added mtrberzi and mozilla tech talks event entries
authorPatrick Melanson <pj2melan@uwaterloo.ca>
Tue, 24 Feb 2015 19:18:59 +0000 (14:18 -0500)
committerPatrick Melanson <pj2melan@uwaterloo.ca>
Tue, 24 Feb 2015 19:18:59 +0000 (14:18 -0500)
events.xml

index cae15dc..d86861e 100644 (file)
@@ -5,11 +5,91 @@
 
 <!-- Winter 2015 -->
 
-<eventitem date="2015-02-27 " time="6:00 PM" room="EV3 1408"
+<eventitem date="2015-03-10" time="6:00 PM" room="MC 4040"
+           title="Runtime Type Inference in Dynamic Languages - Day 2">
+  <short>
+    <p>
+      Day 2 of Runtime Type Inference in Dynamic Languages with Kannan Vijayan
+    </p>
+  </short>
+  <abstract>
+    <p>
+      Day 2 of Runtime Type Inference in Dynamic Languages with Kannan Vijayan
+    </p>
+    </abstract>
+</eventitem>
+
+<eventitem date="2015-03-09" time="6:00 PM" room="MC 4040"
+           title="Runtime Type Inference in Dynamic Languages - Day 1">
+  <short>
+    <p>
+      Javascript is fast. In some cases, very close to compiled-language fast.
+      How is this even possible? How do we know what types our variables have?
+      How can we optimize it well? Kannan Vijayan will be talking about the
+      historical advances in JIT-compilation of dynamically typed programs over
+      two days. Of course, both of those talks will have free food.
+    </p>
+  </short>
+  <abstract>
+    <p>
+      How do we make dynamic languages fast? Today, modern Javascript engines
+      have demonstrated that programs written in dynamically typed scripting lan-
+      guages can be executed close to the speed of programs written in languages
+      with static types. So how did we get here? How do we extract precious type
+      information from programs at runtime? If any variable can hold a value of any
+      type, then how can we optimize well?
+      <br></br>
+      This talk covers a bit of the history of the techniques used in this space, and
+      tries to summarize, in broad strokes, how those techniques come together to
+      enable efficient jit-compilation of dynamically typed programs.
+      To do the topic justice, Kannan Vijayan will be talking the Monday and
+      Tuesday March 9th and 10th.
+      <br></br>
+      Does that mean two consecutive days of free food? Yes it does.
+    </p>
+  </abstract>
+</eventitem>
+
+<eventitem date="2015-03-03" time="6:00 PM" room="MC 2038"
+           title="SAT and SMT solvers">
+  <short>
+    <p>
+      Murphy Berzish out how to programmatically determine if a program is satisfiable,
+      and how to find a concrete counterexample if it is unsatisfiable. At the core
+      are SAT/SMT solvers. SAT theory deals with Boolean Satisfiability solvers,
+      and SMT theory, Satisfiability Modulo a Theory, allows SMT to be extended
+      to common data structures. Free food!
+    </p>
+  </short>
+  <abstract>
+    <p>
+      Does your program have an overflow error? Will it work with all inputs? How
+      do you know for sure? Test cases are the bread and butter of resilient design,
+      but bugs still sneak into software. What if we could prove our programs are
+      error-free?
+      <br></br>
+      Boolean Satisfiability (SAT) solvers determine the â€˜satisfiability’ of boolean
+      set of equations for a set of inputs. An SMT solver (Satisfiability Modulo
+      a Theory) applies SMT to bit-vectors, strings, arrays, and more. Together,
+      we can reduce a program and prove it is satisfiable, or provide a concrete
+      counter-example. The implications of this are computer-aided reasoning tools
+      for error-checking in addition to much more robust programs.
+      <br></br>
+      In this talk Murphy Berzish will give an overview of SAT/SMT theory and
+      some real-world solution methods. He will also demonstrate applications of
+      SAT/SMT solvers in theorem proving, model checking, and program verifica-
+      tion.
+      <br></br>
+      What else? Oh yes, refreshments and drinks will be served. Come out!
+    </p>
+  </abstract>
+</eventitem>
+
+<eventitem date="2015-02-27" time="6:00 PM" room="EV3 1408"
            title="Code Party 0">
   <short>
     <p>
-      The first code part of Winter 2015, and we have something a litle different
+      The first code party of Winter 2015, and we have something a litle different
       this time. We're running a Code Retreat (coderetreat.org) with Boltmade.
       The result of this is that you will be able to do a coding challenge, wherein
       you implement Rule 110 (like the Game of Life). Of course, if you want to
@@ -18,7 +98,7 @@
   </short>
   <abstract>
     <p>
-      The first code part of Winter 2015, and we have something a litle different
+      The first code party of Winter 2015, and we have something a litle different
       this time. We're running a Code Retreat (coderetreat.org) with Boltmade.
       The result of this is that you will be able to do a coding challenge, wherein
       you implement Rule 110 (like the Game of Life). Of course, if you want to