Added unix102 section with references, materials from previous

sessions, external links, etc.
foo
Elana Hashman 11 years ago
parent 8cf39bbb83
commit eab76bff34
  1. 2
      Makefile
  2. 3
      unix102/Makefile
  3. BIN
      unix102/cheatsheet.pdf
  4. 7
      unix102/directory.xml
  5. 106
      unix102/index.xml
  6. BIN
      unix102/unix101.pdf

@ -2,7 +2,7 @@ SHELL = umask 002; exec /bin/sh
FILES = events.ics events.atom news.atom index.html stats.html \
favicon.ico default.css csclub.der csclub.pem robots.txt
SUBDIRS = about events office news services media buttons logos flash library industry opencl
SUBDIRS = about events office news services media buttons logos flash library industry opencl unix102
include common.mk

@ -0,0 +1,3 @@
FILES = index.html cheatsheet.pdf unix101.pdf
RELDIR = unix102/
include ../common.mk

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<?xml version='1.0'?>
<!DOCTYPE directory SYSTEM "../csc.dtd">
<directory title="UNIX 102">
<diritem title="Cheat Sheet" href="cheatsheet" />
</directory>

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<?xml version='1.0'?>
<!DOCTYPE cscpage SYSTEM "../csc.dtd">
<cscpage title="UNIX 102 Tutorial Information">
<header />
<section title="UNIX 102 Reference Material">
<p>
This page contains some links to material covered during UNIX 101 and 102,
as well as some extracurricular content for you to review in your free
time.
</p>
<p>
Download the <a href="unix101.pdf">slides</a> or <a href="cheatsheet.pdf">cheatsheet</a> handout from UNIX 101.
</p>
</section>
<section title="vim References">
<p>
First and foremost, make sure you have tried running vimtutor. This
program is available on the CSC systems, as well as the student.cs and
student.math environments. Try the following commands from a shell:
<pre>
ssh userid@linux.student.cs.uwaterloo.ca
vimtutor
</pre>
This <a href="http://newbiedoc.sourceforge.net/text_editing/vim.html#BUILT-IN-HELP-VIM">document</a> from sourceforge should also prove to be useful.
</p>
</section>
<section title="bash References">
<p>
From the GNU bash reference manual (a very good source of information,
albeit a little arcane and verbose):
</p>
<ul>
<li><a href="http://www.gnu.org/software/bash/manual/bash.html#What-is-a-shell_003f">What is a shell?</a></li>
<li><a href="http://www.gnu.org/software/bash/manual/bash.html#Redirections">Redirecting input/output</a></li>
<li><a href="http://www.gnu.org/software/bash/manual/bash.html#Pattern-Matching">Globbing</a></li>
<li><a href="http://www.gnu.org/software/bash/manual/bash.html#Quoting">Quotes/escapes</a></li>
<li><a href="http://www.gnu.org/software/bash/manual/bash.html#Compound-Commands">Conditional and looping constructs</a></li>
<li><a href="http://www.gnu.org/software/bash/manual/bash.html#Shell-Parameters">Shell variables</a> (including <a href="http://www.gnu.org/software/bash/manual/bash.html#Special-Parameters">special variables</a>)</li>
</ul>
<p>
Here are some example bash scripts covered in today's lecture:
</p>
<ul>
<li>Simple script whose parameters are any number of text files, that will
print all the files and filenames to standard output: appender</li>
<li>Simple renaming script that takes two strings, one to replace with the
other, and renames all files in the current directory as specified:
renamer</li>
<li>Script that scrapes concert website for tickets and sends emails/text
messages when tickets are available: tickets_email</li>
</ul>
</section>
<section title="Regular Expression References">
<p>
This
<a href="http://www.regular-expressions.info/quickstart.html">page</a>
is a good brief reference for regular expressions.
</p>
</section>
<section title="git References">
<p>
Here's an article I found claiming to list the <a href="http://sixrevisions.com/resources/git-tutorials-beginners/">top 10 git tutorials</a>.
Whether or not that's true, you should still learn something.
Here is also a brief review of the commands we covered today.
</p>
<p> This clones a copy of the codebase for you to work on locally:
<pre>
git clone
</pre>
This "pulls" (updates with) any new changes others have made since you last
worked on the code, so they are now part of your local code:
<pre>
git pull
</pre>
This commits any of the changes that you've recently made in [files] (or -a
for everything), getting ready to "push" the changes to other users:
<pre>
git commit [files] (-a)
</pre>
This "pushes" (sends) your changes back to the "master" repository,
allowing other people working on the project to "pull" your changes.
<pre>
git push
</pre>
</p>
</section>
<section title="Beyond UNIX 10X">
<p>
You might be surprised - almost all the information on this page was at
one point found using Google. Remember, your best resources for learning
more about UNIX are your friends, your manpages, and the internet. So
fire up your favorite search engine, and get learning!
</p>
</section>
<footer />
</cscpage>

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