation on the finer arts of food science.  Jeff's book has been featured on NPR, BBC and his presentations have wowed audiences of hackers &amp; foodies alike. We're happy to have Jeff joining us for a hands on demonstration.
3118 </p></short>
3119
3120
3121     <abstract><p>The CSC is happy to be hosting Jeff Potter, author of "Cooking for Geeks" for a presentation on the finer arts of food science.
3122 Jeff's book has been featured on NPR, BBC and his presentations have wowed audiences of hackers &amp; foodies alike.
3123 We're happy to have Jeff joining us for a hands on demonstration.
3124 </p><p>But you don't have to take our word for it... here's what Jeff has to say:
3125 </p><p>Hi! I'm Jeff Potter, author of Cooking for Geeks (O'Reilly Media, 2010), and I'm doing a "D.I.Y. Book Tour" to talk
3126 about my just-released book. I'll talk about the food science behind what makes things yummy, giving you a quick
3127 primer on how to go into the kitchen and have a fun time turning out a good meal.
3128 Depending upon the space, I’ll also bring along some equipment or food that we can experiment with, and give you a chance to play with stuff and pester me with questions.
3129 </p><p>If you have a copy of the book, bring it! I’ll happily sign it.
3130 </p></abstract>
3131
3132 </eventitem>
3133 <eventitem date="2010-09-21" time="04:30 PM" room="MC4061" title="In the Beginning">
3134
3135     <short><p><b>by Dr. Prabhakar Ragde, Cheriton School of Computer Science</b>. I'll be workshopping some lecture ideas involving representations of
3136     numbers, specification of computation in  functional terms, reasoning about
3137     such specifications, and comparing the strengths and weaknesses of  different approaches.
3138 </p></short>
3139
3140
3141     <abstract><p>I'll be workshopping some lecture ideas involving representations
3142     of numbers, specification of computation in
3143     functional terms, reasoning about such specifications, and comparing the
3144     strengths and weaknesses of
3145     different approaches. No prior background is needed; the talk should be accessible
3146     to anyone attending
3147     the University of Waterloo and, I hope, interesting to both novices and experts.
3148 </p></abstract>
3149
3150 </eventitem>
3151 <eventitem date="2010-09-14" time="04:30 PM" room="Comfy Lounge" title="Elections">
3152   <short><p>Fall term executive elections and general meeting.</p></short>
3153 </eventitem>
3154
3155 <!-- Spring 2010 -->
3156
3157 <eventitem date="2010-07-20" time="04:30 PM" room="MC2066" title="The Incompressibility Method">
3158 <short>
3159 In this talk, we shall explore the incompressibility method---an interesting and
3160 extremely powerful framework for determining the average-case runtime of
3161 algorithms.  Within the right background knowledge, the heapsort question can be
3162 answered with an elegant 3-line proof.
3163 </short>
3164 <abstract>
3165 <p>Heapsort. It runs in $\Theta(n \log n)$ time in the worst case, and in $O(n)$
3166     time in the best case.  Do you think that heapsort runs faster than $O(n
3167     \log n)$ time on average?  Could it be possible that on most inputs,
3168     heapsort runs in $O(n)$ time, running more slowly only on a small fraction
3169     of inputs?</p>
3170 <p>Most students would say no. It "feels" intuitively obvious that heapsort
3171     should take the full $n \log n$ steps on most inputs.  However, proving this
3172     rigourously with probabilistic arguments turns out to be very difficult.
3173     Average case analysis of algorithms is one of those icky subjects that most
3174     students don't want to touch with a ten foot pole; why should it be so
3175     difficult if it is so intuitively obvious?</p>
3176 <p>In this talk, we shall explore the incompressibility method---an interesting
3177     and extremely powerful framework for determining the average-case runtime of
3178     algorithms.  Within the right background knowledge, the heapsort question
3179     can be answered with an elegant 3-line proof.</p>
3180 <p>The crucial fact is that an overwhelmingly large fraction of randomly
3181     generated objects are incompressible. We can show that the inputs to
3182     heapsort that run quickly correspond to inputs that can be compressed,
3183     thereby proving that heapsort can't run quickly on average.  Of course,
3184     "compressible" is something that must be rigourously defined, and for this
3185     we turn to the fascinating theory of Kolmogorov complexity.</p>
3186 <p>In this talk, we'll briefly discuss the proof of the incompressibility
3187     theorem and then see a number of applications.  We won't dwell too much on
3188     gruesome mathemtical details.  No specific background is required, but
3189     knowledge of some of the topics in CS240 will be helpful in understanding
3190     some of the applications.</p>
3191 </abstract>
3192 </eventitem>
3193
3194 <eventitem date="2010-07-13" time="04:30 PM" room="MC2066" title="Halftoning and Digital Art">
3195     <short><p>Edgar Bering will be giving a talk titled: Halftoning and Digital Art</p></short>
3196     <abstract><p>Halftoning is the process of simulating a continuous tone image
3197         with small dots or regions of one colour. Halftoned images may be seen
3198         in older newspapers with a speckled appearance, and to this day colour
3199         halftoning is used in printers to reproduce images. In this talk I will
3200         present various algorithmic approaches to halftoning, with an eye not
3201         toward exact image reproduction but non-photorealistic rendering and
3202         art. Included in the talk will be an introduction to digital paper
3203         cutting and a tutorial on how to use the CSC's paper cutter to render
3204         creations.
3205 </p></abstract>
3206 </eventitem>
3207
3208
3209 <eventitem date="2010-07-09" time="07:00 PM" room="MC Comfy" title="Code Party">
3210     <short><p>There is a CSC Code Party Friday starting at 7:00PM (1900)
3211             until we get bored (likely in the early in morning). Come out for
3212             fun hacking times.
3213     </p></short>
3214     <abstract><p>There is a CSC Code Party Friday starting at 7:00PM (1900)
3215             until we get bored (likely in the early in morning). Come out for
3216             fun hacking times.
3217     </p></abstract>
3218 </eventitem>
3219
3220 <eventitem date="2010-07-06" time="04:30 PM" room="MC2054" title="Dataflow Analysis">
3221   <short><p>Nomair Naeem, a P.H.D. Student at Waterloo, will be giving a talk about Dataflow Analysis</p></short>
3222   <abstract><p>
3223     After going through an introduction to Lattice Theory and a formal treatment to
3224     Dataflow Analysis Frameworks, we will take an in-depth view of the
3225     Interprocedural Finite Distributive Subset (IFDS) Algorithm which implements a
3226     fully context-sensitive, inter-procedural static dataflow analysis. Then, using
3227     a Variable Type Analysis as an example, I will outline recent extensions that we
3228     have made to open up the analysis to a larger variety of static analysis
3229     problems and making it more efficient.
3230     </p><p>
3231     The talk is self-contained and no prior knowledge of program analysis is
3232     necessary.
3233   </p></abstract>
3234 </eventitem>
3235
3236 <eventitem date="2010-06-22" time="04:30 PM" room="MC2066" title="Compiling To Combinators">
3237   <short><p>Professor Ragde will be giving the first of our Professor talks for the Spring 2010 term.</p></short>
3238   <abstract><p>
3239     Number theory was thought to be mathematically appealing but practically
3240     useless until the RSA encryption algorithm demonstrated its considerable
3241     utility. I'll outline how combinatory logic (dating back to 1920) has a
3242     similarly unexpected application to efficient and effective compilation,
3243     which directly catalyzed the development of lazy functional programming
3244     languages such as Haskell. The talk is self-contained; no prior knowledge
3245     of functional programming is necessary.
3246   </p></abstract>
3247 </eventitem>
3248
3249 <eventitem date="2010-05-25" time="05:00 PM" room="MC2066" title="Gerald Sussman">
3250   <short><p>Why Programming is a Good Medium for Expressing Poorly Understood and Sloppily Formulated Ideas</p></short>
3251   <abstract>Full details found <a href="http://csclub.uwaterloo.ca/misc/sussman/">here</a></abstract>
3252 </eventitem>
3253
3254 <eventitem date="2010-05-26" time="03:30 PM" room="MC5136" title="Gerald Sussman">
3255   <short><p>Public Reception</p></short>
3256   <abstract>Full details found <a href="http://csclub.uwaterloo.ca/misc/sussman/">here</a></abstract>
3257 </eventitem>
3258
3259 <eventitem date="2010-05-26" time="05:000PM" room="MC5158" title="Gerald Sussman">
3260   <short><p>The Art of the Propagator</p></short>
3261   <abstract>Full details found <a href="http://csclub.uwaterloo.ca/misc/sussman/">here</a></abstract>
3262 </eventitem>
3263
3264 <eventitem date="2010-05-11" time="05:30 PM" room="Comfy Lounge" title="Elections">
3265   <short><p>Spring term executive elections and general meeting.</p></short>
3266 </eventitem>
3267
3268 <!-- Winter 2010 -->
3269 <eventitem date="2010-04-06" time="04:30 PM" room="DC1304" title="Brush-Based Constructive Solid Geometry">
3270
3271     <short><p>The last talk in the CS10 series will be presented by Jordan Saunders, in which he will discuss methods for processing brush-based constructive solid geometry.
3272 </p></short>
3273
3274
3275     <abstract><p>For some would-be graphics programmers, the biggest barrier-to-entry is getting data to render. This is why there exist so
3276 many terrain renderers: by virtue of the fact that rendering height-fields tends to give pretty pictures from next to no
3277 "created" information. However, it becomes more difficult when programmers want to do indoor rendering (in the style of the
3278 Quake and Unreal games). Ripping map information from the Quake games is possible (and fairly simple), but their tool-chain
3279 is fairly clumsy from the point of view of adding a conversion utility.
3280 </p><p>My talk is about Constructive Solid Geometry from a Brush-based perspective (nearly identical to Unreal's and still very similar
3281 to Quake's). The basic idea is that there are brushes (convex volumes in 3-space) and they can either be additive (solid brushes)
3282 or subtractive (hollow, or air brushes). The entire world starts off as an infinite solid lump and you can start removing sections
3283 of it then adding them back in. The talk pertains to fast methods of taking the list of brushes and generating world geometry. I may
3284 touch on interface problems with the editor, but the primary content will be the different ways I generated the geometry and what I found to be best.
3285 </p></abstract>
3286
3287 </eventitem>
3288 <eventitem date="2010-04-07" time="1:00 PM" room="MC2037" title="Windows Azure Lab">
3289
3290     <short><p>Get the opportunity to learn about Microsoft's Cloud Services Platform, Windows Azure.   Attend this Hands-on-lab session sponsored by Microsoft.
3291 </p></short>
3292
3293
3294     <abstract><p>We are in the midst of an industry shift as developers and businesses embrace the Cloud.
3295 Technical innovations in the cloud are dramatically changing the economics of computing
3296 and reducing barriers that keep businesses from meeting the increasing demands of
3297 today's customers.  The cloud promises choice and enables scenarios that previously
3298 were not economically practical.
3299 </p><p>Microsoft's Windows Azure is an internet-scale cloud computing services platform hosted
3300 in Microsoft data centers.  The Windows Azure platform, allows developers to build and
3301 deploy production ready cloud services and applications. With the Windows Azure platform,
3302 developers can take advantage of greater choice and flexibility in how they develop and
3303 deploy applications, while using familiar tools and programming languages.
3304 </p><p>Get the opportunity to learn about Microsoft's Cloud Services Platform, Windows Azure.
3305 Attend the Hands-on-lab session sponsored by Microsoft.
3306 </p></abstract>
3307
3308 </eventitem>
3309 <eventitem date="2010-04-01" time="6:30 PM" room="CSC Office" title="CTRL-D">
3310
3311     <short><p>Once again the CSC will be holding its traditional end of term dinner. It will be at the Vice President's house. If you don't know how to get there meet at the club office at 6:30 PM, a group will be leaving from the MC then. The dinner will be potluck style so bring a dish for 4-6 people, or some plates or pop or something.
3312 </p></short>
3313
3314
3315     <abstract><p>Once again the CSC will be holding its traditional end of term dinner. It will
3316 be at the Vice President's house. If you don't know how to get there meet
3317 at the club office at 6:30 PM, a group will be leaving from the MC then. The
3318 dinner will be potluck style so bring a dish for 4-6 people, or some plates
3319 or pop or something.
3320 </p></abstract>
3321
3322 </eventitem>
3323 <eventitem date="2010-03-30" time="4:30 PM" room="DC1304" title="NUI: The future of robotics and automated systems">
3324
3325     <short><p>Member Sam Pasupalak will present some of his ongoing work in Natural User Interfaces and Robotics in this sixth installment of CS10.
3326 </p></short>
3327
3328
3329     <abstract><p>Bill Gates in his article “A Robot in every home” in the Scientific American describes how the current
3330 robotics industry resembles the 1970’s of the Personal Computer Industry. In fact it is not just
3331 Microsoft which has already taken a step forward by starting the Microsoft Robotics studio, but robotics
3332 researchers around the world believe that robotics and automation systems are going to be ubiquitous in
3333 the next 10-20 years (similar to Mark Weiser’s analogy of Personal Computers 20 years ago). Natural User
3334 Interfaces (NUIs) are going to revolutionize the way we interact with computers, cellular phones, household
3335 appliances, automated systems in our daily lives. Just like the GUI made personal computing a reality,
3336 I believe natural user interfaces will do the same for robotics.
3337 </p><p>During the presentation I will be presenting my ongoing software project on natural user interfaces as well
3338 as sharing my goals for the future, one of which is to provide an NUI SDK and the other to provide a common
3339 Robotics OS for every hardware vendor that will enable people to make applications without worrying about
3340 underlying functionality. If time permits I would like to present a demo of my software prototype.
3341 </p></abstract>
3342
3343 </eventitem>
3344 <eventitem date="2010-03-26" time="7:00 PM" room="MC7001" title="A Final Party of Code">
3345
3346     <short><p>There is a CSC/CMC Code Party Friday starting at 7:00PM (1900) until we get bored (likely in the early in morning). Come out for fun hacking times, spreading Intertube memes (optional), hacking on open source projects, doing some computational math, and other general classiness. There will be free energy drinks for everyone's enjoyment. This is the last of the term so don't miss out.
3347 </p></short>
3348
3349
3350     <abstract><p>There is a CSC/CMC Code Party Friday starting at 7:00PM (1900) until we
3351 get bored (likely in the early in morning). Come out for fun hacking
3352 times, spreading Intertube memes (optional), hacking on open source projects,
3353 doing some computational math, and other
3354 general classiness. There will be free energy drinks for everyone's
3355 enjoyment. This is the last of the term so don't miss out.
3356 </p></abstract>
3357
3358 </eventitem>
3359 <eventitem date="2010-03-23" time="4:30 PM" room="MC5158" title="Memory-Corruption Security Holes: How to exploit, patch and prevent them.">
3360
3361     <short><p>Despite it being 2010, code is still being exploited due to stack overflows, a 40+ year old class of security vulnerabilities. In this talk, I will go over several common methods of program exploitation, both on the stack and on the heap, as well as going over some of the current mitigation techniques (i.e. stack canaries, ASLR, etc.) for these holes, and similarly, how some of these can be bypassed as well.
3362 </p></short>
3363
3364
3365     <abstract><p>Despite it being 2010, code is still being exploited due to
3366 stack overflows, a 40+ year old class of security vulnerabilities. In
3367 this talk, I will go over several common methods of program
3368 exploitation, both on the stack and on the heap, as well as going over
3369 some of the current mitigation techniques (i.e. stack canaries, ASLR,
3370 etc.) for these holes, and similarly, how some of these can be
3371 bypassed as well.
3372 </p></abstract>
3373
3374 </eventitem>
3375 <eventitem date="2010-03-19" time="7:00 PM" room="Comfy Lounge" title="Another Party of Code">
3376
3377     <short><p>There is a CSC Code Party Friday starting at 7:00PM (1900) until we get bored (likely in the early in morning). Come out for fun hacking times, spreading Intertube memes (optional), hacking on the OpenMoko, creating music mixes, and other general classiness. There will be free energy drinks for everyone's enjoyment.
3378 </p></short>
3379
3380
3381     <abstract><p>There is a CSC Code Party Friday starting at 7:00PM (1900) until we
3382 get bored (likely in the early in morning). Come out for fun hacking
3383 times, spreading Intertube memes (optional), hacking on the OpenMoko,
3384 creating music mixes, and other
3385 general classiness. There will be free energy drinks for everyone's
3386 enjoyment.
3387 </p></abstract>
3388
3389 </eventitem>
3390 <eventitem date="2010-03-16" time="4:30 PM" room="MC5158" title="Approximation Hardness and the Unique Games Conjecture">
3391
3392     <short><p>The fifth installment in CS10: Undergraduate Seminars in CS, features CSC member Elyot Grant introducing the theory of approximation algorithms. Fun times and a lack of gruesome math are promised.
3393 </p></short>
3394
3395
3396     <abstract><p>The theory of NP-completeness suggests that some problems in CS are inherently hard—that is,
3397 there is likely no possible algorithm that can efficiently solve them.  Unfortunately, many of
3398 these problems are ones that people in the real world genuinely want to solve!  How depressing!
3399 What can one do when faced with a real-life industrial optimization problem whose solution may
3400 save millions of dollars but is probably impossible to determine without trillions of
3401 years of computation time?
3402 </p><p>One strategy is to be content with an approximate (but provably "almost ideal") solution, and from
3403 here arises the theory of approximation algorithms.  However, this theory also has a depressing side,
3404 as many well-known optimization problems have been shown to be provably hard to approximate well.
3405 </p><p>This talk shall focus on the depressing.  We will prove that various optimization problems (such as
3406 traveling salesman and max directed disjoint paths) are impossible to approximate well unless P=NP.
3407 These proofs are easy to understand and are REALLY COOL thanks to their use of very slick reductions.
3408 </p><p>We shall explore many NP-hard optimization problems and state the performance of the best known
3409 approximation algorithms and best known hardness results.  Tons of open problems will be mentioned,
3410 including the unique games conjecture, which, if proven true, implies the optimality of many of the
3411 best known approximation algorithms for NP-complete problems like MAX-CUT and INDEPENDENT SET.
3412 </p><p>I promise fun times and no gruesome math.  Basic knowledge of graph theory and computational
3413 complexity might help but is not required.
3414 </p></abstract>
3415
3416 </eventitem>
3417 <eventitem date="2010-03-12" time="7:00 PM" room="Comfy Lounge" title="A Party of Code">
3418
3419     <short><p>A fevered night of code, friends, fun, energy drinks, and the CSC.
3420 </p></short>
3421
3422
3423     <abstract><p>A fevered night of code, friends, fun, energy drinks, and the CSC.
3424 </p><p>Come join us for a night of coding. Get in touch with more experianced coders,
3425 advertize for/bug squash on your favourite open source project, write that personal
3426 project you were planning to do for a while but haven't found the time. Don't
3427 have any ideas but want to sit and hack? We can find something for you to do.
3428 </p></abstract>
3429
3430 </eventitem>
3431
3432 <eventitem date="2010-03-09" time="4:30 PM" room="DC1304" title="Software Transactional Memory and Using STM in Haskell">
3433
3434     <short><p>The fourth Undergraduate Seminar in Computer Science will be presented by Brennan Taylor, a club member. He will be discussing various concurrent computing problems, and introducing Software Transactional Memory as a solution to them.
3435 </p></short>
3436
3437
3438     <abstract><p>Concurrency is hard. Well maybe not hard, but it sure is annoying to get right. Even the
3439 simplest of synchronization tasks are hard to implement correctly when using synchronization
3440 primitives such as locks and semaphores.
3441 </p><p>In this talk we explore what Software Transactional Memory (STM) is, what problems STM solves,
3442 and how to use STM in Haskell. We explore a number of examples that show how easy STM is to use
3443 and how expressive Haskell can be. The goal of this talk is to convince attendees that STM is
3444 not only a viable synchronization solution, but superior to how synchronization is typically
3445 done today.
3446 </p></abstract>
3447
3448 </eventitem>
3449 <eventitem date="2010-03-06" time="5:00 PM" room="Waterloo Bowling Lanes" title="Bowling">
3450     <short><p>The CSC is going bowling. $9.75 for shoes and two games. The bowling alley serves fried food and beer. Join us for
3451     some or all of the above</p></short>
3452 </eventitem>
3453
3454 <eventitem date="2010-03-02" time="4:30 PM" room="DC1304" title="QIP=PSPACE">
3455
3456     <short><p>Dr. John Watrous of the <a href="http://www.iqc.ca">IQC</a> will present his recent result "QIP=PSPACE". The talk will not assume any familiarity with quantum computing or complexity theory, and light refreshments will be provided.
3457 </p></short>
3458
3459
3460     <abstract><p>The interactive proof system model of computation is a cornerstone of
3461 complexity theory, and its quantum computational variant has been
3462 studied in quantum complexity theory for the past decade.  In this
3463 talk I will discuss an exact characterization of the power of quantum
3464 interactive proof systems that I recently proved in collaboration with
3465 Rahul Jain, Zhengfeng Ji, and Sarvagya Upadhyay.  The characterization
3466 states that the collection of computational problems having quantum
3467 interactive proof systems consists precisely of those problems
3468 solvable with an ordinary classical computer using a polynomial amount
3469 of memory (or QIP = PSPACE in complexity-theoretic terminology).  This
3470 characterization implies the striking fact that quantum computing does
3471 not provide any increase in computational power over classical
3472 computing in the context of interactive proof systems.
3473 </p><p>I will not assume that the audience for this talk has any familiarity
3474 with either quantum computing or complexity theory; and to be true to
3475 the spirit of the interactive proof system model, I hope to make this
3476 talk as interactive as possible -- I will be happy to explain anything
3477 related to the talk that I can that people are interested in learning
3478 about.
3479 </p></abstract>
3480
3481 </eventitem>
3482 <eventitem date="2010-02-26" time="7:00 PM" room="CnD Lounge" title="Contest Closing">
3483     <short><p>The <a href="http://contest.csclub.uwaterloo.ca">contest</a> is coming to a close tomorrow, so to finish it in style we will be having ice cream and code friday night.
3484     It would be a shame if Waterloo lost (we're not on top of the <a href="http://csclub.uwaterloo.ca/contest/rankings.php">leaderboard</a> right now) so come out and hack for the home team.</p></short>
3485 </eventitem>
3486
3487 <eventitem date="2010-02-25" time="4:30 PM" room="DC1302" title="CSCF Town Hall">
3488
3489     <short><p>Come to a town hall style meeting with the managers of CSCF to discuss how to improve the undergraduate (student.cs) computing environment. Have gripes? Suggestions? Requests? Now is the time to voice them.
3490 </p></short>
3491
3492
3493     <abstract><p>Come to a town hall style meeting with the managers of CSCF to discuss how
3494 to improve the undergraduate (student.cs) computing environment. Have gripes?
3495 Suggestions? Requests? Now is the time to voice them.
3496 </p><p>CSCF management (Bill Ince, Associate Director; Dave Gawley, Infrastructure Support;
3497 Dawn Keenan, User Support; Lawrence Folland, Research Support) will be at the
3498 meeting to listen to student concerns and suggestions.  Information gathered from
3499 the meeting will be summarized and taken to the CSCF advisory committee for
3500 discussion and planning.
3501 </p></abstract>
3502
3503 </eventitem>
3504
3505 <eventitem date="2010-02-23" time="04:30 PM" room="MC5136B" title="The Best Algorithms are Randomized Algorithms">
3506
3507     <short><p>In this talk Nicholas Harvey discusses the prevalence of randomized algorithms and their application to solving optimization problems on graphs; with startling results compared to deterministic algorithms.
3508 </p></short>
3509
3510
3511     <abstract><p>For many problems, randomized algorithms are either the fastest algorithm or the simplest algorithm;
3512 sometimes they even provide the only known algorithm. Randomized algorithms have become so prevalent
3513 that deterministic algorithms could be viewed as a curious special case. In this talk I will describe
3514 some startling examples of randomized algorithms for solving some optimization problems on graphs.
3515 </p></abstract>
3516
3517 </eventitem>
3518
3519 <eventitem date="2010-02-09" time="4:30 PM" room="DC1304" title="An Introduction to Vector Graphics Libraries with Cairo">
3520
3521     <short><p>Cairo is an open source, cross platform, vector graphics library with the ability to  output to many kinds of surfaces, including PDF, SVG and PNG surfaces, as well as  X-Window, Win32 and Quartz 2D backends. Unlike the raster graphics used with programmes  and libraries such as The Gimp and ImageMagick, vector graphics are not defined by grids  of pixels, but rather by a collection of drawing operations. These operations detail how to  draw lines, fill shapes, and even set text to create the desired image. This has the  advantages of being infinitely scalable, smaller in file size, and simpler to express within  a computer programme. This talk will be an introduction to the concepts and metaphors used  by vector graphics libraries in general and Cairo in particular.
3522 </p></short>
3523
3524
3525     <abstract><p>Cairo is an open source, cross platform, vector graphics library with the ability to
3526 output to many kinds of surfaces, including PDF, SVG and PNG surfaces, as well as
3527 X-Window, Win32 and Quartz 2D backends. Unlike the raster graphics used with programmes
3528 and libraries such as The Gimp and ImageMagick, vector graphics are not defined by grids
3529 of pixels, but rather by a collection of drawing operations. These operations detail how to
3530 draw lines, fill shapes, and even set text to create the desired image. This has the
3531 advantages of being infinitely scalable, smaller in file size, and simpler to express within
3532 a computer programme. This talk will be an introduction to the concepts and metaphors used
3533 by vector graphics libraries in general and Cairo in particular.
3534 </p></abstract>
3535
3536 </eventitem>
3537
3538 <eventitem date="2010-02-11" time="4:30 PM" room="MC3005" title="UNIX 101 Encore">
3539
3540     <short><p>New to Unix? No problem, we'll teach you to power use circles around your friends! The popular tutorial returns for a second session, in case you missed the first one.
3541 </p></short>
3542
3543
3544     <abstract><p>New to Unix? No problem, we'll teach you to power use circles around your friends!
3545 The popular tutorial returns for a second session, in case you missed the first one.
3546 </p><p>This first tutorial is an introduction to the Unix shell environment, both on the student
3547 servers and on other Unix environments. Topics covered include: using the shell, both basic
3548 interaction and advanced topics like scripting and job control, the filesystem and manipulating
3549 it, and ssh. If you feel you're already familiar with these topics don't hesitate to come
3550 to Unix 102 to learn about documents, editing, and other related tasks, or watch out
3551 for Unix 103 and 104 that get much more in depth into power programming tools on Unix.
3552 </p></abstract>
3553
3554 </eventitem>
3555 <eventitem date="2010-02-10" time="4:30 PM" room="MC3003" title="UNIX 101">
3556
3557     <short><p>New to Unix? No problem, we'll teach you to power use circles around your friends!
3558 </p></short>
3559
3560
3561     <abstract><p>New to Unix? No problem, we'll teach you to power use circles around your friends!
3562 </p><p>This first tutorial is an introduction to the Unix shell environment, both on the student
3563 servers and on other Unix environments. Topics covered include: using the shell, both basic
3564 interaction and advanced topics like scripting and job control, the filesystem and manipulating
3565 it, and ssh. If you feel you're already familiar with these topics don't hesitate to come
3566 to Unix 102 to learn about documents, editing, and other related tasks, or watch out
3567 for Unix 103 and 104 that get much more in depth into power programming tools on Unix.
3568 </p></abstract>
3569
3570 </eventitem>
3571 <eventitem date="2010-01-18" time="15:30 PM" room="MC2066" title="Wilderness Programming">
3572
3573     <short><p>Paul Lutus describes his early Apple II software development days, conducted  from the far end of a 1200-foot power cord, in a tiny Oregon cabin. Paul  describes how he wrote a best-seller (Apple Writer) in assembly language,  while dealing with power outages, lightning storms and the occasional  curious bear.
3574 </p></short>
3575
3576
3577     <abstract><p>Paul Lutus describes his early Apple II software development days, conducted
3578 from the far end of a 1200-foot power cord, in a tiny Oregon cabin. Paul
3579 describes how he wrote a best-seller (Apple Writer) in assembly language,
3580 while dealing with power outages, lightning storms and the occasional
3581 curious bear.
3582 </p><p>Paul also describes his subsequent four-year solo around-the-world sail in a
3583 31-foot boat. And be ready with your inquiries -- Paul will answer your
3584 questions.
3585 </p><p>Paul Lutus has a wide background in science and technology. He designed spacecraft
3586 components for the NASA Space Shuttle and created a mathematical model of the solar
3587 system used during the Viking Mars lander program. Then, at the beginning of the
3588 personal computer revolution, Lutus switched career paths and took up computer
3589 science. His best-known program is "Apple Writer," an internationally successful
3590 word processing program for the early Apple computers.
3591 </p></abstract>
3592
3593 </eventitem>
3594
3595 <eventitem date="2010-01-26" time="05:00 PM" room="DC1302" title="Deep learning with multiplicative interactions">
3596
3597     <short><p>Geoffrey Hinton, from the University of Toronto and the Canadian Institute  for Advanced Research, will discuss some of his latest work in learning networks and artificial intelligence. The talk will be accessable, so don't hesitate to come out. More information about Dr. Hinton's research can be found on  <a href="http://www.cs.toronto.edu/~hinton/">his website</a>.
3598 </p></short>
3599
3600
3601     <abstract><p>Deep networks can be learned efficiently from unlabeled data. The layers
3602 of representation are learned one at a time using a simple learning
3603 module, called a "Restricted Boltzmann Machine" that has only one layer
3604 of latent variables. The values of the latent variables of one
3605 module form the data for training the next module.  Although deep
3606 networks have been quite successful for tasks such as object
3607 recognition, information retrieval, and modeling motion capture data,
3608 the simple learning modules do not have multiplicative interactions which
3609 are very useful for some types of data.
3610 </p><p>The talk will show how a third-order energy function can be factorized to
3611 yield a simple learning module that retains advantageous properties of a
3612 Restricted Boltzmann Machine such as very simple exact inference and a
3613 very simple learning rule based on pair-wise statistics. The new module
3614 contains multiplicative interactions that are useful for a variety of
3615 unsupervised learning tasks. Researchers at the University of Toronto
3616 have been using this type of module to extract oriented energy from image
3617 patches and dense flow fields from image sequences. The new module can
3618 also be used to allow motions of a particular style to be achieved by
3619 blending autoregressive models of motion capture data.
3620 </p></abstract>
3621
3622 </eventitem>
3623
3624
3625 <!-- Fall 2009 -->
3626 <eventitem date="2009-12-05" time="6:30 PM" room="MC3036" edate="2009-12-05" etime="11:55 PM" title="The Club That Really Likes Dinner">
3627     <short><p>Come on out to the club's termly end of term dinner, details in the abstract</p></short>
3628     <abstract><p>The dinner will be potluck style at the Vice President's house, please RSVP (respond swiftly to the vice president)
3629     <a href="https://csclub.uwaterloo.ca/rsvp">here</a> if you plan on attending. If you don't know how to get there meet at the club
3630     office at 6:30 PM, a group will be leaving to lead you there.</p></abstract>
3631 </eventitem>
3632
3633 <eventitem date="2009-11-27" time="7:00 PM" room="Comfy Lounge" edate="2009-11-28" etime="7:00 AM" title="Code Party!!11!!">
3634
3635     <short><p>A fevered night of code, friends, fun, energy drinks, and the CSC. Facebook will be around to bring some food and hang out.
3636 </p></short>
3637
3638
3639     <abstract><p>Come join us for a night of coding. Get in touch with more experianced coders,
3640 advertize for/bug squash on your favourite open source project, write that personal
3641 project you were planning to do for a while but haven't found the time. Don't
3642 have any ideas but want to sit and hack? Try your hand at the Facebook puzzles,
3643 write a new app, or just chill and watch scifi.
3644 </p></abstract>
3645
3646 </eventitem>
3647
3648 <eventitem date="2009-11-05" time="4:30 PM" room="MC2065" title="In the Beginning">
3649
3650     <short><p>To most CS students an OS kernel is pretty low level. But there is something even lower, the instructions that must be executed to get the CPU ready to accept a kernel.  That is, if you look at any processor's reference manual there is a page or two describing the state of the CPU when it powered on.  This talk describes what needs to happen next, up to the point where the first kernel instruction executes.
3651 </p></short>
3652
3653
3654     <abstract><p>To most CS students an OS kernel is pretty low level. But there is
3655 something even lower, the instructions that must be executed to get the
3656 CPU ready to accept a kernel.  That is, if you look at any processor's
3657 reference manual there is a page or two describing the state of the CPU
3658 when it powered on.  This talk describes what needs to happen next,
3659 up to the point where the first kernel instruction executes.
3660 </p><p>This part of execution is extremely architecture-dependent.  Those of
3661 you who have any experience with this aspect of CS probably know the x86
3662 architecture, and think it's horrible, which it is. I am going to talk
3663 about the ARM architecture, which is inside almost all mobile phones,
3664 and which allows us to look at a simple implementation that includes
3665 all the essentials.
3666 </p></abstract>
3667
3668 </eventitem>
3669
3670 <eventitem date="2009-10-20" time="04:30 PM" room="MC3036" title="CSC Goes To Dooly's">
3671
3672     <short><p>We're going to Dooly's to play pool. What more do you want from us? Come to the Club office and we'll all bus there together. We've got discount tables for club members so be sure to be there.
3673 </p></short>
3674
3675
3676     <abstract><p>We're going to Dooly's to play pool. What more do you want from us?
3677 Come to the Club office and we'll all bus there together. We've got
3678 discount tables for club members so be sure to be there.
3679 </p></abstract>
3680
3681 </eventitem>
3682
3683 <eventitem date="2009-10-16" time="7:00 PM" room="Comfy Lounge" title="Code Party and Contest Finale">
3684
3685     <short><p>Come on out for a night of code, contests, and energy drinks. Join the Computer Scinece Club for the finale of the Google AI Challenge and an all night code party. Finish up your entry, or start it (its not too late). Not interested in the contest? Come out anyway for a night of coding and comradarie with us.
3686 </p></short>
3687
3688
3689     <abstract><p>Come on out for a night of code, contests, and energy drinks. Join the Computer
3690 Scinece Club for the finale of the Google AI Challenge and an all night code party.
3691 Finish up your entry, or start it (its not too late). Not interested in the contest?
3692 Come out anyway for a night of coding and comradarie with us.
3693 </p><p>Included in the party will be the contest finale and awards cerimony, so if you've
3694 entered be sure to stick arround to collect the spoils of victory, or see just who
3695 that person you couldn't edge off is.
3696 </p></abstract>
3697
3698 </eventitem>
3699
3700 <eventitem date="2009-10-08" time="4:30 PM" room="MC3003" title="UNIX 103">
3701
3702     <short><p>In this long-awaited third installment of the popular Unix Tutorials the  friendly experts of the CSC will teach you the simple art of version control.  You will learn the purpose and use of two different Version Control Systems  (git and subversion). This tutorial will advise you in the discipline of  managing the source code of your projects and enable you to quickly learn new  Version Control Systems in the work place -- a skill that is much sought after  by employers.
3703 </p></short>
3704
3705
3706     <abstract><p>In this long-awaited third installment of the popular Unix Tutorials the
3707 friendly experts of the CSC will teach you the simple art of version control.
3708 You will learn the purpose and use of two different Version Control Systems
3709 (git and subversion). This tutorial will advise you in the discipline of
3710 managing the source code of your projects and enable you to quickly learn new
3711 Version Control Systems in the work place -- a skill that is much sought after
3712 by employers.
3713 </p></abstract>
3714
3715 </eventitem>
3716
3717 <eventitem date="2009-10-14" time="2:30 PM" room="DC1304" title="UofT Graduate School Information Session">
3718     <short><p> "Is Graduate School for You?" Get the answers to your grad school questions - and have a bite to eat, our treat</p>
3719     </short>
3720     <abstract><p> Join Prof. Greg Wilson, faculty member in the Software Engineering research group in the UofT's Department of Computer Science,
3721     as he gives insight into studying at the graduate level-what can be expected, what does UofT offer, is it right for you? Pizza and pop will
3722     be served. <b>Come see what grad school is all about!</b>. All undergraduate students are welcome; registration is not required.</p>
3723     <p>For any questions about the program, visit <a href="http://www.cs.toronto.edu/dcs/prospective-grad.html">UofT's website</a>. This
3724     event is not run by the CS Club, and is announced here for the benefit of our members.</p></abstract>
3725 </eventitem>
3726
3727 <eventitem date="2009-10-03" time="10:00 AM" edate="2009-10-03" etime="3:30 PM" room="DC1301 FishBowl" title="Linux Install Fest">
3728
3729     <short><p>Interested in trying Linux but don't know where to start?
3730     Come to the Linux install fest to demo Linux, get help installing it
3731     on your computer, either stand alone or a dual boot, and help setting
3732     up your fresh install. Have lunch and hang around if you like, or just come in for a CD.
3733 </p></short>
3734
3735
3736     <abstract><p>Interested in trying Linux but don't know where to start?
3737 Come to the Linux install fest to demo Linux, get help installing it on
3738 your computer, either stand alone or a dual boot, and help setting
3739 up your fresh install. Have lunch and hang around if you like, or just
3740 come in for a qick install.
3741 </p></abstract>
3742
3743 </eventitem>
3744
3745 <eventitem date="2009-10-01" time="4:30 PM" room="MC3003" title="UNIX 102">
3746
3747     <short><p>The next installment in the CS Club's popular Unix tutorials UNIX 102 introduces powerful text editing tools for programming and document formatting.
3748 </p></short>
3749
3750
3751     <abstract><p>Unix 102 is a follow up to Unix 101, requiring basic knowledge of the shell.
3752 If you missed Unix101 but still know your way around you should be fine.
3753 Topics covered include: "real" editors, document typesetting with LaTeX
3754 (great for assignments!), bulk editing, spellchecking, and printing in the
3755 student environment and elsewhere.
3756 </p><p>If you aren't interested or feel comfortable with these taskes, watch out for
3757 Unix 103 and 104 to get more depth in power programming tools on Unix.
3758 </p></abstract>
3759
3760 </eventitem>
3761
3762 <eventitem date="2009-09-28" time="4:30 PM" edate="2009-10-09" etime="11:59 OM" room="MC3003" title="AI Programming Contest sponsored by Google">
3763
3764     <short><p>Come learn how to write an intelligent game-playing program.
3765       No past experience necessary.  Submit your program using the <a href="http://csclub.uwaterloo.ca/contest/">online web interface</a>
3766       to watch it battle against other people's programs.   Beginners and experts welcome! Prizes provided by google,
3767       including the delivery of your resume to google recruiters.
3768 </p></short>
3769
3770
3771     <abstract><p>Come learn how to write an intelligent game-playing program.
3772         No past experience necessary.  Submit your program using the <a href="http://csclub.uwaterloo.ca/contest/">online
3773         web interface</a> to watch it battle against other people's programs.
3774         Beginners and experts welcome!
3775     </p><p>The contest is sponsored by Google, so be sure to compete for a chance
3776          to get noticed by them.
3777     </p><p>Prizes for the top programs:
3778    <ul><li>$100 in Cash Prizes</li>
3779        <li> Google t-shirts</li>
3780        <li>Fame and recognition</li>
3781        <li>Your resume directly to a Google recruiter</li>
3782    </ul>
3783 </p></abstract>
3784
3785 </eventitem>
3786 <eventitem date="2009-09-24" time="4:30 PM" room="MC3003" title="UNIX 101">
3787
3788     <short><p>
3789         New to Unix? No problem, we'll teach you to power use circles around your friends!
3790     </p></short>
3791
3792
3793     <abstract><p>
3794         New to Unix? No problem, we'll teach you to power use circles around your friends!
3795     </p><p>
3796         This first tutorial is an introduction to the Unix shell environment, both on the student
3797         servers and on other Unix environments. Topics covered include: using the shell, both basic
3798         interaction and advanced topics like scripting and job control, the filesystem and manipulating
3799         it, and ssh. If you feel you're already familiar with these topics don't hesitate to come
3800         to Unix 102 to learn about documents, editing, and other related tasks, or watch out
3801         for Unix 103 and 104 that get much more in depth into power programming tools on Unix.
3802     </p></abstract>
3803 </eventitem>
3804
3805 <eventitem date="2009-09-15" time="5:00PM" edate="2009-09-15" etime="6:00 PM"
3806        room="Comfy Lounge" title="Elections">
3807     <short><p>
3808      Nominations are open now, either place your name on the nominees board or
3809      e-mail <a href="mailto:cro@csclub.uwaterloo.ca">the CRO</a>
3810      to nominate someone for a position.
3811      Come to the Comfy Lounge to elect your fall term executive. Contact
3812      <a href="mailto:cro@csclub.uwaterloo.ca">the CRO</a> if you have questions.
3813     </p></short>
3814 </eventitem>
3815
3816
3817 <!-- Spring 2009 -->
3818 <eventitem date="2009-07-23" time="4:30 PM" edate="2009-07-23" etime="6:00 PM"
3819            room="MC 3003" title="Unix 103">
3820     <short><p>
3821      In this long-awaited third installment of the popular Unix Tutorials the dark
3822      mages of the CSC will train you in the not-so-arcane magick of version control.
3823      You will learn the purpose and use of two different Version Control Systems
3824      (git and subversion). This tutorial will advise you in the discipline of
3825      managing the source code of your projects and enable you to quickly learn new
3826      Version Control Systems in the work place -- a skill that is much sought after
3827      by employers.
3828     </p></short>
3829 </eventitem>
3830
3831 <eventitem date="2009-07-17" time="7:00 PM" edate="2009-07-18" etime="4:00 AM"
3832            room="MC 3001" title="Code Party">
3833     <short><p>
3834      Have an assignment or project you need to work on? We
3835      will be coding from 7:00pm until 4:00am starting on Friday, July 17th
3836      in the Comfy lounge. Join us!
3837     </p></short>
3838 </eventitem>
3839
3840 <eventitem date="2009-07-07" time="3:00 PM" etime="5:00 PM" room="DC 1302"
3841            title="History of CS Curriculum at UW">
3842     <short><p>
3843      This talk provides a personal overview of the evolution of the
3844      undergraduate computer science curriculum at UW over the past forty
3845      years, concluding with an audience discussion of possible future
3846      developments.
3847     </p></short>
3848 </eventitem>
3849
3850 <eventitem date="2009-06-22" time="4:30 PM" etime="6:30 PM" room="MC 4041"
3851            title="Paper Club">
3852     <short><p> Come and drink tea and read an academic CS paper with
3853      the Paper Club.  We will be meeting from 4:30pm until 6:30pm on
3854      Monday, June 22th on the 4th floor of the MC (exact room number
3855      TBA).  See http://csclub.uwaterloo.ca/~paper
3856     </p></short>
3857 </eventitem>
3858
3859 <eventitem date="2009-06-19" time="5:30 PM" room="Dooly's" title="Dooly's Night">
3860     <short><p>
3861     The CSC will be playing pool at Dooly's. Join us for only a few dollars.
3862     </p></short>
3863 </eventitem>
3864
3865 <eventitem date="2009-06-05" time="7:00 PM" edate="2009-06-06" etime="4:00 AM"
3866            room="MC 3001" title="Code Party">
3867     <short><p>
3868      Have an assignment or project you need to work on? We
3869      will be coding from 7:00pm until 7:00am starting on Friday, June 5th
3870      in the Comfy lounge. Join us!
3871     </p></short>
3872 </eventitem>
3873
3874 <eventitem date="2009-06-02" time="4:30 PM" room="MC 2037" title="Unix 101">
3875     <short><p>
3876         Need to use the UNIX environment for a course, want to overcome your fears of
3877         the command line, or just curious? Come and learn the arcane secrets of the
3878         UNIX command line interface from CSC mages. After this tutorial you will be
3879         comfortable with the essentials of navigating, manipulating and viewing files,
3880         and processing data at the UNIX shell prompt.
3881     </p></short>
3882 </eventitem>
3883
3884 <eventitem date="2009-05-12" time="12:00 PM" room="MC 2034" title="PHP on Windows">
3885     <short><p>PHP Programming Contest Info Session</p></short>
3886     <abstract><p>
3887     Port or create a new PHP web application and you could win a prize
3888     of up to $10k. Microsoft is running a programming contest for PHP
3889     developers willing to support the Windows platform. The contest is
3890     ongoing; this will be a short introduction to it by
3891     representatives of Microsoft and an opportunity to ask questions.
3892     Pizza and pop will be provided.
3893     </p></abstract>
3894 </eventitem>
3895
3896
3897 <!-- Winter 2009 -->
3898 <eventitem date="2009-04-02" time="4:30 PM" room="DC1302" title="Rapid prototyping and mathematical art">
3899
3900     <short><p>A talk by Craig S. Kaplan.</p></short>
3901
3902
3903     <abstract><p>The combination of computer graphics, geometry, and rapid
3904 prototyping technology has created a wide range of exciting
3905 opportunities for using the computer as a medium for creative
3906 expression.  In this talk, I will describe the most popular
3907 technologies for computer-aided manufacturing, discuss
3908 applications of these devices in art and design, and survey
3909 the work of contemporary artists working in the area (with a
3910 focus on mathematical art).  The talk will be primarily
3911 non-technical, but I will mention some of the mathematical
3912 and computational techniques that come into play.
3913 </p></abstract>
3914
3915 </eventitem>
3916 <eventitem date="2009-04-03" time="6:00 PM" edate="2009-04-04"
3917            etime="6:00 AM" room="TBA" title="CTRL-D">
3918   <short>
3919     <p>
3920       Join the Club That Really Likes Dinner for the End Of Term
3921       party!  Inquire closer to the date for details.
3922     </p>
3923   </short>
3924   <abstract>
3925     <p>
3926       This is not an official club event and receives no funding.
3927       Bring food, drinks, deserts, etc.
3928     </p>
3929   </abstract>
3930 </eventitem>
3931
3932 <eventitem date="2009-03-27" time="6:00 PM" edate="2009-03-28"
3933            etime="12:00 PM" room="Comfy Lounge (MC)"
3934            title="Code Party">
3935   <short>
3936     <p>
3937       CSC Code Party!  Same as always - no sleep, lots of caffeine,
3938       and really nerdy entertainment.  Bonus:  Free Cake!
3939     </p>
3940   </short>
3941   <abstract>
3942     <p>
3943       This code party will have the usual, plus it will double as the
3944       closing of the programming contest.  Our experts will be
3945       available to help you polish off your submission.
3946     </p>
3947   </abstract>
3948 </eventitem>
3949
3950 <eventitem date="2009-03-19" time="4:30 PM" edate="2009-03-28"
3951            etime="12:00 PM" room="MC2061"
3952            title="Artificial Intelligence Contest">
3953     <short>
3954       <p>
3955         Come out and try your hand at writing a computer program that
3956         plays Minesweeper Flags, a two-player variant of the classic
3957         computer game, Minesweeper.  Once you're done, your program
3958         will compete head-to-head against the other entries in a
3959         fierce Minesweeper Flags tournament.  There will be a contest
3960         kick-off session on Thursday March 19 at 4:30 PM in room
3961         MC3036.  Submissions will be accepted until Saturday March 28.
3962       </p>
3963     </short>
3964     <abstract>
3965       <p>
3966         Come out and try your hand at writing a computer program that
3967         plays Minesweeper Flags, a two-player variant of the classic
3968         computer game, Minesweeper.  Once you're done, your program
3969         will compete head-to-head against the other entries in a
3970         fierce Minesweeper Flags tournament.  There will be a contest
3971         kick-off session on Thursday March 19 at 4:30 PM in room
3972         MC3036.  Submissions will be accepted until Saturday March 28.
3973       </p>
3974     </abstract>
3975 </eventitem>
3976
3977 <eventitem date="2009-03-05" time="4:30 PM" edate="2009-03-05"
3978            etime="6:30 PM" room="Comfy Lounge"
3979            title="SIGGRAPH Night">
3980   <short>
3981     <p>
3982       Come out and watch the SIGGRAPH (Special Interest Group on
3983       Graphics) conference video review.  A video of insane, amazing,
3984       and mind blowing computer graphics. .
3985     </p>
3986   </short>
3987   <abstract>
3988     <p>
3989       The ACM SIGGRAPH (Special Interest Group on Graphics) hosts a
3990       conference yearly in which the latest and greatest in computer
3991       graphics premier. They record video and as a result produce a
3992       very nice Video Review of the conference. Come join us watching
3993       these videos, as well as a few professors from the UW Computer
3994       Graphics Lab. There will be some kind of food and drink, and its
3995       guranteed to be dazzling.
3996     </p>